Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 007335/001.

Names and composition

"PRONESTYL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007335/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/004 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/005 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017371/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
017371/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 375MG
017371/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007335/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/004 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/005 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017371/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
017371/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 375MG
017371/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
020545/001 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
020545/002 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
040111/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
083287/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
083553/002 PROCAPAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
083693/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
083795/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
084280/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
084357/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
084403/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
084595/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
084604/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
084606/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
084696/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
085079/001 PROCAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
085167/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
085804/001 PROCAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
086065/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
086468/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
086942/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
086943/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
086952/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087020/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087021/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
087079/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
087080/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
087361/001 PRONESTYL-SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
087502/001 PROCAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087510/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
087542/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
087543/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
087643/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
087697/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087875/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
088489/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
088530/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
088531/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088532/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088533/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
088534/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
088535/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
088636/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
088637/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088824/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
088830/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088958/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
088959/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
088974/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
088989/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
088990/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
089026/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
089027/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
089029/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089030/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089042/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
089069/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089070/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089219/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
089220/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
089221/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
089256/001 PROCAINAMIDE HCL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 100MG per ML
089257/001 PROCAINAMIDE HCL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 500MG per ML
089284/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
089369/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
089370/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
089371/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
089415/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089416/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089438/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
089520/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
089528/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089529/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089537/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089840/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG

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Answered questions

To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Shay Savarino 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Annamarie Kreisberg 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Kimberley Raudenbush 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Ariana Fredricks 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Adam Fennig 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Otelia Namisnak 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Sabina Zaya 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Sherise Haspel 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Josphine Sterback 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Horace Kalla 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Gaston Coto 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Jeanelle Zwicker 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Christi Milson 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Marivel Turek 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Katia Lemin 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Maire Comp 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Charise Geimer 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Doria Esteves 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Teresita Macdiarmid 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Jerica Vanzee 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Albertha Somerville 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Desiree Beucler 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Jackqueline Donnely 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Cinderella Catoire 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Harold Mcloy 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Arnulfo Sivils 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Shani Lovejoy 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Meggan Paolicelli 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Gerri Mrotz 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Valeria Pevahouse 1 year ago.


To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Eugene Respes 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Sari Ocran 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Talia Butenhoff 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Thomas Tardif 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Rachal Feng 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Patria Laughton 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Wilson Beltron 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Damian Peavler 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Sharice Salierno 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Bethanie Sperl 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Minh Medina 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Deandra Mavropoulos 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Kazuko Badour 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Harriett Phanthavongsa 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Tristan Walz 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Bud Dewaele 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Kamala Zettlemoyer 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Muriel Soteros 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Marjory Beltrain 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Lakenya Charlebois 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Roselee Correo 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Shameka Servano 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Parthenia Fulks 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Jeana Walquist 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Cristina Kraner 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Rashad Steltzer 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Afton Malsam 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Rey Paladino 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Frida Deanes 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Lindsay Bansal 1 year ago.


To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Apolonia Studyvance 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Cori Piccard 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Lue Jurin 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Romeo Zelek 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Lewis Belvins 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Dianna Stueck 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Pearly Swelt 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Florance Opell 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Carla Berniard 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Miki Rohl 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Kylee Zickuhr 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Lauryn Rifai 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Odelia Nolte 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Hazel Strine 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Santiago Huey 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Floy Vandewalker 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Mickey Reeger 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Abbie Coogan 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Debi Wigger 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Lino Oar 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Ronnie Mcie 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Dennis Bauermeister 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Kathy Sayko 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Susana Aerts 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Josiah Mcgregory 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Riva Dirden 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Carmel Swavely 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Daniell Gloe 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Ghislaine Mosser 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Gretta Ratel 1 year ago.


To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Warner Speyrer 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Cedrick Kishel 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Derek Weinmann 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Tora Schrecker 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Micaela Galang 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Amanda Broadbent 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Lesley Dowda 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Sandy Kapperman 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Wally Hoban 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Hollie Wiss 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Leonida Akinrefon 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Francisco Mcbrayer 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Joellen Shirley 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Ulrike Giorgianni 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Latrice Megee 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Soila Disharoon 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Jeanice Mosley 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Iris Malatesta 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Jene Millward 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Dylan Zadra 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Romona Croffie 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Laci Nicholason 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Johnie Boroski 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Nena Ljungquist 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Edwin Schierbrock 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Donnell Loo 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Gale Snook 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Joanne Winge 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Violet Ballif 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Roxanne Spayd 1 year ago.


