Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 011839/001.

Names and composition

"PROVERA" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011839/001 PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
011839/003 PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
011839/004 PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
011839/001 PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
011839/003 PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
011839/004 PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
012541/002 DEPO-PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
012541/003 DEPO-PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 400MG per ML
020246/001 DEPO-PROVERA MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 150MG per ML
021583/001 DEPO-SUBQ PROVERA 104 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE INJECTABLE/SUBCUTANEOUS 104MG per 0.65ML
040159/001 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040159/002 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040159/003 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040311/001 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040311/002 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040311/003 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076552/001 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 150MG per ML
076553/001 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 150MG per ML
078711/001 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 150MG per ML
081239/001 CYCRIN MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
081240/001 CYCRIN MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083242/001 AMEN MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085686/001 CURRETAB MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088484/001 MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089386/001 CYCRIN MEDROXYPROGESTERONE ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

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Answered questions

What is provera?
i thought it helps to stop your period if it has been on longer than usual. Can i still become pregnant by using this? plz someone answer me rigth away Asked by Sabina Heitger 1 year ago.

Provera is derived from the female hormone progesterone. You may be given Provera if your menstrual periods have stopped or a female hormone imbalance is causing your uterus to bleed abnormally. Provera is also prescribed to prevent abnormal growth of the uterine lining in women taking estrogen replacement therapy. Other forms of medroxyprogesterone, such as Depo-Provera, are used as a contraceptive injection and prescribed in the treatment of endometrial cancer. Medroxyprogesterone inhibits fertility at high doses. Some doctors prescribe Provera to treat endometriosis, menopausal symptoms, premenstrual tension, sexual aggressive behavior in men, and sleep apnea (temporary failure to breath while sleeping). You should never take Provera during the first 4 months of pregnancy. During this formative period, even a few days of treatment with Provera might put your unborn baby at increased risk for birth defects. If you take Provera and later discover that you were pregnant when you took it, discuss this with your doctor right away. Side effects may include: Acne, anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction), blood clot in a vein, lungs, or brain, breakthrough bleeding (between menstrual periods), breast tenderness or sudden or excessive flow of milk, cervical erosion or changes in secretions, depression, excessive growth of hair, fever, fluid retention, hair loss, headache, hives, insomnia, itching, lack of menstruation, menstrual flow changes, spotting, nausea, rash, skin discoloration, sleepiness, weight gain or loss, yellowed eyes and skin. Provera should never be taken during pregnancy. Avoid it if you even suspect you're pregnant. Doctors once prescribed Provera as a test for pregnancy, but no longer do so for 2 reasons: Quicker, safer pregnancy tests are now available. If you are in fact pregnant, Provera might injure the baby. Similarly, Provera used to be given to try to prevent miscarriage. However, doctors now believe that this treatment is not only ineffective but also potentially harmful to the baby. Do not take Provera if you have: Cancer of the breast or genital organs Liver disease or a liver condition A dead fetus still in the uterus Undiagnosed bleeding from the vagina Do not take Provera if you have, or have ever developed, blood clots. Avoid it, too, if it gives you an allergic reaction. Provera may cause some degree of fluid retention. If you have a medical condition that could be made worse by fluid retention--such as epilepsy, migraine, asthma, or a heart or kidney problem--make sure your doctor knows about it. Provera may mask the onset of menopause. In other words, while taking Provera you may continue to experience regular menstrual bleeding even if your menopause has started. Provera may make you depressed, especially if you have suffered from depression in the past. If you become seriously depressed, tell your doctor; you should probably stop taking Provera. If you are diabetic, Provera could make your diabetes worse; your doctor will want to watch you closely while you are taking this drug. There is some concern that Provera, like birth control pills, may increase your risk for a blood clot in a vein. If you experience any symptoms that might suggest the onset of such a condition--pain with swelling, warmth, and redness in a leg vein, coughing or shortness of breath, vision problems, migraine, or weakness or numbness in an arm or leg--see your doctor immediately. Tell your doctor right away if you lose some or all of your vision or you start seeing double. You may have to stop taking the medication. If Provera is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either may be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Provera with aminoglutethimide (Cytadren). You should not take Provera during pregnancy. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, inform your doctor immediately. Provera appears in breast milk. If you are a new mother, you may need to choose between taking Provera and breastfeeding your baby. To Restore Menstrual Periods Provera Tablets are taken in dosages of 5 to 10 milligrams daily for 5 to 10 days. Make sure you discuss what effect this will have on your menstrual cycle with your doctor. You should have bleeding 3 to 7 days after you stop taking Provera. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Due to Hormonal Imbalance Beginning on the 16th or 21st day of your menstrual cycle, you will take 5 to 10 milligrams daily for 5 to 10 days. Make sure you discuss what effect this will have on your menstrual cycle with your doctor. You should have bleeding 3 to 7 days after you stop taking Provera. To Accompany Estrogen Replacement Therapy The recommended regimen is 5 or 10 milligrams of Provera a day for 12 to 14 days each month, beginning on either Day 1 or Day 16 of the cycle. GENERIC NAME: medroxyprogesterone acetate BRAND NAME: Provera, Cycrin, Amen Answered by Laura Bellaire 1 year ago.

Depo Provera is a birth control shot you get 4 times a year. Usually it stops your menstral cycle. If you get the shot from your doctor on a regular schedule it is more effective than the pill at preventing pregnancies. DO NOT GET THIS IF YOU ARE TRYING OR MAY HAVE BECOME PREGNANT! Answered by Cathern Costanza 1 year ago.

I took the shot and my period started right away. After that, I literally had a period ranging from heavy to light for 8 months. It would stop for a day at the most and then start right back up again. My doctor fed me a lot of crap reasons why (ex. You're body is just ridding itself of toxins...). I never did figure out why it happened considering that you aren't even really supposed to have your period on the shot. I agree that more women should be informed about these kind of stories before making a decision. Answered by Yun Bashi 1 year ago.

provera(medroxyprogestrone) is a female hormaone to regulate the ovaries and your period it is used to treat abnormal bleeding and lack of a period. most of your birth control pills already contain this ingrediant. using this drug alone i would not reccomend it as you may get pregnant because birth control pills contain other ingreadiants to prevent pregnancy that taking provera alone does not have Answered by Queenie Dicus 1 year ago.

its a shot..you get every 3 months....it will NOT stop your period you will bleed for months on end, you will gain atleast 15 pounds and have ovarian cysts. I had all this from one shot. Please do not take that stuff!! Answered by Kimbra Pangelina 1 year ago.


Ovulation during provera?
I'm wondering how this works, does my body ovulate while taking provera? if so does that mean that the eggs don't last long. i just don't understand how i get a period in 5 days after i take my pills if i don't ovulate. Asked by Merlin Boateng 1 year ago.

Provera is a synthetic form of the naturally occurring female sex hormone, progesterone. It is used to treat various disorders of the menstrual cycle. A woman's menstrual cycle is a complex process that is controlled by at least four different hormones. The blood levels of these hormones change throughout the menstrual cycle, causing an egg to be released from the ovaries (ovulation), preparation of the womb lining for a possible pregnancy and shedding of the womb lining each month if pregnancy doesn't occur (a menstrual period). There are plenty of places that this complex process can go wrong. If your periods are irregular or have stopped completely and your doctor can find no obvious cause, it may be that something has upset your natural hormone levels. Provera can help to restore your natural hormone levels, because it mimics the effects of your natural progesterone. Normally the level of progesterone in your blood increases about a week before your period. If provera is taken for 5 to 10 days each month at this time ( day 16 to 21 of your cycle) it mimics the natural rise in your progesterone levels. This can help your other hormones to behave in a more normal way. To treat irregular periods this medicine is taken in this way for two menstrual cycles. To treat periods that have stopped it is taken for three menstrual cycles. At the end of the treatment regular periods should return. Endometriosis can also be treated by manipulating your hormones with provera. In this condition, tissue resembling the womb lining grows abnormally around the ovaries, womb and bladder. This tissue is controlled by the same hormones that control your menstrual cycle, and thickens and is shed in the same way as your normal womb lining. Provera stops the abnormal tissue from thickening and then bleeding. As a result your menstrual periods are also likely to stop during the treatment as well. After treatment has finished the patches of endometrial tissue may be smaller, or may have shrunk away altogether. One of progesterone's most important functions is to cause the endometrium to secrete special proteins during the second half of the menstrual cycle, preparing it to receive and nourish an implanted fertilized egg. If implantation does not occur, estrogen and progesterone levels drop, the endometrium breaks down and menstruation occurs.((The provera is a natural progesterone and it helps thickin the lining of your uterus)) If a pregnancy occurs, progesterone is produced in the placenta and levels remain elevated throughout the pregnancy. The combination of high estrogen and progesterone levels suppress further ovulation during pregnancy. Progesterone also encourages the growth of milk-producing glands in the breast during pregnancy. High progesterone levels are believed to be partly responsible for symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), such as breast tenderness, feeling bloated and mood swings. When you skip a period, it could be because of failure to ovulate and subsequent low progesterone levels. Progestogens are included along with estrogen in combination oral contraceptives and in menopausal hormone therapy. Progestins are also used alone for birth control, and for treatment of a variety of other conditions, including abnormal uterine bleeding and amenorrhea (absence of periods); endometriosis; breast, kidney or uterine cancer; and loss of appetite and weight related to AIDS and cancer. Progestins may also be used as a diagnostic aid to check the effects of estrogen. Maintaining menstrual cycles, a function of progestins, is important during childbearing years because shedding the uterine lining each month reduces the risk of endometrial cancer. If you frequently skip periods due to polycystic ovary syndrome, being overweight or underweight, or another disorder, your health care professional may recommend birth control pills to regulate your cycle. If taken throughout your whole cycle it can disrupt ovulation... If taken the last 5 days of your cycle it will not disrupt ovulation and you can still get pregnant.. I hope i helped Answered by Raymon Loch 1 year ago.

