Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017928/001.

Names and composition

"PROTAMINE ZINC INSULIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of INSULIN SUSP PROTAMINE ZINC PURIFIED BEEF.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017928/001 PROTAMINE ZINC INSULIN INSULIN SUSP PROTAMINE ZINC PURIFIED BEEF INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40 UNITS per ML
017928/003 PROTAMINE ZINC INSULIN INSULIN SUSP PROTAMINE ZINC PURIFIED BEEF INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100 UNITS per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017928/001 PROTAMINE ZINC INSULIN INSULIN SUSP PROTAMINE ZINC PURIFIED BEEF INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40 UNITS per ML
017928/003 PROTAMINE ZINC INSULIN INSULIN SUSP PROTAMINE ZINC PURIFIED BEEF INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100 UNITS per ML
018476/001 PROTAMINE ZINC AND ILETIN II INSULIN SUSP PROTAMINE ZINC PURIFIED BEEF INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100 UNITS per ML

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Answered questions

Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Alfredo Nollman 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Glenda Tanke 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Silvia Warran 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Lashawnda Stribley 1 year ago.


Cat with diabetes question:?
How many of you would give your cat shots to maintain his/her health if they discovered they were diabetic? My cat is 6 years old and now is a diabetic. I am going to switch food to try to help diet wise, but because I have a difficult cat and the vet recommends me bringing him back every month to 6 weeks for... Asked by Kendall Masterson 1 year ago.

How many of you would give your cat shots to maintain his/her health if they discovered they were diabetic? My cat is 6 years old and now is a diabetic. I am going to switch food to try to help diet wise, but because I have a difficult cat and the vet recommends me bringing him back every month to 6 weeks for checks and they would have to gas him each time at $100 a pop, not including another $110 for the insuline and syringes every couple of months. His food will have to be ordered and they said no treats. I can't afford to hire someone to give my cat shots when I am gone for long periods of time. How many of you would give shots to a cat? Would you try to maintain it with diet alone? I know I probably should not have gotten him knowing that he could have more health problems. He was sick when I adopted him from the humane society and I had to give him meds so I put them in a gravy pouched food and he kept getting sicker and sicker. Long story short, he developed kidney failure and liver failure at 6 months old and either had or had been in contact with heart worms and they could not treat him for them as it would kill him. The food I was dissolving his meds in wound up being recalled, it was poisonous to him, and that is why he kept getting sick. I switched vets as they were charging 700 dollars for blood work alone and wanted to do exploratory surgery to see why he had kidney and liver failure. I said no to the surgery and when I found out the food was poison, they told me I couldn't believe everything I hear. The new vet helped get his kidneys back to function with just saline drip in his neck area. Iams pet food wound up paying me back those vet bills as it was the cause of him getting sick. Now, he has been excessively drinking and using the liter box, and I found out all this today. What would do if you had my cat? Thank you in advance for your kind answers. Answered by Tequila Mcgoogan 1 year ago.

wow, poor cat, he's certainly been through a lot! I have a diabetic cat, now aged 17. She was diabetic when I got her 7 years ago, and we've been through a bit together. My first, and probably greatest recommendation is find a vet who has personal experience of diabetes - ie has a family member with the illness. Mine's husband is diabetic and I trust her judgement in a way I wouldn't trust another vet's judgement on the subject. I have heard many stories about vets and diabetic cats and most of them are horror stories which boil down to the vet not knowing enough about diabetes. Secondly read as much as you can about it, and join one of the yahoo mailing groups for owners of diabetic cats, their help and encouragement will be invaluable. thirdly - and no-one told me this, I had to find it out for myself - in very broad terms insulin lowers blood sugar, food increases it. It's actually quite important to know! If your cat is drinking and peeing excessively the blood sugar will be high and he needs insulin, if he's staggering around, looking like he's blind, getting stuck in corners he needs food, and quickly. If he's passed out on the floor get to the vet half an hour ago. fourthly, if you are going to persevere with him bully your vet into teaching you how to test his blood sugar yourself. And I mean bully, don't take no for an answer. You can get a blood testing kit from a chemist, they aren't expensive (though the testing sticks that go with them are). One that is intended for human use is absolutely fine for use with a cat. Test the cat regularly just before food, anything in the range 5 - 12 mmol is ok, higher or lower is cause for concern. Given his symptoms at the moment I would say he is well above this. You also don't need a fresh syringe every day, they can last 3-4 days. Despite what your vet will tell you you do not need to change the vial of insulin every month. I eventually grudgingly got mine to admit that a vial can last 3-6 months if you are very careful with it, though it does lose its potency, and contamination is possible. As it happens Phoebe was only borderline diabetic and a new vial was too strong for her - I had to open it and leave it a month to go off before I started using it! Her previous owner was adamant that she couldn't inject the cat twice a day, so she is on a long lasting insulin (insuvet zinc-protamine - don't know if this is a UK only product) and gets an injection in the morning only. You can try to control it with diet alone, but you do need to be checking blood sugar regularly if you do this, and it depends on how badly diabetic the cat is as to whether you will be able to. I would recommend that you find a low carbohydrate high protein food and stick to it. Phoebe was on Hills m/d biscuits (the situation has changed, hence past tense). I changed her to this from Hills w/d which is for weight loss - for some reason it is frequently given to diabetics, but is high carb low protein, which is the exact opposite of what a diabetic should have (again, vet don't know what they are on about!). Feed a measured amount, don't give treats except very occasionally. Feed at regular times. As I said, Phoebe was borderline, she was getting half a unit of insulin twice a week, which is nothing really, but she needed that little bit just to keep her on track. Phoebe now has age related kidney failure, so is now on a kidney diet (unhelpfully, high carb low protein...) and has a cancerous growth on her cheek, so I suspect she is not long for this world. Having said that I never expected to have her as long as I have. But.. to actually answer your question - no I don't think I would try to maintain him entirely on food, unless it was shown that that was enough. I would certainly be feeding him a veterinary diet which has the levels of protein and carbs guaranteed, - in commercial food the levels vary not only between brands, but between flavours, so you need to be very very careful what you get. I would be monitoring his blood sugar myself, daily to start with, possibly even twice a day (and no it isn't fun to do, especially with a difficult cat, you'l probably need help to start with at least), and then in conjunction with my diabetes-knowlegable vet I would be working out a regime that suited both the cat and my life. I wish you luck with him :) Answered by Chanel Greif 1 year ago.

