RIMACTANE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 050429/001.

Names and composition

"RIMACTANE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of RIFAMPIN.

Answered questions

What is rimactacid and remactane?
Asked by Aleisha Teigen 4 months ago.

I think you are asking about rimactazid and rimactane. They are both used to treat tuberculosis (TB). Both are antibiotics and work on disrupting the action of RNA-polymerase. The tuberculosis bacteria use RNA-polymerase to make essential proteins and to copy their own genetic information (DNA). Answered by Marva Topinka 4 months ago.

Rimactacid and Rimactane are brand names of the drug Rifampicin. Rifampicin is an anti-tuberculosis drug but it is not taken alone. It usually is taken in with one or two other anti-TB drugs because one easily develops resistance to the tubercle bacilli if taken singly. It is usually taken once daily and before breakfast and causes reddish or orange discoloration of the urine and other body secretions. This drug is also used as prophylaxis against meningococcemia. Answered by Julio Tatsuno 4 months ago.

antibiotics and combinations to treat tuberculosis. Answered by Maximina Zettler 4 months ago.


What are the drugs of rifampin from first to fourth generations?
Asked by Reuben Ralon 4 months ago.

Rifampin (rif-AM-pin) is used to treat certain bacterial infections. In the U.S.— * Rifadin * Rifadin IV * Rimactane In Canada— * Rifadin * Rimactane * Rofact Answered by Keith Steven 4 months ago.


Side effects?
I am at the moment being treated for Tuberculosis and for the last few days I have bean suffering cramps in my hands and knees, very similar to arthritis, anything to do with the cocktail of drugs they have me on. UK citizen living and working in China Asked by Lonnie Chary 4 months ago.

Here are some drugs and their side effects: Drug Daily adult dose Side effects isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid), also called INH 5 mg/kg up to 300 mg Hepatitis (rare), excessive tiredness, weakness, loss of appetite, upset stomach, vomiting, dark yellow or brown urine, yellowing of the skin or eyes, diarrhea, vision problems, eye pain, numbness or tingling in the hands and feet, rash, fever, swollen glands, sore throat, stomach pains or tenderness rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), also called RIF 10 mg/kg up to 600 mg Hepatitis (rare), headache, muscle pain, bone pain, heartburn, upset stomach, vomiting, stomach cramps, chills, diarrhea, rash, sores on skin or in the mouth, fever, yellowing of the skin or eyes. Urine, stools, saliva, sputum, sweat, and tears may turn red-orange. pyrazinamide, also called PZA 1,000 mg for patients weighing 40 – 55 kg (88 – 121 lbs) 1,500 mg for patients weighing 56 – 75 kg (123 – 165 lbs) 2,000 mg for patients weighing 76 – 90 kg (167 – 198 lbs) Hepatitis (rare), upset stomach, fatigue, rash, fever, vomiting, loss of appetite, yellowing of the skin or eyes, darkened urine, pain and swelling in the joints, unusual bleeding or bruising, difficulty urinating ethambutol (Myambutol), also called EMB 800 mg for patients weighing 40 – 55 kg (88 – 121 lbs) 1,200 mg for patients weighing 56 – 75 kg (123 – 165 lbs) 1,600 mg for patients weighting 76 – 90 kg (167 – 198 lbs) Blurred vision, sudden changes in vision, inability to see the colors red and green, loss of appetite, upset stomach, vomiting, numbness and tingling in the hands. Pyrazinamide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: upset stomach fatigue If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: skin rash fever vomiting loss of appetite yellowing of the skin or eyes darkened urine pain and swelling in the joints * unusual bleeding or bruising difficult urination Answered by Janessa Vastola 4 months ago.

I dont think you have tuberculosis. hand and knees cramps have nothing to do with it symptoms include a productive, prolonged cough of more than three weeks duration, chest pain, and coughing up blood. Systemic symptoms include fever, chills, night sweats, appetite loss, weight loss, paling, and easy fatigability. Answered by Francis Fietsam 4 months ago.