To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Jospeh Manely 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Ivelisse Arehart 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Hugh Donayre 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Stella Munguia 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Avery Melen 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Julie Goga 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Arlean Goodner 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Karin Kuether 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Tomasa Wilcut 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Florine Washburn 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Joann Isler 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Solomon Kubaska 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Man Lajoy 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Arturo Srsen 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Dorathy Coby 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Enola Sagona 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Jesus Curvey 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Leticia Wiedrich 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Amelia Cumber 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Adelina Lepp 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Jesus Basner 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Doretha Sidley 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Rubi Kaner 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Rich Kovacic 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Mariette Kroell 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Floretta Czuba 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Michael Lieske 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Indira Donkervoet 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Belia Pawlak 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Makeda Krapp 1 year ago.


To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Darius Rowser 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Ashli Hanis 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Delois Trusillo 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Julio Hiler 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Lauren Sultemeier 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Tyler Raycraft 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Max Olmos 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Renee Croffie 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Lashaun Genberg 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Morton Veys 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Deanna Tahu 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Matilda Lumm 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Joelle Tamplin 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Sharilyn Schueneman 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Shawnda Haisten 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Janice Diab 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Dori Schmaltz 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Cristie Baun 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Leslie Capristo 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Jestine Snedegar 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Jeraldine Fazzinga 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Jermaine Morgon 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Caren Beyale 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Yasmin Newcomer 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Dollie Boaldin 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Thea Langlois 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Kip Wead 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Caroll Sachleben 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Avelina Tursi 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Rozanne Schardein 1 year ago.


To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Hanh Barsuhn 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Dixie Villanvera 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Gussie Belton 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Dwana Keo 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Khadijah Flurry 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Kasandra Razor 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Kristi Dunham 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Edgardo Heacock 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Manuela Vittorio 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Marleen Padberg 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Jospeh Chesser 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Lesley Passarella 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Olive Lummis 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Jodee Dato 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Crysta Makowsky 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Novella Vigorito 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Priscila Rapa 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Devona Marchuk 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Raquel Keath 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Sherell Borrello 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Imelda Kuhs 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Ping Tena 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Sarita Motzer 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Miquel Heter 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Napoleon Durousseau 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Brooks Russi 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Dewitt Sol 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Portia Magliocco 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Delana Adens 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Synthia Oganesian 1 year ago.


To restore BP in hypotensive crisis......Prostigmin (Neostigmine)?
2 Intropin 3 Bonamine 4 Procainamide HCL (Pronestyl) Asked by Louie Balliet 1 year ago.

I wish I knew! Answered by Elease Linsdau 1 year ago.

Hypotensive Crisis Answered by Chong Grunewald 1 year ago.


Can somebody help me with this nursing math pleeease! And please show me how u got it in detail.?
1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump?2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run... Asked by Barbara Halwick 1 year ago.

1)The order is to give Pronestyl 2mg/min. Standard concentration is 1 gm/250 D5W. How many mL per hr. should the IV run on the infusion pump? 2) An Dopamine drip is prepared as follows: 400 mg Dopamine in 250 cc D5W. The pt. is to recieve 8 mcg/kg/min. The pt. weighs 50 kg. How many mL p/h should the IV run on the infusion pump. Please help me nurses, nursing students, math whizzez...I've tried every formula possible but cannot come up with an answer that makes sense from the problem. I greatly appreciate any help in advance. Answered by Justin Rivello 1 year ago.

1. just multiply 2mg/minute * 60 minutes/1 hr = so you will be infusing 120 mg / hr next step convert 1 gm into mg 1 gm * 1mg / 10^-3 gm = 1000 mg / 250 CC next step divide 1000 mg by 120 mg so the answer would be 8.333 hours this is to determine how many hours should the stock be infused so now that we know that the solution must be infused in 8.33 hours or exactly 8 hours and 19.8 minutes we can compute for the correct regulation of the infusion pump in ml per hour simply divide the 250 ml by the number of hours it should be consumed so 250 ml/8.33 hr = 30 ml/hr for macro-set computation (250 ml/8.33 hours) * (15/60) = 7.5 or 7-8 drops/min for microset computation (250 ml/8.33 hours)*(60/60) = 30.01 or 30-31 microdrops/min 2. first multiply 8 mcg/kg/min by the kilogram 50 by doing so the kg sign has been removed through cancelation so you must be infusing a total of 400 mcg/ min to your patient now convert MCg into MG first convert it to g 400 mcg * 10^-6 g / 1 mcg = .0004 g then convert it into mg .0004 g * 1 mg /10^-3 g = .4 mg so you must be only infusing .4 mg/ minute to your patient multiply it 60 minutes / 1 hour so that would be 24 mg/ hour divide the 400 mg by the 24 mg to see how many hours will it run so 400 mg / 24 mg/hour = so the solution must run for a total of 16.67 hours.. simply divide the 250 ml from the numbers of hours that it will run... 250 ml / 16.67 hours = 14.99 ml/hr or just round it to 15 ml/hr Answered by Joella Cassada 1 year ago.

