Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019260/001.

Names and composition

"PSORCON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DIFLORASONE DIACETATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019260/001 PSORCON DIFLORASONE DIACETATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.05%
020205/001 PSORCON DIFLORASONE DIACETATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017741/001 FLORONE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05% **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017994/001 PSORCON E DIFLORASONE DIACETATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.05%
019259/001 FLORONE E DIFLORASONE DIACETATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
019260/001 PSORCON DIFLORASONE DIACETATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.05%
020205/001 PSORCON DIFLORASONE DIACETATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
075187/001 DIFLORASONE DIACETATE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
075331/001 DIFLORASONE DIACETATE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.05%
075374/001 DIFLORASONE DIACETATE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.05%
075508/001 DIFLORASONE DIACETATE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
076263/001 DIFLORASONE DIACETATE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE CREAM/TOPICAL 0.05%
206572/001 DIFLORASONE DIACETATE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.05%
207440/001 DIFLORASONE DIACETATE DIFLORASONE DIACETATE OINTMENT/TOPICAL 0.05%

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Answered questions

My 2 y/o may have eczema?
he has rough, red, dry patches on his neck and behind one ear. he has a drs appt on friday, but the doc already has said she thinks it may be eczema. what do drs normally prescribe for that and generally how much does the prescription tend to cost? Asked by Philomena Pezzetti 1 year ago.

Elidel, Psorcon, Olux are the new medications given for eczema and they could be very expensive ($100 plus) and different people have different reactions. I have had eczema all my life so I know what your son is going through. Before you go to your doctor, write down all the things that you used on your son or things he may have come into contact before the breakout occured. The doctor will ask you for this information. It could simply be an allergic reaction to his shampoo, soap, laundry detergent, new formula, a pet, a favorite stuffed animal, an insect bite, and the like. Once you remove the allergen, he should be fine. If (and that's a big if) he does have eczema, at some point you may want to take him to an allergist to find out what his triggers may be. Some eczema sufferers are also prone to asthma. Eczema is a chronic disease that has to been managed by behavior. Stress can lead to breakouts. Allergens can lead to breakouts. You have to become aware as to what events happen before a breakout takes place. To mitigate the impact, make sure he drinks plenty of water and stays hydrated --especially in the winter. Water will help with the dryness and will continually flush his system. Do not use harsh soaps or a lot of lather when you wash him. Non-soap products like Eucerine, Dove, Basis, Oil of Olay are best for sensitive, eczema prone skin. To clear up scars, nothing is better than cocoa butter and/or aloe. Tepid (lukewarm) water is best for his bath. If he is in the middle of an outbreak, clip his nails and soak him in a bath with oatmeal (put 3 tablespoons in a clean old sock and toss in the bathtub), baking soda and/or corn starch. Put lotion or oil on partially wet skin to keep him moisturized. Invest in a cool air humidifier (you can get one for $15-$20 at K-Mart) for his bedroom during the dry winter months. You'll be very surprised by how well his skin will do! I hope this helps! Best of Luck! Answered by Geraldo Braker 1 year ago.

I have had eczema my whole life. Creams and oitments depends on if you have insurance. I paid 75.00 for the most expensive kind but most of the time it was like 10.00 to 15.00. You could use oatmeal and make a paste that helps. Or Emu oil if you can find it. Sandlewood oil is the best but very expensive. Make sure you bath him in non-irritating soap like Cephil gentle cleanser. and do not use perfumed lotion. Hydrocortison you can get over the counter and try and see if it helps. Answered by Kelley Bakaler 1 year ago.

solid Morning anybody! Have a astounding day! For WBEE ninety two.5 Rochester huge apple Bethea Astrology - Mercedes ok Champions - B u . s . a . music - A Employment minutiae - Nurse Fushion money - supplies bypass OR video games N playing cards - 2 hundred hi Mr President - C Video Of The Day - 26 at present In background - B the place interior the international - A Answered by Desire Rudloff 1 year ago.

They normally prescribe a hydrocortozone cream. Weak dilutions of this cream are available over the counter. You will need to use it sparingly, and only as your doctor or pharmacist recommends. Incidentally, I have gotten rid of eczema naturally in my family by increasing the amount of zinc in our supplements. Rhino Zinc is a delicious chewable orange flavored vitamin that you can crush for your 2 year old to get it in his diet. My little ones love the taste of it. Answered by Delilah Angello 1 year ago.