My dog is sick, please help?
I have a black lab puppy 3 months old, When i first got it it was happy and playful and really hyper active, Then two days after it got sick. It got a cold with boogers and snot out of its nose and a lot of diaheria, I didn't do anything but lay and sit like it was dying. I had a doctor came and gave him a lot... Asked by Yong Burmester 4 months ago.

I have a black lab puppy 3 months old, When i first got it it was happy and playful and really hyper active, Then two days after it got sick. It got a cold with boogers and snot out of its nose and a lot of diaheria, I didn't do anything but lay and sit like it was dying. I had a doctor came and gave him a lot of shots because he was sick, The dog really didn't get better only a little. So he came back and he came and told me to give him everyday two shots of something i can't remeber its name and he told me to give the dog Mucophylline 3 times a day, and Bisolvon Elixir three times a day, and Rimactane 2 times a day, And the dog is still sick hes a little better when he lays down his leg starts to shake and he isn't hyper active at all. You can't get him to run or walk fast he just slouches and when he sits down he drops down. Please help Answered by Laurel Geidl 4 months ago.

GO TO THE VET NOW B4 IT DIES. Answered by Clotilde Wingham 4 months ago.

Call the breeder. The health guarantee will replace the dog, or refund the money. Answered by Kathlene Kartye 4 months ago.

One: Find another vet Two: Have a full blood panel done Three: If it were me, I'd go to the E-Vet ASAP! Your pup is very ill, please get it better help. Answered by Wade Brewster 4 months ago.


Amoxicillan and Birth Control?
I took 2 Amoxicillan pills today. I have been on birth control for 6 months and have not missed one day. I do not plan on taking more of the Amoxicillan pills, so will this affect my birth control? Asked by Wendy Cheas 4 months ago.

No, but just taking two Amoxicillin isn't a wise thing to do. Rifampicin (Rifadin, Rimactane) or rifabutin (Mycobutin) are the ones that counteract the pill. Re ampicillin/amoxicillin... "In the past, women using hormonal contraception such as the pill or patch would be advised to use an extra method of contraception (eg condoms) while taking an antibiotic like this one and for seven days after finishing the course. However, this advice has now changed." Answered by Devona Muckelroy 4 months ago.

Any anti-botic will change the effectiveness of your birth control, it also effects your skin out in the sun and you are more likely to burn. To be on the safe side, if you are sexually active you should use another form of birth control for a few weeks and continue to take your birth control as usual. Answered by Mandi Hone 4 months ago.

in particular antibiotics do no longer impact beginning administration. notwithstanding there is a few anecdotal data of it reducing the effectiveness in some women that's why it relatively is mentioned to apply condoms jointly as taking the antibiotics. in case you probably did no longer ejaculate interior her the two then with any luck you're ok. i be responsive to somebody who did that apparently (retreating jointly as on bc with antibiotics) and that they have been high quality. while you're in contact then communicate to a pharmacist or wellbeing care expert. Harriet Answered by Tyree Siner 4 months ago.


What does the term MAIO inhibiting drugs mean?
I was asked about drug interactions and this term came up. My question is what drugs are considered maio inhibitors. Asked by Elvira Twohig 4 months ago.

I think you mean MAOI?? Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOI) drugs and trade names: • Furazolidone: Furoxone • Isocarboxazid: Marplan® • Isoniazid: Laniazid®, Nydrazid® • Isoniazid rifampin: Rifamate®, Rimactane®/INH • Moclobemide • Pargyline: Eutonyl® • Phenelzine: Nardil® • Procarbazine: Matulane® • Selegiline: Atapryl®, Deprenyl®, Eldepryl® • Tranylcypromine: Parnate® type of drug: Two groups: • Hydrazine derivatives: phenelzine, isocarboxazid • Non-hydrazine derivatives: tranylcypromine, pargyline mechanism: Agents that inhibit monoamine oxidase and alter catecholamine metabolism (down-regulating noradrenergic synpases and upregulating serotogenic synapses); includes other agents with secondary MAOI action, e.g., phenelzine. used to treat: Depression (refractory to tricyclic antidepressants); antineoplastic (procarbazine), antibiotic (furoxone); adjunctive treatment in Parkinson's (selegine) and hypertension (pargyline). Answered by Lyla Res 4 months ago.