Okay...for formula #1: Pronestyl 2 mg/min or 120mg/hr (60 min/hr) or (2mg/min. x 60 min.) 1 GM/250cc or 1000 mg/250cc (1 GM=1000 mg.) 250cc divided by 1000 mg. = .25mg/cc (amount of medication /cc of fluid) 120 mg.(desired dose) x .25 (mg/cc) = 30 cc/hr Formula #2 Dopamine 400mg/250cc Divide 400 mg by 250 cc to determine the number of mg/cc 250x=400 x=1.6 mg/cc 1.6 mg x 1000 (mcg/1 mg) = 1600 mcg/cc so...... 8 mcg/kg/min x 50 kg(patients weight in kg) x 60 (min/hr) divided by 1600 mcg/cc = 15cc/hr will deliver the desired dose Hope this helps:) Answered by Young Heggestad 1 year ago.

we choose 2mg / min or 60*2mg / hour = a hundred and twenty mg / hour a hundred and twenty mg = .a hundred and twenty gm concentration is a million gm / 250 ml so we choose in easy terms .a hundred and twenty gm.. .a hundred and twenty * 1gm / 250 = .a hundred and twenty / 30 ml we would desire to run the IV at 30 ml in keeping with hour ==== affected person weighs 50 kg. we choose 8mcg/kg/minute ; so for a 50kg affected person we choose 8*50 mcg/minute or 4 hundred mcg / minute = .4 mg / minute = 60*.4 mg / hour = 24 mg / hour Concetration = 4 hundred mg / 250 cc 4 hundred mg / 250 cc = 4 hundred mg / 250 ml = a million.6 mg / ml we choose 24 mg / hour so we would desire to furnish 24 * a million.6 ml or 38.4 ml in keeping with hour ---- OOPS i replaced into incorrect on that final bit.... by way of fact the subsequent answerer pronounced.. could be 24/a million.6 or 15 ml in keeping with hour... I could have added in the gadgets at each step and that i might have considered my blunders :( Answered by Maude Cartlidge 1 year ago.


Why would defibrillation be required for post-op Appendectomy?
I just remembered, the term that was used was "solo atrial fibrillation". Asked by Gil Worstell 1 year ago.

My husband is 27 years old. This past summer during our observation of Ramadan in which we fast during the day (no food/water), my husband presented with symptoms of appendicitis. We took him to the ER where he threw up and was admitted. Triage Nurse immediately put him on an IV for fluids and he had the appendectomy a couple hours later. Post Op, my husband was tachycardic and hypertensive... like- a pulse of 156 and some outrageous BP. The doctors gave him 4 different medications over the period of a couple hours to try to settle his heart down, and they told me he had something with a long name that included atrial... but they that it was rare that his heart was not responding to the medications and that they would not be able to allow his heart to be so tachycardic for very many hours.... anyway so ultimately they had to defibrillate his heart to "reset" it and this was successful in stabilizing him. Now that so much time has passed and he is fine with no apparent heart issues (they did labs and monitors a couple days after he stabilized), I am left with a feeling of uneasiness as to why that post op episode happened to him as it is pretty scary that he had to be defibrillated.... any HCPs, experts, students out there with an idea about what could have caused this complication? Answered by Marcella Swinea 1 year ago.