Use Neem Oil on it. It is natural, like olive oil and comes from India. Smells a bit like burnt garlic, but works fantastic. It is a lot cheaper to order over the internet unless you live in Minneapolis. For some reason, you can buy it a lot cheaper there. In India it is practically free. Answered by Dione Cloud 1 year ago.

Get a jar of Eucerin lotion. It works on my daughter. She helps put it on. I don't think there's any prescription for eczema. Answered by Lilliam Reichmann 1 year ago.


Skin problem pleas help?
my 16 year old son has been suffering the past year with a skin problem , It is the same as my husband their hands crack and itch and get oozzing and sore. the perscription they are useing is called Diflorasone diacetate it is a cream and I dont see any results any help Asked by Portia Phipps 1 year ago.

That is the generic for psorcon or psorcon E...sounds like they both have a severe hand dermatitis (eczema) they should be using this only when they are flared up they should also be using moisturizing CREAMS (not lotion)(Brands we use are Cerave**Cetaphil**DML**really ANY brand as long as it is a CREAM! several times a day and may consider adding "theraseal" several times a day also(can get at target). They should avoid contact of their hands with things that are acidic (tomatoes citrus fruit etc) chemicals (gardening/dishes/laundry soaps etc) avoid antibacterial soaps as all are drying no mater what the label says! Switch to something like "Cerave" soap free cleanser eczema is hard to treat but when it does get under control they will be VERY happy!! ps dont use the psorcon (which is a steroid cream) anywhere but the hands...does he see a dermatologist for this?? just asking because this sounds like a primary care Doctor that RX'd this as a good derm would not start with this drug and would have given you all these extra details for what do to and what not to do! Good luck Answered by Tameka Glandon 1 year ago.

it would desire to be an hypersensitivity. i think of you ought to hunt for suggestion from greater beneficial than one physician if in any respect attainable. Dermatologist and an allergist look the suited. it may be so great in case you would be able to desire to locate a scientific look after the two considered one of them. it would desire to be a cleansing soap you utilize on you laundry or face/hand soaps. it would desire to be an animal he touched or a nutrition touched or eaten. specific fabric or what the dry purifier makes use of. consistent with danger chlorine in a pool ? attempt sparkling aloe from a stay plant. (plenty greater efficient than the bottled form.) stable success. It sounds horribly complicated. playstation . it may additionally be effected by stress/stress or hormones ordinarily. Answered by Tenesha Bajdas 1 year ago.


What is the best medicine for atopic eczema?
red swollen rashes, itchy, dry with fuss Asked by Antonio Duggar 1 year ago.

The best thing you could do is see a dermatologist. I have had eczema all my life and I know what I'm talking about. Elidel, Psorcon, Olux are the new medications given for eczema but different people have different reactions. As a matter of fact, a medication could work very well in one instance and stop working because your body has developed a tolerance to the medication. Eczema is a chronic disease that has to been managed by behavior. Stress can lead to breakouts. Allergens can lead to breakouts. You have to become aware as to what events happen before a breakout takes place. To mitigate the impact, exercise is very important. Asides helping you reduce stress and nervous itching, exercise will put your excretion system into overdrive so an allergen that's in your system can/will be excreted through your sweat. Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated --especially in the winter. Water will help with the dryness and will continually flush your system. Do not use harsh soaps or a lot of lather when you wash. Non-soap products like Eucerine, Dove, Basis, Oil of Olay are best for sensitive, eczema prone skin. To clear up scars, nothing is better than cocoa butter, aloe or Lustra (prescription medication). Stay away from hot showers -- feels great but too drying. If you are in the middle of an outbreak, soak in oatmeal (put 3 tablespoons in a clean old sock and toss in the bathtub), baking soda and/or corn starch. Put lotion or oil on partially wet skin to keep your self moisturized. Invest in a cool air humidifier (you can get one for $15-$20 at K-Mart) for your bedroom during the dry winter months. You'll be very surprised by how well your skin will do! I hope this helps! Best of Luck! Answered by In Bakerville 1 year ago.

Cortaid( over the counter steroid) and Euceren cream. Answered by Ema Lungstrom 1 year ago.

Hydrocordizone cream or Eucerin cream Answered by Johnson Sander 1 year ago.

Betnovate A....it is a corticosteroid....see your doctor/pharmacist Answered by Dorinda Ada 1 year ago.


I have eczema and just bad skin, if i drink nothing but water will that help me clear my skin?
Asked by Mandi Mcnealey 1 year ago.

