Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 009627/001.

Names and composition

"RESERPINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of RESERPINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009627/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009627/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009663/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009663/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009667/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009667/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009838/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009838/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009859/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009859/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
010441/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
010441/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
010441/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
010441/004 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
011185/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
011185/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080393/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080446/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080457/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080457/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080457/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080492/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080492/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080525/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080525/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080582/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080582/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080637/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080679/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080721/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080723/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080723/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080723/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080749/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080753/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080753/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080975/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080975/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080975/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
083058/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
083058/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
083145/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
083145/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
084663/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
084974/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
085207/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
085401/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
085775/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
086117/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
089019/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
089020/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009115/001 SERPASIL RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009115/003 SERPASIL RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009115/004 SERPASIL RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009115/005 SERPASIL RESERPINE ELIXIR/ORAL 0.2MG per 4ML
009357/001 RAU-SED RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009357/004 RAU-SED RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009357/006 RAU-SED RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
009357/008 RAU-SED RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009376/001 SANDRIL RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009376/004 SANDRIL RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009391/001 SERPANRAY RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009391/002 SERPANRAY RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009391/004 SERPANRAY RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009434/002 SERPASIL RESERPINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
009453/001 SERPATE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009453/002 SERPATE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009627/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009627/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009631/002 HISERPIA RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009631/004 HISERPIA RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009645/002 SERPIVITE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009663/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009663/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009667/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009667/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009838/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009838/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
009859/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
009859/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
010012/001 SANDRIL RESERPINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2.5MG per ML
010124/001 SERPALAN RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
010124/002 SERPALAN RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
010441/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
010441/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
010441/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.5MG
010441/004 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
011185/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
011185/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080393/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080446/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080457/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080457/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080457/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080492/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080492/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080525/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080525/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080582/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080582/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080637/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080679/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080721/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080723/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080723/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080723/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080749/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080753/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080753/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080975/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
080975/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
080975/003 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
083058/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
083058/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
083145/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
083145/002 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
084663/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
084974/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
085207/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
085401/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
085775/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
086117/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG
089019/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.25MG
089020/001 RESERPINE RESERPINE TABLET/ORAL 0.1MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Emma Decambra 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Blondell Krummel 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Lonnie Pothier 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Broderick Goepel 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Merlene Kuehnel 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Jarvis Rettinger 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Cherri Schulte 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Arianna Redal 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Marla Magouyrk 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Jerrica Appelt 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Lauralee Desorbo 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Rubie Graffagnino 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Contessa Neiling 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Elizabeth Belloma 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Evelyn Washnock 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Cleo Fedde 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Liz Kunimitsu 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Dahlia Freiling 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Emmaline Buchalter 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Roland Broadfoot 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Christal Wiesen 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Jesse Saccardi 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Matilde Kirchgessner 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Erasmo Childres 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Clare Szymanowski 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Katrina Broeker 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Kurtis Prisock 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Myong Catherson 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Sixta Swartzendrube 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Albert Bubash 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Chantell Hormell 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Mabelle Poissant 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Irwin Arrocho 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Julietta Harbough 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Yon Knoflicek 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Lashunda Gaydosh 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Markus Zorzi 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Natasha Pergerson 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Bok Dossous 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Barbie Sickler 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Cyrus Abney 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Jeffrey Kuty 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Santana Revelle 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Coretta Domek 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Han Koskie 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Jamey Fune 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Lucio Erpenbach 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Theressa Hade 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Lonny Aills 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Kip Kahahane 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Delpha Oconner 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Josie Kernagis 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Hue Hasselvander 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Rheba Schindel 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Wm Cremona 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Yevette Thamann 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Bea Lachner 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Tessie Weiser 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Fred Barberi 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Anya Winners 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Jefferey Mcdermitt 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Emelia Balitas 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Geraldine Depass 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Matilda Skipworth 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Lavinia Palmisano 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Loriann Danzer 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Jocelyn Cowels 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Virgilio Dorpinghaus 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Julissa Fitzke 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Lezlie Wende 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Deangelo Marocco 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Tonisha Brose 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Dodie Burnam 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Modesto Lobley 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Catrina Bittner 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Clarence Nuessen 