What you're describing sounds less like a true defibrillation and more like a cardioversion. (A defibrillation is done to shock a heart into a more positive rhythm during a code situation.) A cardioversion is done when a patient experiences atrial fibrillation which is resistant to drugs such as beta blockers, ibutilide fumarate, amiodarone or pronestyl. When the patient's rhythm is atrial fibrillation, and the fluid and electrolyte levels in his blood are deemed to be within normal limits, and the atrial fibrillation does not respond by converting to a regular sinus rhythm, then he becomes a candidate for an elective cardioversion. A cardioversion uses the same paddles used in a defibrillation, but uses a low level of electricity to synchronize the atrium and the ventricles, thus restoring a regular sinus rhythm. Some patients develop atrial fibrillation under extreme stress. Some develop it with pneumonia or infections. Some develop it when they receive certain medications or ingest excessive caffeine or even excessive thyroid hormone. As for your husband, it may not return again for many years. Atrial fibrillation can occur at any age, but most often occurs in older people. If it occurs only rarely, then a cardiologist can provide medication to be taken by mouth to convert it, once a full work up has been done. People who have more frequent episodes may take medication to prevent a-fib daily. People who no longer respond to drugs as a preventive for this rhythm may have a procedure called a cardiac ablation, in which the conduction system of the heart is mapped, and the region which houses the focus which causes the atrial fib can be ablated. The safest course with your husband is to see a cardiologist and explain what happened when he had his appendectomy. The cardiologist will do an EKG now, and ensure that it is within normal limits. He will also likely send your husband for an echocardiogram (which is a simple ultrasound exam of the heart) This will help to rule our any structural abnormalities which may cause atrial fibrillation during stress. Once your husband has had anything of a significant nature ruled out, should the atrial fibrillation ever return, you have a cardiologist who knows your husband, and baseline EKG and echocardiography, which can be very useful to have. Very best wishes. Answered by Tonita Gillilan 1 year ago.

It's the gender taboo. Most people believe that gender is NOT fluid and most people think there are only two possible and unchangeable genders: Male and Female. Having a gender presentation that doesn't fix their myopic "norm" makes them extremely uncomfortable. The idea that the heart of who they are, at the chemical level can be altered so dramatically, that this "badass tough guy" persona really is only skin deep and that if some "tranny" can transform herself into a more congruent gender, (i.e. female), that means that a pretty pink dress is only a few little pills away. When some challenged individuals first see through the looking-glass, it's just too much for them. Poor macho souls. Answered by Nilda Gehrig 1 year ago.


Can medication cause lupus?
My mom is 54 and she has ben diagnosed with lupus. She is on 3 diarhettics (sp?) and blood pressure meds. Plus she has to take 4 potassium horse pills 4 times a day!!!!!!! Is there ny research that being over medicated can bring on lupus, and if so, is it reversible? Asked by Ericka Enns 1 year ago.

Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: * Heart disease * Thyroid disease * Hypertension * Neuropsychiatric disorders * Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: * procainamide (Pronestyl) * hydralazine (Apresoline) * quinidine (Quinaglute). Despite the symptoms of lupus and the potential side-effects of treatment, people with lupus can maintain a high quality of life overall. One key to managing lupus is to understand the disease and its impact. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Many people with lupus experience increased fatigue, pain, a rash, fever, abdominal discomfort, headache, or dizziness just before a flare. Developing strategies to prevent flares can also be helpful, such as learning to recognize your warning signals and maintaining good communication with your doctor. It is also important for people with lupus to receive regular health care, instead of seeking help only when symptoms worsen. Results from a medical exam and laboratory work on a regular basis allows the doctor to note any changes and to identify and treat flares early. The treatment plan, which is tailored to the individual’s specific needs and circumstances, can be adjusted accordingly. If new symptoms are identified early, treatments may be more effective. Other concerns also can be addressed at regular checkups. The doctor can provide guidance about such issues as the use of sunscreens, stress reduction, and the importance of structured exercise and rest, as well as birth control and family planning. Because people with lupus can be more susceptible to infections, the doctor may recommend yearly influenza vaccinations or pneumococcal vaccinations for some patients. Women with lupus should receive regular preventive health care, such as gynecological and breast examinations. Men with lupus should have the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Both men and women need to have their blood pressure and cholesterol checked on a regular basis. If a person is taking corticosteroids or antimalarial medications, an eye exam should be done at least yearly to screen for and treat eye problems. Learning to recognize the warning signs of a flare can help the patient take steps to ward it off or reduce its intensity. Staying healthy requires extra effort and care for people with lupus, so it becomes especially important to develop strategies for maintaining wellness. Wellness involves close attention to the body, mind, and spirit. One of the primary goals of wellness for people with lupus is coping with the stress of having a chronic disorder. Effective stress management varies from person to person. Some approaches that may help include exercise, relaxation techniques such as meditation, and setting priorities for spending time and energy. Developing and maintaining a good support system is also important. A support system may include family, friends, medical professionals, community organizations, and support groups. Participating in a support group can provide emotional help, boost self-esteem and morale, and help develop or improve coping skills. Answered by Lamar Beckwith 1 year ago.