If you've simply been advised that you've a diabetic cat, you can be scared of what the longer term holds on your puppy. The well information is that diabetes isn't a loss of life sentence for cats. Your cat might are living an extended and comfortable existence with diabetes. All this calls for is so that you can deal with your cat and furnish the puppy wellbeing presents that she or he demands. The following expertise might support you realize what you have got to do on your diabetic cat. Regular checkups: If your cat has been identified with diabetes, it's important that you simply seek advice from your veterinarian in most cases. Your cat will want blood sugar tests to be certain that she or he is receiving the correct quantity of insulin. This will have to be performed each and every three months or as most of the time as your vet shows. While diabetic individuals can investigate their blood sugar stages at dwelling, this isn't feasible with cats except you purchase a glucose tracking approach. Answered by Gayle Monsma 1 year ago.

Hi I an expert in feline diabetes. I can help you not only save money but to get your cat back to optimum health IF you are proact5ive and willing to do the work. His food does not have to be ordered. Most likely you cannot do this with diet alone. If you do the work and we are lucky, it is possible that your cat can become diet controlled in 2 months time. If you are interested in doing the right thing here, my direct email is in my profile. Please use that instead of through answers Answered by Ronald Meachen 1 year ago.

I have starred your question in the hopes that one of my contacts who knows a lot about feline diabetes will see it. Answered by Frankie Stanco 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Murray Timinsky 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Henry Longhofer 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Jason Trupp 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Margert Arrigo 1 year ago.


Cat with diabetes question:?
How many of you would give your cat shots to maintain his/her health if they discovered they were diabetic? My cat is 6 years old and now is a diabetic. I am going to switch food to try to help diet wise, but because I have a difficult cat and the vet recommends me bringing him back every month to 6 weeks for... Asked by Perry Gerrero 1 year ago.

How many of you would give your cat shots to maintain his/her health if they discovered they were diabetic? My cat is 6 years old and now is a diabetic. I am going to switch food to try to help diet wise, but because I have a difficult cat and the vet recommends me bringing him back every month to 6 weeks for checks and they would have to gas him each time at $100 a pop, not including another $110 for the insuline and syringes every couple of months. His food will have to be ordered and they said no treats. I can't afford to hire someone to give my cat shots when I am gone for long periods of time. How many of you would give shots to a cat? Would you try to maintain it with diet alone? I know I probably should not have gotten him knowing that he could have more health problems. He was sick when I adopted him from the humane society and I had to give him meds so I put them in a gravy pouched food and he kept getting sicker and sicker. Long story short, he developed kidney failure and liver failure at 6 months old and either had or had been in contact with heart worms and they could not treat him for them as it would kill him. The food I was dissolving his meds in wound up being recalled, it was poisonous to him, and that is why he kept getting sick. I switched vets as they were charging 700 dollars for blood work alone and wanted to do exploratory surgery to see why he had kidney and liver failure. I said no to the surgery and when I found out the food was poison, they told me I couldn't believe everything I hear. The new vet helped get his kidneys back to function with just saline drip in his neck area. Iams pet food wound up paying me back those vet bills as it was the cause of him getting sick. Now, he has been excessively drinking and using the liter box, and I found out all this today. What would do if you had my cat? Thank you in advance for your kind answers. Answered by Marisa Bigger 1 year ago.

