Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 012827/002.

Names and composition

"ROBINUL FORTE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GLYCOPYRROLATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012827/002 ROBINUL FORTE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
012827/001 ROBINUL GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
012827/002 ROBINUL FORTE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
014764/001 ROBINUL GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
017558/001 ROBINUL GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
022571/001 CUVPOSA GLYCOPYRROLATE SOLUTION/ORAL 1MG per 5ML
040568/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040568/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040653/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040653/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040821/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040821/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040836/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040836/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040844/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040844/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
040847/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040847/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
081169/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
085562/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
085563/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
086178/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
086900/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
086902/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
086947/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
088475/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
089335/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
089393/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
089397/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE Injectable/ Injection 0.2MG per ML
090020/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
090020/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
090195/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
090195/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
090963/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
091182/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
091182/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
091413/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
091413/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
091522/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1.5MG
202675/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
207201/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
207201/002 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE TABLET/ORAL 2MG
207639/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML
207923/001 SEEBRI GLYCOPYRROLATE POWDER/INHALATION 15.6MCG per INH
208973/001 GLYCOPYRROLATE GLYCOPYRROLATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.2MG per ML

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Answered questions

I cant sweat...good and bad?
i recently started taking robinul forte, twice a day (a pill prescribed by my doctor for my hyperhidrosis-excessive sweating-i had it in my hands and feet) anyways, I DONT SWEAT ANYMORE YAAAY. but the one problem is whenever i go outside and do physical activities..i get REALLY hot. my face turns red...im also... Asked by Kristina Doud 1 year ago.

i recently started taking robinul forte, twice a day (a pill prescribed by my doctor for my hyperhidrosis-excessive sweating-i had it in my hands and feet) anyways, I DONT SWEAT ANYMORE YAAAY. but the one problem is whenever i go outside and do physical activities..i get REALLY hot. my face turns red...im also about to start playing soccer again...any suggestions for what i should do? thanks so much. Answered by Lashawna Albright 1 year ago.

Sweating is very important and gets junk out of your lymphatic system. And eliminates toxins. Prolly not a good thing if you cannot sweat at all. And yea u should talk to your doctor.. You dont wanna have heat stroke. Answered by Brooke Fahnestock 1 year ago.


Hyperhidrosis how to stop it ?
Please no rude comments Asked by Christi Mccuan 1 year ago.

Treatments may include: Antiperspirants. Excessive sweating may be controlled with strong anti-perspirants, which plug the sweat ducts. Products containing 10% to 15% aluminum chloride hexahydrate are the first line of treatment for underarm sweating. Some patients may be be prescribed a product containing a higher dose of aluminum chloride, which is applied nightly onto the affected areas. Antiperspirants can cause skin irritation, and large doses of aluminum chloride can damage clothing. Note: Deodorants do not prevent sweating, but are helpful in reducing body odor. Medication. Anticholinergics drugs, such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul-Forte), help to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands. Although effective for some patients, these drugs have not been studied as well as other treatments. Side effects include dry mouth, dizziness, and problems with urination. Beta-blockers or benzodiazepines may help reduce stress-related sweating. Iontophoresis. This FDA-approved procedure uses electricity to temporarily turn off the sweat gland. It is most effective for sweating of the hands and feet. The hands or feet are placed into water, and then a gentle current of electricity is passed through it. The electricity is gradually increased until the patient feels a light tingling sensation. The therapy lasts about 10-20 minutes and requires several sessions. Side effects include skin cracking and blisters, although rare. Botox. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) is FDA approved for the treatment of severe underarm sweating, a condition called primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Small doses of purified botulinum toxin injected into the underarm temporarily block the nerves that stimulate sweating. Side effects include injection-site pain and flu-like symptoms. If you are considering Botox for other areas of excessive sweating talk to your doctor in detail. Botox used for sweating of the palms can cause mild, but temporary weakness and intense pain. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). In severe cases, a minimally-invasive surgical procedure called sympathectomy may be recommended when other treatments fail. The procedure turns off the signal that tells the body to sweat excessively. It is usually done on patients whose palms sweat much more heavily than normal. It may also be used to treat extreme sweating of the face. ETS does not work as well for those with excessive armpit sweating. See: ETS surgery Answered by Ami Sample 1 year ago.


Sweating problem, can anyone help?
Whenever I go out with friends, talk to a pretty girl at school or even talking to teachers/adults I start to sweat. It's nothing but my armpits; and it's very embarrassing, I often have to keep my arms at my sides just to cover my awful armpit stains. It doesn't smell usually because I have deodorant... Asked by Hal Germon 1 year ago.

