Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020210/001.

Names and composition

"PROPULSID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020210/001 PROPULSID CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
020210/002 PROPULSID CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
020398/001 PROPULSID CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 1MG BASE per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020210/001 PROPULSID CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
020210/002 PROPULSID CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
020398/001 PROPULSID CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 1MG BASE per ML
020767/001 PROPULSID QUICKSOLV CISAPRIDE MONOHYDRATE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE

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Answered questions

Is anyone's cat on cisapride (propulsid)?
The vet is going to put my cat on cisapride (propulsid) and I'd like to know about how much money I should expect to pay for it. Any approximations out there? Asked by Cristie Kelash 1 year ago.

It's generic, and a cat needs a small dose, so it's inexpensive. I can't remember the cost, as it was a couple of years ago. Answered by Randal Campagne 1 year ago.


Does anyone know how to relieve a cat from constipation? I've spent alot of money and time at the vet and they
prescribe latulose & propulsid but after 3weeks to a month he's constipated again,does anyone know to end the constipation for good? Asked by Mildred Dorfman 1 year ago.

It may have a lot to do with what you feed him. Try feeding him more wet than dry, or you could give him a teaspoon of canned pumpkin over his hard food. Most cats really like the taste of it and it helps retain some moisture in his poop which also combats constipation. Also, try giving him a product called Laxatone. You can also get that from your vet. It's primary function is treatment for hairballs, but it's like flavored vaseline and helps lubricate his GI tract. Some cats are still genetically predisposed to such problems and you may have to give him pumpkin, lactulose, laxatone etc for the rest of his life. I hope this helps. Good Luck! Answered by Terry Pauley 1 year ago.

Try giving the cat a serenge full of green tea every day. It is all natural, but it really helps with this problem. You could also try soft food if the cat only eats hard food, this normally helps also. Answered by Lauran Delena 1 year ago.

Try a bit of the tuna packed with vegetable oil..or get some cod liver oil to put in his food..give it to him twice a day(1-2 teaspoons) at first and then just once after things start "working" If it seems like too much then cut it back of course. Answered by Tameka Dimon 1 year ago.

I agree with Linarkry that diet is important. Moisture and fat are important in keeping bowels in healthy condition so canned food and the addition of salmon oil or olive oil is important in the diet. Use quality canned food, not grocery store stuff. Natural Balance, Wellness etc. offer good canned foods in their line. Answered by Rosann Gidwani 1 year ago.

my cat has the same problem. he also gets diarrhea right after the episode and gets very dehydrated and sickly looking. he has been loosing weight and the vet want to do all sorts of test that cost 2000.00. will try remedys below also. thanks Answered by Yanira Linde 1 year ago.

I dont know, but I heard that feeding them the juice from sardine cans helps. Answered by Luigi Florence 1 year ago.

Cod liver oil. Cats love fish, and cod liver oil will cure his constipation. Answered by Armandina Kulaga 1 year ago.

Sounds like it is something in his diet. Maybe you should consider changing his food. Answered by Tonisha Bio 1 year ago.

just sit that puss down and tell it to shat Answered by Genoveva Bandanza 1 year ago.


Is there a non surgical "relief" for sombody suffering from gastropiaresis...?
Asked by Al Medbery 1 year ago.

Sometimes a drug called "Propulsid" helps. The only other treatment I know of is the placement of a jeujostomy tube to bypass the stomach by putting the liquid formula lower than the stomach. Answered by Aleida Cesena 1 year ago.

perhaps you should direct your question to another category .Gastroparesis is a medical condition consisting of a paresis (partial paralysis) of the stomach ("gastro-"), resulting in food remaining in the stomach for a longer period of time. It may arise in acute illness of any kind, and chronically due to autonomic neuropathy (e.g. secondary to diabetes mellitus) Answered by Felton Piecuch 1 year ago.


My 4 month old shepherd has been diagnosed with esophogitis, which got worse after the explorative laporatomy?
she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet,... Asked by Eldora Barahana 1 year ago.

she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet, but are dreading it happening. she's so underweight and has such discomfort sometimes (several times a day to all day sometimes) Answered by Vivian Hickie 1 year ago.

Does your puppy have mega-esophagus? I would be suspicious of a congenital defect called persistant right aortic arch. This is where a fetal remnant fails to recede and causes stricture around the esophagus. They usually go on to devolope mega-esophagus, which usually resolves once the PRAA is fixed. This is a thoracic surgery and very expensive. I would ask for a referral to a surgeon who is familiar with this or an internal medicine specialist. Answered by Maximina Hearns 1 year ago.

three occasions an afternoon is quality for younger dogs and specially German Shepherds. German Shepherds have a tendency to vomit just a little bile whilst they're too hungry. They want extra widespread of feeding schedules. I could additionally advocate discovering a bigger high-quality dog meals. Look for one wherein the primary, principal factor is precise meat (no meat derivative). Answered by Irvin Yamada 1 year ago.


My 4 month old shepherd has been diagnosed with esophogitis, which got worse after the explorative laporatomy?
she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet,... Asked by Margery Gaustad 1 year ago.

she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet, but are dreading it happening. she's so underweight and has such discomfort sometimes (several times a day to all day sometimes) Answered by Loyd Wizwer 1 year ago.


Alt med ideas to help gastroparesis (non diabetic) patient anyone?
I have a friend with gastroparesis and was hoping one of you altmed experts might have some ideas for us. Asked by Telma Gridley 1 year ago.

As yet, there is no cure for gastroparesis, but in most cases, symptoms can be improved with treatment. Regardless of the cause, treatment programs are fairly similar. Diet Changing how and what foods are eaten is helpful. It is best to eat six small meals a day, instead of three large ones. Liquid dietary supplements are often recommended since liquid meals pass through the stomach more easily and quickly. Avoid high fat foods that naturally slow gastric emptying and foods high in fiber like citrus and broccoli because the indigestible part will remain in the stomach too long. Medications Propulsid (cisapride) was developed to treat this condition and was of benefit to thousands of patients. Unfortunately, it was linked to about 300 cases of heart rhythm irregularity including 80 deaths and was taken off the market in 2000. With the removal of Propulsid, an older drug, Reglan (metoclopramide), has again become the drug of choice. It has been shown to be effective in the acute management of many gastroparetic conditions, but often loses its effectiveness over time. It can be given by mouth, intravenously (into the vein), subcutaneously (under the skin), and rectally. Unfortunately, side effects are common including drowsiness, loss of menstrual periods, impotence, and muscle spasms. With prologed use, some patients develop a Parkinson's-like tremor. Benadryl can limit some of the side effects but worsens the drowsiness. Erythromycin has become the gastric prokinetic of choice for those patients who fail to respond to conventional agents. This antibiotic also acts to stimulate the muscles of the stomach to contract. It can be given intravenously and by mouth. Domperidone (Motilium, Janssen) is another drug that improves gastric emptying and may have less side-effects. It has been available overseas (and even over the counter in Europe), but is not FDA approved in the US. None of these drugs are totally effective and without side effects. Research is ongoing. Two new drugs that may possibly be helpful are Zelmac (tegaserod), a new drug for Irritable Bowel Syndrome with constipation and Viagra (sildenafil), which is marketed for male erectile dysfunction, but has also shown some benefit. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that part of the delay in stomach emptying occurs as a result of lack of nitric oxide in stomach tissues. The same basic molecular problem causes impotence in men. Experiments have shown that in mice Viagra reversed gastroparesis. Human trials are underway. When nausea is a predominent symptom, a separate anti-nausea drug is often added such as Compazine (prochlorperazine) or Trans-Scop (scopolamine patches). But, again, side effects are common. In severe cases Zofran (ondansetron) may be used, but is very expensive. In milder cases of nausea, accupressure wrist bands are a non-invasive method that most patients tolerate well. Surgery Surgery is seldom done for gastroparesis, but in severe cases, a feeding jejeunostomy tube can be placed surgically. This thin plastic tube goes through the skin of the abdominal wall and directly enters the small intestine far downstream from the stomach. Special liquid nutrition given through this feeding tube bypasses the mouth, esophagus, and stomach and is delivered directly to the small intestine for absorption. Answered by Micha Adels 1 year ago.