Mono Amine Oxidase Inhibitors - MAOI See the wiki page about it They are old fashioned antidepressants and associated with the necessity to stick to a particular diet and avoid certain foods. There is a new class of MAOI's now, the RIMA's Reversible Inhibitors of Monoamine oxidase A: moclobemide This is a better drug as it is safer and does not require the diet. It is considered a mild antidepressant as it's efficacy is not quite up to par with the hard core tricyclics and SSRI's The wiki page has a list of the names of these: # Isocarboxazid (Marplan) # Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix, Moclodura®) # Phenelzine (Nardil) # Tranylcypromine (Parnate) # Selegiline (Selegiline, Eldepryl), and Emsam # Nialamide # Iproniazid (Marsilid, Iprozid, Ipronid, Rivivol, Propilniazida) # Iproclozide # Toloxatone Answered by Eleanore Ficher 4 months ago.

I asked my doctor recently. It is a group of drugs that used to be used for treating depression. They are still used but not very often. I don't have the names of the drugs but if you aren't being treated for depression, you should be ok. If in doubt, call a 24 hr. pharmacy and ask to speak to the pharmacist. Answered by Tempie Kleffman 4 months ago.

Certain types of antideppressants. (BTW, it's MAOI) Look this up on the internet and it will give you the names of them. Most health care professionals are steering away from these now because of the many interactions with other meds and even foods, such as cheese and wine. Answered by Jesus Weitzel 4 months ago.

Maoi Drug Names Answered by Simona Vandertuig 4 months ago.


Tuberculosis?
what is the method of respiration for tuberculosis and what are the environmental conditions for favorable growth for tuberculosis? this is for a paper i have to write Asked by Pok Sanderford 4 months ago.