Medroxyprogesterone Ovulation Answered by Regina Demedeiros 1 year ago.

Ovulation doesn't cause bleeding. Many women who do not ovulate still will bleed. In a normal cycle, the lining of the uterus builds up in response to a rise of hormones, estrogen and progesterone. Then, after a peak, the hormone level drops sharply. When the uterus no longer has the hormonal support, it lets go of it's lining and you bleed. (If a fertilized egg is implanted, other factors take over and there is not the sharp drop in hormones, so no period.) Provera is a hormone like progesterone. The point of taking it is to get a big build up of the endometrium, your uterine lining. Then, when you suddenly stop it, there is a sudden withdrawal of the progesterone from your body. Unless there is some other problem, you should have a substantial withdrawal bleed. It's unlikely that you would ovulate while taking it; it overrides your natural cycle and prevents that. But after you bleed, you could. Answered by Carina Cadwell 1 year ago.

If you are having to take provera to have periods then you are probably not ovulating anyway. (that is my understanding of the meds) I am currently on both and have been on provera now for a year and taken it previous years before. Have you been checked to make sure you are ovulating? My doctor told me provera will not help anything with ovulation just to bring your period on and that is it. Good luck hope this helps! Answered by Audrea Lukin 1 year ago.


Depo provera.. spotting?
okay so I've benn on depo for almost 3 years now and have never had a problem until a few weeks ago. i have been spotting for the past 3 weeks now and its been very weird. it ranges from brown spots to really bright red. i've looked online for info but every website says something different.the thing... Asked by Ashleigh Yeakley 1 year ago.

okay so I've benn on depo for almost 3 years now and have never had a problem until a few weeks ago. i have been spotting for the past 3 weeks now and its been very weird. it ranges from brown spots to really bright red. i've looked online for info but every website says something different. the thing is, my boyfriend and i started having sex again so i thought this was a reason why i was spotting. ive also been working out and sometimes heavy work outs cause spotting. i havent had sex in two weeks or done any exercise to see if this had anything to do with the spotting... BUT i still have spotting. I havent had my period in almost 3 yrs so is this normal? the spotting has been happening for 3 weeks now.. if someone has some advice please let me know.. thanks! Answered by Eloy Dibrell 1 year ago.

Depo Shot Spotting Answered by Kirstie Depaolo 1 year ago.

Spotting On Depo Answered by Sal Worthey 1 year ago.

I went on the depo around 13 years ago and bled for 6 months straight.. not heavy just spotting. After 6 months I finally built up the courage to go see a doctor... and was prescribed Ponstan... It cleared it up like a charm. I only had one shot and that was it. 13 years later... I decided to give it another go... I told my current doctor about the Ponstan and he prescribed that as well. Worked a treat. I was about 4 months overdue for my next shot (but wasnt sexually active in that time anyway) and recently had another shot. This time I have the brown spotting etc.. The Ponstan 250mg doesnt seem to be kicking in (should do so after a week) so tomorrow I'm heading to the docs again to request the stronger version which is what I used originally. Fingers crossed but it works for me. I asked recent doc why it works so well.. he explained that it's because Ponstan reduces haemoraging (spelling?) I was Answered by Ginger Lafratta 1 year ago.

depo is very tricky. Ive also been using it for a few years, and sometimes i never get spotting but then theres times that i spot for weeks and weeks. the spotting is normal, you have nothing to worry about. Birth control is like that sometimes, you are interfering with your body's normal function in taking birth control though. Answered by Dong Galeas 1 year ago.

I commend you for using depo... my first try at it and i bled for 3 months non stop... you should see your doctor asap Answered by Shavonne Blommel 1 year ago.

It is possible, but I'm not convinced Answered by Tomeka Stobierski 1 year ago.


About Depo provera?
sorry hopefuly you can read it my key bored is not working right and my cp is being realy slow Asked by Roxane Lobe 1 year ago.

What are the chances of getting pregnant with Depo Provera? It is unusual to get pregnant while taking Depo-Provera regularly, but pregnancies sometimes occur before the shot is given, and then go unrecognized until there is an obvious sign, like fetal movement. If a woman does becomes pregnant while using Depo Provera, and continues her pregnancy, there may be an increased risk of premature birth. Pregnancy and Depo Provera are like sunshine and rain. There is an extremely rare chance of them being together. Famed as one of the best birth control pills, Depo Provera is also infamous for preventing pregnancies even after use. This can be blamed on the long term effects of the hormone progestin, which is the main ingredient of Depo Provera. Depo Provera is a hormone injection that lasts for 3 months to prevent pregnancy. It is a long-acting progestin based contraceptive is given as a shot into your arm or buttock once every three months. The injection has synthetic progesterone and no estrogen. Depo Provera stops the ovaries from releasing eggs and thus prevents pregnancy by preventing the ovarian egg cells from maturing and releasing from the ovary. If an egg does not mature and release from either ovary there is no egg to be fertilized by sperm and pregnancy cannot occur. Depo Provera shot also changes the condition of the lining of the uterus so that pregnancy is less likely to occur. The effectiveness of Depo Provera in preventing pregnancy starts to wear off after three months, but the medication may remain in your body for up to a year. Due to the risk of serious health problems, Depo Provera is not recommended for women who are planning on becoming pregnant in the near future, are concerned over weight gain, have liver disease, gallbladder disease, or a history of depression. Your clinician or doctor can help you decide. There are also a lot of other associated disadvantages of Depo Provera that can hinder conception after long term use. The long term use of this medication causes irregularities in menstrual cycles for many women. Though medically they are acceptable as side effects, they can be very disturbing for some women. Irregular, heavy, or no bleeding are common side effects of Depo Provera. After a year of use, many women stop having periods. By the second year of use, many women have no periods at all. In addition, they can also be misleading for women who want to keep track of their menstrual cycles. Another concern for many women who are considering using or are using Depo-Provera is weight gain. On average, women gain about five pounds during the first year of use, so if you're using this method, it's a good idea to pay extra close attention to your eating habits and to get into an exercise routine. Furthermore, women who use Depo Provera may face an increased risk of osteoporosis and are advised to exercise and take in plenty of calcium. Some studies suggest, however, that bone density is restored once women stop taking Depo Provera. If you have been on Depo Provera and decide you want to get pregnant, it may take more than a year to regain your fertility. Don't forget to take either folate or a daily vitamin that contains folate while you are off Depo Provera and trying to get pregnant. Folic acid can prevent birth defects that occur in the period before you might even know that you're pregnant. Answered by Belva Bayani 1 year ago.

the chances of you getting pregnant on depo is extremely low. however there is more to be worried about with depo. you lose 2.5 bone mass density every year you are on it. doesnt sound like much but it is and can lead to osteoporosis very early in life. take calcium supplements with vitamin d in it. also alot of owmen have trouble conceiving for years after getting off the shot. there are other hormonal problems with it such as severe weight gain, extreme hunger, facial and body hair that isnt supposed to be there and wont go away. big stroke risk, infertility. look this up further and i would advise to get on a different birth control. personally i gained 25 lbs in 6 months on depo!! and started to grow little hairs after i took it on my fc stomach and chest ewww!!!. never had this problem before! looked it up and its pretty common. the weight i gained was really hard to lose because it took forever for the hormones to leave my body after getting off it. Answered by Syble Ransler 1 year ago.

yes i got pregnant right before i got the shot so it was too early to tell and even the clinic got a negative results but sure enough i miscarried and with the hormone still in my system doctor's confirmed that i had been pregnant. i bleed for 6 weeks. Answered by Porsche Almstead 1 year ago.


Had really heavy bleeding 9-4-06, got on provera?
The doc put me on 5 mg provera for 14 days, said I would bleed at the end. Never started bleeding. So now, it's beena month and 6 days since I finished the meds. Should I be expecting some bleeding? Or liek when I was on Depo-provera will thei screw up my periods even more? Asked by Dimple Pliego 1 year ago.

I've had the identical factor occur to me. I began my shot at the twenty fifth and did not bleed in any respect until final Tuesday. I obtained so drawback that I went to my health care provider. She positioned me at the continous tablet seasonale to quit the bleeding. It will have to relieve it. If you get drawback with the bleeding or if you're bleeding EXTREMELY I could certainly advise you notice a health care provider. I was once additionally instructed should you feel approximately it and pressure out approximately it it is going to make matters worse. Is this your first shot? Keep in brain the shot for the primary 12 months might intent alot of recognizing by way of the cycle. Breakthrough bleeding occurs plenty so I could now not fear approximately it. Answered by Terri Greenwood 1 year ago.


Has anyone had a good experience with Depo Provera?
I've noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss. People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased? Does anyone have any good... Asked by Michal Schnorbus 1 year ago.

I've noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss. People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased? Does anyone have any good experiences with this form of birth control? Answered by Dione Walrod 1 year ago.

Depo-Provera has several advantages:[3][4][17][18] * Highly effective at preventing pregnancy. * Injected every 12 weeks. The only continuing action is to book subsequent follow-up injections every twelve weeks, and to monitor side effects to ensure that they do not require medical attention. * No estrogen. No increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, or myocardial infarction. * Culturally acceptable. Some cultures believe injections are especially efficacious. Injections also afford privacy because use is not detectable. * Minimal drug interactions (compared to other hormonal contraceptives). * Decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Depo-Provera reduces the risk of endometrial cancer by 80%. The reduced risk of endometrial cancer in Depo-Provera users is thought to be due to both the direct anti-proliferative effect of progestogen on the endometrium and the indirect reduction of estrogen levels by suppression of ovarian follicular development. * Decreased risk of iron deficiency anemia, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, and uterine fibroids. * Decreased symptoms of endometriosis. * Decreased incidence of primary dysmenorrhea, ovulation pain, and functional ovarian cysts. * Decreased incidence of seizures in women with epilepsy. Additionally, unlike most other hormonal contraceptives, Depo-Provera's contraceptive effectiveness is not affected by enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. * Decreased incidence and severity of sickle cell crises in women with sickle-cell disease. In the largest clinical trial of Depo-Provera, the most frequently reported adverse reactions (which may or may not be related to the use of Depo-Provera) were: menstrual irregularities (bleeding or amenorrhea or both), abdominal pain or discomfort, weight changes, headache, asthenia (weakness or fatigue), and nervousness. Other, less frequently reported adverse reactions are listed in the patient and physician label information for Depo-Provera. Answered by Marg Scisco 1 year ago.