Non Diabetic Gastroparesis Answered by Tamesha Angelino 1 year ago.

I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether and I can now walk totally pain free. Believe it or not, I even danced at my niece's wedding last month, something I have not done in a many years. I've been following the book for six months now and my blood sugar is well within normal range. I feel great! I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes. Answered by Roger Goldtrap 1 year ago.


Pill description?
was just asking because my 83 year old grandfather has moved in w/me and i dont know what it is,(not in a bottle) but thanks for the smart *** answers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Nola Mammoccio 1 year ago.

Metoclopramide Tablets (10 mg) PLIVA 430 round scored white GENERIC NAME: metoclopramide BRAND NAME: Reglan DRUG CLASS: Metoclopramide is a "prokinetic" agent that increases muscle tone of the lower esophagus sphincter. The lower esophagus sphincter, located between the esophagus and stomach, normally prevents reflux of acid and other stomach contents into the esophagus. In patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD), a weakened lower esophagus sphincter allows reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus, causing heart burn and acid damage to the esophagus (peptic esophagitis). Metoclopramide decreases stomach acid reflux by strengthening the lower esophagus sphincter. Like cisapride (Propulsid), metoclopramide also hastens the stomach emptying of solid and liquid meals into the intestines. Rapid emptying of meals also help decrease the reflux of stomach acid and other contents into the esophagus. Metoclopramide interferes with dopamine receptors in the brain. Since dopamine causes nausea. Metoclopramide can be an effective anti-nausea medication. While cisapride and metoclopramide are similar in decreasing gastroesophageal reflux, metoclopramide is more likely to cause nervous system side effects such as jitteriness, insomnia, sedation, or anxiety. PRESCRIPTION: no GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: tablets: 5 mg and 10mg. Syrup: 5 mg/5 ml STORAGE: Tablets and syrup should be stored at temperature between 15-30C (59-86F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Metoclopramide is used on a short term basis (4 to 12 weeks) for patients with heartburn and esophagitis due to gastroesophageal reflux. Please also read the Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD) article. Stomach nerve damage due to diabetes (diabetic gastric stasis) can cause delayed stomach emptying, resulting in nausea, vomiting, fullness, and heartburn. Metoclopramide can be effective in relieving nausea and other symptoms related to diabetic gastric stasis. Metoclopramide is also used in the treatment of nausea related to postoperative state and cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: Metoclopramide is usually given four times daily, 30 minutes before each meal and at bedtime for the treatment of esophageal reflux. Dosage and frequency may be lowered in elderly patients, and in situations where symptoms occur only intermittently and at specific times. Concurrent administration of Anticholinergic medications can decrease the effectiveness of metoclopramide. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Metoclopramide can have nervous system side effects, such as depression, anxiety, sedation, restlessness, and insomnia. Parkinson patients can experience worsening of symptoms with metoclopramide. Metoclopramide may impair the mental and/or physical abilities to drive or operate machinery. Rarely, metoclopramide can cause involuntary muscle movements, facial grimacing, and dystonic reactions resembling tetanus. Since metoclopramide accelerates stomach emptying, it can increase absorption and effects of other medications. For example, the effects of sedatives such as alcohol and diazepam (Valium) can be accelerated when used together with metoclopramide. Safety in pregnancy, nursing mothers, and children has not been established. SIDE EFFECTS: Metoclopramide is generally well tolerated when used in low doses for brief periods. The nervous system side effects increase with higher doses and longer periods of treatment. The common side effects are mentioned above under Drug Interactions. 1 Glossary metoclopramide Answered by Donald Garrison 1 year ago.

PLIVA 430 METOCLOPRAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET 10 MG from PLIVA MEDICAL INDICATIONS: Indications ADULTS (20 years and over): Digestive Disorders: restores normal co-ordination and tone to the upper digestive tract and relieves symptoms of gastroduodenal dysfunction including: Dyspepsia Heartburn Flatulence Sickness Regurgitation of bile Pain These symptoms may be associated with such conditions as: Peptic ulcer Duodenitis Reflux oesophagitis Gastritis Hiatus hernia Cholelithiasis and post-cholecystectomy dyspepsia Oral: Adults (20 years and older): 10mg three times daily. For patients less than 60kg, see Table 1. Elderly patients (as for adults): To avoid adverse reactions adhere strictly to dosage recommendations and where prolonged therapy is considered necessary, patients should be regularly reviewed. manafacturer info: ICN Pharmaceuticals Distributed in New Zealand by: Pacific Pharmaceuticals Ltd PO Box 11-183 Ellerslie AUCKLAND Telephone: 09-579-2792 SINCE I AM NOT A MEDICAL DOCTOR I AM IN NO WAY PROVIDING THIS INFORMATION FOR DIAGNOSIS PURPOUSES AND I ALSO DO NOT CONDONE THE USAGE OF PILLS THAT HAVE BEEN FOUND IN ANY PLACE OTHER THAN A MARKED PERSCRIPTION BOTTLE INTENDED FOR USE BY THE INDICATED PATIENT. Answered by Therese Womeldorff 1 year ago.

The Pill Description Answered by Brittney Haubner 1 year ago.

PLIVA 430 METOCLOPRAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE metoclopramide is to relieve nausea and vomiting, stomach pain and bloating, loss of appetite, and a persistent feeling of fullness after meals. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Answered by Luciano Nuckels 1 year ago.

Different pharmacies get their pills from different suppliers. It's possible to make the same drug and give it a different color or shape so companies do this alot. Even if you get your meds from the same pharmacy each time you might get different looking pills from time to time because they may switch suppliers to get a cheaper price. Answered by Lilli Dulemba 1 year ago.

I think that it is a 50 mg of Trazodone Trazodone is used as an antidepressant, and can be highly addictive if not taken as how a physican ordered it Answered by Marchelle Syversen 1 year ago.


Is Zyrtec safe with grapefruit?
Asked by Ken Hoffpauir 1 year ago.

yes its safe in case youre interested: (disregard the numbers.. they were my own notes) Medications that should be avoided with grapefruit amiodarone (Cordarone)8 astemizole (Hismanal)5,9 atorvastatin (Lipitor) budesonide (Entocort)8 buspirone (BuSpar) cerivastatin (Baycol)5,9 cilostazol (Pletal)5 cisapride (Propulsid, Prepulsid)9 colchicine 5 eletriptan (Relpax)5 etoposide (Vepesid)8,10 halofantrine (Halfan) indinavir (Crixivan)10 lovastatin (Mevacor) mifepristone (Mifeprex)5 pimozide (Orap)5 sildenafil (Viagra) simvastatin (Zocor) sirolimus (Rapamune)5 terfenadine (Seldane)1,9 ziprasidone (Geodon)5 Use with grapefruit with caution albendazole (Albenza) carbamazepine (Tegretol)3 clomipramine (Anafranil)8 cyclosporine (Neoral)2,3,8 dextromethorphan diazepam (Valium)8 dofetilide (Tikosyn)5 erythromycin (E-mycin) felodipine (Renedil, Plendil) fexofenadine (Allegra)10 gefitinib (Iressa) imatinib mesylate (Gleevec/Glivec) itraconazole (Sporanox)10 losartan (Cozaar) methadone5 methylprednisolone (Medrol)8,9 midazolam (Versed)9 montelukast (Singulair)5 nicardipine (Cardene)8 nifedipine (Procardia) nimodipine (Nimotop) nisoldipine (Sular) pranidipine quetiapine (Seroquel)5 quinidine (Ouinaglute, Quinidex)8 quinine saquinavir (Invirase)2 sertraline (Zoloft) tacrolimus (FK-506, Prograf)2,3,8 tamoxifen (Nolvadex)5 tamsulosin (Flomax)5 tolterodine (Detrol)5 triazolam (Halcion) Medications with no significant interaction with grapefruit Drugs in this section have all been studied with Grapefruit, and found to have minimal/negligible interaction alprazolam (Xanax)4 amlodipine (Norvasc)4 amprenavir (Agenerase)4,10 caffeine4 carvedilol (Coreg)4 clarithromycin (Biaxin) clozapine (Clozaril)4 digoxin (Lanoxin) diltiazem (Cardizem)4 17-B estradiol4 ethinyl estradiol 4,8 haloperidol (Haldol) omeprazole (Losec, Prilosec)4 phenytoin (Dilantin) prednisone (Deltasone) scopolamine (Hyoscine)4 theophylline (Theo-Dur, Uniphyl) verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) Medications considered safe for use with grapefruit cetirizine (Zyrtec, Reactine)6 desloratadine (Aerius, Clarinex)7 fluvastatin (Lescol)7 loratadine (Claritin)6 pravastatin (Pravachol)7 rosuvastatin (Crestor)7 Answered by Arletha Kellow 1 year ago.