The best thing you could do is see a dermatologist. I have had eczema all my life and I know what I'm talking about. Elidel, Psorcon, Olux are the new medications given for eczema but different people have different reactions. As a matter of fact, a medication could work very well in one instance and stop working because your body has developed a tolerance to the medication. Eczema is a chronic disease that has to been managed by behavior. Stress can lead to breakouts. Allergens can lead to breakouts. You have to become aware as to what events happen before a breakout takes place. To mitigate the impact, exercise is very important. Asides helping you reduce stress and nervous itching, exercise will put your excretion system into overdrive so an allergen that's in your system can/will be excreted through your sweat. Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated --especially in the winter. Water will help with the dryness and will continually flush your system. Do not use harsh soaps or a lot of lather when you wash. Non-soap products like Eucerine, Dove, Basis, Oil of Olay are best for sensitive, eczema prone skin. To clear up scars, nothing is better than cocoa butter, aloe or Lustra (prescription medication). Stay away from hot showers -- feels great but too drying. If you are in the middle of an outbreak, soak in oatmeal (put 3 tablespoons in a clean old sock and toss in the bathtub), baking soda and/or corn starch. Put lotion or oil on partially wet skin to keep your self moisturized. Invest in a cool air humidifier (you can get one for $15-$20 at K-Mart) for your bedroom during the dry winter months. You'll be very surprised by how well your skin will do! I hope this helps! Best of Luck! Answered by Kandi Shuker 1 year ago.

It will help, but it wont clear your skin completely. I have eczema as well and I use an over the counter medicine for psoriasis, after a few days of use it will clear up your eczema. Find something with "Coal Tar" in it, it stinks but works wonders. Where you live, what you eat, your stress level ALL effect your skin, changing just one piece of your daily lifestyle will not fix everything. I hope things look up for you and your skin. Answered by Alia Mccartney 1 year ago.

I have eczema too... I drink a TON of water and it hasn't helped a bit. My two cents: see a dermatologist. Use baby oil as soon as you get out of the shower. Use lots of lotions. These things may not cure your eczema and "bad skin," but they could help. Answered by Antoine Kohnz 1 year ago.

use an exfoliating but moisturizing body wash...like St Ives exfoliating scrub...or even apricot scrub...- this will remove the dead skin of the eczema .. when u are finished showering and your skin is still wet, apply baby oil or cocoa butter shower oil..'the body shop' has good oils too (and im not talking about lotion- oil for the body that looks like cooking oil)....that will moisturize your skin very well- oh ya and only pat dry with your towel..don't rub.. for lotion u should apply cocoa butter body lotion.. use ' Palmer's Cocoa butter'..i use it and its great......another good product is 'Eucerine' but that doesn't work great for me- not that it won't for you though..- you can get both of these at any drugstore (CVS, Walgreens, Wal-mart, Rite Aid..etc...) avoid: over-exfoliating, dehydration, strong wind on your skin, sun burn, a lot of swimming water alone, doesn't get rid of eczema,..try taking a lot of foods containing Vitamin D & E eczema is not contagious but possibly genetic - if none of this helps, then go see a dermatologist for special creams Answered by Cari Headen 1 year ago.

Essential Fatty Acids help eczema heal. Answered by Lewis Carlstrom 1 year ago.

I am so sorry but this is a skin condition that has nothing to do with what you drink. Drinking water will clear up pimples though and is great for your body. So keep it up. Answered by Gudrun Lorson 1 year ago.

This is just the toxins in your skin getting out, you should exercise to this will help a lot try adding to your foods fruits and veg these will help the body to restore what has lost Congratulation on stopping I wish u all the best Answered by Dwana Sietz 1 year ago.

It might help to drink lots of water (not "nothing but water" though!). However you need medical treatment if your skin is that bad. Answered by Cyndy Feistner 1 year ago.

a little not much though. i have very bad skin and it honestly doesn't help much. i take prescription skin cream to keep my skin normal. honestly i hate it. Answered by Tanesha Loras 1 year ago.


Psoriasis Treatment in France?
I will be in Paris in two weeks and I have Psoriasis - I was wondering what prescription creams are used to treat psoriasis and can I purchase some in the pharmacy w/out a prescription? I live in U.S. & I have used Dovonex, Salicylic Acid, Cormax, Psorcon, Ultravate and none of these have worked for me - was... Asked by Jolie Carrion 1 year ago.