this will help you with your paper Tuberculosis Treatment Date updated: December 21, 2006 Content provided by MayoClinic.com Until the mid-20th century, people with tuberculosis were routinely cared for in sanitariums - often for years - where the clear, cold air, abundant food and enforced rest were believed to heal the lungs and halt the wasting that's characteristic of the disease. Often, the treatment not only helped cure TB, but also prevented its spread. Today, medications are the cornerstone of tuberculosis treatment. The therapy is lengthy. Normally, you take antibiotics for six to 12 months to completely destroy the bacteria. The exact drugs and length of treatment depends on your age, overall health, the results of susceptibility tests, and whether you have TB infection or active TB. Treating TB infection If tests show that you have TB infection but not active disease, your doctor may recommend preventive drug therapy to destroy dormant bacteria that might become active in the future. In that case, you're likely to receive a daily dose of the TB medication isoniazid (INH). For treatment to be effective, you usually take INH for six to nine months. Long-term use can cause side effects, including the life-threatening liver disease hepatitis. For that reason, your doctor will monitor you closely while you're taking INH. During treatment, avoid using acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and avoid or limit alcohol use. Both greatly increase your risk of liver damage. Treating active TB disease If you're diagnosed with active TB, you're likely to begin taking four medications - isoniazid, rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), ethambutol (Myambutol) and pyrazinamide. This regimen may change if susceptibility tests later show some of these drugs to be ineffective. Even so, you'll continue to take several medications. Depending on the severity of your disease and whether there is drug resistance, one or two of the four drugs may be stopped after a few months. Sometimes the drugs may be combined in a single tablet such as Rifater, which contains isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide. This makes your therapy less complicated while ensuring that you get the different drugs needed to completely destroy TB bacteria. Another drug that may make treatment easier is rifapentine (Priftin), which is taken just once a week during the last four months of therapy. Sometimes you may be hospitalized for the first two weeks of therapy or until tests show that you're no longer contagious. Completing treatment is essential Because TB bacteria grow slowly, treatment for an active infection is lengthy - usually six to 12 months. After a few weeks, you won't be contagious and may start to feel better, but it's essential that you finish the full course of therapy and take the medications exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Stopping treatment too soon or skipping doses can create drug-resistant strains of the disease that are much more dangerous and difficult to treat. Drug-resistant strains that aren't treated can quickly become fatal, especially in people with impaired immune systems. In an effort to help people stick with their treatment regimen, some doctors and clinics use a program called directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS). In this approach, a nurse or other health care professional administers your medication so that you don't have to remember to take it on your own. Treatment side effects Side effects of TB drugs aren't common, but can be serious when they do occur. All TB medications can be highly toxic to your liver. Rifampin can also cause severe flu-like signs and symptoms - fever, chills, muscle pain, nausea and vomiting. When taking these medications, call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following: Nausea or vomiting Loss of appetite A yellow color to your skin (jaundice) A fever lasting three or more days that has no obvious cause, such as a cold or the flu Tenderness or soreness in your abdomen Blurred vision or colorblindness Treating drug-resistant TB Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is any strain of TB that can't be treated by the two most powerful TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. Extensive drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is a newly developed strain of TB that's resistant to the same treatments that MDR-TB is, and additionally XDR-TB is resistant to three or more of the second-line TB drugs. Both strains develop as a result of partial or incomplete treatment - either because people skip doses or don't finish their entire course of medication or because they're given the wrong treatment regimen. This gives bacteria time to undergo mutations that can resist treatment with first-line TB drugs. MDR-TB can be treated. But it requires at least two years of therapy with second-line medications that can be highly toxic. Even with treatment, many people with MDR-TB may not survive. And when treatment is successful, people with this form of TB may need surgery to remove areas of persistent infection or repair lung damage. Treating these resistant forms of TB is far more costly than treating nonresistant TB, making therapy unaffordable in many parts of the world. Because these resistant infections are spreading and could potentially make all TB incurable, some experts believe that ineffective treatment is ultimately worse than no treatment at all. Treating people who have HIV/AIDS Treating people who are co-infected with TB and HIV is a particular challenge. HIV-positive people are especially likely to develop MDR-TB and to rapidly progress from latent to active infection. What's more, the most powerful AIDS drugs - protease inhibitors - interact with rifampin and other drugs used to treat TB, reducing the effectiveness of both types of medications. To avoid interactions, people living with both HIV and TB may stop taking protease inhibitors while they complete a short course of TB therapy that includes rifampin. Or they may be treated with a TB regimen in which rifampin is replaced with another drug that's less likely to interfere with AIDS medications. In such cases, doctors carefully monitor the response to therapy, and the duration and type of regimen may change over time. Without treatment, most people living with both HIV and TB will die, often in a matter of months. In such cases, the primary cause of death is TB, not AIDS. Answered by Louetta Checkett 4 months ago.


URGENT QUESTION 2!?
If It Is tuberculosis in my girlfriends lungs, could you give me some stuff about it like. Can It Go Away. If Not Is There Ways To Get It Too Go Away. All Stuff Like That. Thanks For All Your Help, Your Help Is Greatfully Apreicated! Asked by Abraham Vandenburgh 4 months ago.

Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infection that primarily affects your lungs. Every year, tuberculosis kills nearly 2 million people worldwide. The infection is common — about one-third of the human population is infected with TB, with one new infection occurring every second. Tuberculosis has plagued human beings for millennia. Signs of tubercular damage have been found in Egyptian mummies and in bones dating back at least 5,000 years. Today, despite advances in treatment, TB is a global pandemic, fueled by the spread of HIV/AIDS, poverty, a lack of health services and the emergence of drug-resistant strains of the bacterium that causes the disease. Tuberculosis spreads through airborne droplets when a person with the infection coughs, talks or sneezes. In general, you need prolonged exposure to an infected person before becoming infected yourself. Even then, you may not develop symptoms of the disease. Or, symptoms may not show up until many years later. Left untreated, tuberculosis can be fatal. With proper care, however, most cases of tuberculosis can be treated, even those resistant to the drugs commonly used against the disease Treatment Until the mid-20th century, people with tuberculosis were routinely cared for in sanitariums — often for years — where the clear, cold air, abundant food and enforced rest were believed to heal the lungs and halt the wasting that's characteristic of the disease. Often, the treatment not only helped cure TB, but also prevented its spread. Today, medications are the cornerstone of tuberculosis treatment. The therapy is lengthy. Normally, you take antibiotics for six to 12 months to completely destroy the bacteria. The exact drugs and length of treatment depends on your age, overall health, the results of susceptibility tests, and whether you have TB infection or active TB. Treating TB infection If tests show that you have TB infection but not active disease, your doctor may recommend preventive drug therapy to destroy dormant bacteria that might become active in the future. In that case, you're likely to receive a daily dose of the TB medication isoniazid (INH). For treatment to be effective, you usually take INH for six to nine months. Long-term use can cause side effects, including the life-threatening liver disease hepatitis. For that reason, your doctor will monitor you closely while you're taking INH. During treatment, avoid using acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) and avoid or limit alcohol use. Both greatly increase your risk of liver damage. Treating active TB disease If you're diagnosed with active TB, you're likely to begin taking four medications — isoniazid, rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), ethambutol (Myambutol) and pyrazinamide. This regimen may change if susceptibility tests later show some of these drugs to be ineffective. Even so, you'll continue to take several medications. Depending on the severity of your disease and whether there is drug resistance, one or two of the four drugs may be stopped after a few months. Sometimes the drugs may be combined in a single tablet such as Rifater, which contains isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide. This makes your therapy less complicated while ensuring that you get the different drugs needed to completely destroy TB bacteria. Another drug that may make treatment easier is rifapentine (Priftin), which is taken just once a week during the last four months of therapy. Sometimes you may be hospitalized for the first two weeks of therapy or until tests show that you're no longer contagious. Completing treatment is essential Because TB bacteria grow slowly, treatment for an active infection is lengthy — usually six to 12 months. After a few weeks, you won't be contagious and may start to feel better, but it's essential that you finish the full course of therapy and take the medications exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Stopping treatment too soon or skipping doses can create drug-resistant strains of the disease that are much more dangerous and difficult to treat. Drug-resistant strains that aren't treated can quickly become fatal, especially in people with impaired immune systems. In an effort to help people stick with their treatment regimen, some doctors and clinics use a program called directly observed therapy short-course (DOTS). In this approach, a nurse or other health care professional administers your medication so that you don't have to remember to take it on your own. Treatment side effects Side effects of TB drugs aren't common, but can be serious when they do occur. All TB medications can be highly toxic to your liver. Rifampin can also cause severe flu-like signs and symptoms — fever, chills, muscle pain, nausea and vomiting. When taking these medications, call your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following: Nausea or vomiting Loss of appetite A yellow color to your skin (jaundice) A fever lasting three or more days that has no obvious cause, such as a cold or the flu Tenderness or soreness in your abdomen Blurred vision or colorblindness Treating drug-resistant TB Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is any strain of TB that can't be treated by the two most powerful TB drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. Extensive drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is a newly developed strain of TB that's resistant to the same treatments that MDR-TB is, and additionally XDR-TB is resistant to three or more of the second-line TB drugs. Both strains develop as a result of partial or incomplete treatment — either because people skip doses or don't finish their entire course of medication or because they're given the wrong treatment regimen. This gives bacteria time to undergo mutations that can resist treatment with first-line TB drugs. MDR-TB can be treated. But it requires at least two years of therapy with second-line medications that can be highly toxic. Even with treatment, many people with MDR-TB may not survive. And when treatment is successful, people with this form of TB may need surgery to remove areas of persistent infection or repair lung damage. Treating these resistant forms of TB is far more costly than treating nonresistant TB, making therapy unaffordable in many parts of the world. Because these resistant infections are spreading and could potentially make all TB incurable, some experts believe that ineffective treatment is ultimately worse than no treatment at all. Treating people who have HIV/AIDS Treating people who are co-infected with TB and HIV is a particular challenge. HIV-positive people are especially likely to develop MDR-TB and to rapidly progress from latent to active infection. What's more, the most powerful AIDS drugs — protease inhibitors — interact with rifampin and other drugs used to treat TB, reducing the effectiveness of both types of medications. To avoid interactions, people living with both HIV and TB may stop taking protease inhibitors while they complete a short course of TB therapy that includes rifampin. Or they may be treated with a TB regimen in which rifampin is replaced with another drug that's less likely to interfere with AIDS medications. In such cases, doctors carefully monitor the response to therapy, and the duration and type of regimen may change over time. Without treatment, most people living with both HIV and TB will die, often in a matter of months. In such cases, the primary cause of death is TB, not AIDS. GekKO! Answered by Marty Quincey 4 months ago.