Cozaar And Grapefruit Answered by Lavada Dunnegan 1 year ago.

Thanks for the answers! Answered by Ocie Chaulklin 1 year ago.


Help! not sure if my cat is still constipated after having an enama.?
my cat is 11 yrs old and has a history of constipation. Recently he had an enama and he was completely backup =( the vet kept him for 3 nights at the hospital (for observation as they said) which probably stressed my cat even more - he barely ate and did not go. we finally took him home with the following meds the... Asked by Marissa Amedeo 1 year ago.

my cat is 11 yrs old and has a history of constipation. Recently he had an enama and he was completely backup =( the vet kept him for 3 nights at the hospital (for observation as they said) which probably stressed my cat even more - he barely ate and did not go. we finally took him home with the following meds the vet gave us - lactulose, propulsid, fortiflora, dismutase, orbax and new food Purina OM (wet & dry). It has been 3 days now and my cat has still yet to go. he barely eats and has lost some weight. i'm afraid he is constipated again? do not want to bring him back to the vet .. too traumatizing and cost $$$. any suggestions to help my cat go? Answered by Mercedes Gatts 1 year ago.

You can try raising the fiber amounts in his food. Fiber absorbs water thereby creating looser, bulkier stools. That shortens the transit time in the gastrointestinal tract and keeps things moving. While you want to increase the amount of fiber in your cat's diet, you don't want to overdo it. Initially, don't be tempted to switch to the highest-fiber diet you can find. And you should introduce the dietary change gradually, over five to seven days. If you switch your cat too quickly onto a high-fiber diet, your poor feline chum will likely become very uncomfortable with gas pains. Sources of supplementary fiber include bran, psyllium (Metamucil), and canned pumpkin. Some cats will eat these products, others won't. If your cat will eat them, mix the fiber-rich supplement in with quality canned cat food. But if he's not eating and has lost weight, this might not be a sign that he's just constipated. If he's not eating then he won't need to go. There may be another problem which only your vet will be able to tell you about, or better yet, just call him and tell him your cats circumstances. I know about the high price of the Vet. You were given the best medicines for the treatment of constipation, I now believe it is something else related, altogether. Answered by Debrah Jaquith 1 year ago.

The vet gave me some enemas to give to my cat, but first have they checked your cat for kidney disease? Constipation is common with kidney disease. His rectum may be somewhat sore so apply a small amount of Vaseline or A&D ointment . He may be holding back for this reason. Why not stay with just the canned food, The dry may just be too much bulk causing hard or no bowel movements. Rubbing his stomach in a circular downward motion may also help the stool pass. He should have a BM by tomorrow, If not call the vet and ask about outer laxatives or stool softeners that you may be able to get over the counter. Also ask about fish oil capsules to pour over the food or other oils o grease up the intestines a little. Good luck. Answered by Pete Arritola 1 year ago.

Poor kitty...its so difficult when they can't tell us what's wrong. Is he over weight? That can cause constipation as well as more serious issues. If he isn't eating, then he won't be going to the bathroom too much either. Important thing is to get him drinking...dehydration is the worst. When my Ebby had bowel problems, the vet recommended a small amount of canned pumpkin mixed in with his food. You could try this once he starts eating again. Its supposed to keep them regular. Have you tried cajoling him with something like tuna or his favourite food. NOT too much, since he has eaten so little, but just enough to get him going...and have you tried his old food? One of my cats would positively refuse to eat new food... Not to scare you, but you do need to get your cat drinking and eating soon. They can go down hill really quickly if they don't. After having your kitty for three days, and knowing his history, your vet should be giving you a definite answer on what's going on. If he/she didn't tell you then call them up and ask. You need to know if kitty has kidney damage or what. I'll keep my fingers crossed for kitty. Answered by Fredricka Mihalchik 1 year ago.

You might need to learn to give your cat enemas every so often. We had to do this with our Simon. We used a Fleet Pediatric enema bottle - not the fluid, just the bottle with warm water. It is not hard to learn and once you've done it just once, you've got the procedure down. See if your vet will show you how to do it. If not, email me. Answered by Susannah Dirk 1 year ago.

it really sound like his kidneys have shut down. Take him to another vet, sounds like his one likes the money, instead of the truth. Answered by Quinn Weckman 1 year ago.


Is anyone's cat on cisapride (propulsid)?
The vet is going to put my cat on cisapride (propulsid) and I'd like to know about how much money I should expect to pay for it. Any approximations out there? Asked by Keira Kreps 1 year ago.

It's generic, and a cat needs a small dose, so it's inexpensive. I can't remember the cost, as it was a couple of years ago. Answered by Quentin Deman 1 year ago.


Does anyone know how to relieve a cat from constipation? I've spent alot of money and time at the vet and they
prescribe latulose & propulsid but after 3weeks to a month he's constipated again,does anyone know to end the constipation for good? Asked by Floyd Loffelbein 1 year ago.

It may have a lot to do with what you feed him. Try feeding him more wet than dry, or you could give him a teaspoon of canned pumpkin over his hard food. Most cats really like the taste of it and it helps retain some moisture in his poop which also combats constipation. Also, try giving him a product called Laxatone. You can also get that from your vet. It's primary function is treatment for hairballs, but it's like flavored vaseline and helps lubricate his GI tract. Some cats are still genetically predisposed to such problems and you may have to give him pumpkin, lactulose, laxatone etc for the rest of his life. I hope this helps. Good Luck! Answered by Earlean Svenningsen 1 year ago.

Try giving the cat a serenge full of green tea every day. It is all natural, but it really helps with this problem. You could also try soft food if the cat only eats hard food, this normally helps also. Answered by Ira Sain 1 year ago.

Try a bit of the tuna packed with vegetable oil..or get some cod liver oil to put in his food..give it to him twice a day(1-2 teaspoons) at first and then just once after things start "working" If it seems like too much then cut it back of course. Answered by Graham Kurasz 1 year ago.

I agree with Linarkry that diet is important. Moisture and fat are important in keeping bowels in healthy condition so canned food and the addition of salmon oil or olive oil is important in the diet. Use quality canned food, not grocery store stuff. Natural Balance, Wellness etc. offer good canned foods in their line. Answered by Elke Sostre 1 year ago.

my cat has the same problem. he also gets diarrhea right after the episode and gets very dehydrated and sickly looking. he has been loosing weight and the vet want to do all sorts of test that cost 2000.00. will try remedys below also. thanks Answered by Bernice Demeritte 1 year ago.

I dont know, but I heard that feeding them the juice from sardine cans helps. Answered by Tama Wolsky 1 year ago.

Cod liver oil. Cats love fish, and cod liver oil will cure his constipation. Answered by Darby Kostura 1 year ago.