I will be in Paris in two weeks and I have Psoriasis - I was wondering what prescription creams are used to treat psoriasis and can I purchase some in the pharmacy w/out a prescription? I live in U.S. & I have used Dovonex, Salicylic Acid, Cormax, Psorcon, Ultravate and none of these have worked for me - was wondering what is used in France - Thank you (you can write to me in french too) Answered by Kimberlee Bernacki 1 year ago.

Département de Biostatistique et Information Médicale, Paris, FRANCE if you visit there, they'll tell you all about it and they will provide you with the treatments. Answered by Catherina Bolten 1 year ago.


What are some good natural ways that clears up Psoriasis in the scalp?
Thank you all so much! Asked by Bettyann Cornell 1 year ago.

Well...first of all...there is NO cure for Psoriasis. You can use medication or "naturopathic remedies" for the rest of your life, and still have flair-ups from time-to-time. Psoriasis is an auto-immune dermatological disorder that affects MANY people. Some people have an almost continuous chronic flair up -- lesions are often diffuse to entire body, or they can have intermittent flair ups where the lesions will appear, get bad, then start to go down. There have been some research that suggests it is often tied to one's stress/anxiety level as to how bad they may break out. There are also people who are lucky enough to have it in only one (or two) locations on their bodies, making it much easier to manage. I typically prescribe a variety of medications to use on various areas for a month at a time -- giving it time to see if it responds well. If poor response, then I switch to another agent. I've found the most reliable to be: Dovonex (for the scalp), and Psorcon (for the skin). On occasion, I've had to use a couple weeks of steroid (Prednisone) for more severe flairs. I've had patients who have tried both the diet and naturopathic remedies at the shops to help, but with rather poor to nill results. They simply don't have the research based evidence to prove they are potent or effective, but are ALWAYS suggested by the person trying to sell something. I'd say, 100% of my patients eventually come back to the pharmaceuticals because nothing else worked. Sure...I truly WISH there was a good and researched based natural remedy, but I (or my patients), have yet to find it. Remember...this is NOT going to go away. You're NOT going to be rid of it, and management is the ONLY WAY to deal with it....at least for now. Answered by Brittny Eppler 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are some good natural ways that clears up Psoriasis in the scalp? I have had Prosiasis for over 4 years and it hasn't cleared up yet. 1.What causes it? 2. Is there a special diet that can clear it up? 3. How long have you had it? 4. How can I get it out and off of my scalp/hair? Thank you! Answered by Roseanna Snaders 1 year ago.

I had a 13 year history of psoriasis, though I was in good health otherwise. But these severe large, thick and scaly excoriated plaques on my neck, ears, trunk and limbs ruined the way I was leading my life. I would be with red, inflamed itchy skin for most part of the year and these silvery scales would seem to be erupting without any reason. To make matters worse, blisters would appear over already red and itching skin. It was living hell. I was treated with various options but nothing seemed to be working. Some of the treatments that I underwent in this depressing period of 13 years included tar preparation, tropical steroids and anthralin. I was also given light therapy many times but everything I tried would give me temporary relief. And soon, after a few days I would be plagued with the situation again. In one of those moments when I was completely lost I stumbled upon this website just by chance. I read it and felt that as if someone had put the story my life on this web page. I was thoroughly convinced that if ANYONE can cure me of condition, it would be you. And was I right, or what. I started recovering within 3 days of starting this treatment. Something that had become a painful part of me for 13 years was actually getting healed! My ears are healed and my neck is smooth again!. I am a month into the treatment and I have never felt better in my life! Psoriasis Revolution? Answered by Courtney Dammrich 1 year ago.

I've had psoriasis for 10 years, tried many prescription drugs including steroids. Finally I've found natural remedies at serenaskin.com. I was using ointment and spray for my scalp and extract internally. It controls my psoriasis greatly. I have not had flare-ups for more than a year now, just continue to take anti-psoriasis extract 4 times a year as advised. I would definitely recommend it. It's all natural herbal stuff. Answered by Mallie Kilmer 1 year ago.

apple cider vinegar or coconut oil i use for acne this site is awesome - www.earthclinic.com people used it and they share how well it works... Psoriasis Remedies Updated: 10/21/2008 "Psoriasis... is a disease which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. Psoriasis is hypothesized to be immune-mediated and is not contagious. The disorder is a chronic recurring condition which varies in severity from minor localised patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) - and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. The cause of psoriasis is not known, but it is believed to have a genetic component. Several factors are thought to aggravate psoriasis. These include stress, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking. Individuals with psoriasis may suffer from depression and loss of self-esteem. As such, quality of life is an important factor in evaluating the severity of the disease. There are many treatments available but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat." (Wikipedia) Answered by Lorraine Oldershaw 1 year ago.