It was the first birth control I ever used. I only used it for 9 months because I bled continuosly for those 9 months. I didn't gain weight or anything else with it. The bleeding was the only side effect I had. Its very convenient and worth a shot to see how your body reacts to it. You might have no problems from it. Answered by Laurene Ramie 1 year ago.


About the Depo provera?
While antibiotics does the depo shot fail?I can't remember if the doctor told me yes or no..I have been on antibiotics for only 4 days, but I also have had unproteced sex.Can it fail and what are the chances I may be pregnant.i'm not having symptoms or anything, but they curiosity is killing... Asked by Marion Lisman 1 year ago.

While antibiotics does the depo shot fail? I can't remember if the doctor told me yes or no.. I have been on antibiotics for only 4 days, but I also have had unproteced sex. Can it fail and what are the chances I may be pregnant. i'm not having symptoms or anything, but they curiosity is killing me Just to be safe I. Answered by Florencia Hadnot 1 year ago.

Antibiotics can interfere with any hormonal birth control, so you should always use a backup method when you're on antibiotics. Your chances of being pregnant are still pretty slim, but you should probably go ahead and take a test, just to be on the safe side. Answered by Kyung Treto 1 year ago.

i was told that antibiotics do not interfere with depo provera Answered by Lorna Mcmanis 1 year ago.


Is depo provera a good choice for birth control?
does it work good? Asked by Jed Sajor 1 year ago.

Warnings and precautions Depo Provera can require up to fourteen days to take effect. This means pregnancy can occur within fourteen days of the first Depo injection. Takes seven days to take effect if given after the first four days of the period cycle. Effective immediately if given during the first four days of the period cycle. Offers no protection against Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Depo Provera can affect menstrual bleeding. After a year of use, 55% of women experience amenorrhoea; after 2 years, the rate rises to 68%. In the first months of use "irregular or unpredictable bleeding or spotting, or rarely, heavy or continuous bleeding" was reported. Delayed return of fertility. The average return to fertility is 9 to 10 months after the last injection. By 18 months after the last injection, fertility is the same as that in former users of other contraceptive methods Long-term studies of users of Depo-Provera have found slight or no increased overall risk of breast cancer. However, the study population did show a slightly increased risk of breast cancer in recent users (Depo use in the last four years) under age 35, similar to that seen with the use of combined oral contraceptive pills.[16] Infants born to women exposed to Depo during pregnancy in one study had an 80% greater chance of dying in the first year of life. [edit] Black box warning While it has long been known that Depo-Provera causes bone loss, it has recently been discovered that the osteoporotic effects of the injection grow worse the longer Depo-Provera is administered, may remain long after the injections are stopped, and may be irreversible. For this reason, on November 17, 2004 the United States Food and Drug Administration and Pfizer agreed to put a "black box warning" on Depo-Provera's label. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) advises that the use of Depo Provera should not be restricted. It is unclear whether the bone density loss associated with Depo-Provera use is reversible, and if so, how completely. Three studies have suggested that bone loss is reversible after the discontinuation of Depo-Provera, although one notes that bone loss was not reversible in long-term users of Depo-Provera. Other studies have suggested that the effect of Depo-Provera use on post-menopausal bone density is minimal,[24] perhaps because Depo users experience less bone loss at menopause. However, as of 2006, no study has directly examined fracture risk in post-menopausal women who have used Depo-Provera; therefore, the risk is unknown. Pfizer and the FDA recommend that Depo-Provera not be used for longer than 2 years, unless there is no viable alternative method of contraception, due to concerns over bone loss. Side effects Depo-Provera may have side effects, in order of greatest frequency:[26] menstrual irregularities (irregular bleeding, amenorrhoea absence of bleeding or metrorrhagia constant bleeding) nausea, vomiting, headaches, dizziness, breast swelling and tenderness, depression, skin disorders (rash, hot flushes, acne, alteration hair growth), alteration in appetite, altered weight and changes in libido. Other possible associated side effects are set out in the product licensing and patient labelling with some rare but potentially serious effects being: convulsions, jaundice, urinary tract infections, allergic reactions, fainting, paralysis, osteoporosis, lack of return to fertility, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolus. FAilure Rates Most sources cite the failure rate for Depo-Provera at 0.3 percent annually, which would be three women out of a thousand per year. The two year combined failure rate for Depo-Provera, Norplant, and IUD use for women aged 20-24 was 10.9 percent, which comes out to one woman in ten. Answered by Patrice Ewton 1 year ago.

It can be great for some women that don't want to think about taking tablets everyday, and is normally given as an option to help women who suffer from endometriosis, (I have been operated for twice for endometriosis and was given the shot, I ended up getting my period for 6 months, and suffered alot of nausia, my mother who also has been operated for for endometriosis, also had the shot, she didn't suffer ongoing bleeding but suffered sever weight gain and nausia.. The shot doesn't actually make you gain weight, but it does increase your appetite alot so if you are not a person who controls their eating habits well you can gain alot of weight... I never had this problem as I am always very busy and exersize alot, and eat a balanced diet.. My mother on the other hand is not very good at controlling her appetite and when she felt hungry she ate, and ate not the right food, so she put on loads of weight... You have to weigh up what is right for you , I have met loads of women that swear by depo provera, and have met loads that think its the worst thing ever made, I personally wouldn't take it again, but I beleive it's important to try different things and find out what works for you, for me the Contraceptive ring is fabulous a ring which you change every month (not a diaphram) it looks like a thick rubber band all you do is place it up there, and it goes unnoticed its been fabulous, and because you dont take it like a tablet which goes though your stomache you dont get nausia.. Ask your doctor about it, in Spanish it is called Anillo Contraceptivo Best of luck Answered by Livia Tousley 1 year ago.

Exercising each day when compared with morning Answered by Jeanelle Odneal 1 year ago.

while eating dinner out test to have a healthier solution Answered by Rosia Redpath 1 year ago.

It works well however, I was on it for three years and it made it that I gained 60 pounds and it took my husband and I 13 months to get pregnant after being on it. If you can remember the pill Yasmine was my favorite. Answered by Laquanda Caffey 1 year ago.

NO! No No No No No NO No No I don't know WHY that shot is still on the market. You can get all sorts of scary illnesses from it, including mental problems like anxiety and depression... My daughter tried this shot... please please don't make her mistake. It was AWEFUL for her. If you don't believe me, do some online research, there are women all over who had terrible side effects. Answered by Violeta Glab 1 year ago.

Adhere to an increasingly trim protein/green vegetable eating habits Answered by Georgeanna Ohno 1 year ago.

It is highly effective against pregnancy, but it can make you gain weight like crazy! Answered by Kyle Cotrone 1 year ago.


What is provera?
i thought it helps to stop your period if it has been on longer than usual. Can i still become pregnant by using this? plz someone answer me rigth away Asked by Aron Bilek 1 year ago.

Provera is derived from the female hormone progesterone. You may be given Provera if your menstrual periods have stopped or a female hormone imbalance is causing your uterus to bleed abnormally. Provera is also prescribed to prevent abnormal growth of the uterine lining in women taking estrogen replacement therapy. Other forms of medroxyprogesterone, such as Depo-Provera, are used as a contraceptive injection and prescribed in the treatment of endometrial cancer. Medroxyprogesterone inhibits fertility at high doses. Some doctors prescribe Provera to treat endometriosis, menopausal symptoms, premenstrual tension, sexual aggressive behavior in men, and sleep apnea (temporary failure to breath while sleeping). You should never take Provera during the first 4 months of pregnancy. During this formative period, even a few days of treatment with Provera might put your unborn baby at increased risk for birth defects. If you take Provera and later discover that you were pregnant when you took it, discuss this with your doctor right away. Side effects may include: Acne, anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction), blood clot in a vein, lungs, or brain, breakthrough bleeding (between menstrual periods), breast tenderness or sudden or excessive flow of milk, cervical erosion or changes in secretions, depression, excessive growth of hair, fever, fluid retention, hair loss, headache, hives, insomnia, itching, lack of menstruation, menstrual flow changes, spotting, nausea, rash, skin discoloration, sleepiness, weight gain or loss, yellowed eyes and skin. Provera should never be taken during pregnancy. Avoid it if you even suspect you're pregnant. Doctors once prescribed Provera as a test for pregnancy, but no longer do so for 2 reasons: Quicker, safer pregnancy tests are now available. If you are in fact pregnant, Provera might injure the baby. Similarly, Provera used to be given to try to prevent miscarriage. However, doctors now believe that this treatment is not only ineffective but also potentially harmful to the baby. Do not take Provera if you have: Cancer of the breast or genital organs Liver disease or a liver condition A dead fetus still in the uterus Undiagnosed bleeding from the vagina Do not take Provera if you have, or have ever developed, blood clots. Avoid it, too, if it gives you an allergic reaction. Provera may cause some degree of fluid retention. If you have a medical condition that could be made worse by fluid retention--such as epilepsy, migraine, asthma, or a heart or kidney problem--make sure your doctor knows about it. Provera may mask the onset of menopause. In other words, while taking Provera you may continue to experience regular menstrual bleeding even if your menopause has started. Provera may make you depressed, especially if you have suffered from depression in the past. If you become seriously depressed, tell your doctor; you should probably stop taking Provera. If you are diabetic, Provera could make your diabetes worse; your doctor will want to watch you closely while you are taking this drug. There is some concern that Provera, like birth control pills, may increase your risk for a blood clot in a vein. If you experience any symptoms that might suggest the onset of such a condition--pain with swelling, warmth, and redness in a leg vein, coughing or shortness of breath, vision problems, migraine, or weakness or numbness in an arm or leg--see your doctor immediately. Tell your doctor right away if you lose some or all of your vision or you start seeing double. You may have to stop taking the medication. If Provera is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either may be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Provera with aminoglutethimide (Cytadren). You should not take Provera during pregnancy. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, inform your doctor immediately. Provera appears in breast milk. If you are a new mother, you may need to choose between taking Provera and breastfeeding your baby. To Restore Menstrual Periods Provera Tablets are taken in dosages of 5 to 10 milligrams daily for 5 to 10 days. Make sure you discuss what effect this will have on your menstrual cycle with your doctor. You should have bleeding 3 to 7 days after you stop taking Provera. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Due to Hormonal Imbalance Beginning on the 16th or 21st day of your menstrual cycle, you will take 5 to 10 milligrams daily for 5 to 10 days. Make sure you discuss what effect this will have on your menstrual cycle with your doctor. You should have bleeding 3 to 7 days after you stop taking Provera. To Accompany Estrogen Replacement Therapy The recommended regimen is 5 or 10 milligrams of Provera a day for 12 to 14 days each month, beginning on either Day 1 or Day 16 of the cycle. GENERIC NAME: medroxyprogesterone acetate BRAND NAME: Provera, Cycrin, Amen Answered by Arline Wenthold 1 year ago.