Sounds like it is something in his diet. Maybe you should consider changing his food. Answered by Phung Beene 1 year ago.

just sit that puss down and tell it to shat Answered by Wesley Bedward 1 year ago.


Is there a non surgical "relief" for sombody suffering from gastropiaresis...?
Asked by Thanh Magnini 1 year ago.

Sometimes a drug called "Propulsid" helps. The only other treatment I know of is the placement of a jeujostomy tube to bypass the stomach by putting the liquid formula lower than the stomach. Answered by Delmy Schmelz 1 year ago.

perhaps you should direct your question to another category .Gastroparesis is a medical condition consisting of a paresis (partial paralysis) of the stomach ("gastro-"), resulting in food remaining in the stomach for a longer period of time. It may arise in acute illness of any kind, and chronically due to autonomic neuropathy (e.g. secondary to diabetes mellitus) Answered by Liz Crowder 1 year ago.


My 4 month old shepherd has been diagnosed with esophogitis, which got worse after the explorative laporatomy?
she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet,... Asked by Herma Antione 1 year ago.

she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet, but are dreading it happening. she's so underweight and has such discomfort sometimes (several times a day to all day sometimes) Answered by Donna Skibbe 1 year ago.

Does your puppy have mega-esophagus? I would be suspicious of a congenital defect called persistant right aortic arch. This is where a fetal remnant fails to recede and causes stricture around the esophagus. They usually go on to devolope mega-esophagus, which usually resolves once the PRAA is fixed. This is a thoracic surgery and very expensive. I would ask for a referral to a surgeon who is familiar with this or an internal medicine specialist. Answered by Elden Tyl 1 year ago.

three occasions an afternoon is quality for younger dogs and specially German Shepherds. German Shepherds have a tendency to vomit just a little bile whilst they're too hungry. They want extra widespread of feeding schedules. I could additionally advocate discovering a bigger high-quality dog meals. Look for one wherein the primary, principal factor is precise meat (no meat derivative). Answered by Nicholle Shark 1 year ago.


My 4 month old shepherd has been diagnosed with esophogitis, which got worse after the explorative laporatomy?
she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet,... Asked by Leora Rockman 1 year ago.

she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet, but are dreading it happening. she's so underweight and has such discomfort sometimes (several times a day to all day sometimes) Answered by Kristeen Sanflippo 1 year ago.


Alt med ideas to help gastroparesis (non diabetic) patient anyone?
I have a friend with gastroparesis and was hoping one of you altmed experts might have some ideas for us. Asked by Felicidad Seabold 1 year ago.

As yet, there is no cure for gastroparesis, but in most cases, symptoms can be improved with treatment. Regardless of the cause, treatment programs are fairly similar. Diet Changing how and what foods are eaten is helpful. It is best to eat six small meals a day, instead of three large ones. Liquid dietary supplements are often recommended since liquid meals pass through the stomach more easily and quickly. Avoid high fat foods that naturally slow gastric emptying and foods high in fiber like citrus and broccoli because the indigestible part will remain in the stomach too long. Medications Propulsid (cisapride) was developed to treat this condition and was of benefit to thousands of patients. Unfortunately, it was linked to about 300 cases of heart rhythm irregularity including 80 deaths and was taken off the market in 2000. With the removal of Propulsid, an older drug, Reglan (metoclopramide), has again become the drug of choice. It has been shown to be effective in the acute management of many gastroparetic conditions, but often loses its effectiveness over time. It can be given by mouth, intravenously (into the vein), subcutaneously (under the skin), and rectally. Unfortunately, side effects are common including drowsiness, loss of menstrual periods, impotence, and muscle spasms. With prologed use, some patients develop a Parkinson's-like tremor. Benadryl can limit some of the side effects but worsens the drowsiness. Erythromycin has become the gastric prokinetic of choice for those patients who fail to respond to conventional agents. This antibiotic also acts to stimulate the muscles of the stomach to contract. It can be given intravenously and by mouth. Domperidone (Motilium, Janssen) is another drug that improves gastric emptying and may have less side-effects. It has been available overseas (and even over the counter in Europe), but is not FDA approved in the US. None of these drugs are totally effective and without side effects. Research is ongoing. Two new drugs that may possibly be helpful are Zelmac (tegaserod), a new drug for Irritable Bowel Syndrome with constipation and Viagra (sildenafil), which is marketed for male erectile dysfunction, but has also shown some benefit. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that part of the delay in stomach emptying occurs as a result of lack of nitric oxide in stomach tissues. The same basic molecular problem causes impotence in men. Experiments have shown that in mice Viagra reversed gastroparesis. Human trials are underway. When nausea is a predominent symptom, a separate anti-nausea drug is often added such as Compazine (prochlorperazine) or Trans-Scop (scopolamine patches). But, again, side effects are common. In severe cases Zofran (ondansetron) may be used, but is very expensive. In milder cases of nausea, accupressure wrist bands are a non-invasive method that most patients tolerate well. Surgery Surgery is seldom done for gastroparesis, but in severe cases, a feeding jejeunostomy tube can be placed surgically. This thin plastic tube goes through the skin of the abdominal wall and directly enters the small intestine far downstream from the stomach. Special liquid nutrition given through this feeding tube bypasses the mouth, esophagus, and stomach and is delivered directly to the small intestine for absorption. Answered by Wm Birdwell 1 year ago.

Non Diabetic Gastroparesis Answered by Doris Fromme 1 year ago.

I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether and I can now walk totally pain free. Believe it or not, I even danced at my niece's wedding last month, something I have not done in a many years. I've been following the book for six months now and my blood sugar is well within normal range. I feel great! I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes. Answered by Iris Tayse 1 year ago.


Pill description?
was just asking because my 83 year old grandfather has moved in w/me and i dont know what it is,(not in a bottle) but thanks for the smart *** answers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Sammy Kubal 1 year ago.

Metoclopramide Tablets (10 mg) PLIVA 430 round scored white GENERIC NAME: metoclopramide BRAND NAME: Reglan DRUG CLASS: Metoclopramide is a "prokinetic" agent that increases muscle tone of the lower esophagus sphincter. The lower esophagus sphincter, located between the esophagus and stomach, normally prevents reflux of acid and other stomach contents into the esophagus. In patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD), a weakened lower esophagus sphincter allows reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus, causing heart burn and acid damage to the esophagus (peptic esophagitis). Metoclopramide decreases stomach acid reflux by strengthening the lower esophagus sphincter. Like cisapride (Propulsid), metoclopramide also hastens the stomach emptying of solid and liquid meals into the intestines. Rapid emptying of meals also help decrease the reflux of stomach acid and other contents into the esophagus. Metoclopramide interferes with dopamine receptors in the brain. Since dopamine causes nausea. Metoclopramide can be an effective anti-nausea medication. While cisapride and metoclopramide are similar in decreasing gastroesophageal reflux, metoclopramide is more likely to cause nervous system side effects such as jitteriness, insomnia, sedation, or anxiety. PRESCRIPTION: no GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: tablets: 5 mg and 10mg. Syrup: 5 mg/5 ml STORAGE: Tablets and syrup should be stored at temperature between 15-30C (59-86F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Metoclopramide is used on a short term basis (4 to 12 weeks) for patients with heartburn and esophagitis due to gastroesophageal reflux. Please also read the Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD) article. Stomach nerve damage due to diabetes (diabetic gastric stasis) can cause delayed stomach emptying, resulting in nausea, vomiting, fullness, and heartburn. Metoclopramide can be effective in relieving nausea and other symptoms related to diabetic gastric stasis. Metoclopramide is also used in the treatment of nausea related to postoperative state and cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: Metoclopramide is usually given four times daily, 30 minutes before each meal and at bedtime for the treatment of esophageal reflux. Dosage and frequency may be lowered in elderly patients, and in situations where symptoms occur only intermittently and at specific times. Concurrent administration of Anticholinergic medications can decrease the effectiveness of metoclopramide. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Metoclopramide can have nervous system side effects, such as depression, anxiety, sedation, restlessness, and insomnia. Parkinson patients can experience worsening of symptoms with metoclopramide. Metoclopramide may impair the mental and/or physical abilities to drive or operate machinery. Rarely, metoclopramide can cause involuntary muscle movements, facial grimacing, and dystonic reactions resembling tetanus. Since metoclopramide accelerates stomach emptying, it can increase absorption and effects of other medications. For example, the effects of sedatives such as alcohol and diazepam (Valium) can be accelerated when used together with metoclopramide. Safety in pregnancy, nursing mothers, and children has not been established. SIDE EFFECTS: Metoclopramide is generally well tolerated when used in low doses for brief periods. The nervous system side effects increase with higher doses and longer periods of treatment. The common side effects are mentioned above under Drug Interactions. 1 Glossary metoclopramide Answered by Noelle Barswell 1 year ago.