Have you tried giving your scalp an oil treatment?, and leave it in for two days. One of my friends uses nutrametics apricot oil and puts it through her scalp freely by parting the hair where its bad and leaving it there for a couple of days and it helps get rid of the problem. Just put a towel on your pillow at night. Answered by Gaynell Mandonado 1 year ago.


My 2 y/o may have eczema?
he has rough, red, dry patches on his neck and behind one ear. he has a drs appt on friday, but the doc already has said she thinks it may be eczema. what do drs normally prescribe for that and generally how much does the prescription tend to cost? Asked by Mai Schuchard 1 year ago.

Elidel, Psorcon, Olux are the new medications given for eczema and they could be very expensive ($100 plus) and different people have different reactions. I have had eczema all my life so I know what your son is going through. Before you go to your doctor, write down all the things that you used on your son or things he may have come into contact before the breakout occured. The doctor will ask you for this information. It could simply be an allergic reaction to his shampoo, soap, laundry detergent, new formula, a pet, a favorite stuffed animal, an insect bite, and the like. Once you remove the allergen, he should be fine. If (and that's a big if) he does have eczema, at some point you may want to take him to an allergist to find out what his triggers may be. Some eczema sufferers are also prone to asthma. Eczema is a chronic disease that has to been managed by behavior. Stress can lead to breakouts. Allergens can lead to breakouts. You have to become aware as to what events happen before a breakout takes place. To mitigate the impact, make sure he drinks plenty of water and stays hydrated --especially in the winter. Water will help with the dryness and will continually flush his system. Do not use harsh soaps or a lot of lather when you wash him. Non-soap products like Eucerine, Dove, Basis, Oil of Olay are best for sensitive, eczema prone skin. To clear up scars, nothing is better than cocoa butter and/or aloe. Tepid (lukewarm) water is best for his bath. If he is in the middle of an outbreak, clip his nails and soak him in a bath with oatmeal (put 3 tablespoons in a clean old sock and toss in the bathtub), baking soda and/or corn starch. Put lotion or oil on partially wet skin to keep him moisturized. Invest in a cool air humidifier (you can get one for $15-$20 at K-Mart) for his bedroom during the dry winter months. You'll be very surprised by how well his skin will do! I hope this helps! Best of Luck! Answered by Rosie Zempel 1 year ago.

I have had eczema my whole life. Creams and oitments depends on if you have insurance. I paid 75.00 for the most expensive kind but most of the time it was like 10.00 to 15.00. You could use oatmeal and make a paste that helps. Or Emu oil if you can find it. Sandlewood oil is the best but very expensive. Make sure you bath him in non-irritating soap like Cephil gentle cleanser. and do not use perfumed lotion. Hydrocortison you can get over the counter and try and see if it helps. Answered by Zita Swartzel 1 year ago.

solid Morning anybody! Have a astounding day! For WBEE ninety two.5 Rochester huge apple Bethea Astrology - Mercedes ok Champions - B u . s . a . music - A Employment minutiae - Nurse Fushion money - supplies bypass OR video games N playing cards - 2 hundred hi Mr President - C Video Of The Day - 26 at present In background - B the place interior the international - A Answered by Nakia Farwell 1 year ago.

They normally prescribe a hydrocortozone cream. Weak dilutions of this cream are available over the counter. You will need to use it sparingly, and only as your doctor or pharmacist recommends. Incidentally, I have gotten rid of eczema naturally in my family by increasing the amount of zinc in our supplements. Rhino Zinc is a delicious chewable orange flavored vitamin that you can crush for your 2 year old to get it in his diet. My little ones love the taste of it. Answered by Danette Baile 1 year ago.

Use Neem Oil on it. It is natural, like olive oil and comes from India. Smells a bit like burnt garlic, but works fantastic. It is a lot cheaper to order over the internet unless you live in Minneapolis. For some reason, you can buy it a lot cheaper there. In India it is practically free. Answered by Robert Sedenko 1 year ago.

Get a jar of Eucerin lotion. It works on my daughter. She helps put it on. I don't think there's any prescription for eczema. Answered by Thao Bowlds 1 year ago.