Depo Provera is a birth control shot you get 4 times a year. Usually it stops your menstral cycle. If you get the shot from your doctor on a regular schedule it is more effective than the pill at preventing pregnancies. DO NOT GET THIS IF YOU ARE TRYING OR MAY HAVE BECOME PREGNANT! Answered by Maribel Segall 1 year ago.

I took the shot and my period started right away. After that, I literally had a period ranging from heavy to light for 8 months. It would stop for a day at the most and then start right back up again. My doctor fed me a lot of crap reasons why (ex. You're body is just ridding itself of toxins...). I never did figure out why it happened considering that you aren't even really supposed to have your period on the shot. I agree that more women should be informed about these kind of stories before making a decision. Answered by Mozell Wesselink 1 year ago.

provera(medroxyprogestrone) is a female hormaone to regulate the ovaries and your period it is used to treat abnormal bleeding and lack of a period. most of your birth control pills already contain this ingrediant. using this drug alone i would not reccomend it as you may get pregnant because birth control pills contain other ingreadiants to prevent pregnancy that taking provera alone does not have Answered by Detra Massman 1 year ago.

its a shot..you get every 3 months....it will NOT stop your period you will bleed for months on end, you will gain atleast 15 pounds and have ovarian cysts. I had all this from one shot. Please do not take that stuff!! Answered by Yoshie Cardoni 1 year ago.


Ovulation during provera?
I'm wondering how this works, does my body ovulate while taking provera? if so does that mean that the eggs don't last long. i just don't understand how i get a period in 5 days after i take my pills if i don't ovulate. Asked by Isaiah Hulsman 1 year ago.

Provera is a synthetic form of the naturally occurring female sex hormone, progesterone. It is used to treat various disorders of the menstrual cycle. A woman's menstrual cycle is a complex process that is controlled by at least four different hormones. The blood levels of these hormones change throughout the menstrual cycle, causing an egg to be released from the ovaries (ovulation), preparation of the womb lining for a possible pregnancy and shedding of the womb lining each month if pregnancy doesn't occur (a menstrual period). There are plenty of places that this complex process can go wrong. If your periods are irregular or have stopped completely and your doctor can find no obvious cause, it may be that something has upset your natural hormone levels. Provera can help to restore your natural hormone levels, because it mimics the effects of your natural progesterone. Normally the level of progesterone in your blood increases about a week before your period. If provera is taken for 5 to 10 days each month at this time ( day 16 to 21 of your cycle) it mimics the natural rise in your progesterone levels. This can help your other hormones to behave in a more normal way. To treat irregular periods this medicine is taken in this way for two menstrual cycles. To treat periods that have stopped it is taken for three menstrual cycles. At the end of the treatment regular periods should return. Endometriosis can also be treated by manipulating your hormones with provera. In this condition, tissue resembling the womb lining grows abnormally around the ovaries, womb and bladder. This tissue is controlled by the same hormones that control your menstrual cycle, and thickens and is shed in the same way as your normal womb lining. Provera stops the abnormal tissue from thickening and then bleeding. As a result your menstrual periods are also likely to stop during the treatment as well. After treatment has finished the patches of endometrial tissue may be smaller, or may have shrunk away altogether. One of progesterone's most important functions is to cause the endometrium to secrete special proteins during the second half of the menstrual cycle, preparing it to receive and nourish an implanted fertilized egg. If implantation does not occur, estrogen and progesterone levels drop, the endometrium breaks down and menstruation occurs.((The provera is a natural progesterone and it helps thickin the lining of your uterus)) If a pregnancy occurs, progesterone is produced in the placenta and levels remain elevated throughout the pregnancy. The combination of high estrogen and progesterone levels suppress further ovulation during pregnancy. Progesterone also encourages the growth of milk-producing glands in the breast during pregnancy. High progesterone levels are believed to be partly responsible for symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), such as breast tenderness, feeling bloated and mood swings. When you skip a period, it could be because of failure to ovulate and subsequent low progesterone levels. Progestogens are included along with estrogen in combination oral contraceptives and in menopausal hormone therapy. Progestins are also used alone for birth control, and for treatment of a variety of other conditions, including abnormal uterine bleeding and amenorrhea (absence of periods); endometriosis; breast, kidney or uterine cancer; and loss of appetite and weight related to AIDS and cancer. Progestins may also be used as a diagnostic aid to check the effects of estrogen. Maintaining menstrual cycles, a function of progestins, is important during childbearing years because shedding the uterine lining each month reduces the risk of endometrial cancer. If you frequently skip periods due to polycystic ovary syndrome, being overweight or underweight, or another disorder, your health care professional may recommend birth control pills to regulate your cycle. If taken throughout your whole cycle it can disrupt ovulation... If taken the last 5 days of your cycle it will not disrupt ovulation and you can still get pregnant.. I hope i helped Answered by Giovanni Pallas 1 year ago.

Medroxyprogesterone Ovulation Answered by Caryl Merkle 1 year ago.

Ovulation doesn't cause bleeding. Many women who do not ovulate still will bleed. In a normal cycle, the lining of the uterus builds up in response to a rise of hormones, estrogen and progesterone. Then, after a peak, the hormone level drops sharply. When the uterus no longer has the hormonal support, it lets go of it's lining and you bleed. (If a fertilized egg is implanted, other factors take over and there is not the sharp drop in hormones, so no period.) Provera is a hormone like progesterone. The point of taking it is to get a big build up of the endometrium, your uterine lining. Then, when you suddenly stop it, there is a sudden withdrawal of the progesterone from your body. Unless there is some other problem, you should have a substantial withdrawal bleed. It's unlikely that you would ovulate while taking it; it overrides your natural cycle and prevents that. But after you bleed, you could. Answered by Young Graw 1 year ago.

If you are having to take provera to have periods then you are probably not ovulating anyway. (that is my understanding of the meds) I am currently on both and have been on provera now for a year and taken it previous years before. Have you been checked to make sure you are ovulating? My doctor told me provera will not help anything with ovulation just to bring your period on and that is it. Good luck hope this helps! Answered by Kandy Gruhlke 1 year ago.


Depo provera.. spotting?
okay so I've benn on depo for almost 3 years now and have never had a problem until a few weeks ago. i have been spotting for the past 3 weeks now and its been very weird. it ranges from brown spots to really bright red. i've looked online for info but every website says something different.the thing... Asked by Ayako Lilyblade 1 year ago.

okay so I've benn on depo for almost 3 years now and have never had a problem until a few weeks ago. i have been spotting for the past 3 weeks now and its been very weird. it ranges from brown spots to really bright red. i've looked online for info but every website says something different. the thing is, my boyfriend and i started having sex again so i thought this was a reason why i was spotting. ive also been working out and sometimes heavy work outs cause spotting. i havent had sex in two weeks or done any exercise to see if this had anything to do with the spotting... BUT i still have spotting. I havent had my period in almost 3 yrs so is this normal? the spotting has been happening for 3 weeks now.. if someone has some advice please let me know.. thanks! Answered by Janey Basye 1 year ago.

Depo Shot Spotting Answered by Giovanni Roberds 1 year ago.

Spotting On Depo Answered by Diamond Youngkin 1 year ago.

I went on the depo around 13 years ago and bled for 6 months straight.. not heavy just spotting. After 6 months I finally built up the courage to go see a doctor... and was prescribed Ponstan... It cleared it up like a charm. I only had one shot and that was it. 13 years later... I decided to give it another go... I told my current doctor about the Ponstan and he prescribed that as well. Worked a treat. I was about 4 months overdue for my next shot (but wasnt sexually active in that time anyway) and recently had another shot. This time I have the brown spotting etc.. The Ponstan 250mg doesnt seem to be kicking in (should do so after a week) so tomorrow I'm heading to the docs again to request the stronger version which is what I used originally. Fingers crossed but it works for me. I asked recent doc why it works so well.. he explained that it's because Ponstan reduces haemoraging (spelling?) I was Answered by Rosalie Woodburn 1 year ago.

depo is very tricky. Ive also been using it for a few years, and sometimes i never get spotting but then theres times that i spot for weeks and weeks. the spotting is normal, you have nothing to worry about. Birth control is like that sometimes, you are interfering with your body's normal function in taking birth control though. Answered by Andrew Balkin 1 year ago.

I commend you for using depo... my first try at it and i bled for 3 months non stop... you should see your doctor asap Answered by Charissa Hillsgrove 1 year ago.

It is possible, but I'm not convinced Answered by Eun Lomba 1 year ago.