Whenever I go out with friends, talk to a pretty girl at school or even talking to teachers/adults I start to sweat. It's nothing but my armpits; and it's very embarrassing, I often have to keep my arms at my sides just to cover my awful armpit stains. It doesn't smell usually because I have deodorant on. I've tried every anti - and so called "super-strength" - perspirants and nothing works. Always the same. I don't know if it's I'm anxious in social situations, but I want this to stop asap. My doctor said nothing was wrong and that it was totally normal, I disagree. Does anyone have any advice? Much appreciated, thank you! Answered by Mao Simoncini 1 year ago.

You may have a case of Hyperhydrosis, a condition characterized by abnormally increased sweating/perspiration. Hands, feet, armpits, and the groin area are among the most active regions of perspiration due to the relatively high concentration of sweat glands. Try seeing another doctor. You may be also be asked details about your sweating, such as: (Location) Does it occur your face, palms, or armpits, or all over the body? Time pattern Does it occur at night? Did it begin suddenly? (Triggers) Does the sweating occur when you are reminded of something that upset you (such as traumatic event)? (What other symptoms do you have?) for example: Weight loss Pounding heartbeat Cold or clammy hands Fever Lack of appetite Treatments may include: Stronger Antiperspirants. Excessive sweating may be controlled with strong anti-perspirants, which plug the sweat ducts. Products containing 10% to 20% aluminum chloride hexahydrate are the first line of treatment for underarm sweating. Some patients may be be prescribed a product containing a higher dose of aluminum chloride, which is applied nightly onto the affected areas. Antiperspirants can cause skin irritation, and large doses of aluminum chloride can damage clothing. Note: Deodorants do not prevent sweating, but are helpful in reducing body odor. Medication. Anticholinergics drugs, such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul-Forte), help to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands. Although effective for some patients, these drugs have not been studied as well as other treatments. Side effects include dry mouth, dizziness, and problems with urination. Beta-blockers or benzodiazepines may help reduce stress-related sweating. Iontophoresis. This FDA-approved procedure uses electricity to temporarily turn off the sweat gland. It is most effective for sweating of the hands and feet. The hands or feet are placed into water, and then a gentle current of electricity is passed through it. The electricity is gradually increased until the patient feels a light tingling sensation. The therapy lasts about 10-20 minutes and requires several sessions. Side effects include skin cracking and blisters, although rare. Botox. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) is FDA approved for the treatment of severe underarm sweating, a condition called primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Small doses of purified botulinum toxin injected into the underarm temporarily block the nerves that stimulate sweating. Side effects include injection-site pain and flu-like symptoms. If you are considering Botox for other areas of excessive sweating talk to your doctor in detail. Botox used for sweating of the palms can cause mild, but temporary weakness and intense pain. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). In severe cases, a minimally-invasive surgical procedure called sympathectomy may be recommended when other treatments fail. The procedure turns off the signal that tells the body to sweat excessively. It is usually done on patients whose palms sweat much more heavily than normal. It may also be used to treat extreme sweating of the face. ETS does not work as well for those with excessive armpit sweating. See: ETS surgery. It seems like you may be suffering from anxiety caused by nervousness.I hope all goes well. Answered by Madalyn Gobern 1 year ago.

Find a different doctor! Maybe go to a dermatologist who can prescribe prescription strength antiperspirants. You could also try anticholinergics, an oral medication used to stop sweating. Or a beta-blocker like propranolol. There are also botox injections which may sound weird but are an FDA approved treatment for excessive underarm sweating. Then there is surgery as a last resort... There are plenty of options so don't despair! Try and find a doctor who understands and ask them what they could do. Research "hyperhidrosis treatments"- because that is the fancy name for what you have. Good luck! Answered by Julian Pimpare 1 year ago.


I always sweat and it's embarrassing. help?
i tend to sweat loads at school and it's really embarrassing. i don't sweat so much at home though which bothers me. people say i smell but i can't help it! i'm not a nervous person i don't think but at school we have these big blazers we have to wear at all times unless we ask to take them off... Asked by Ivan Arcand 1 year ago.

i tend to sweat loads at school and it's really embarrassing. i don't sweat so much at home though which bothers me. people say i smell but i can't help it! i'm not a nervous person i don't think but at school we have these big blazers we have to wear at all times unless we ask to take them off and i feel embarrassed to take it off BECAUSE of the sweating. i always have big patches of sweat under my arms through the day and with our white shirts, it's clearly visible, and when i get home and put my shirt in the wash, it gets clean, comes out again, i wear it again, etc etc and after a few weeks of this (ps i do have multiple shirts not just one) i see underneath my arms the shirt's armpit area has yellowed and that makes me feel awful.i wear roll on deodorants now, but i've tried so many deodorants and nothing seems to be working for me. it's really horrible for me and i need help. anyone? home remedies would be best but any suggestions will be great help. thanks in advance. Answered by Elinore Stansifer 1 year ago.

Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition in which a person sweats excessively and unpredictably. People with hyperhidrosis may sweat even when the temperature is cool or when they are at rest. Treatment Treatments may include: Antiperspirants. Excessive sweating may be controlled with strong anti-perspirants, which plug the sweat ducts. Products containing 10% to 20% aluminum chloride hexahydrate are the first line of treatment for underarm sweating. Some patients may be be prescribed a product containing a higher dose of aluminum chloride, which is applied nightly onto the affected areas. Antiperspirants can cause skin irritation, and large doses of aluminum chloride can damage clothing. Note: Deodorants do not prevent sweating, but are helpful in reducing body odor. Medication. Anticholinergics drugs, such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul-Forte), help to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands. Although effective for some patients, these drugs have not been studied as well as other treatments. Side effects include dry mouth, dizziness, and problems with urination. Beta-blockers or benzodiazepines may help reduce stress-related sweating. Iontophoresis. This FDA-approved procedure uses electricity to temporarily turn off the sweat gland. It is most effective for sweating of the hands and feet. The hands or feet are placed into water, and then a gentle current of electricity is passed through it. The electricity is gradually increased until the patient feels a light tingling sensation. The therapy lasts about 10-20 minutes and requires several sessions. Side effects include skin cracking and blisters, although rare. Botox. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) is FDA approved for the treatment of severe underarm sweating, a condition called primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Small doses of purified botulinum toxin injected into the underarm temporarily block the nerves that stimulate sweating. Side effects include injection-site pain and flu-like symptoms. If you are considering Botox for other areas of excessive sweating talk to your doctor in detail. Botox used for sweating of the palms can cause mild, but temporary weakness and intense pain. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). In severe cases, a minimally-invasive surgical procedure called sympathectomy may be recommended when other treatments fail. The procedure turns off the signal that tells the body to sweat excessively. It is usually done on patients whose palms sweat much more heavily than normal. It may also be used to treat extreme sweating of the face. ETS does not work as well for those with excessive armpit sweating. See: ETS surgery Answered by Kortney Hernandz 1 year ago.

This is the same technique I have taught over 138,000 men and women in 157 countries to successfully treat their excessive sweating condition over the past 7 years! Remember: Watch the whole video, as the ending will pleasantly surprise you� Answered by Anthony Larriuz 1 year ago.


How can I sweat less?
I do basketball for sport at school, and we do training and I sweat A LOT and I want to know how I can sweat less?? Asked by May Vaquero 1 year ago.

Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition in which a person sweats excessively and unpredictably. People with hyperhidrosis may sweat even when the temperature is cool or when they are at rest. Sweating helps the body stay cool. In most cases, it is perfectly natural. People sweat more in warm temperatures, when they exercise, or in response to situations that make them nervous, angry, embarrassed, or afraid. However, excessive sweating occurs without such triggers. Those with hyperhidrosis appear to have overactive sweat glands. The uncontrollable sweating can lead to significant discomfort, both physical and emotional. Treatment: 1. Reduce your intake of coffee. Coffee is known to keep your body in an 'active' state which reduces the amount of sleep your body has and causes anxiety on the body therefore increasing the amount you sweat. 2. Change your clothes everyday, shower everyday and use an antibacterial soap as this will help kill the 'smell inducing bacteria' as well as removing sweat from the body. 2. Using a strong antiperspirant deodorant is one of the best cosmetic ways to deal with the problem. Antiperspirants are astringents that work by chemically plugging the opening to the sebaceous glands in the armpit which stops sweat from being released onto the skin; however sebum is still produced so a negative side effect of antiperspirants are cysts forming due to trapped sebum. 3. Start drinking Sage. It is known to be an extremely effective solution as it has been known to reduce sweating by up to 50%. How to prepare the drink: Take a tablespoon of sage leaves (which you can buy from your local supermarket) and let them soak in boiling water for approximately ten minutes, then pour out the water and drink it. 4. Medication. Anticholinergics drugs, such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul-Forte), help to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands. Although effective for some patients, these drugs have not been studied as well as other treatments. Side effects include dry mouth, dizziness, and problems with urination. Beta-blockers or benzodiazepines may help reduce stress-related sweating. 5. Iontophoresis. This FDA-approved procedure uses electricity to temporarily turn off the sweat gland. It is most effective for sweating of the hands and feet. The hands or feet are placed into water, and then a gentle current of electricity is passed through it. The electricity is gradually increased until the patient feels a light tingling sensation. The therapy lasts about 10-20 minutes and requires several sessions. Side effects include skin cracking and blisters, although rare. 6. Botox. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) is FDA approved for the treatment of severe underarm sweating, a condition called primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Small doses of purified botulinum toxin injected into the underarm temporarily block the nerves that stimulate sweating. Side effects include injection-site pain and flu-like symptoms. If you are considering Botox for other areas of excessive sweating talk to your doctor in detail. Botox used for sweating of the palms can cause mild, but temporary weakness and intense pain. 7. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). In severe cases, a minimally-invasive surgical procedure called sympathectomy may be recommended when other treatments fail. The procedure turns off the signal that tells the body to sweat excessively. It is usually done on patients whose palms sweat much more heavily than normal. It may also be used to treat extreme sweating of the face. ETS does not work as well for those with excessive armpit sweating. Answered by Shayla Begeman 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How can I sweat less? I do basketball for sport at school, and we do training and I sweat A LOT and I want to know how I can sweat less?? Answered by Rodolfo Dewitt 1 year ago.