Skin problem pleas help?
my 16 year old son has been suffering the past year with a skin problem , It is the same as my husband their hands crack and itch and get oozzing and sore. the perscription they are useing is called Diflorasone diacetate it is a cream and I dont see any results any help Asked by Ferdinand Linnert 1 year ago.

That is the generic for psorcon or psorcon E...sounds like they both have a severe hand dermatitis (eczema) they should be using this only when they are flared up they should also be using moisturizing CREAMS (not lotion)(Brands we use are Cerave**Cetaphil**DML**really ANY brand as long as it is a CREAM! several times a day and may consider adding "theraseal" several times a day also(can get at target). They should avoid contact of their hands with things that are acidic (tomatoes citrus fruit etc) chemicals (gardening/dishes/laundry soaps etc) avoid antibacterial soaps as all are drying no mater what the label says! Switch to something like "Cerave" soap free cleanser eczema is hard to treat but when it does get under control they will be VERY happy!! ps dont use the psorcon (which is a steroid cream) anywhere but the hands...does he see a dermatologist for this?? just asking because this sounds like a primary care Doctor that RX'd this as a good derm would not start with this drug and would have given you all these extra details for what do to and what not to do! Good luck Answered by Hosea Lorenzetti 1 year ago.

it would desire to be an hypersensitivity. i think of you ought to hunt for suggestion from greater beneficial than one physician if in any respect attainable. Dermatologist and an allergist look the suited. it may be so great in case you would be able to desire to locate a scientific look after the two considered one of them. it would desire to be a cleansing soap you utilize on you laundry or face/hand soaps. it would desire to be an animal he touched or a nutrition touched or eaten. specific fabric or what the dry purifier makes use of. consistent with danger chlorine in a pool ? attempt sparkling aloe from a stay plant. (plenty greater efficient than the bottled form.) stable success. It sounds horribly complicated. playstation . it may additionally be effected by stress/stress or hormones ordinarily. Answered by Mellie Ayuso 1 year ago.


I have eczema and just bad skin, if i drink nothing but water will that help me clear my skin?
Asked by Oscar Verucchi 1 year ago.

The best thing you could do is see a dermatologist. I have had eczema all my life and I know what I'm talking about. Elidel, Psorcon, Olux are the new medications given for eczema but different people have different reactions. As a matter of fact, a medication could work very well in one instance and stop working because your body has developed a tolerance to the medication. Eczema is a chronic disease that has to been managed by behavior. Stress can lead to breakouts. Allergens can lead to breakouts. You have to become aware as to what events happen before a breakout takes place. To mitigate the impact, exercise is very important. Asides helping you reduce stress and nervous itching, exercise will put your excretion system into overdrive so an allergen that's in your system can/will be excreted through your sweat. Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated --especially in the winter. Water will help with the dryness and will continually flush your system. Do not use harsh soaps or a lot of lather when you wash. Non-soap products like Eucerine, Dove, Basis, Oil of Olay are best for sensitive, eczema prone skin. To clear up scars, nothing is better than cocoa butter, aloe or Lustra (prescription medication). Stay away from hot showers -- feels great but too drying. If you are in the middle of an outbreak, soak in oatmeal (put 3 tablespoons in a clean old sock and toss in the bathtub), baking soda and/or corn starch. Put lotion or oil on partially wet skin to keep your self moisturized. Invest in a cool air humidifier (you can get one for $15-$20 at K-Mart) for your bedroom during the dry winter months. You'll be very surprised by how well your skin will do! I hope this helps! Best of Luck! Answered by Sal Glay 1 year ago.

It will help, but it wont clear your skin completely. I have eczema as well and I use an over the counter medicine for psoriasis, after a few days of use it will clear up your eczema. Find something with "Coal Tar" in it, it stinks but works wonders. Where you live, what you eat, your stress level ALL effect your skin, changing just one piece of your daily lifestyle will not fix everything. I hope things look up for you and your skin. Answered by Kyoko Girand 1 year ago.