About Depo provera?
sorry hopefuly you can read it my key bored is not working right and my cp is being realy slow Asked by Julienne Coskey 1 year ago.

What are the chances of getting pregnant with Depo Provera? It is unusual to get pregnant while taking Depo-Provera regularly, but pregnancies sometimes occur before the shot is given, and then go unrecognized until there is an obvious sign, like fetal movement. If a woman does becomes pregnant while using Depo Provera, and continues her pregnancy, there may be an increased risk of premature birth. Pregnancy and Depo Provera are like sunshine and rain. There is an extremely rare chance of them being together. Famed as one of the best birth control pills, Depo Provera is also infamous for preventing pregnancies even after use. This can be blamed on the long term effects of the hormone progestin, which is the main ingredient of Depo Provera. Depo Provera is a hormone injection that lasts for 3 months to prevent pregnancy. It is a long-acting progestin based contraceptive is given as a shot into your arm or buttock once every three months. The injection has synthetic progesterone and no estrogen. Depo Provera stops the ovaries from releasing eggs and thus prevents pregnancy by preventing the ovarian egg cells from maturing and releasing from the ovary. If an egg does not mature and release from either ovary there is no egg to be fertilized by sperm and pregnancy cannot occur. Depo Provera shot also changes the condition of the lining of the uterus so that pregnancy is less likely to occur. The effectiveness of Depo Provera in preventing pregnancy starts to wear off after three months, but the medication may remain in your body for up to a year. Due to the risk of serious health problems, Depo Provera is not recommended for women who are planning on becoming pregnant in the near future, are concerned over weight gain, have liver disease, gallbladder disease, or a history of depression. Your clinician or doctor can help you decide. There are also a lot of other associated disadvantages of Depo Provera that can hinder conception after long term use. The long term use of this medication causes irregularities in menstrual cycles for many women. Though medically they are acceptable as side effects, they can be very disturbing for some women. Irregular, heavy, or no bleeding are common side effects of Depo Provera. After a year of use, many women stop having periods. By the second year of use, many women have no periods at all. In addition, they can also be misleading for women who want to keep track of their menstrual cycles. Another concern for many women who are considering using or are using Depo-Provera is weight gain. On average, women gain about five pounds during the first year of use, so if you're using this method, it's a good idea to pay extra close attention to your eating habits and to get into an exercise routine. Furthermore, women who use Depo Provera may face an increased risk of osteoporosis and are advised to exercise and take in plenty of calcium. Some studies suggest, however, that bone density is restored once women stop taking Depo Provera. If you have been on Depo Provera and decide you want to get pregnant, it may take more than a year to regain your fertility. Don't forget to take either folate or a daily vitamin that contains folate while you are off Depo Provera and trying to get pregnant. Folic acid can prevent birth defects that occur in the period before you might even know that you're pregnant. Answered by Mamie Ady 1 year ago.

the chances of you getting pregnant on depo is extremely low. however there is more to be worried about with depo. you lose 2.5 bone mass density every year you are on it. doesnt sound like much but it is and can lead to osteoporosis very early in life. take calcium supplements with vitamin d in it. also alot of owmen have trouble conceiving for years after getting off the shot. there are other hormonal problems with it such as severe weight gain, extreme hunger, facial and body hair that isnt supposed to be there and wont go away. big stroke risk, infertility. look this up further and i would advise to get on a different birth control. personally i gained 25 lbs in 6 months on depo!! and started to grow little hairs after i took it on my fc stomach and chest ewww!!!. never had this problem before! looked it up and its pretty common. the weight i gained was really hard to lose because it took forever for the hormones to leave my body after getting off it. Answered by Mazie Holzem 1 year ago.

yes i got pregnant right before i got the shot so it was too early to tell and even the clinic got a negative results but sure enough i miscarried and with the hormone still in my system doctor's confirmed that i had been pregnant. i bleed for 6 weeks. Answered by Melaine Sinka 1 year ago.


Had really heavy bleeding 9-4-06, got on provera?
The doc put me on 5 mg provera for 14 days, said I would bleed at the end. Never started bleeding. So now, it's beena month and 6 days since I finished the meds. Should I be expecting some bleeding? Or liek when I was on Depo-provera will thei screw up my periods even more? Asked by Lino Desler 1 year ago.

I've had the identical factor occur to me. I began my shot at the twenty fifth and did not bleed in any respect until final Tuesday. I obtained so drawback that I went to my health care provider. She positioned me at the continous tablet seasonale to quit the bleeding. It will have to relieve it. If you get drawback with the bleeding or if you're bleeding EXTREMELY I could certainly advise you notice a health care provider. I was once additionally instructed should you feel approximately it and pressure out approximately it it is going to make matters worse. Is this your first shot? Keep in brain the shot for the primary 12 months might intent alot of recognizing by way of the cycle. Breakthrough bleeding occurs plenty so I could now not fear approximately it. Answered by Dimple Hysong 1 year ago.


Has anyone had a good experience with Depo Provera?
I've noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss. People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased? Does anyone have any good... Asked by Maryetta Schnair 1 year ago.

I've noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss. People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased? Does anyone have any good experiences with this form of birth control? Answered by Aracelis Ellsmore 1 year ago.

Depo-Provera has several advantages:[3][4][17][18] * Highly effective at preventing pregnancy. * Injected every 12 weeks. The only continuing action is to book subsequent follow-up injections every twelve weeks, and to monitor side effects to ensure that they do not require medical attention. * No estrogen. No increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, or myocardial infarction. * Culturally acceptable. Some cultures believe injections are especially efficacious. Injections also afford privacy because use is not detectable. * Minimal drug interactions (compared to other hormonal contraceptives). * Decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Depo-Provera reduces the risk of endometrial cancer by 80%. The reduced risk of endometrial cancer in Depo-Provera users is thought to be due to both the direct anti-proliferative effect of progestogen on the endometrium and the indirect reduction of estrogen levels by suppression of ovarian follicular development. * Decreased risk of iron deficiency anemia, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, and uterine fibroids. * Decreased symptoms of endometriosis. * Decreased incidence of primary dysmenorrhea, ovulation pain, and functional ovarian cysts. * Decreased incidence of seizures in women with epilepsy. Additionally, unlike most other hormonal contraceptives, Depo-Provera's contraceptive effectiveness is not affected by enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. * Decreased incidence and severity of sickle cell crises in women with sickle-cell disease. In the largest clinical trial of Depo-Provera, the most frequently reported adverse reactions (which may or may not be related to the use of Depo-Provera) were: menstrual irregularities (bleeding or amenorrhea or both), abdominal pain or discomfort, weight changes, headache, asthenia (weakness or fatigue), and nervousness. Other, less frequently reported adverse reactions are listed in the patient and physician label information for Depo-Provera. Answered by Lynetta Houts 1 year ago.

It was the first birth control I ever used. I only used it for 9 months because I bled continuosly for those 9 months. I didn't gain weight or anything else with it. The bleeding was the only side effect I had. Its very convenient and worth a shot to see how your body reacts to it. You might have no problems from it. Answered by Sebrina Puls 1 year ago.


About the Depo provera?
While antibiotics does the depo shot fail?I can't remember if the doctor told me yes or no..I have been on antibiotics for only 4 days, but I also have had unproteced sex.Can it fail and what are the chances I may be pregnant.i'm not having symptoms or anything, but they curiosity is killing... Asked by Eleanor Aldarondo 1 year ago.

While antibiotics does the depo shot fail? I can't remember if the doctor told me yes or no.. I have been on antibiotics for only 4 days, but I also have had unproteced sex. Can it fail and what are the chances I may be pregnant. i'm not having symptoms or anything, but they curiosity is killing me Just to be safe I. Answered by Deloise Pizzo 1 year ago.

Antibiotics can interfere with any hormonal birth control, so you should always use a backup method when you're on antibiotics. Your chances of being pregnant are still pretty slim, but you should probably go ahead and take a test, just to be on the safe side. Answered by Herta Lokken 1 year ago.

i was told that antibiotics do not interfere with depo provera Answered by Arnoldo Crayne 1 year ago.


Is depo provera a good choice for birth control?
does it work good? Asked by Maris Stirgus 1 year ago.

Warnings and precautions Depo Provera can require up to fourteen days to take effect. This means pregnancy can occur within fourteen days of the first Depo injection. Takes seven days to take effect if given after the first four days of the period cycle. Effective immediately if given during the first four days of the period cycle. Offers no protection against Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Depo Provera can affect menstrual bleeding. After a year of use, 55% of women experience amenorrhoea; after 2 years, the rate rises to 68%. In the first months of use "irregular or unpredictable bleeding or spotting, or rarely, heavy or continuous bleeding" was reported. Delayed return of fertility. The average return to fertility is 9 to 10 months after the last injection. By 18 months after the last injection, fertility is the same as that in former users of other contraceptive methods Long-term studies of users of Depo-Provera have found slight or no increased overall risk of breast cancer. However, the study population did show a slightly increased risk of breast cancer in recent users (Depo use in the last four years) under age 35, similar to that seen with the use of combined oral contraceptive pills.[16] Infants born to women exposed to Depo during pregnancy in one study had an 80% greater chance of dying in the first year of life. [edit] Black box warning While it has long been known that Depo-Provera causes bone loss, it has recently been discovered that the osteoporotic effects of the injection grow worse the longer Depo-Provera is administered, may remain long after the injections are stopped, and may be irreversible. For this reason, on November 17, 2004 the United States Food and Drug Administration and Pfizer agreed to put a "black box warning" on Depo-Provera's label. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) advises that the use of Depo Provera should not be restricted. It is unclear whether the bone density loss associated with Depo-Provera use is reversible, and if so, how completely. Three studies have suggested that bone loss is reversible after the discontinuation of Depo-Provera, although one notes that bone loss was not reversible in long-term users of Depo-Provera. Other studies have suggested that the effect of Depo-Provera use on post-menopausal bone density is minimal,[24] perhaps because Depo users experience less bone loss at menopause. However, as of 2006, no study has directly examined fracture risk in post-menopausal women who have used Depo-Provera; therefore, the risk is unknown. Pfizer and the FDA recommend that Depo-Provera not be used for longer than 2 years, unless there is no viable alternative method of contraception, due to concerns over bone loss. Side effects Depo-Provera may have side effects, in order of greatest frequency:[26] menstrual irregularities (irregular bleeding, amenorrhoea absence of bleeding or metrorrhagia constant bleeding) nausea, vomiting, headaches, dizziness, breast swelling and tenderness, depression, skin disorders (rash, hot flushes, acne, alteration hair growth), alteration in appetite, altered weight and changes in libido. Other possible associated side effects are set out in the product licensing and patient labelling with some rare but potentially serious effects being: convulsions, jaundice, urinary tract infections, allergic reactions, fainting, paralysis, osteoporosis, lack of return to fertility, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolus. FAilure Rates Most sources cite the failure rate for Depo-Provera at 0.3 percent annually, which would be three women out of a thousand per year. The two year combined failure rate for Depo-Provera, Norplant, and IUD use for women aged 20-24 was 10.9 percent, which comes out to one woman in ten. Answered by Karoline Gulde 1 year ago.

