Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020414/001.

Names and composition

"PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020414/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
040457/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
040502/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
040512/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
040512/002 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
089572/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
203184/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
204737/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
205650/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009829/002 MESTINON PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
009830/001 MESTINON PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
011665/001 MESTINON PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
015193/001 MESTINON PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE SYRUP/ORAL 60MG per 5ML
017398/001 REGONOL PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
020414/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
040457/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
040502/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
040512/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG
040512/002 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
089572/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
203184/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
204737/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 180MG
205650/001 PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE PYRIDOSTIGMINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 60MG

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Answered questions

Medical marijuana? My daughter has myasthenia gravis, could this thelp??
come on people, more responses plz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Raymond Tashiro 1 year ago.

She is taking Pyridostigmine bromide aka Mestinon. She just started taking it a few days ago and what it does is it allows "A-seat-a-co-leen" to be produced. It takes time to work, this I know. But I want faster results. Is it safe to give her Marijuana? Will it help her? I am no doctor, but I know she needs that "a-seat-a-c-leen" stuff in her. What will boost her levels? Can i start an IV and give her my blood? I NEEDS HELPS!!! Answered by Rima Amodt 1 year ago.

lol rmerch just chill...... ;-) Answered by Sumiko Schuffert 1 year ago.

Look..you do not need to do anything. I've had myasthenia gravis for a year and a half...I'm taking mestinon as well. A few days is not going to show a change. It takes time like any other medicine. You certainly do not need to give her marijuana. You do not need to start an IV either. That's not a bright idea. I'm sorry, but you're going to have to wait for results. If you don't like it talk to your doctor. The last thing you want your child on is steroids.(Prednisone) Trust me, they suck. Answered by Thora Placencia 1 year ago.


The Gulf War and the PB Pills?
Hey people! Just wanting to know about the effects some veterans suffered after taking PB pills (Pyridostigmine Bromide) during the Gulf War. If there were any effects like heart attacks? Or any other internal or psychological problems. Or anything else during the war that may have any long term effect on them?... Asked by Rickie Tidwell 1 year ago.

Hey people! Just wanting to know about the effects some veterans suffered after taking PB pills (Pyridostigmine Bromide) during the Gulf War. If there were any effects like heart attacks? Or any other internal or psychological problems. Or anything else during the war that may have any long term effect on them? Anything they might have been exposed too. Anything that would cause collapsing and dying........unexplainibly. I know it sounds weird but just trying to find some info on somethings. Thank you. Answered by Junko Shade 1 year ago.

I have had no problems, thank God. Good luck. Answered by Brigid Janszen 1 year ago.


Foods for decreasing sexual desire(men)?
Asked by Kevin Washor 1 year ago.

it's not healthy to decrease sex drive for a male by putting something in your body to do so, exercise can help and is much healthier but nothing is wrong with a strong sexx drive, quite the opposite really your body is work great if you have a large sex drive..... get over it masterbating is perfectly healthy,much healthier than not masterbating at all Answered by Hye Mcmurphy 1 year ago.

I don't think such foods exist. Nor do foods that increase desire. It's a psychosomatic thing. The only way food will decrease desire is if it makes you sick, and you don't want that. If you think your libido is abormally high or it's severely interfering with your life, seek help, otherwise, don't worry about it... Answered by Nicolasa Haslett 1 year ago.

Sorry for being here... hihi. Whatever but don´t you dare to eat bananas... just in case. Answered by Korey Emanuelson 1 year ago.

rocky mountain oysters you probably wont want to have sex after you eat them, and your loved one wont either Answered by Retta Cosentino 1 year ago.


WHY DOES THiS HAPPEN?
whenever i sit down for a good amount of time and stand back up everything goes black for a few seconds Asked by Erlene Christenson 1 year ago.