PLIVA 430 METOCLOPRAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET 10 MG from PLIVA MEDICAL INDICATIONS: Indications ADULTS (20 years and over): Digestive Disorders: restores normal co-ordination and tone to the upper digestive tract and relieves symptoms of gastroduodenal dysfunction including: Dyspepsia Heartburn Flatulence Sickness Regurgitation of bile Pain These symptoms may be associated with such conditions as: Peptic ulcer Duodenitis Reflux oesophagitis Gastritis Hiatus hernia Cholelithiasis and post-cholecystectomy dyspepsia Oral: Adults (20 years and older): 10mg three times daily. For patients less than 60kg, see Table 1. Elderly patients (as for adults): To avoid adverse reactions adhere strictly to dosage recommendations and where prolonged therapy is considered necessary, patients should be regularly reviewed. manafacturer info: ICN Pharmaceuticals Distributed in New Zealand by: Pacific Pharmaceuticals Ltd PO Box 11-183 Ellerslie AUCKLAND Telephone: 09-579-2792 SINCE I AM NOT A MEDICAL DOCTOR I AM IN NO WAY PROVIDING THIS INFORMATION FOR DIAGNOSIS PURPOUSES AND I ALSO DO NOT CONDONE THE USAGE OF PILLS THAT HAVE BEEN FOUND IN ANY PLACE OTHER THAN A MARKED PERSCRIPTION BOTTLE INTENDED FOR USE BY THE INDICATED PATIENT. Answered by Wenona Geibel 1 year ago.

The Pill Description Answered by Jerald Baek 1 year ago.

PLIVA 430 METOCLOPRAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE metoclopramide is to relieve nausea and vomiting, stomach pain and bloating, loss of appetite, and a persistent feeling of fullness after meals. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Answered by Stephen Hung 1 year ago.

Different pharmacies get their pills from different suppliers. It's possible to make the same drug and give it a different color or shape so companies do this alot. Even if you get your meds from the same pharmacy each time you might get different looking pills from time to time because they may switch suppliers to get a cheaper price. Answered by Rosamaria Versage 1 year ago.

I think that it is a 50 mg of Trazodone Trazodone is used as an antidepressant, and can be highly addictive if not taken as how a physican ordered it Answered by Rex Larch 1 year ago.


Is Zyrtec safe with grapefruit?
Asked by Jamie Corners 1 year ago.

yes its safe in case youre interested: (disregard the numbers.. they were my own notes) Medications that should be avoided with grapefruit amiodarone (Cordarone)8 astemizole (Hismanal)5,9 atorvastatin (Lipitor) budesonide (Entocort)8 buspirone (BuSpar) cerivastatin (Baycol)5,9 cilostazol (Pletal)5 cisapride (Propulsid, Prepulsid)9 colchicine 5 eletriptan (Relpax)5 etoposide (Vepesid)8,10 halofantrine (Halfan) indinavir (Crixivan)10 lovastatin (Mevacor) mifepristone (Mifeprex)5 pimozide (Orap)5 sildenafil (Viagra) simvastatin (Zocor) sirolimus (Rapamune)5 terfenadine (Seldane)1,9 ziprasidone (Geodon)5 Use with grapefruit with caution albendazole (Albenza) carbamazepine (Tegretol)3 clomipramine (Anafranil)8 cyclosporine (Neoral)2,3,8 dextromethorphan diazepam (Valium)8 dofetilide (Tikosyn)5 erythromycin (E-mycin) felodipine (Renedil, Plendil) fexofenadine (Allegra)10 gefitinib (Iressa) imatinib mesylate (Gleevec/Glivec) itraconazole (Sporanox)10 losartan (Cozaar) methadone5 methylprednisolone (Medrol)8,9 midazolam (Versed)9 montelukast (Singulair)5 nicardipine (Cardene)8 nifedipine (Procardia) nimodipine (Nimotop) nisoldipine (Sular) pranidipine quetiapine (Seroquel)5 quinidine (Ouinaglute, Quinidex)8 quinine saquinavir (Invirase)2 sertraline (Zoloft) tacrolimus (FK-506, Prograf)2,3,8 tamoxifen (Nolvadex)5 tamsulosin (Flomax)5 tolterodine (Detrol)5 triazolam (Halcion) Medications with no significant interaction with grapefruit Drugs in this section have all been studied with Grapefruit, and found to have minimal/negligible interaction alprazolam (Xanax)4 amlodipine (Norvasc)4 amprenavir (Agenerase)4,10 caffeine4 carvedilol (Coreg)4 clarithromycin (Biaxin) clozapine (Clozaril)4 digoxin (Lanoxin) diltiazem (Cardizem)4 17-B estradiol4 ethinyl estradiol 4,8 haloperidol (Haldol) omeprazole (Losec, Prilosec)4 phenytoin (Dilantin) prednisone (Deltasone) scopolamine (Hyoscine)4 theophylline (Theo-Dur, Uniphyl) verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) Medications considered safe for use with grapefruit cetirizine (Zyrtec, Reactine)6 desloratadine (Aerius, Clarinex)7 fluvastatin (Lescol)7 loratadine (Claritin)6 pravastatin (Pravachol)7 rosuvastatin (Crestor)7 Answered by Ilona Remigio 1 year ago.

Cozaar And Grapefruit Answered by Phyllis Capriola 1 year ago.

Thanks for the answers! Answered by Evonne Kerchner 1 year ago.


Help! not sure if my cat is still constipated after having an enama.?
my cat is 11 yrs old and has a history of constipation. Recently he had an enama and he was completely backup =( the vet kept him for 3 nights at the hospital (for observation as they said) which probably stressed my cat even more - he barely ate and did not go. we finally took him home with the following meds the... Asked by Laurine Fan 1 year ago.

my cat is 11 yrs old and has a history of constipation. Recently he had an enama and he was completely backup =( the vet kept him for 3 nights at the hospital (for observation as they said) which probably stressed my cat even more - he barely ate and did not go. we finally took him home with the following meds the vet gave us - lactulose, propulsid, fortiflora, dismutase, orbax and new food Purina OM (wet & dry). It has been 3 days now and my cat has still yet to go. he barely eats and has lost some weight. i'm afraid he is constipated again? do not want to bring him back to the vet .. too traumatizing and cost $$$. any suggestions to help my cat go? Answered by Gil Chanthasene 1 year ago.

You can try raising the fiber amounts in his food. Fiber absorbs water thereby creating looser, bulkier stools. That shortens the transit time in the gastrointestinal tract and keeps things moving. While you want to increase the amount of fiber in your cat's diet, you don't want to overdo it. Initially, don't be tempted to switch to the highest-fiber diet you can find. And you should introduce the dietary change gradually, over five to seven days. If you switch your cat too quickly onto a high-fiber diet, your poor feline chum will likely become very uncomfortable with gas pains. Sources of supplementary fiber include bran, psyllium (Metamucil), and canned pumpkin. Some cats will eat these products, others won't. If your cat will eat them, mix the fiber-rich supplement in with quality canned cat food. But if he's not eating and has lost weight, this might not be a sign that he's just constipated. If he's not eating then he won't need to go. There may be another problem which only your vet will be able to tell you about, or better yet, just call him and tell him your cats circumstances. I know about the high price of the Vet. You were given the best medicines for the treatment of constipation, I now believe it is something else related, altogether. Answered by Daniela Medieros 1 year ago.