It can be great for some women that don't want to think about taking tablets everyday, and is normally given as an option to help women who suffer from endometriosis, (I have been operated for twice for endometriosis and was given the shot, I ended up getting my period for 6 months, and suffered alot of nausia, my mother who also has been operated for for endometriosis, also had the shot, she didn't suffer ongoing bleeding but suffered sever weight gain and nausia.. The shot doesn't actually make you gain weight, but it does increase your appetite alot so if you are not a person who controls their eating habits well you can gain alot of weight... I never had this problem as I am always very busy and exersize alot, and eat a balanced diet.. My mother on the other hand is not very good at controlling her appetite and when she felt hungry she ate, and ate not the right food, so she put on loads of weight... You have to weigh up what is right for you , I have met loads of women that swear by depo provera, and have met loads that think its the worst thing ever made, I personally wouldn't take it again, but I beleive it's important to try different things and find out what works for you, for me the Contraceptive ring is fabulous a ring which you change every month (not a diaphram) it looks like a thick rubber band all you do is place it up there, and it goes unnoticed its been fabulous, and because you dont take it like a tablet which goes though your stomache you dont get nausia.. Ask your doctor about it, in Spanish it is called Anillo Contraceptivo Best of luck Answered by Brian Nord 1 year ago.

Exercising each day when compared with morning Answered by Leanna Vanier 1 year ago.

while eating dinner out test to have a healthier solution Answered by Collin Weemhoff 1 year ago.

It works well however, I was on it for three years and it made it that I gained 60 pounds and it took my husband and I 13 months to get pregnant after being on it. If you can remember the pill Yasmine was my favorite. Answered by Dennis Puddy 1 year ago.

NO! No No No No No NO No No I don't know WHY that shot is still on the market. You can get all sorts of scary illnesses from it, including mental problems like anxiety and depression... My daughter tried this shot... please please don't make her mistake. It was AWEFUL for her. If you don't believe me, do some online research, there are women all over who had terrible side effects. Answered by Ken Crosier 1 year ago.

Adhere to an increasingly trim protein/green vegetable eating habits Answered by Amira Hunze 1 year ago.

It is highly effective against pregnancy, but it can make you gain weight like crazy! Answered by Willian Schubert 1 year ago.


What is provera?
i thought it helps to stop your period if it has been on longer than usual. Can i still become pregnant by using this? plz someone answer me rigth away Asked by Sueann Pietsch 1 year ago.

Provera is derived from the female hormone progesterone. You may be given Provera if your menstrual periods have stopped or a female hormone imbalance is causing your uterus to bleed abnormally. Provera is also prescribed to prevent abnormal growth of the uterine lining in women taking estrogen replacement therapy. Other forms of medroxyprogesterone, such as Depo-Provera, are used as a contraceptive injection and prescribed in the treatment of endometrial cancer. Medroxyprogesterone inhibits fertility at high doses. Some doctors prescribe Provera to treat endometriosis, menopausal symptoms, premenstrual tension, sexual aggressive behavior in men, and sleep apnea (temporary failure to breath while sleeping). You should never take Provera during the first 4 months of pregnancy. During this formative period, even a few days of treatment with Provera might put your unborn baby at increased risk for birth defects. If you take Provera and later discover that you were pregnant when you took it, discuss this with your doctor right away. Side effects may include: Acne, anaphylaxis (life-threatening allergic reaction), blood clot in a vein, lungs, or brain, breakthrough bleeding (between menstrual periods), breast tenderness or sudden or excessive flow of milk, cervical erosion or changes in secretions, depression, excessive growth of hair, fever, fluid retention, hair loss, headache, hives, insomnia, itching, lack of menstruation, menstrual flow changes, spotting, nausea, rash, skin discoloration, sleepiness, weight gain or loss, yellowed eyes and skin. Provera should never be taken during pregnancy. Avoid it if you even suspect you're pregnant. Doctors once prescribed Provera as a test for pregnancy, but no longer do so for 2 reasons: Quicker, safer pregnancy tests are now available. If you are in fact pregnant, Provera might injure the baby. Similarly, Provera used to be given to try to prevent miscarriage. However, doctors now believe that this treatment is not only ineffective but also potentially harmful to the baby. Do not take Provera if you have: Cancer of the breast or genital organs Liver disease or a liver condition A dead fetus still in the uterus Undiagnosed bleeding from the vagina Do not take Provera if you have, or have ever developed, blood clots. Avoid it, too, if it gives you an allergic reaction. Provera may cause some degree of fluid retention. If you have a medical condition that could be made worse by fluid retention--such as epilepsy, migraine, asthma, or a heart or kidney problem--make sure your doctor knows about it. Provera may mask the onset of menopause. In other words, while taking Provera you may continue to experience regular menstrual bleeding even if your menopause has started. Provera may make you depressed, especially if you have suffered from depression in the past. If you become seriously depressed, tell your doctor; you should probably stop taking Provera. If you are diabetic, Provera could make your diabetes worse; your doctor will want to watch you closely while you are taking this drug. There is some concern that Provera, like birth control pills, may increase your risk for a blood clot in a vein. If you experience any symptoms that might suggest the onset of such a condition--pain with swelling, warmth, and redness in a leg vein, coughing or shortness of breath, vision problems, migraine, or weakness or numbness in an arm or leg--see your doctor immediately. Tell your doctor right away if you lose some or all of your vision or you start seeing double. You may have to stop taking the medication. If Provera is taken with certain other drugs, the effects of either may be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Provera with aminoglutethimide (Cytadren). You should not take Provera during pregnancy. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, inform your doctor immediately. Provera appears in breast milk. If you are a new mother, you may need to choose between taking Provera and breastfeeding your baby. To Restore Menstrual Periods Provera Tablets are taken in dosages of 5 to 10 milligrams daily for 5 to 10 days. Make sure you discuss what effect this will have on your menstrual cycle with your doctor. You should have bleeding 3 to 7 days after you stop taking Provera. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Due to Hormonal Imbalance Beginning on the 16th or 21st day of your menstrual cycle, you will take 5 to 10 milligrams daily for 5 to 10 days. Make sure you discuss what effect this will have on your menstrual cycle with your doctor. You should have bleeding 3 to 7 days after you stop taking Provera. To Accompany Estrogen Replacement Therapy The recommended regimen is 5 or 10 milligrams of Provera a day for 12 to 14 days each month, beginning on either Day 1 or Day 16 of the cycle. GENERIC NAME: medroxyprogesterone acetate BRAND NAME: Provera, Cycrin, Amen Answered by Blanche Calvi 1 year ago.

Depo Provera is a birth control shot you get 4 times a year. Usually it stops your menstral cycle. If you get the shot from your doctor on a regular schedule it is more effective than the pill at preventing pregnancies. DO NOT GET THIS IF YOU ARE TRYING OR MAY HAVE BECOME PREGNANT! Answered by Vivien Morgana 1 year ago.

I took the shot and my period started right away. After that, I literally had a period ranging from heavy to light for 8 months. It would stop for a day at the most and then start right back up again. My doctor fed me a lot of crap reasons why (ex. You're body is just ridding itself of toxins...). I never did figure out why it happened considering that you aren't even really supposed to have your period on the shot. I agree that more women should be informed about these kind of stories before making a decision. Answered by Theda Rainier 1 year ago.

provera(medroxyprogestrone) is a female hormaone to regulate the ovaries and your period it is used to treat abnormal bleeding and lack of a period. most of your birth control pills already contain this ingrediant. using this drug alone i would not reccomend it as you may get pregnant because birth control pills contain other ingreadiants to prevent pregnancy that taking provera alone does not have Answered by Lynell Fedoriw 1 year ago.

its a shot..you get every 3 months....it will NOT stop your period you will bleed for months on end, you will gain atleast 15 pounds and have ovarian cysts. I had all this from one shot. Please do not take that stuff!! Answered by Kiyoko Kisinger 1 year ago.


Ovulation during provera?
I'm wondering how this works, does my body ovulate while taking provera? if so does that mean that the eggs don't last long. i just don't understand how i get a period in 5 days after i take my pills if i don't ovulate. Asked by Margit Warthen 1 year ago.