One trick is to keep your body a bit cooler, try a neck band, or wet material tied around your neck. Answered by Tobi Spuck 1 year ago.

wear deodorant. Answered by Delaine Kimery 1 year ago.


Why do I sweat so much?
Ever since I was little, my hands have been sweating constantly, but after I hit puberty, everything else sweats, too. And it's really excessive- I use certain dri and, while it helps some, I'm still sweating. I'm not over-weight or anything and I don't live in a place that's hot. I'm not... Asked by Jerry Custodio 1 year ago.

Ever since I was little, my hands have been sweating constantly, but after I hit puberty, everything else sweats, too. And it's really excessive- I use certain dri and, while it helps some, I'm still sweating. I'm not over-weight or anything and I don't live in a place that's hot. I'm not exactly in shape, but that wouldn't do it, right? Answered by Luciano Foulcard 1 year ago.

Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition in which a person sweats excessively and unpredictably. People with hyperhidrosis may sweat even when the temperature is cool or when they are at rest. Primary hyperhidrosis affects 2 - 3% of the population, yet less than 40% of patients with this condition seek medical advice. In the majority of primary hyperhidrosis cases, no cause can be found. It seems to run in families. If the sweating occurs as a result of another medical condition, it is called secondary hyperhidrosis. The sweating may be all over the body, or it may be in one area. Conditions that cause second hyperhidrosis include: Acromegaly Anxiety conditions Cancer Carcinoid syndrome Certain medications and substances of abuse Glucose control disorders Heart disease Hyperthyroidism Lung disease Menopause Parkinson’s disease Pheochromocytoma Spinal cord injury Stroke Tuberculosis or other infections Tests can be performed to help diagnose Starch-iodine test. An iodine solution is applied to the sweaty area. After it dries, starch is sprinkled on the area. The starch-iodine combination turns a dark blue color wherever there is excess sweat. Paper test. Special paper is placed on the affected area to absorb the sweat, then weighed. The heavier it weight, the more sweat has accumulated. The patient may be also be asked details about the sweating, such as: Location Is it on face, palms, or armpits? Is it all over the body? Time pattern Does it occur at night? Did it begin suddenly? How long have you had it? Triggers Does it occur in response to reminders of a traumatic event? What other symptoms are present (for example, weight loss, a pounding heartbeat, lack of appetite)? Are the hands cold and clammy? Is there a fever? Treatment Return to top Treatments may include: Antiperspirants. Excessive sweating may be controlled with strong anti-perspirants, which plug the sweat ducts. Products containing 10% to 15% aluminum chloride hexahydrate are the first line of treatment for underarm sweating. Some patients may be be prescribed a product containing a higher dose of aluminum chloride, which is applied nightly onto the affected areas. Antiperspirants can cause skin irritation, and strong doses of aluminum chloride can damage clothing. Note: Deodorants do not prevent sweating, but are helpful in reducing body odor. Medication. Anticholinergics drugs, such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul-Forte), help to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands. Although effective for some patients, these drugs have not been studied as well as other treatments. Side effects include dry mouth, dizziness, and problems with urination. Beta-blockers or benzodiazepines may help reduce stress-related sweating. Iontophoresis. This FDA-approved procedure uses electricity to temporarily turn off the sweat gland. It is most effective for sweating of the hands and feet. The hands or feet are placed into water, and then a gentle current of electricity is passed through it. The electricity is gradually increased until the patient feels a light tingling sensation. The therapy lasts about 10-20 minutes and requires several sessions. Side effects include skin cracking and blisters, although rare. Botox. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) was approved by the FDA in 2004 for the treatment of severe underarm sweating, a condition called primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Small doses of purified botulinum toxin injected into the underarm temporarily block the nerves that stimulate sweating. Side effects include injection-site pain and flu-like symptoms. If you are considering Botox for other areas of excessive sweating talk to your doctor in detail. Botox used for sweating of the palms can cause mild, but temporary weakness and intense pain. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). In severe cases, a minimally-invasive surgical procedure called sympathectomy may be recommended. The procedure is usually performed on patients with excessively sweaty palms. It is not as effective on those with excessive armpit sweating. This surgery turns off the signal which tells the body to sweat excessively. ETS surgery is done while the patient is asleep under general anesthesia. The doctor makes two or three tiny cuts under the arm. The patient's lung is collapsed so the surgeon has more room to work. A tiny camera, called an endoscope, is inserted to guide the surgeon to the appropriate nerve. After the nerve associated with the overactive gland is identified, it is removed or destroyed. The lung is restored to normal, and the wound closed with stitches. The identical procedure is done on the other side of the body. The surgery takes about a half hour. Patients usually go home the next day, but may experience pain for about a week. ETS requires special training. Before having this surgery, make sure your doctor is properly trained. Risks include artery damage, nerve damage, and increased sweating. New sweating occurs in about 50% of patients. Support Groups Return to top International Hyperhidrosis Society, www.sweathelp.org Expectations (prognosis) Return to top Aluminum Chloride: Initially a patient may need to use it three to seven times a week. After sweating becomes normal, the person may need to use it only once every one to three weeks. If skin irritation is a problem, a doctor may temporarily prescribe 1% hydrocortisone cream. Botox: Swelling goes away in a few weeks. The effect of a single injection can last up to a few months. Some patients need additional injections. (* We have 2 pts that had this done and it works*) Iontophoresis: Sweating may be reduced after six to 10 sessions. After that, the person may need treatment once every one to four weeks. Some of the causes of hyperhidrosis can be serious. Always consult a doctor if you have excessive sweating. I am a medical assistant for a group of Neurologists Answered by Latoyia Mccaffree 1 year ago.

At one time in my life I to was a heavy sweater, I was so embarassed at times when my arm pits would sweat, Im older now and thinner and I still sweat but not like when I was your age, but here are a few bits of advise from a recovered perspirer, ok to start with stop using that deoderant, use mitchim, or theirs another deoderant they sell in your local rite aid or walgreens that cost a bit more than the average deoderant but works well, but I cant remember the name of it, {sorry}. But to be honest with you this is something that you will out grow and its normal for you to sweat, your body is doing its job, and for now Im afraid your just gonna have to live with it, but do look into another choice of anti-persperant, and good luck. Answered by Tandra Borella 1 year ago.

Your very lucky there are some people like me who have a hard time sweating. I actually have to have a hard run in the summer time to sweat.no joke it sucks. My blood pressure runs lower than norm ever since I was born. Answered by Edison Cass 1 year ago.

Get a medical checkup. Good luck. Answered by Ted Madnick 1 year ago.

if you sweat to much ur gona die ahaha ur screwed Answered by Ria Hoberek 1 year ago.


She sweats a lot.....her palms and feet ewwww....?
She's 32 years old,not a sporty type of lady.5'4" in height and weighs 130lbs. Asked by Toshiko Bard 1 year ago.

Can anyone help me how and what advise i can give to my bestfriend who really sweat so much.Sometimes she would rather stay home all day and not wanting to mingle with other friends because of her health problem.She had been told by our nurse friend that if she goes for some kind of operation or surgery it will cause her much trouble to her health.I don't know how to help and she's starting to feel tired of dealing with this.Please help!Thank you in advance. Answered by Micheal Bukovsky 1 year ago.