I'm truly am sorry to hear such news. Tuberculosis is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs. But, TB bacteria can attack any part of the body such as the kidney, spine, and brain. If not treated properly, TB disease can be fatal. If you have active TB, your doctor may recommend that you take 4 medicines: Isoniazid Rifampin (one brand name: Rifadin) Ethambutol (brand name: Myambutol) Pyrazinamide Answered by Junko Piech 4 months ago.

I'm sorry to hear that Taylor. TB is a deadly infectious disease that affects most of the body's systems. If you're looking to treat it, it may take about half a year up to a year to completely kill all of the bacteria. Two antibiotics that would be helpful are rifampicin and isoniazid. Hope all gets better soon. Answered by Lorean Fred 4 months ago.

My first theory grew to become into spray him with water on an identical time as doing it yet if you consider that he's doing it once you won't be able to see it i think of he's doing it out of boredom in all probability. Is he going on sufficient walks? Is he being performed with/socialized with different canines? Tie the curtains up while leaving the room and/or take the canine with you to maintain a watch on him. And advance walks/canine park visits. additionally, while leaving and not in a position to take him with you, then positioned him outdoors (why go away a canine contained in the homestead once you will desire to head get grocery's which will pee everywhere) Get new curtains so the scent would be "long gone" acceptable now, it rather is his "pee spot" (canines will numerous cases continuously pee contained in the comparable area) eliminate his spot, that would desire to help. Thats all my suggestions. Answered by Sheila Mazuera 4 months ago.

Immediate treatment at a hospital!!!!!! Vaccinate the both of you. Tell any friends or family that you have been in contact or were exposed to this disease.They also should be checked and vaccinated if they already haven't been. Answered by Jerome Krein 4 months ago.


Pregnant on Depo? Serious answers only!?
I have been on antibiotics, which i was just told cancels it out to. I guess I'll be going to get a test this week.. oh boy! Asked by Gwendolyn Parshall 4 months ago.

I've been on the depo shot since mid summer of last year, I am due back for my 5th shot april 15th and i'm not going for it. When I got my first shot i was on my period the entire 3 months until i got my 2nd then it went away and came back for a few weeks on my 3rd shot and 4th. I haven't felt sick or anything up now. Lately I've been feeling sick to my stomach randomly for the past 3 weeks or so, my hips have been hurting just walking. I already have a 1yr old daughter and I only ever had heartburn when I was pregnant with her and I had heartburn about 5 days ago. I'm just trying to figure out if this is side effects of the shot or not? Answered by Ai Schoonmaker 4 months ago.

very probably. that shot is *horrible* for side effects. btw: you haven't taken rimactane or medication for anxiety, have you? those cancel out birth control pills. Answered by Carlee Bleakney 4 months ago.


High Blood Pressure medication Nifedipine, what are the side effect?
Hi, i am on Nifedipine 20 mg twice a day on morning and evening for my high blood pressure. Nifedipine is a belong a to group of high blood pressure medication calcium blocker, on a long term usage will it has any serious side effect on the body and will it effect my bone density on long run? thanks Asked by Stacy Kamber 4 months ago.