The vet gave me some enemas to give to my cat, but first have they checked your cat for kidney disease? Constipation is common with kidney disease. His rectum may be somewhat sore so apply a small amount of Vaseline or A&D ointment . He may be holding back for this reason. Why not stay with just the canned food, The dry may just be too much bulk causing hard or no bowel movements. Rubbing his stomach in a circular downward motion may also help the stool pass. He should have a BM by tomorrow, If not call the vet and ask about outer laxatives or stool softeners that you may be able to get over the counter. Also ask about fish oil capsules to pour over the food or other oils o grease up the intestines a little. Good luck. Answered by Sol Kole 1 year ago.

Poor kitty...its so difficult when they can't tell us what's wrong. Is he over weight? That can cause constipation as well as more serious issues. If he isn't eating, then he won't be going to the bathroom too much either. Important thing is to get him drinking...dehydration is the worst. When my Ebby had bowel problems, the vet recommended a small amount of canned pumpkin mixed in with his food. You could try this once he starts eating again. Its supposed to keep them regular. Have you tried cajoling him with something like tuna or his favourite food. NOT too much, since he has eaten so little, but just enough to get him going...and have you tried his old food? One of my cats would positively refuse to eat new food... Not to scare you, but you do need to get your cat drinking and eating soon. They can go down hill really quickly if they don't. After having your kitty for three days, and knowing his history, your vet should be giving you a definite answer on what's going on. If he/she didn't tell you then call them up and ask. You need to know if kitty has kidney damage or what. I'll keep my fingers crossed for kitty. Answered by Lenita Fantauzzi 1 year ago.

You might need to learn to give your cat enemas every so often. We had to do this with our Simon. We used a Fleet Pediatric enema bottle - not the fluid, just the bottle with warm water. It is not hard to learn and once you've done it just once, you've got the procedure down. See if your vet will show you how to do it. If not, email me. Answered by Almeta Beedle 1 year ago.

it really sound like his kidneys have shut down. Take him to another vet, sounds like his one likes the money, instead of the truth. Answered by Donn Talbert 1 year ago.


Is anyone's cat on cisapride (propulsid)?
The vet is going to put my cat on cisapride (propulsid) and I'd like to know about how much money I should expect to pay for it. Any approximations out there? Asked by Willene Geneseo 1 year ago.

It's generic, and a cat needs a small dose, so it's inexpensive. I can't remember the cost, as it was a couple of years ago. Answered by Yvette Leah 1 year ago.


Does anyone know how to relieve a cat from constipation? I've spent alot of money and time at the vet and they
prescribe latulose & propulsid but after 3weeks to a month he's constipated again,does anyone know to end the constipation for good? Asked by Leonore Costas 1 year ago.

It may have a lot to do with what you feed him. Try feeding him more wet than dry, or you could give him a teaspoon of canned pumpkin over his hard food. Most cats really like the taste of it and it helps retain some moisture in his poop which also combats constipation. Also, try giving him a product called Laxatone. You can also get that from your vet. It's primary function is treatment for hairballs, but it's like flavored vaseline and helps lubricate his GI tract. Some cats are still genetically predisposed to such problems and you may have to give him pumpkin, lactulose, laxatone etc for the rest of his life. I hope this helps. Good Luck! Answered by Albertina Cataquet 1 year ago.

Try giving the cat a serenge full of green tea every day. It is all natural, but it really helps with this problem. You could also try soft food if the cat only eats hard food, this normally helps also. Answered by Carmelita Stickel 1 year ago.

Try a bit of the tuna packed with vegetable oil..or get some cod liver oil to put in his food..give it to him twice a day(1-2 teaspoons) at first and then just once after things start "working" If it seems like too much then cut it back of course. Answered by Malena Reeger 1 year ago.

I agree with Linarkry that diet is important. Moisture and fat are important in keeping bowels in healthy condition so canned food and the addition of salmon oil or olive oil is important in the diet. Use quality canned food, not grocery store stuff. Natural Balance, Wellness etc. offer good canned foods in their line. Answered by Serita Cahalane 1 year ago.

my cat has the same problem. he also gets diarrhea right after the episode and gets very dehydrated and sickly looking. he has been loosing weight and the vet want to do all sorts of test that cost 2000.00. will try remedys below also. thanks Answered by Sherlyn Goldie 1 year ago.

I dont know, but I heard that feeding them the juice from sardine cans helps. Answered by Marlyn Girote 1 year ago.

Cod liver oil. Cats love fish, and cod liver oil will cure his constipation. Answered by Christel Gagen 1 year ago.

Sounds like it is something in his diet. Maybe you should consider changing his food. Answered by Cassondra Minic 1 year ago.

just sit that puss down and tell it to shat Answered by Shawnda Parrott 1 year ago.


Is there a non surgical "relief" for sombody suffering from gastropiaresis...?
Asked by Maryam Vonderheide 1 year ago.

Sometimes a drug called "Propulsid" helps. The only other treatment I know of is the placement of a jeujostomy tube to bypass the stomach by putting the liquid formula lower than the stomach. Answered by Niki Cwikla 1 year ago.

perhaps you should direct your question to another category .Gastroparesis is a medical condition consisting of a paresis (partial paralysis) of the stomach ("gastro-"), resulting in food remaining in the stomach for a longer period of time. It may arise in acute illness of any kind, and chronically due to autonomic neuropathy (e.g. secondary to diabetes mellitus) Answered by Kara Gerson 1 year ago.


My 4 month old shepherd has been diagnosed with esophogitis, which got worse after the explorative laporatomy?
she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet,... Asked by Manuela Kavin 1 year ago.

she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet, but are dreading it happening. she's so underweight and has such discomfort sometimes (several times a day to all day sometimes) Answered by Elenora Sanocki 1 year ago.

Does your puppy have mega-esophagus? I would be suspicious of a congenital defect called persistant right aortic arch. This is where a fetal remnant fails to recede and causes stricture around the esophagus. They usually go on to devolope mega-esophagus, which usually resolves once the PRAA is fixed. This is a thoracic surgery and very expensive. I would ask for a referral to a surgeon who is familiar with this or an internal medicine specialist. Answered by Faustina Nessler 1 year ago.

three occasions an afternoon is quality for younger dogs and specially German Shepherds. German Shepherds have a tendency to vomit just a little bile whilst they're too hungry. They want extra widespread of feeding schedules. I could additionally advocate discovering a bigger high-quality dog meals. Look for one wherein the primary, principal factor is precise meat (no meat derivative). Answered by Nestor Fesenbek 1 year ago.


My 4 month old shepherd has been diagnosed with esophogitis, which got worse after the explorative laporatomy?
she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet,... Asked by Alena Jui 1 year ago.

she's on carafate, pepcid, prilosec, tramadol and propulsid (for motility) and has been getting better than a month ago. but still has bouts where she hacks/gags and regurgitates a frothy slimy mucus and sometimes the food in her belly. what caused the slimy mucus! she doesn't have evident stricture yet, but are dreading it happening. she's so underweight and has such discomfort sometimes (several times a day to all day sometimes) Answered by Shenika Mcmiller 1 year ago.


Alt med ideas to help gastroparesis (non diabetic) patient anyone?
I have a friend with gastroparesis and was hoping one of you altmed experts might have some ideas for us. Asked by Victor Sterrett 1 year ago.