High blood pressure medications can cause drug induced lupus. However, you have to balance the high blood pressure issues, which are very very dangerous, against the lupus issues. Only her doctors can do that. Her rheumatologist and the doctor who is treating her other issues MUST work together. Make sure they do. Generally, drug induced lupus goes away when the offending medication is removed. However, you need to talk with the doctors to find out IF the blood pressure meds she is taking are those that can trigger lupus. Don't try to manage this yourself. It can all be life threatening. You are assuming that she is over medicated. How do you know that? Do you really think that people on Yahoo Answers will be able to tell you what to do, better than a doctor? If you don't trust her doctors, get new ones. Do some reading about DIL or drug induced lupus at the link provided. You don't KNOW that her lupus is drug induced. She may have developed systemic lupus not as a result of the medications she takes. I am begging you not to fool around with your mom's life by asking nincompoops on Yahoo Answers! What will you do? Ask her to stop her meds so she can have a heart attack or stroke because someone here thought it was a good idea? You and your mom need to TALK with the docs and get some answers there. Answered by Ngan Rosboril 1 year ago.

Medications that may play a role in inducing lupus include: ACE inhibitors (captopril, lisinopril). Procainamide hydrochloride. Hydralazine hydrochloride. Isoniazid. Certain anticonvulsants called hydantoins, such as phenytoin and ethotoin. Chlorpromazine hydrochloride. Methyldopa. Minocycline. Interferon alfa. D-penicillamine. Antibodies to tumor necrosis factor-a. Certain medications can cause temporary symptoms and signs of lupus. The symptoms go away when you stop taking the medication, generally within a few weeks. Symptoms are usually milder than in typical lupus, and the kidneys and central nervous system are rarely affected. Though this list includes certain antihypertensives, there are no diuretics here. Wishing all the best for your Mom! Answered by Lecia Krehbiel 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Chong Grovier 1 year ago.


What are the possible medications that cause drug induced lupus?
I HEARD ANTIBIOTICS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE MED'S ANY OTHERS?? also IM FINDING MIXED OPPINIONS ON WHETHER DOXICYCLINE "CAUSES" OR "TREATS" LUPUS? ANYONE HAVE FACTS ON THAT? Asked by Lucina Hibbler 1 year ago.

"Although as many as 100 drugs have been reported to cause DRL, most cases are caused by the following 4 drugs: procainamide (Pronestyl), hydralazine (Apresoline), minocycline, and quinidine (Quinaglute). With these 4 drugs, the risk of developing DRL after 2 years of drug use is 5-20 percent. With the other drugs reported to cause DRL, the risk is less than 1 percent." A previous YA response to your second question: "Doxicycline: It can cause SLE and it should not be given to patients with SLE where it could exacerbate or worsen the said condition. Therefore, it cannot be used to treat lupus. Antibiotics, such as tetracycline, are often used for a given time frame to be able to work its best. Unfortunately, some people think that it would be better to take it for an extended period of time to make sure that it does its work completely. This is a misconception since the body has a way of getting immune to antibiotics. When this happens, it can produce adverse results instead of helping the body out such as growth of other organisms, and inducing other conditions to arise." Answered by Ria Sobrio 1 year ago.

hydralazine sulphas see list attached Answered by Felipa Kisicki 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Carolynn Jehlicka 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Marlin Jeleniewski 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Dino Rapley 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Marlin Leitner 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Joaquin Slavinski 1 year ago.