Nifedipine is generic for Adalat or Procardia or Procardia XL What should I avoid while taking nifedipine? Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. Use caution when you stand or sit up from a lying position, especially if you wake up during the night. You may become dizzy when changing positions. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking nifedipine. What are the possible side effects of nifedipine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking nifedipine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusually fast or slow heartbeats; severe dizziness or fainting; psychosis; yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice); or swelling of the legs or ankles. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take nifedipine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache, fatigue, or tiredness; flushing; insomnia; vivid or abnormal dreams; nausea or constipation; or increased urination. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect nifedipine? Before taking nifedipine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: another heart medication to treat the same or another condition; cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S., Eryc, Ery-Tab, others); itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); carbamazepine (Tegretol); phenytoin (Dilantin); or rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane) or rifabutin (Mycobutin). You may not be able to take nifedipine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with nifedipine or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products. Now, here comes the numerous controversies. A lot of articles stated that pts on CCB (calcium channel blockers) such as Nifepidine(Procardia) , Verpamil,(Calan) Diltiazem (Cardizem) shouldn't be taking calcium supplements. Calcium supplements ( may contain lead) may also decrease the efficacy of calcium channel . However, other studies suggested that Inadequate calcium intake may contribute to accelerated bone loss and density. .There is an ongoing debate whether these calcium channel blockers increase the risks of heart attacks.; as these meds block the transport of calcium across the muscle cell membrane. Calcium. Calcium regulates the tone of the smooth muscles lining blood vessels, and population studies have found that people who have sufficient dietary calcium have lower blood pressure than those who do not. Hypertension itself increases calcium loss from the body. The effects of extra calcium on blood pressure, however, are mixed with some even showing higher pressure. Effects of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs on Exercise. Certain anti-hypertensive medications, including diuretics and beta-blockers, can interfere with exercise capacity. ACE inhibitors or calcium-channel blockers are the best drugs for active individuals. However, patients who must take drugs that interfere somewhat with exercise capability should still adhere to an exercise program and consult a physician on how best to balance medications with exercise. Dash Diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is rcommended for Hypertensive pts. It's low salt to avoid more potassium loss. It's rich in fruits and vegetables. and nutrients and calcium obtained from foods naturally. They also contain other nutirents such as potassium and magnesium which help in the absorption of Ca. The site below also mentioned no bone loss: Times Leader | 01/23/2007 | Blood pressure medicine will not cause bone ... Blood pressure medicine will not cause bone loss Ask Dr. H ... Norvasc is in the class of blood pressure medications called "calcium channel blockers. ...www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/l... Answered by Demetria Jimenez 4 months ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Kelli Boback 4 months ago.

Nifedipine Side Effects Answered by Lucina Marbut 4 months ago.

I found a great link for you on long term uses of Captopril (Nifedipine), and I am a nurse, and I have seen patients on this for the rest of their of life, no bad side effects become of it. As far as bone density, you will just need to take a multi-vitamin that has calcium in it just to keep your calcium level up. I hope this article helps and good luck. Answered by Shelia Cauley 4 months ago.

Hey guys, The best progress that I have ever had was with Rays perfect remedy (just google it) Without a doubt the most incredible results that I have ever had for diabetes. Answered by Shavonda Abbs 4 months ago.

like both, fruits: berries, oatmeal, pears, peaches, dragonfruit, pomegranate.... Vegetables: CUCUMBERS, bok choy, green beans, broccoli,.... We guess the two are great. Answered by Carmelo Kaina 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050429/001 RIMACTANE RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
050420/001 RIFADIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
050429/001 RIMACTANE RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
050627/001 RIFADIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL
062303/001 RIFADIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
064150/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
064150/002 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
064217/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL
065028/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
065028/002 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
065390/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
065390/002 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
065421/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL
065502/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL
090034/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 150MG
090034/002 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN CAPSULE/ORAL 300MG
091181/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL
204101/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL
205039/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL
206736/001 RIFAMPIN RIFAMPIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 600MG per VIAL

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