As yet, there is no cure for gastroparesis, but in most cases, symptoms can be improved with treatment. Regardless of the cause, treatment programs are fairly similar. Diet Changing how and what foods are eaten is helpful. It is best to eat six small meals a day, instead of three large ones. Liquid dietary supplements are often recommended since liquid meals pass through the stomach more easily and quickly. Avoid high fat foods that naturally slow gastric emptying and foods high in fiber like citrus and broccoli because the indigestible part will remain in the stomach too long. Medications Propulsid (cisapride) was developed to treat this condition and was of benefit to thousands of patients. Unfortunately, it was linked to about 300 cases of heart rhythm irregularity including 80 deaths and was taken off the market in 2000. With the removal of Propulsid, an older drug, Reglan (metoclopramide), has again become the drug of choice. It has been shown to be effective in the acute management of many gastroparetic conditions, but often loses its effectiveness over time. It can be given by mouth, intravenously (into the vein), subcutaneously (under the skin), and rectally. Unfortunately, side effects are common including drowsiness, loss of menstrual periods, impotence, and muscle spasms. With prologed use, some patients develop a Parkinson's-like tremor. Benadryl can limit some of the side effects but worsens the drowsiness. Erythromycin has become the gastric prokinetic of choice for those patients who fail to respond to conventional agents. This antibiotic also acts to stimulate the muscles of the stomach to contract. It can be given intravenously and by mouth. Domperidone (Motilium, Janssen) is another drug that improves gastric emptying and may have less side-effects. It has been available overseas (and even over the counter in Europe), but is not FDA approved in the US. None of these drugs are totally effective and without side effects. Research is ongoing. Two new drugs that may possibly be helpful are Zelmac (tegaserod), a new drug for Irritable Bowel Syndrome with constipation and Viagra (sildenafil), which is marketed for male erectile dysfunction, but has also shown some benefit. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that part of the delay in stomach emptying occurs as a result of lack of nitric oxide in stomach tissues. The same basic molecular problem causes impotence in men. Experiments have shown that in mice Viagra reversed gastroparesis. Human trials are underway. When nausea is a predominent symptom, a separate anti-nausea drug is often added such as Compazine (prochlorperazine) or Trans-Scop (scopolamine patches). But, again, side effects are common. In severe cases Zofran (ondansetron) may be used, but is very expensive. In milder cases of nausea, accupressure wrist bands are a non-invasive method that most patients tolerate well. Surgery Surgery is seldom done for gastroparesis, but in severe cases, a feeding jejeunostomy tube can be placed surgically. This thin plastic tube goes through the skin of the abdominal wall and directly enters the small intestine far downstream from the stomach. Special liquid nutrition given through this feeding tube bypasses the mouth, esophagus, and stomach and is delivered directly to the small intestine for absorption. Answered by Reita Acklen 1 year ago.

Non Diabetic Gastroparesis Answered by Rima Rademaker 1 year ago.

I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of this horrible disease is the severe pain I constantly get in my feet. The pain is so bad that I avoid standing and walking as much as possible. I've got to tell you that within the first month, my feet stopped hurting altogether and I can now walk totally pain free. Believe it or not, I even danced at my niece's wedding last month, something I have not done in a many years. I've been following the book for six months now and my blood sugar is well within normal range. I feel great! I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes. Answered by Una Deavila 1 year ago.


Pill description?
was just asking because my 83 year old grandfather has moved in w/me and i dont know what it is,(not in a bottle) but thanks for the smart *** answers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Shavonne Jondahl 1 year ago.

Metoclopramide Tablets (10 mg) PLIVA 430 round scored white GENERIC NAME: metoclopramide BRAND NAME: Reglan DRUG CLASS: Metoclopramide is a "prokinetic" agent that increases muscle tone of the lower esophagus sphincter. The lower esophagus sphincter, located between the esophagus and stomach, normally prevents reflux of acid and other stomach contents into the esophagus. In patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD), a weakened lower esophagus sphincter allows reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus, causing heart burn and acid damage to the esophagus (peptic esophagitis). Metoclopramide decreases stomach acid reflux by strengthening the lower esophagus sphincter. Like cisapride (Propulsid), metoclopramide also hastens the stomach emptying of solid and liquid meals into the intestines. Rapid emptying of meals also help decrease the reflux of stomach acid and other contents into the esophagus. Metoclopramide interferes with dopamine receptors in the brain. Since dopamine causes nausea. Metoclopramide can be an effective anti-nausea medication. While cisapride and metoclopramide are similar in decreasing gastroesophageal reflux, metoclopramide is more likely to cause nervous system side effects such as jitteriness, insomnia, sedation, or anxiety. PRESCRIPTION: no GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: tablets: 5 mg and 10mg. Syrup: 5 mg/5 ml STORAGE: Tablets and syrup should be stored at temperature between 15-30C (59-86F). PRESCRIBED FOR: Metoclopramide is used on a short term basis (4 to 12 weeks) for patients with heartburn and esophagitis due to gastroesophageal reflux. Please also read the Gastroesophageal Reflux (GERD) article. Stomach nerve damage due to diabetes (diabetic gastric stasis) can cause delayed stomach emptying, resulting in nausea, vomiting, fullness, and heartburn. Metoclopramide can be effective in relieving nausea and other symptoms related to diabetic gastric stasis. Metoclopramide is also used in the treatment of nausea related to postoperative state and cancer chemotherapy. DOSING: Metoclopramide is usually given four times daily, 30 minutes before each meal and at bedtime for the treatment of esophageal reflux. Dosage and frequency may be lowered in elderly patients, and in situations where symptoms occur only intermittently and at specific times. Concurrent administration of Anticholinergic medications can decrease the effectiveness of metoclopramide. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Metoclopramide can have nervous system side effects, such as depression, anxiety, sedation, restlessness, and insomnia. Parkinson patients can experience worsening of symptoms with metoclopramide. Metoclopramide may impair the mental and/or physical abilities to drive or operate machinery. Rarely, metoclopramide can cause involuntary muscle movements, facial grimacing, and dystonic reactions resembling tetanus. Since metoclopramide accelerates stomach emptying, it can increase absorption and effects of other medications. For example, the effects of sedatives such as alcohol and diazepam (Valium) can be accelerated when used together with metoclopramide. Safety in pregnancy, nursing mothers, and children has not been established. SIDE EFFECTS: Metoclopramide is generally well tolerated when used in low doses for brief periods. The nervous system side effects increase with higher doses and longer periods of treatment. The common side effects are mentioned above under Drug Interactions. 1 Glossary metoclopramide Answered by Nenita Callejas 1 year ago.

PLIVA 430 METOCLOPRAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET 10 MG from PLIVA MEDICAL INDICATIONS: Indications ADULTS (20 years and over): Digestive Disorders: restores normal co-ordination and tone to the upper digestive tract and relieves symptoms of gastroduodenal dysfunction including: Dyspepsia Heartburn Flatulence Sickness Regurgitation of bile Pain These symptoms may be associated with such conditions as: Peptic ulcer Duodenitis Reflux oesophagitis Gastritis Hiatus hernia Cholelithiasis and post-cholecystectomy dyspepsia Oral: Adults (20 years and older): 10mg three times daily. For patients less than 60kg, see Table 1. Elderly patients (as for adults): To avoid adverse reactions adhere strictly to dosage recommendations and where prolonged therapy is considered necessary, patients should be regularly reviewed. manafacturer info: ICN Pharmaceuticals Distributed in New Zealand by: Pacific Pharmaceuticals Ltd PO Box 11-183 Ellerslie AUCKLAND Telephone: 09-579-2792 SINCE I AM NOT A MEDICAL DOCTOR I AM IN NO WAY PROVIDING THIS INFORMATION FOR DIAGNOSIS PURPOUSES AND I ALSO DO NOT CONDONE THE USAGE OF PILLS THAT HAVE BEEN FOUND IN ANY PLACE OTHER THAN A MARKED PERSCRIPTION BOTTLE INTENDED FOR USE BY THE INDICATED PATIENT. Answered by Lourdes Kasa 1 year ago.

The Pill Description Answered by Ruth Chupp 1 year ago.