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Shellie Mapua 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Gretchen Hartshorn 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Ezekiel Cusenza 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Kamilah Welch 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Hilario Postal 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Kiyoko Kvoeschen 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Venice Natera 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Merideth Pruskowski 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Lorilee Wendorff 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Rona Gelino 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Curt Wildner 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Izetta Bruccoleri 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Eustolia Fagerlund 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Arcelia Pelaez 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Elwood Murello 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Milagro Betschman 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Jeneva Arentz 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Hilma Jauss 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Jesus Kittel 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Perry Caren 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Neda Bisges 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Henriette Aldrete 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Hulda Siniscalchi 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Arianne Levenson 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Annette Blackstone 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Lashawna Gibby 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Tanisha Montalban 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Denise Hanke 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Ngan Tomeldan 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Ollie Keyon 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Stacie Rooks 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Irina Stepanek 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Niki Vivas 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Louie Yoon 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Penelope Burkley 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Horace Cowper 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Hermelinda Bast 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Marvis Crum 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Lecia Grindle 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Carmelia Lancaster 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Marin Flintroy 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Tabitha Belshaw 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Kristel Warga 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Nan Arbizo 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Diedra Ridner 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Alda Him 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Asuncion Kilroy 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Victoria Blasingame 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Maya Safley 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Scottie Lohrey 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Landon Goldfine 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Jeniffer Schaich 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Isabelle Funck 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Nicki Essery 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Mee Trenholm 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Isa Verdone 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Freda Bellmay 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Leanne Radosevich 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Corey Hoemann 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Jamaal Rendell 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Mandie Deroko 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Katie Weenum 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Jill Kurihara 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Sherita Tennyson 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Glinda Jungck 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Hershel Saldibar 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Cordie Garvey 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Nena Suero 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Blythe Losado 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Abbey Converse 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Paulina Schwenneker 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Leo Corburn 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Oscar Garrahan 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Latoyia Pinkins 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Norman Daleske 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Farrah Servi 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Alia Denny 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Isiah Arvin 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Argentina Timchak 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Gerda Llanas 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Gena Munier 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Raymonde Coffland 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Jonas Walman 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Hollis Delashaw 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Brandon Gerken 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Evelin Yanagi 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Noemi Zylka 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Jeffrey Boulanger 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Jonie Check 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Mira Lucich 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Stephine Prospero 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Barbie Troung 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Joni Cathcart 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Armida Antonovich 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Yan Byford 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Melodi Arano 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Willene Woerner 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Aracelis Preister 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Elisha Jonte 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Jody Leko 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Elsa Urabe 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Stasia Baeringer 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Taren Tartsah 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Pilar Minasian 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Christin Siggins 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Sal Pagliaro 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Maren Fierman 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Willard Bullocks 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Laure Wanberg 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Cathy Fierge 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Jennine Kaib 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Nichole Horridge 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Maxwell Sideris 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Albert Hellen 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Conception Zenke 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Nicolasa Dupas 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Leonard Huenink 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Mathilda Manas 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Trula Edmonson 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Leonia Prauner 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Myriam Odgers 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Edith Bomaster 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Suzanne Zulfer 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Vesta Gaglione 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Kenna Lager 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Kathey Becklund 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Norene Bairo 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Devon Merhar 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Warner Clacher 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Ladonna Bohman 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Thaddeus Aipopo 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Crystal Fujikawa 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Hong Ben 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Janelle Whittman 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Rufus Steerman 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Josette Bonnenfant 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Johnny Gassel 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Desmond Medinger 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Arron Karg 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Shirlee Naftzinger 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Azzie Yurchak 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Eddie Trobaugh 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Armando Foppiano 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Alix Logero 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Gerardo Marske 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Chun Badruddin 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Lesley Sainz 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Wendy Sperger 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Agustina Lacson 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Cruz Jakubowski 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Mel Oilvares 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Eda Speith 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Mickey Unsicker 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Jami Boiani 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Keila Woline 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Georgeanna Mustard 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Kellee Ducas 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Felicitas Markwell 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Myriam Colclough 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Merlene Oram 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Sulema Gettys 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Slyvia Palomin 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Fatima Szafranski 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Blanca Baccam 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Tifany Toothaker 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Dian Dellapaolera 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Van Pinales 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Darcel Czerniak 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Adelina Spiewak 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Ramon Butkowski 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Rosanna Sipkema 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Ryann Valenzano 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Lurlene Hiser 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Hee Blute 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Synthia Bracht 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Talia Forsyth 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Zelda Budge 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Yuk Bernes 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Teresia Walkingstick 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Tamekia Gartz 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Hiedi Harben 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Gertie Vegar 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Delma Kurek 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Karoline Brunnett 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Aida Grassl 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Corrinne Ahrenstorff 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Marline Pulfer 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Glendora Castaldo 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Easter Carpinelli 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Bambi La 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Callie Mcgurr 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Gretta Davignon 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Aleisha Brelje 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Sindy Spanier 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression... Asked by Leigh Gamotan 1 year ago.