wow, poor cat, he's certainly been through a lot! I have a diabetic cat, now aged 17. She was diabetic when I got her 7 years ago, and we've been through a bit together. My first, and probably greatest recommendation is find a vet who has personal experience of diabetes - ie has a family member with the illness. Mine's husband is diabetic and I trust her judgement in a way I wouldn't trust another vet's judgement on the subject. I have heard many stories about vets and diabetic cats and most of them are horror stories which boil down to the vet not knowing enough about diabetes. Secondly read as much as you can about it, and join one of the yahoo mailing groups for owners of diabetic cats, their help and encouragement will be invaluable. thirdly - and no-one told me this, I had to find it out for myself - in very broad terms insulin lowers blood sugar, food increases it. It's actually quite important to know! If your cat is drinking and peeing excessively the blood sugar will be high and he needs insulin, if he's staggering around, looking like he's blind, getting stuck in corners he needs food, and quickly. If he's passed out on the floor get to the vet half an hour ago. fourthly, if you are going to persevere with him bully your vet into teaching you how to test his blood sugar yourself. And I mean bully, don't take no for an answer. You can get a blood testing kit from a chemist, they aren't expensive (though the testing sticks that go with them are). One that is intended for human use is absolutely fine for use with a cat. Test the cat regularly just before food, anything in the range 5 - 12 mmol is ok, higher or lower is cause for concern. Given his symptoms at the moment I would say he is well above this. You also don't need a fresh syringe every day, they can last 3-4 days. Despite what your vet will tell you you do not need to change the vial of insulin every month. I eventually grudgingly got mine to admit that a vial can last 3-6 months if you are very careful with it, though it does lose its potency, and contamination is possible. As it happens Phoebe was only borderline diabetic and a new vial was too strong for her - I had to open it and leave it a month to go off before I started using it! Her previous owner was adamant that she couldn't inject the cat twice a day, so she is on a long lasting insulin (insuvet zinc-protamine - don't know if this is a UK only product) and gets an injection in the morning only. You can try to control it with diet alone, but you do need to be checking blood sugar regularly if you do this, and it depends on how badly diabetic the cat is as to whether you will be able to. I would recommend that you find a low carbohydrate high protein food and stick to it. Phoebe was on Hills m/d biscuits (the situation has changed, hence past tense). I changed her to this from Hills w/d which is for weight loss - for some reason it is frequently given to diabetics, but is high carb low protein, which is the exact opposite of what a diabetic should have (again, vet don't know what they are on about!). Feed a measured amount, don't give treats except very occasionally. Feed at regular times. As I said, Phoebe was borderline, she was getting half a unit of insulin twice a week, which is nothing really, but she needed that little bit just to keep her on track. Phoebe now has age related kidney failure, so is now on a kidney diet (unhelpfully, high carb low protein...) and has a cancerous growth on her cheek, so I suspect she is not long for this world. Having said that I never expected to have her as long as I have. But.. to actually answer your question - no I don't think I would try to maintain him entirely on food, unless it was shown that that was enough. I would certainly be feeding him a veterinary diet which has the levels of protein and carbs guaranteed, - in commercial food the levels vary not only between brands, but between flavours, so you need to be very very careful what you get. I would be monitoring his blood sugar myself, daily to start with, possibly even twice a day (and no it isn't fun to do, especially with a difficult cat, you'l probably need help to start with at least), and then in conjunction with my diabetes-knowlegable vet I would be working out a regime that suited both the cat and my life. I wish you luck with him :) Answered by Vilma Bedre 1 year ago.

If you've simply been advised that you've a diabetic cat, you can be scared of what the longer term holds on your puppy. The well information is that diabetes isn't a loss of life sentence for cats. Your cat might are living an extended and comfortable existence with diabetes. All this calls for is so that you can deal with your cat and furnish the puppy wellbeing presents that she or he demands. The following expertise might support you realize what you have got to do on your diabetic cat. Regular checkups: If your cat has been identified with diabetes, it's important that you simply seek advice from your veterinarian in most cases. Your cat will want blood sugar tests to be certain that she or he is receiving the correct quantity of insulin. This will have to be performed each and every three months or as most of the time as your vet shows. While diabetic individuals can investigate their blood sugar stages at dwelling, this isn't feasible with cats except you purchase a glucose tracking approach. Answered by Lorinda Javed 1 year ago.

Hi I an expert in feline diabetes. I can help you not only save money but to get your cat back to optimum health IF you are proact5ive and willing to do the work. His food does not have to be ordered. Most likely you cannot do this with diet alone. If you do the work and we are lucky, it is possible that your cat can become diet controlled in 2 months time. If you are interested in doing the right thing here, my direct email is in my profile. Please use that instead of through answers Answered by Maple Alevras 1 year ago.

I have starred your question in the hopes that one of my contacts who knows a lot about feline diabetes will see it. Answered by Lynsey Senna 1 year ago.


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