Medical math dosage calculations help!?
this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give?Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity =250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet =... Asked by Ethyl Tippens 1 year ago.

this is for my health occupations class and i do homechool and dont meet with my teachers please help 1. The doctor orders 250mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 125mg per tablet. What dose do you give? Desired dose / Supply on hand x Quantity = 250 mg / 125 mg x 1 tablet = __________ 2. The doctor orders 10mg of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 5mg per2mL. What dose do you give? 10mg / 5mg x 2mL = ___________ 3. The doctor orders 1g of a medication. The supply that you have on hand is in a dose of 50mg per 2mL.What dose do you give?Desired dose must be in same units as supply on hand. (1g = 1000mg) 1000mg / 50mg x 2mL = ____________ 4. Order: 30mg Have: 10mg per tablet Give: _________ 5. Order: 1mg Have: 5mg per mL Give: _________ 6. Order: 1500mg Have: 500mg per tablet Give: _________ 7. Order: 10mg Have: 20mg per mL Give: _________ 8. Order: 10mg Have: 2.5mg per tablet Give: _________ 9. Order: 25mg Have: 5mg per 2mL Give: _________ 10. Order: 75mg Have: 25mg per 3mL Give: _________ 11. Order: 150mg Have: 10mg per 3mL Give: _________ 12. Order: 150mg Have: 75mg per tablet Give: _________ 13. Order: 1g Have: 50 mg per mL Give: _________ 14. Order: 0.5g Have: 200mg per tablet Give: _________ 15. Order: 1g Have: 50mg per 2mL Give: _________ 16. The physician orders 75mg of Demerol every four hours (q5h) whenever necessary (prn) for pain. It isavailable as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be injected? 17. The physician orders Librium 50mg IM (intermuscular injection) to relax a patient suffering from alcoholwithdraw. It is available as 100mg per 2mL. How much should be injected? 18. A physician orders 25mg of Dilantin IV for an epileptic with severe psychomotor seizures. It is available as 50mg per mL. How many mL should be administered? 19. A physician orders 500mg of Pronestyl IM for a patient with a ventricular arrhythmia (abnormal heartrhythm. It is available as 1g per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 20. A physician orders 60mg of gentamicin sulfate IM for a patient with a staphylococcus urinary tractinfection. It is available as 80mg per 2mL. How many mL should be injected? 21. During a 24-­‐hr period, a patient receives 2.5L of intravenous solution and drinks 2.440cc of fluids. Whatis his total intake of fluids in liters? 22. A liver has been removed from a donor for transplant. During the helicopter flight to deliver the liver, itmust be kept at 36.5 oF. What is this temperature in oC? 23. Most adults have 5000 to 6000mL of blood in their bodies. How many quarts of blood do they have? 24. A genetic researcher uses 25m rolls of chromatography paper. 3 inches of paper is needed for eachchromatography test. How many tests can be performed with one roll of paper? 25. A 12 year old child with acute asthma weighs 71 pounds. You are to give 6 mg of aminophylline forevery kg of body weight. How many mg do you give? Answered by Chad Kimmerle 1 year ago.

These questions are very simple do you know how to do the calculations or have you not been properly instructed? I will gladly help you out, but it will take quite some time. Why don't you tell me what you do not understand and I can better help. Answered by Kara Foxhoven 1 year ago.

Pharmacists calculate doses as in many circumstances as available for the EMR to help, yet nurses nonetheless could desire to accomplish their very own calculations as a double verify technique. If their very own calculations do no longer tournament those achieved via the pharmacist, they could desire to call to validate the final answer. each and every now and then nurses could desire to calculate a dose with out outdoors information, and nurses are very powerfuble to try this. drugs calculations are no longer from now on complicated than undemanding algebra. The hardship in scientific calculations are in lots of circumstances the contraptions. some people exchange into puzzled via the contraptions used and block on the particularly undemanding math in touch. additionally: If a man or woman is busy or distracted, an undemanding math blunders can ensue. it is why further and extra hospitals are going to 'fairly Zones' around the place nurses or others are working. an undemanding math blunders in healthcare is a decimal blunders. those could properly be catastrophic if no longer caught in time because of the fact the affected person gained ten circumstances the conventional dose. hence, many drugs are presented as close to to the unit of use as available to make it extra glaring if a decimal blunders is made. The heparin dosage blunders that brought about dying to newborns grew to become into no longer a calculation, yet an blunders made in examining the concentration on the vial. instead of 10 contraptions of heparin in step with milliliter, the medicine grew to become right into a million,000mg in step with milliliter. particular precautions are in place at maximum hospitals to stay away from this way of tragic blunders Answered by Roman Bonardi 1 year ago.

If you tell us *your* answers, I'd be glad to check them for you. If you're unable to do the calculations, at least set up the problem, but these are all pretty easy. Here are the first few answers: 1. 2 tablets 2. 4 ml 3. 40 ml Answered by Claire Deacon 1 year ago.


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