I have eczema too... I drink a TON of water and it hasn't helped a bit. My two cents: see a dermatologist. Use baby oil as soon as you get out of the shower. Use lots of lotions. These things may not cure your eczema and "bad skin," but they could help. Answered by Jackson Axthelm 1 year ago.

use an exfoliating but moisturizing body wash...like St Ives exfoliating scrub...or even apricot scrub...- this will remove the dead skin of the eczema .. when u are finished showering and your skin is still wet, apply baby oil or cocoa butter shower oil..'the body shop' has good oils too (and im not talking about lotion- oil for the body that looks like cooking oil)....that will moisturize your skin very well- oh ya and only pat dry with your towel..don't rub.. for lotion u should apply cocoa butter body lotion.. use ' Palmer's Cocoa butter'..i use it and its great......another good product is 'Eucerine' but that doesn't work great for me- not that it won't for you though..- you can get both of these at any drugstore (CVS, Walgreens, Wal-mart, Rite Aid..etc...) avoid: over-exfoliating, dehydration, strong wind on your skin, sun burn, a lot of swimming water alone, doesn't get rid of eczema,..try taking a lot of foods containing Vitamin D & E eczema is not contagious but possibly genetic - if none of this helps, then go see a dermatologist for special creams Answered by Bailey Douvier 1 year ago.

Essential Fatty Acids help eczema heal. Answered by April Asiello 1 year ago.

I am so sorry but this is a skin condition that has nothing to do with what you drink. Drinking water will clear up pimples though and is great for your body. So keep it up. Answered by Ailene Vukelich 1 year ago.

This is just the toxins in your skin getting out, you should exercise to this will help a lot try adding to your foods fruits and veg these will help the body to restore what has lost Congratulation on stopping I wish u all the best Answered by Lesia Markell 1 year ago.

It might help to drink lots of water (not "nothing but water" though!). However you need medical treatment if your skin is that bad. Answered by Helene Walken 1 year ago.

a little not much though. i have very bad skin and it honestly doesn't help much. i take prescription skin cream to keep my skin normal. honestly i hate it. Answered by Jasper Morawski 1 year ago.


What is the best medicine for atopic eczema?
red swollen rashes, itchy, dry with fuss Asked by Elois Sicilian 1 year ago.

The best thing you could do is see a dermatologist. I have had eczema all my life and I know what I'm talking about. Elidel, Psorcon, Olux are the new medications given for eczema but different people have different reactions. As a matter of fact, a medication could work very well in one instance and stop working because your body has developed a tolerance to the medication. Eczema is a chronic disease that has to been managed by behavior. Stress can lead to breakouts. Allergens can lead to breakouts. You have to become aware as to what events happen before a breakout takes place. To mitigate the impact, exercise is very important. Asides helping you reduce stress and nervous itching, exercise will put your excretion system into overdrive so an allergen that's in your system can/will be excreted through your sweat. Drink plenty of water and stay hydrated --especially in the winter. Water will help with the dryness and will continually flush your system. Do not use harsh soaps or a lot of lather when you wash. Non-soap products like Eucerine, Dove, Basis, Oil of Olay are best for sensitive, eczema prone skin. To clear up scars, nothing is better than cocoa butter, aloe or Lustra (prescription medication). Stay away from hot showers -- feels great but too drying. If you are in the middle of an outbreak, soak in oatmeal (put 3 tablespoons in a clean old sock and toss in the bathtub), baking soda and/or corn starch. Put lotion or oil on partially wet skin to keep your self moisturized. Invest in a cool air humidifier (you can get one for $15-$20 at K-Mart) for your bedroom during the dry winter months. You'll be very surprised by how well your skin will do! I hope this helps! Best of Luck! Answered by Lyndsey Rollind 1 year ago.

Cortaid( over the counter steroid) and Euceren cream. Answered by Julia Felton 1 year ago.

Hydrocordizone cream or Eucerin cream Answered by Darcie Pettibone 1 year ago.

Betnovate A....it is a corticosteroid....see your doctor/pharmacist Answered by Delmer Ruschel 1 year ago.


Psoriasis Treatment in France?
I will be in Paris in two weeks and I have Psoriasis - I was wondering what prescription creams are used to treat psoriasis and can I purchase some in the pharmacy w/out a prescription? I live in U.S. & I have used Dovonex, Salicylic Acid, Cormax, Psorcon, Ultravate and none of these have worked for me - was... Asked by Sherry Sallings 1 year ago.

I will be in Paris in two weeks and I have Psoriasis - I was wondering what prescription creams are used to treat psoriasis and can I purchase some in the pharmacy w/out a prescription? I live in U.S. & I have used Dovonex, Salicylic Acid, Cormax, Psorcon, Ultravate and none of these have worked for me - was wondering what is used in France - Thank you (you can write to me in french too) Answered by Celena Sletten 1 year ago.

Département de Biostatistique et Information Médicale, Paris, FRANCE if you visit there, they'll tell you all about it and they will provide you with the treatments. Answered by Breann Hissam 1 year ago.