PLIVA 430 METOCLOPRAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE metoclopramide is to relieve nausea and vomiting, stomach pain and bloating, loss of appetite, and a persistent feeling of fullness after meals. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Answered by Hank Sayles 1 year ago.

Different pharmacies get their pills from different suppliers. It's possible to make the same drug and give it a different color or shape so companies do this alot. Even if you get your meds from the same pharmacy each time you might get different looking pills from time to time because they may switch suppliers to get a cheaper price. Answered by Denise Neymeyer 1 year ago.

I think that it is a 50 mg of Trazodone Trazodone is used as an antidepressant, and can be highly addictive if not taken as how a physican ordered it Answered by Myrtle Olive 1 year ago.


Is Zyrtec safe with grapefruit?
Asked by Geralyn Spindel 1 year ago.

yes its safe in case youre interested: (disregard the numbers.. they were my own notes) Medications that should be avoided with grapefruit amiodarone (Cordarone)8 astemizole (Hismanal)5,9 atorvastatin (Lipitor) budesonide (Entocort)8 buspirone (BuSpar) cerivastatin (Baycol)5,9 cilostazol (Pletal)5 cisapride (Propulsid, Prepulsid)9 colchicine 5 eletriptan (Relpax)5 etoposide (Vepesid)8,10 halofantrine (Halfan) indinavir (Crixivan)10 lovastatin (Mevacor) mifepristone (Mifeprex)5 pimozide (Orap)5 sildenafil (Viagra) simvastatin (Zocor) sirolimus (Rapamune)5 terfenadine (Seldane)1,9 ziprasidone (Geodon)5 Use with grapefruit with caution albendazole (Albenza) carbamazepine (Tegretol)3 clomipramine (Anafranil)8 cyclosporine (Neoral)2,3,8 dextromethorphan diazepam (Valium)8 dofetilide (Tikosyn)5 erythromycin (E-mycin) felodipine (Renedil, Plendil) fexofenadine (Allegra)10 gefitinib (Iressa) imatinib mesylate (Gleevec/Glivec) itraconazole (Sporanox)10 losartan (Cozaar) methadone5 methylprednisolone (Medrol)8,9 midazolam (Versed)9 montelukast (Singulair)5 nicardipine (Cardene)8 nifedipine (Procardia) nimodipine (Nimotop) nisoldipine (Sular) pranidipine quetiapine (Seroquel)5 quinidine (Ouinaglute, Quinidex)8 quinine saquinavir (Invirase)2 sertraline (Zoloft) tacrolimus (FK-506, Prograf)2,3,8 tamoxifen (Nolvadex)5 tamsulosin (Flomax)5 tolterodine (Detrol)5 triazolam (Halcion) Medications with no significant interaction with grapefruit Drugs in this section have all been studied with Grapefruit, and found to have minimal/negligible interaction alprazolam (Xanax)4 amlodipine (Norvasc)4 amprenavir (Agenerase)4,10 caffeine4 carvedilol (Coreg)4 clarithromycin (Biaxin) clozapine (Clozaril)4 digoxin (Lanoxin) diltiazem (Cardizem)4 17-B estradiol4 ethinyl estradiol 4,8 haloperidol (Haldol) omeprazole (Losec, Prilosec)4 phenytoin (Dilantin) prednisone (Deltasone) scopolamine (Hyoscine)4 theophylline (Theo-Dur, Uniphyl) verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan) Medications considered safe for use with grapefruit cetirizine (Zyrtec, Reactine)6 desloratadine (Aerius, Clarinex)7 fluvastatin (Lescol)7 loratadine (Claritin)6 pravastatin (Pravachol)7 rosuvastatin (Crestor)7 Answered by Cleta Diberardino 1 year ago.

Cozaar And Grapefruit Answered by Myrtle Colden 1 year ago.

Thanks for the answers! Answered by Lazaro Calumag 1 year ago.


Help! not sure if my cat is still constipated after having an enama.?
my cat is 11 yrs old and has a history of constipation. Recently he had an enama and he was completely backup =( the vet kept him for 3 nights at the hospital (for observation as they said) which probably stressed my cat even more - he barely ate and did not go. we finally took him home with the following meds the... Asked by Ashley Mcmanamy 1 year ago.

my cat is 11 yrs old and has a history of constipation. Recently he had an enama and he was completely backup =( the vet kept him for 3 nights at the hospital (for observation as they said) which probably stressed my cat even more - he barely ate and did not go. we finally took him home with the following meds the vet gave us - lactulose, propulsid, fortiflora, dismutase, orbax and new food Purina OM (wet & dry). It has been 3 days now and my cat has still yet to go. he barely eats and has lost some weight. i'm afraid he is constipated again? do not want to bring him back to the vet .. too traumatizing and cost $$$. any suggestions to help my cat go? Answered by Tiffiny Kahrer 1 year ago.

You can try raising the fiber amounts in his food. Fiber absorbs water thereby creating looser, bulkier stools. That shortens the transit time in the gastrointestinal tract and keeps things moving. While you want to increase the amount of fiber in your cat's diet, you don't want to overdo it. Initially, don't be tempted to switch to the highest-fiber diet you can find. And you should introduce the dietary change gradually, over five to seven days. If you switch your cat too quickly onto a high-fiber diet, your poor feline chum will likely become very uncomfortable with gas pains. Sources of supplementary fiber include bran, psyllium (Metamucil), and canned pumpkin. Some cats will eat these products, others won't. If your cat will eat them, mix the fiber-rich supplement in with quality canned cat food. But if he's not eating and has lost weight, this might not be a sign that he's just constipated. If he's not eating then he won't need to go. There may be another problem which only your vet will be able to tell you about, or better yet, just call him and tell him your cats circumstances. I know about the high price of the Vet. You were given the best medicines for the treatment of constipation, I now believe it is something else related, altogether. Answered by Carson Ehn 1 year ago.

The vet gave me some enemas to give to my cat, but first have they checked your cat for kidney disease? Constipation is common with kidney disease. His rectum may be somewhat sore so apply a small amount of Vaseline or A&D ointment . He may be holding back for this reason. Why not stay with just the canned food, The dry may just be too much bulk causing hard or no bowel movements. Rubbing his stomach in a circular downward motion may also help the stool pass. He should have a BM by tomorrow, If not call the vet and ask about outer laxatives or stool softeners that you may be able to get over the counter. Also ask about fish oil capsules to pour over the food or other oils o grease up the intestines a little. Good luck. Answered by Margrett Mullally 1 year ago.

Poor kitty...its so difficult when they can't tell us what's wrong. Is he over weight? That can cause constipation as well as more serious issues. If he isn't eating, then he won't be going to the bathroom too much either. Important thing is to get him drinking...dehydration is the worst. When my Ebby had bowel problems, the vet recommended a small amount of canned pumpkin mixed in with his food. You could try this once he starts eating again. Its supposed to keep them regular. Have you tried cajoling him with something like tuna or his favourite food. NOT too much, since he has eaten so little, but just enough to get him going...and have you tried his old food? One of my cats would positively refuse to eat new food... Not to scare you, but you do need to get your cat drinking and eating soon. They can go down hill really quickly if they don't. After having your kitty for three days, and knowing his history, your vet should be giving you a definite answer on what's going on. If he/she didn't tell you then call them up and ask. You need to know if kitty has kidney damage or what. I'll keep my fingers crossed for kitty. Answered by Lita Stenner 1 year ago.

You might need to learn to give your cat enemas every so often. We had to do this with our Simon. We used a Fleet Pediatric enema bottle - not the fluid, just the bottle with warm water. It is not hard to learn and once you've done it just once, you've got the procedure down. See if your vet will show you how to do it. If not, email me. Answered by Burl Manzueta 1 year ago.

it really sound like his kidneys have shut down. Take him to another vet, sounds like his one likes the money, instead of the truth. Answered by Bess Hornoff 1 year ago.


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