Provera is a synthetic form of the naturally occurring female sex hormone, progesterone. It is used to treat various disorders of the menstrual cycle. A woman's menstrual cycle is a complex process that is controlled by at least four different hormones. The blood levels of these hormones change throughout the menstrual cycle, causing an egg to be released from the ovaries (ovulation), preparation of the womb lining for a possible pregnancy and shedding of the womb lining each month if pregnancy doesn't occur (a menstrual period). There are plenty of places that this complex process can go wrong. If your periods are irregular or have stopped completely and your doctor can find no obvious cause, it may be that something has upset your natural hormone levels. Provera can help to restore your natural hormone levels, because it mimics the effects of your natural progesterone. Normally the level of progesterone in your blood increases about a week before your period. If provera is taken for 5 to 10 days each month at this time ( day 16 to 21 of your cycle) it mimics the natural rise in your progesterone levels. This can help your other hormones to behave in a more normal way. To treat irregular periods this medicine is taken in this way for two menstrual cycles. To treat periods that have stopped it is taken for three menstrual cycles. At the end of the treatment regular periods should return. Endometriosis can also be treated by manipulating your hormones with provera. In this condition, tissue resembling the womb lining grows abnormally around the ovaries, womb and bladder. This tissue is controlled by the same hormones that control your menstrual cycle, and thickens and is shed in the same way as your normal womb lining. Provera stops the abnormal tissue from thickening and then bleeding. As a result your menstrual periods are also likely to stop during the treatment as well. After treatment has finished the patches of endometrial tissue may be smaller, or may have shrunk away altogether. One of progesterone's most important functions is to cause the endometrium to secrete special proteins during the second half of the menstrual cycle, preparing it to receive and nourish an implanted fertilized egg. If implantation does not occur, estrogen and progesterone levels drop, the endometrium breaks down and menstruation occurs.((The provera is a natural progesterone and it helps thickin the lining of your uterus)) If a pregnancy occurs, progesterone is produced in the placenta and levels remain elevated throughout the pregnancy. The combination of high estrogen and progesterone levels suppress further ovulation during pregnancy. Progesterone also encourages the growth of milk-producing glands in the breast during pregnancy. High progesterone levels are believed to be partly responsible for symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS), such as breast tenderness, feeling bloated and mood swings. When you skip a period, it could be because of failure to ovulate and subsequent low progesterone levels. Progestogens are included along with estrogen in combination oral contraceptives and in menopausal hormone therapy. Progestins are also used alone for birth control, and for treatment of a variety of other conditions, including abnormal uterine bleeding and amenorrhea (absence of periods); endometriosis; breast, kidney or uterine cancer; and loss of appetite and weight related to AIDS and cancer. Progestins may also be used as a diagnostic aid to check the effects of estrogen. Maintaining menstrual cycles, a function of progestins, is important during childbearing years because shedding the uterine lining each month reduces the risk of endometrial cancer. If you frequently skip periods due to polycystic ovary syndrome, being overweight or underweight, or another disorder, your health care professional may recommend birth control pills to regulate your cycle. If taken throughout your whole cycle it can disrupt ovulation... If taken the last 5 days of your cycle it will not disrupt ovulation and you can still get pregnant.. I hope i helped Answered by Emerson Damm 1 year ago.

Medroxyprogesterone Ovulation Answered by Ricki Dolven 1 year ago.

Ovulation doesn't cause bleeding. Many women who do not ovulate still will bleed. In a normal cycle, the lining of the uterus builds up in response to a rise of hormones, estrogen and progesterone. Then, after a peak, the hormone level drops sharply. When the uterus no longer has the hormonal support, it lets go of it's lining and you bleed. (If a fertilized egg is implanted, other factors take over and there is not the sharp drop in hormones, so no period.) Provera is a hormone like progesterone. The point of taking it is to get a big build up of the endometrium, your uterine lining. Then, when you suddenly stop it, there is a sudden withdrawal of the progesterone from your body. Unless there is some other problem, you should have a substantial withdrawal bleed. It's unlikely that you would ovulate while taking it; it overrides your natural cycle and prevents that. But after you bleed, you could. Answered by Xuan Delucca 1 year ago.

If you are having to take provera to have periods then you are probably not ovulating anyway. (that is my understanding of the meds) I am currently on both and have been on provera now for a year and taken it previous years before. Have you been checked to make sure you are ovulating? My doctor told me provera will not help anything with ovulation just to bring your period on and that is it. Good luck hope this helps! Answered by Nga Steinbrook 1 year ago.


Depo provera.. spotting?
okay so I've benn on depo for almost 3 years now and have never had a problem until a few weeks ago. i have been spotting for the past 3 weeks now and its been very weird. it ranges from brown spots to really bright red. i've looked online for info but every website says something different.the thing... Asked by Shirlene Tregre 1 year ago.

okay so I've benn on depo for almost 3 years now and have never had a problem until a few weeks ago. i have been spotting for the past 3 weeks now and its been very weird. it ranges from brown spots to really bright red. i've looked online for info but every website says something different. the thing is, my boyfriend and i started having sex again so i thought this was a reason why i was spotting. ive also been working out and sometimes heavy work outs cause spotting. i havent had sex in two weeks or done any exercise to see if this had anything to do with the spotting... BUT i still have spotting. I havent had my period in almost 3 yrs so is this normal? the spotting has been happening for 3 weeks now.. if someone has some advice please let me know.. thanks! Answered by Lemuel Undercoffler 1 year ago.

Depo Shot Spotting Answered by Sharita Snedden 1 year ago.

Spotting On Depo Answered by Reiko Kammer 1 year ago.

I went on the depo around 13 years ago and bled for 6 months straight.. not heavy just spotting. After 6 months I finally built up the courage to go see a doctor... and was prescribed Ponstan... It cleared it up like a charm. I only had one shot and that was it. 13 years later... I decided to give it another go... I told my current doctor about the Ponstan and he prescribed that as well. Worked a treat. I was about 4 months overdue for my next shot (but wasnt sexually active in that time anyway) and recently had another shot. This time I have the brown spotting etc.. The Ponstan 250mg doesnt seem to be kicking in (should do so after a week) so tomorrow I'm heading to the docs again to request the stronger version which is what I used originally. Fingers crossed but it works for me. I asked recent doc why it works so well.. he explained that it's because Ponstan reduces haemoraging (spelling?) I was Answered by Marin Werkhoven 1 year ago.

depo is very tricky. Ive also been using it for a few years, and sometimes i never get spotting but then theres times that i spot for weeks and weeks. the spotting is normal, you have nothing to worry about. Birth control is like that sometimes, you are interfering with your body's normal function in taking birth control though. Answered by Jolene Spiewak 1 year ago.

I commend you for using depo... my first try at it and i bled for 3 months non stop... you should see your doctor asap Answered by Zachery Cannellos 1 year ago.

It is possible, but I'm not convinced Answered by Niesha Uzdygan 1 year ago.


About Depo provera?
sorry hopefuly you can read it my key bored is not working right and my cp is being realy slow Asked by Bethanie Oriley 1 year ago.

What are the chances of getting pregnant with Depo Provera? It is unusual to get pregnant while taking Depo-Provera regularly, but pregnancies sometimes occur before the shot is given, and then go unrecognized until there is an obvious sign, like fetal movement. If a woman does becomes pregnant while using Depo Provera, and continues her pregnancy, there may be an increased risk of premature birth. Pregnancy and Depo Provera are like sunshine and rain. There is an extremely rare chance of them being together. Famed as one of the best birth control pills, Depo Provera is also infamous for preventing pregnancies even after use. This can be blamed on the long term effects of the hormone progestin, which is the main ingredient of Depo Provera. Depo Provera is a hormone injection that lasts for 3 months to prevent pregnancy. It is a long-acting progestin based contraceptive is given as a shot into your arm or buttock once every three months. The injection has synthetic progesterone and no estrogen. Depo Provera stops the ovaries from releasing eggs and thus prevents pregnancy by preventing the ovarian egg cells from maturing and releasing from the ovary. If an egg does not mature and release from either ovary there is no egg to be fertilized by sperm and pregnancy cannot occur. Depo Provera shot also changes the condition of the lining of the uterus so that pregnancy is less likely to occur. The effectiveness of Depo Provera in preventing pregnancy starts to wear off after three months, but the medication may remain in your body for up to a year. Due to the risk of serious health problems, Depo Provera is not recommended for women who are planning on becoming pregnant in the near future, are concerned over weight gain, have liver disease, gallbladder disease, or a history of depression. Your clinician or doctor can help you decide. There are also a lot of other associated disadvantages of Depo Provera that can hinder conception after long term use. The long term use of this medication causes irregularities in menstrual cycles for many women. Though medically they are acceptable as side effects, they can be very disturbing for some women. Irregular, heavy, or no bleeding are common side effects of Depo Provera. After a year of use, many women stop having periods. By the second year of use, many women have no periods at all. In addition, they can also be misleading for women who want to keep track of their menstrual cycles. Another concern for many women who are considering using or are using Depo-Provera is weight gain. On average, women gain about five pounds during the first year of use, so if you're using this method, it's a good idea to pay extra close attention to your eating habits and to get into an exercise routine. Furthermore, women who use Depo Provera may face an increased risk of osteoporosis and are advised to exercise and take in plenty of calcium. Some studies suggest, however, that bone density is restored once women stop taking Depo Provera. If you have been on Depo Provera and decide you want to get pregnant, it may take more than a year to regain your fertility. Don't forget to take either folate or a daily vitamin that contains folate while you are off Depo Provera and trying to get pregnant. Folic acid can prevent birth defects that occur in the period before you might even know that you're pregnant. Answered by Rosanna Mrnak 1 year ago.

the chances of you getting pregnant on depo is extremely low. however there is more to be worried about with depo. you lose 2.5 bone mass density every year you are on it. doesnt sound like much but it is and can lead to osteoporosis very early in life. take calcium supplements with vitamin d in it. also alot of owmen have trouble conceiving for years after getting off the shot. there are other hormonal problems with it such as severe weight gain, extreme hunger, facial and body hair that isnt supposed to be there and wont go away. big stroke risk, infertility. look this up further and i would advise to get on a different birth control. personally i gained 25 lbs in 6 months on depo!! and started to grow little hairs after i took it on my fc stomach and chest ewww!!!. never had this problem before! looked it up and its pretty common. the weight i gained was really hard to lose because it took forever for the hormones to leave my body after getting off it. Answered by Luna Eggett 1 year ago.

yes i got pregnant right before i got the shot so it was too early to tell and even the clinic got a negative results but sure enough i miscarried and with the hormone still in my system doctor's confirmed that i had been pregnant. i bleed for 6 weeks. Answered by Larue Sherry 1 year ago.