What are some good natural ways that clears up Psoriasis in the scalp?
Thank you all so much! Asked by Isabel Render 1 year ago.

Well...first of all...there is NO cure for Psoriasis. You can use medication or "naturopathic remedies" for the rest of your life, and still have flair-ups from time-to-time. Psoriasis is an auto-immune dermatological disorder that affects MANY people. Some people have an almost continuous chronic flair up -- lesions are often diffuse to entire body, or they can have intermittent flair ups where the lesions will appear, get bad, then start to go down. There have been some research that suggests it is often tied to one's stress/anxiety level as to how bad they may break out. There are also people who are lucky enough to have it in only one (or two) locations on their bodies, making it much easier to manage. I typically prescribe a variety of medications to use on various areas for a month at a time -- giving it time to see if it responds well. If poor response, then I switch to another agent. I've found the most reliable to be: Dovonex (for the scalp), and Psorcon (for the skin). On occasion, I've had to use a couple weeks of steroid (Prednisone) for more severe flairs. I've had patients who have tried both the diet and naturopathic remedies at the shops to help, but with rather poor to nill results. They simply don't have the research based evidence to prove they are potent or effective, but are ALWAYS suggested by the person trying to sell something. I'd say, 100% of my patients eventually come back to the pharmaceuticals because nothing else worked. Sure...I truly WISH there was a good and researched based natural remedy, but I (or my patients), have yet to find it. Remember...this is NOT going to go away. You're NOT going to be rid of it, and management is the ONLY WAY to deal with it....at least for now. Answered by Charlette Dapoz 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are some good natural ways that clears up Psoriasis in the scalp? I have had Prosiasis for over 4 years and it hasn't cleared up yet. 1.What causes it? 2. Is there a special diet that can clear it up? 3. How long have you had it? 4. How can I get it out and off of my scalp/hair? Thank you! Answered by Kandra Viles 1 year ago.

I had a 13 year history of psoriasis, though I was in good health otherwise. But these severe large, thick and scaly excoriated plaques on my neck, ears, trunk and limbs ruined the way I was leading my life. I would be with red, inflamed itchy skin for most part of the year and these silvery scales would seem to be erupting without any reason. To make matters worse, blisters would appear over already red and itching skin. It was living hell. I was treated with various options but nothing seemed to be working. Some of the treatments that I underwent in this depressing period of 13 years included tar preparation, tropical steroids and anthralin. I was also given light therapy many times but everything I tried would give me temporary relief. And soon, after a few days I would be plagued with the situation again. In one of those moments when I was completely lost I stumbled upon this website just by chance. I read it and felt that as if someone had put the story my life on this web page. I was thoroughly convinced that if ANYONE can cure me of condition, it would be you. And was I right, or what. I started recovering within 3 days of starting this treatment. Something that had become a painful part of me for 13 years was actually getting healed! My ears are healed and my neck is smooth again!. I am a month into the treatment and I have never felt better in my life! Psoriasis Revolution? Answered by Gail Macmaster 1 year ago.

I've had psoriasis for 10 years, tried many prescription drugs including steroids. Finally I've found natural remedies at serenaskin.com. I was using ointment and spray for my scalp and extract internally. It controls my psoriasis greatly. I have not had flare-ups for more than a year now, just continue to take anti-psoriasis extract 4 times a year as advised. I would definitely recommend it. It's all natural herbal stuff. Answered by Kyle Anastacio 1 year ago.

apple cider vinegar or coconut oil i use for acne this site is awesome - www.earthclinic.com people used it and they share how well it works... Psoriasis Remedies Updated: 10/21/2008 "Psoriasis... is a disease which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. Psoriasis is hypothesized to be immune-mediated and is not contagious. The disorder is a chronic recurring condition which varies in severity from minor localised patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) - and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. The cause of psoriasis is not known, but it is believed to have a genetic component. Several factors are thought to aggravate psoriasis. These include stress, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking. Individuals with psoriasis may suffer from depression and loss of self-esteem. As such, quality of life is an important factor in evaluating the severity of the disease. There are many treatments available but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat." (Wikipedia) Answered by Anita Dillinger 1 year ago.

Have you tried giving your scalp an oil treatment?, and leave it in for two days. One of my friends uses nutrametics apricot oil and puts it through her scalp freely by parting the hair where its bad and leaving it there for a couple of days and it helps get rid of the problem. Just put a towel on your pillow at night. Answered by Luise Kerson 1 year ago.


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