BEST BUDS, HERE IS SOME INFO: Orthostatic hypotension (also known as postural hypotension and, colloquially, as head rush) is a sudden fall in blood pressure, typically greater than 20/10 mm Hg, that occurs when a person assumes a standing position. Contents [hide] 1 Symptoms 2 Causes 3 Treatment and management 3.1 Medical management 3.2 Lifestyle advice 4 References 5 External links [edit] Symptoms Symptoms, which generally occur after sudden standing, include dizziness, lightheadedness, headache, blurred or dimmed vision (possibly to the point of momentary blindness), and fainting. [edit] Causes Orthostatic hypotension is significantly more common in tall patients.[citation needed] It may be caused by hypovolemia (a decreased amount of blood in the body), resulting from bleeding, the excessive use of diuretics, vasodilators, or other types of drugs, dehydration, or prolonged bed rest. It also occurs in people with anemia. Short lived episodes of orthostatic hypotension are common in children. It can be a side effect of certain anti-depressants, such as tricyclics or SSRIs.[1] The disorder may be associated with Addison's disease, atherosclerosis (build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries), diabetes, and certain neurological disorders including Shy-Drager syndrome and other forms of dysautonomia. [edit] Treatment and management When orthostatic hypotension is caused by hypovolemia due to medications, the disorder may be reversed by adjusting the dosage or by discontinuing the medication. When the condition is caused by prolonged bed rest, improvement may occur by sitting up with increasing frequency each day. In some cases, physical counterpressure such as elastic hose or whole-body inflatable suits may be required. Dehydration is treated with salt and fluids. The prognosis for individuals with orthostatic hypotension depends on the underlying cause of the condition. [edit] Medical management Some drugs that are used in the treatment of orthostatic hypotension include fludrocortisone (Florinef), erythropoietin and midodrine. Pyridostigmine bromide (Mestinon) is now also used to treat orthostatic hypotension[2] [edit] Lifestyle advice Some suggestions for minimizing the effects include: Checking blood pressure regularly with a home monitoring kit. Check when lying flat and when standing as well as when symptoms occur. Standing slowly rather than quickly, as the delay can give the blood vessels more time to constrict properly. This can help avoid incidents of syncope. Take a deep breath and flex your abdominal muscles while rising to maintain blood and oxygen in the brain. Maintaining an elevated salt intake, through sodium supplements or electrolyte-enriched drinks. A suggested value is 10 g per day; overuse can lead to hypertension and should be avoided. Maintaining a proper fluid intake to prevent the effects of dehydration. As eating lowers blood pressure, eat multiple smaller meals rather than fewer larger meals. Take extra care when standing after eating. Answered by Kiana Boczar 1 year ago.

Sounds like high blood pressure or low blood count (anemia). Have a check up soon and discuss your problems with your DR. Good luck and wellness to you! Answered by Mittie Hawking 1 year ago.

Your body is reacting to a change in blood pressure. You may want to get your BP checked to see if it is a little low and discuss this symptom with your doctor. It's usually nothing serious and is fairly common. It happens to me sometimes, too. Answered by Junior Steeby 1 year ago.

This could be a sign of a serious problem, you should get to the doctor as soon as you can about that, it isn't normal. It could be a blood disorder such as anemia, or even a heart condition. Answered by Albertine Weyandt 1 year ago.

If you stand up too quickly it can cause a rapid loss in blood pressure. This happens to me sometimes too. Answered by Isadora Rizo 1 year ago.

Blood pressure is low Answered by Ai Carmel 1 year ago.

maybe low blood pressure or low blood sugar, at least I know thats how it is when you stand up quickly and feel a rush of dizziness and "floaters" Answered by Sarita Stillwagon 1 year ago.

low blood pressure Answered by Mechelle Hatzenbihler 1 year ago.


What causes POTS Disease (Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome)?
My daughter was diagnosed with this. She is only 11. What are signs and symptons and what causes it. Asked by Lilla Hade 1 year ago.

I have this and it's definitely not fun and I'm an adult. After battling dizzy spells for three years now, it hasn't gotten any better. I'm guessing it's not hereditary because I never had it up until a whiplash injury I sustained in 2004. I believe the main symptoms of this is severe dizzy spells which syncope episodes will follow. My POTS gets aggrivated by constant movement, standing up too fast, loud unexpected noises, elevators, and escalators. All of these will result in dizzy spells which when it gets intense it causes me to pass out for a few minutes(syncope episodes). The reason for the dizzy spells is because of the quick increase or decrease in the heart rate. At one point my heart rate was 80/60 or 60/80...I can never get that right. If I'm able to sit still or lay down, it will get my heart rate back to normal within 30 minutes to a hour or more. The reason loud noise triggers my POTS is because of the way the heart responds to unexpected things. Walking normally also triggers my dizzy spells so this is why I have to sit as much as possible. You may not want to do this with your daughter because her muscles can become weak very quick like mine did back in 2005. The constant dizzy spells makes me very sleepy which might make your daughter. It all has to do with the way the heart works during any kind of activity. They say medications won't cure POTS but it will help to keep it from occuring too much. Unfortunately for me, I'm on Effexor. Stay away from Effexor, Topamax, or other anti depressant medications. These will make the symptoms worse. Topamax made me even dizzier. I was dizzy all day each time I took it. Effexor greatly increased my heart rate. It caused me to be severly sleepy and it just made me lethargic. I can't get a doctor to prescribe me the meds that's actually for what I have. If your daughter's not taking any meds yet, ask your doctor about several meds. Flourinef helps but it takes away the potassium. Take suppliments to keep from losing potassium. Proamitine(Midrodrine) is another along with Celexa and Pyridostigmine Bromide. Celexa should start off at .5 mg. The Celexa and Pyridostigmine Bromide doesn't have those huge side effects and it's made to aid people who have a low tolerance for meds like me. Also see the sources below to read more about POTS. Answered by Pauline Surrency 1 year ago.

Pott Syndrome Answered by Phung Greenley 1 year ago.


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