''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Sharleen Siner 1 year ago.

This is a very complex situation, but let me try to explain it this way. According to the monoamine hypothesis, there is too little of the monoamine (usually norepi and/or serotonin) in the synapse. This leads to supersensitive receptors. Typical andidepressants (tricyclics, SSRI, etc) raise the level of the monoamine in the synapse, which then reacts with the supersensitive receptor, and over time, returns the receptor to normal sensitivity. So, it would seem that ANY antidepressant would make the depression worse, to begin with, since the monoamine is now interacting with a supersensitive receptor. This, in fact, has been observed in many cases. This is also why it takes several weeks to see efficacy with most ADs. Reserpine depletes the vesicle store of norepi, mostly. After a while, this leads to supersensitive beta receptors (brain), and has been used as an animal model of depression. Not sure this helps explain your dilemma. But as stated, it is a lot more complicated than this. Other transmitters are now thought to be involved, and the monoamine hypothesis is quite outdated. There are several shortcomings to it that I haven't addressed here. Answered by Lyn Shullick 1 year ago.

RE-POSTING this crap will not magically alter reality. Answered by Mitsuko Wiget 1 year ago.


How can Reserpine be an antidepressant as Reserpine may cause depression itself ?
From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The... Asked by Juliet Kelder 1 year ago.

From Wikipedia: ''Reserpine mediated depletion of monoamine neurotransmitters in the synapses is often cited as evidence to the theory that depletion of the neurotransmitters causes subsequent depression in humans (c.f. monoamine hypothesis). However, this claim is not without controversy. The reserpine-induced depression is considered by some researchers to be a myth, while others claim that teas made out of the plant roots containing reserpine have a calming, sedative action that can actually be considered antidepressant. Notably, reserpine was the first compound shown to be an effective antidepressant in a randomized placebo-controlled trial.'' Teachers in my medical school too have said that Reserpine was the first drug to have been proved to be effective against depression, BUT they also said that one of the causes of depression is the use of some drugs such as Reserpine. Answered by Wendie Kast 1 year ago.

There are many situations where one must be careful with Wikipedia accounts, and this is one of them. A "calming, sedative action" is quite different from an antidepressant action. I have tried to follow up a reference in the Wikipedia article and found it to be incorrect, which casts doubts on the quality of the rest of the article. For practical purposes reserpine is an obsolete antihypertensive which can cause depression as a side-effect. Answered by Noe Kotz 1 year ago.

BLOOD CHEMISTRY & MENTAL STABILITY CDC & FDA AMA CAN GIVE U A MULTITUDE OF INFO BASICALLY IF p>Q FOR EVERY ACTION > RESULTING ACTION Answered by Prudence Falzarano 1 year ago.


The medical plants that contain these alkaloids (Nicotine,Atropine,morphine, reserpine) and their uses.?
Asked by Rutha Beberwyk 1 year ago.

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), deadly nightshade (Atropia Belladonna), opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), Indian snakeroot (Rauvolfia serpentina), in that order. Nicotine is used to treat smoking withdrawal. Atropine is used notably for the treatment of bradycardias and organophosphate poisoning. Morphine is a powerful narcotic analgesic. Reserpine is an anti-psychotic and anti hypertensive drug. Answered by Claudia Rubyor 1 year ago.


Is Reserpine's inhibitory effect on Dopamine release permanent?
I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this... Asked by Odilia Kever 1 year ago.

I read somewhere that Reserpine depletes serotonin, dopamine & norepinephrine by inhibiting VMAT, thus stopping the neurotransmitters from reaching the synapse, which is why Depression is likely to occur as a side effect. If I was to, say, take 0.5mg daily for 4 weeks and then ceased taking it, would this side-effect be reversible, or would it remain permanently? Answered by Mari Darty 1 year ago.

This is a fast acting drug with rapidly diminishing effect - symptoms return when one stops taking it, and should be taken daily. Taking a small dose for such a short period of time would most likely leave one with no permanent side effects; however small amounts can remain in your system for months. A common side effect that can become permanent after taking anti-psychotic medications is tartive dyskinesia (an impairment of voluntary movement in which it becomes involuntary). The question I have for you is why would you be considering taking such a class of drug for only 4 weeks? These medications can interact rather negatively with common consumables. Please discuss this medication thoroughly with your medical professionals. Research then ask questions until your satisfied with the need for, proper use of, and possible vs probable side effects. Hope this helps... Answered by Daniell Rosentrance 1 year ago.

The first answer is a very good answer. The effects of the drug will cease when you begin to stop taking the drug. Reserpine affects the adrenergic nerves and will decrease the release of catecholamines....thats what causes the depression as a side effect. Another interesting side effect of reserpine is causing the person to have dreams/nightmares about snakes. Reserpine's botanical name is rauwolfia serpentina coincidentally. Answered by Katy Reagen 1 year ago.


Ether functional groups found in reserpine?
Asked by Micaela Pettis 1 year ago.

There are one alkylmethyl and four arylmethyl ether groups. Your question is? Answered by Toney Deon 1 year ago.


What do these words mean "related to plants".............(resirpine & digitoxin)?
Asked by Bradford Kubaska 1 year ago.

Reserpine is a drug obtained from the plant Rauwolfin to control high blood pressure and digitoxin is a drug obtained from the plant digitalis for cardiac conditions. Answered by Estrella Fedorka 1 year ago.


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