Yeah I guess I know how your friend feels,Unfortunately I have that problem too. It's called Hyperhidrosis,it is a medical condition in which a person sweats excessively and unpredictably. People with hyperhidrosis may sweat even when the temperature is cool or when they are at rest. Some treatments can be: Antiperspirants. Excessive sweating may be controlled with strong anti-perspirants, which plug the sweat ducts. Medication. Anticholinergics drugs, such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul-Forte), help to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands. Although effective for some patients, these drugs have not been studied as well as other treatments. Iontophoresis. This FDA-approved procedure uses electricity to temporarily turn off the sweat gland. It is most effective for sweating of the hands and feet. Botox. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) is FDA approved for the treatment of severe underarm sweating, a condition called primary axillary hyperhidrosis. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). In severe cases, a minimally-invasive surgical procedure called sympathectomy may be recommended when other treatments fail. I've been doing lontophoresis which is a "theray" where you put your hands or feet into water, and then a gentle current of electricity is passed through it. The electricity is gradually increased until you feel a light tingling sensation. The therapy lasts about 10-20 minutes and requires several sessions. So far it has work I use to sweat all the time non-stop and this had heled me alot, I hope this hels your friend! Answered by Page Gowell 1 year ago.

If you really care for as you can say "Friend" Then why are you pushing her to mingle with other friends i suggest letting her be healthy and let her do anything she wants. If shes happy then i guess you'll be happy :) Hope iv helped Answered by Cathi Agresto 1 year ago.

And I am assuming this best friend is really you?... Anyways, go to a doctor they have prescription creams and such. Answered by Devon Milhouse 1 year ago.

more details needed, is she a small or large person, is she active or a couch potato,? Answered by Maureen Caughey 1 year ago.


How can i ruduce how much i sweat?
hi, im a teenage girl, and i sweat a lot. underarm, stomach, back, neck, head, thighs, hands, the whole nine yards. not only when its hot but also when im nervous. its pretty disgusting and im really tired of it. is there something i can do? i have tried many products for my under arm with no success. im not... Asked by Vicente Adduci 1 year ago.

hi, im a teenage girl, and i sweat a lot. underarm, stomach, back, neck, head, thighs, hands, the whole nine yards. not only when its hot but also when im nervous. its pretty disgusting and im really tired of it. is there something i can do? i have tried many products for my under arm with no success. im not interested in any surgery or botax at least for now, so is there something else i can do? Answered by Luci Galligan 1 year ago.

Sweating - excessive; Perspiration - excessive; Diaphoresis Definition Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition in which a person sweats excessively and unpredictably. People with hyperhidrosis may sweat even when the temperature is cool or when they are at rest. Treatments may include : Antiperspirants-containing 10% to 15% aluminum chloride hexahydrate. Note: Deodorants do not prevent sweating, but are helpful in reducing body odor. Medication. Anticholinergics drugs, such as glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul-Forte), help to prevent the stimulation of sweat glands Iontophoresis. This FDA-approved procedure uses electricity to temporarily turn off the sweat gland. It is most effective for sweating of the hands and feet Botox. Botulinum toxin type A (Botox) was approved by the FDA in 2004 for the treatment of severe underarm sweating, a condition called primary axillary hyperhidrosis Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). In severe cases, a minimally-invasive surgical procedure called sympathectomy may be recommended. The procedure is usually performed on patients with excessively sweaty palms Control of anxiety and stress. . Notify the Doctor: If sweating is accompanied by fever, weight loss, chest pain, shortness of breath, or a rapid, pounding heartbeat. These symptoms may indicate an underlying problem, such as hyperthyroidism Excessive sweating may also be a symptom of menopause. In the meantime, exercise moderately, avoid alcohol, coffee, low blood sugar;•Spicy foods (known as "gustatory sweating") Warm temperatures; and Withdrawal from alcohol or narcotic pain killers Answered by Ralph Depner 1 year ago.


Clammy hands?
Im almost 16 years old and always have sweaty/clammy hands and feet, it there a treatment for hypohydrosis? is there an available over the counter pill or anything! it really embarresing to meet new people and shake their hands when your hands are all sweaty! Asked by Roseanne Aitken 1 year ago.

Hyperhydosis is a common problem. There are no over the counter meds. There are some prescription meds one I know from experience is Robinul Forte, it works well.. Some dermatologist will inject botox in the hands and feet.. Answered by Darron Karney 1 year ago.

Drink water at least 2 liters a day. Sounds silly but it helped my brother get rid of it. Answered by Mitchell Burton 1 year ago.

You mean HYPER (meaning excessive, hypo-little)hydrosis. Are you trying to pull a fast one? Answered by Alethea Strohbehn 1 year ago.


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