Had really heavy bleeding 9-4-06, got on provera?
The doc put me on 5 mg provera for 14 days, said I would bleed at the end. Never started bleeding. So now, it's beena month and 6 days since I finished the meds. Should I be expecting some bleeding? Or liek when I was on Depo-provera will thei screw up my periods even more? Asked by Tonda Bizzell 1 year ago.

I've had the identical factor occur to me. I began my shot at the twenty fifth and did not bleed in any respect until final Tuesday. I obtained so drawback that I went to my health care provider. She positioned me at the continous tablet seasonale to quit the bleeding. It will have to relieve it. If you get drawback with the bleeding or if you're bleeding EXTREMELY I could certainly advise you notice a health care provider. I was once additionally instructed should you feel approximately it and pressure out approximately it it is going to make matters worse. Is this your first shot? Keep in brain the shot for the primary 12 months might intent alot of recognizing by way of the cycle. Breakthrough bleeding occurs plenty so I could now not fear approximately it. Answered by Harland Juste 1 year ago.


Has anyone had a good experience with Depo Provera?
I've noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss. People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased? Does anyone have any good... Asked by Pasty Bubert 1 year ago.

I've noticed a lot of people are saying really bad things about it. The main ones that worry me are the weight gain and the hair loss. People have reported to have lost 20+ pounds. But I mean, is it ALL the shots fault or was it because your cravings for food increased? Does anyone have any good experiences with this form of birth control? Answered by Veda Lozaya 1 year ago.

Depo-Provera has several advantages:[3][4][17][18] * Highly effective at preventing pregnancy. * Injected every 12 weeks. The only continuing action is to book subsequent follow-up injections every twelve weeks, and to monitor side effects to ensure that they do not require medical attention. * No estrogen. No increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), stroke, or myocardial infarction. * Culturally acceptable. Some cultures believe injections are especially efficacious. Injections also afford privacy because use is not detectable. * Minimal drug interactions (compared to other hormonal contraceptives). * Decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Depo-Provera reduces the risk of endometrial cancer by 80%. The reduced risk of endometrial cancer in Depo-Provera users is thought to be due to both the direct anti-proliferative effect of progestogen on the endometrium and the indirect reduction of estrogen levels by suppression of ovarian follicular development. * Decreased risk of iron deficiency anemia, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, and uterine fibroids. * Decreased symptoms of endometriosis. * Decreased incidence of primary dysmenorrhea, ovulation pain, and functional ovarian cysts. * Decreased incidence of seizures in women with epilepsy. Additionally, unlike most other hormonal contraceptives, Depo-Provera's contraceptive effectiveness is not affected by enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. * Decreased incidence and severity of sickle cell crises in women with sickle-cell disease. In the largest clinical trial of Depo-Provera, the most frequently reported adverse reactions (which may or may not be related to the use of Depo-Provera) were: menstrual irregularities (bleeding or amenorrhea or both), abdominal pain or discomfort, weight changes, headache, asthenia (weakness or fatigue), and nervousness. Other, less frequently reported adverse reactions are listed in the patient and physician label information for Depo-Provera. Answered by Mercy Longabaugh 1 year ago.

It was the first birth control I ever used. I only used it for 9 months because I bled continuosly for those 9 months. I didn't gain weight or anything else with it. The bleeding was the only side effect I had. Its very convenient and worth a shot to see how your body reacts to it. You might have no problems from it. Answered by Lorraine Eberlein 1 year ago.


About the Depo provera?
While antibiotics does the depo shot fail?I can't remember if the doctor told me yes or no..I have been on antibiotics for only 4 days, but I also have had unproteced sex.Can it fail and what are the chances I may be pregnant.i'm not having symptoms or anything, but they curiosity is killing... Asked by Cleo Liscomb 1 year ago.

While antibiotics does the depo shot fail? I can't remember if the doctor told me yes or no.. I have been on antibiotics for only 4 days, but I also have had unproteced sex. Can it fail and what are the chances I may be pregnant. i'm not having symptoms or anything, but they curiosity is killing me Just to be safe I. Answered by Johnson Biggers 1 year ago.

Antibiotics can interfere with any hormonal birth control, so you should always use a backup method when you're on antibiotics. Your chances of being pregnant are still pretty slim, but you should probably go ahead and take a test, just to be on the safe side. Answered by Renae Ovsanik 1 year ago.

i was told that antibiotics do not interfere with depo provera Answered by Alison Hoyland 1 year ago.


Is depo provera a good choice for birth control?
does it work good? Asked by Grover Apalategui 1 year ago.

Warnings and precautions Depo Provera can require up to fourteen days to take effect. This means pregnancy can occur within fourteen days of the first Depo injection. Takes seven days to take effect if given after the first four days of the period cycle. Effective immediately if given during the first four days of the period cycle. Offers no protection against Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Depo Provera can affect menstrual bleeding. After a year of use, 55% of women experience amenorrhoea; after 2 years, the rate rises to 68%. In the first months of use "irregular or unpredictable bleeding or spotting, or rarely, heavy or continuous bleeding" was reported. Delayed return of fertility. The average return to fertility is 9 to 10 months after the last injection. By 18 months after the last injection, fertility is the same as that in former users of other contraceptive methods Long-term studies of users of Depo-Provera have found slight or no increased overall risk of breast cancer. However, the study population did show a slightly increased risk of breast cancer in recent users (Depo use in the last four years) under age 35, similar to that seen with the use of combined oral contraceptive pills.[16] Infants born to women exposed to Depo during pregnancy in one study had an 80% greater chance of dying in the first year of life. [edit] Black box warning While it has long been known that Depo-Provera causes bone loss, it has recently been discovered that the osteoporotic effects of the injection grow worse the longer Depo-Provera is administered, may remain long after the injections are stopped, and may be irreversible. For this reason, on November 17, 2004 the United States Food and Drug Administration and Pfizer agreed to put a "black box warning" on Depo-Provera's label. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) advises that the use of Depo Provera should not be restricted. It is unclear whether the bone density loss associated with Depo-Provera use is reversible, and if so, how completely. Three studies have suggested that bone loss is reversible after the discontinuation of Depo-Provera, although one notes that bone loss was not reversible in long-term users of Depo-Provera. Other studies have suggested that the effect of Depo-Provera use on post-menopausal bone density is minimal,[24] perhaps because Depo users experience less bone loss at menopause. However, as of 2006, no study has directly examined fracture risk in post-menopausal women who have used Depo-Provera; therefore, the risk is unknown. Pfizer and the FDA recommend that Depo-Provera not be used for longer than 2 years, unless there is no viable alternative method of contraception, due to concerns over bone loss. Side effects Depo-Provera may have side effects, in order of greatest frequency:[26] menstrual irregularities (irregular bleeding, amenorrhoea absence of bleeding or metrorrhagia constant bleeding) nausea, vomiting, headaches, dizziness, breast swelling and tenderness, depression, skin disorders (rash, hot flushes, acne, alteration hair growth), alteration in appetite, altered weight and changes in libido. Other possible associated side effects are set out in the product licensing and patient labelling with some rare but potentially serious effects being: convulsions, jaundice, urinary tract infections, allergic reactions, fainting, paralysis, osteoporosis, lack of return to fertility, deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolus. FAilure Rates Most sources cite the failure rate for Depo-Provera at 0.3 percent annually, which would be three women out of a thousand per year. The two year combined failure rate for Depo-Provera, Norplant, and IUD use for women aged 20-24 was 10.9 percent, which comes out to one woman in ten. Answered by Vennie Strowd 1 year ago.

It can be great for some women that don't want to think about taking tablets everyday, and is normally given as an option to help women who suffer from endometriosis, (I have been operated for twice for endometriosis and was given the shot, I ended up getting my period for 6 months, and suffered alot of nausia, my mother who also has been operated for for endometriosis, also had the shot, she didn't suffer ongoing bleeding but suffered sever weight gain and nausia.. The shot doesn't actually make you gain weight, but it does increase your appetite alot so if you are not a person who controls their eating habits well you can gain alot of weight... I never had this problem as I am always very busy and exersize alot, and eat a balanced diet.. My mother on the other hand is not very good at controlling her appetite and when she felt hungry she ate, and ate not the right food, so she put on loads of weight... You have to weigh up what is right for you , I have met loads of women that swear by depo provera, and have met loads that think its the worst thing ever made, I personally wouldn't take it again, but I beleive it's important to try different things and find out what works for you, for me the Contraceptive ring is fabulous a ring which you change every month (not a diaphram) it looks like a thick rubber band all you do is place it up there, and it goes unnoticed its been fabulous, and because you dont take it like a tablet which goes though your stomache you dont get nausia.. Ask your doctor about it, in Spanish it is called Anillo Contraceptivo Best of luck Answered by Yessenia Helmkamp 1 year ago.

Exercising each day when compared with morning Answered by Shandra Aderholdt 1 year ago.

while eating dinner out test to have a healthier solution Answered by Gertrudis Mangham 1 year ago.

It works well however, I was on it for three years and it made it that I gained 60 pounds and it took my husband and I 13 months to get pregnant after being on it. If you can remember the pill Yasmine was my favorite. Answered by Estell Kurutz 1 year ago.

NO! No No No No No NO No No I don't know WHY that shot is still on the market. You can get all sorts of scary illnesses from it, including mental problems like anxiety and depression... My daughter tried this shot... please please don't make her mistake. It was AWEFUL for her. If you don't believe me, do some online research, there are women all over who had terrible side effects. Answered by Freeda Rotman 1 year ago.

Adhere to an increasingly trim protein/green vegetable eating habits Answered by Tashina Dereu 1 year ago.

It is highly effective against pregnancy, but it can make you gain weight like crazy! Answered by Adrian Zukof 1 year ago.


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