Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020545/001.

Names and composition

"PROCANBID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020545/001 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
020545/002 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007335/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/004 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/005 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017371/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
017371/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 375MG
017371/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
020545/001 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
020545/002 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
040111/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
083287/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
083553/002 PROCAPAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
083693/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
083795/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
084280/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
084357/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
084403/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
084595/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
084604/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
084606/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
084696/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
085079/001 PROCAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
085167/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
085804/001 PROCAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
086065/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
086468/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
086942/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
086943/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
086952/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087020/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087021/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
087079/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
087080/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
087361/001 PRONESTYL-SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
087502/001 PROCAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087510/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
087542/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
087543/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
087643/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
087697/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
087875/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
088489/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
088530/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
088531/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088532/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088533/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
088534/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
088535/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
088636/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
088637/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088824/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
088830/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
088958/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
088959/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
088974/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
088989/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
088990/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
089026/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
089027/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
089029/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089030/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089042/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
089069/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089070/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089219/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
089220/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
089221/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
089256/001 PROCAINAMIDE HCL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 100MG per ML
089257/001 PROCAINAMIDE HCL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 500MG per ML
089284/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
089369/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
089370/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
089371/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
089415/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089416/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089438/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
089520/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
089528/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089529/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089537/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089840/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG

Ask a doctor

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Answered questions

Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Ermelinda Elam 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Randall Heziak 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Isabella Part 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Latrice Fergen 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Trisha Carlton 1 year ago.


What medications cause lupus?
what kinds of meds can contribute to Lupus? thank you Asked by Ariana Khamsyuorauon 1 year ago.

What Medicines Cause Drug-Induced Lupus? Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: Heart disease Thyroid disease Hypertension Neuropsychiatric disorders Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: procainamide (Pronestyl) hydralazine (Apresoline) quinidine (Quinaglute). The risk for developing lupus-like disease from any of the other 35 drugs is low or very low; with some drugs only one or two cases have been reported. Dozens of medications have been reported to trigger SLE. However, more than 90% of cases of "drug-induced lupus" occurs as a side effect of one of the following six drugs: hydralazine (Apresoline is used for high blood pressure); quinidine (Quinidine Gluconate, Quinidine Sulfate) and procainamide (Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) are used for abnormal heart rhythms; phenytoin (Dilantin) is used for epilepsy; isoniazid ([Nydrazid, Laniazid] used for tuberculosis); and d-penicillamine (used for rheumatoid arthritis). These drugs are known to stimulate the immune system and cause SLE. ..... Answered by Damien Hershkop 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Lorriane Sonkens 1 year ago.


Macrolide antibiotics--does problem with one automatically rule out others?
I can't take Bactrim, it's a sulfa drug, and there's no question I can't take those. No penicillins, either. Asked by Ines Fabacher 1 year ago.

I can't take zithromax, but I have taken another macrolide several times in the last few years (clarithromycin?), and don't recall having any trouble with it. But now they say I can't take it any more. I have had so many drug reactions in the past that there are very few antibiotics I can take, and don't want to cut this one off the list unless it's absolutely necessary. It's good for bronchitis, which I tend to get two or three times a year at least. My reaction to zithromax years ago was chest pain. The urgent care doctor I saw at the time (I was out of town) diagnosed pleurisy caused by the medicine. This sounds a little odd to me now that I think about it, but I suppose it's possible. Do you know anything about this kind of drug reaction? Can you give me information or intelligent questions to ask my doctor and pharmacist to get to the bottom of this? Thanks so much for your help. Answered by Roma Partee 1 year ago.

Having had pleurisy twice, I know how painful it is! I was uncertain, however, about its being caused by medicines because both times mine developed from a bad case of bronchitis. Here is what I found, with the part I doubted marked with *****: What causes pleurisy? Pleurisy can be caused by any of the following conditions: * Infections: bacterial (including those that cause tuberculosis), fungi, parasites, or viruses * Inhaled chemicals or toxic substances: exposure to some cleaning agents like ammonia * Collagen vascular diseases: lupus, rheumatoid arthritis * Cancers: for example, the spread of lung cancer or breast cancer to the pleura * Tumors of the pleura: mesothelioma or sarcoma * Congestion: heart failure * Pulmonary embolism: blood clot inside the blood vessels to the lungs. These clots sometimes severely reduce blood and oxygen to portions of the lung and can result in death to that portion of lung tissue (termed lung infarction). This, too, can cause pleurisy. * Obstruction of lymph channels: as a result of centrally located lung tumors * Trauma: rib fractures or irritation from chest tubes used to drain air or fluid from the pleural cavity in the chest ***** Certain drugs: drugs that can cause lupus-like syndromes (such as hydralazine [Apresoline], Procan [Pronestyl, Procan-SR, Procanbid - these brands no longer are available in the U.S.], phenytoin [Dilantin], and others) * Abdominal processes: such as pancreatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, gallbladder disease, and damage to the spleen. * Pneumothorax: air in the pleural space, occurring spontaneously or from trauma. Answered by Tracee Branner 1 year ago.

It sounds like you need to talk with your pharmacist. I very often find myself correcting misconceptions about antibiotic allergies from my physician/NP/PA colleagues -- your pharmacist is well-positioned to get to the bottom of the issues and figure out what can/should be used for you. Answered by Rebeca Sum 1 year ago.


What time is proper to take my medications? I take several. I do not know if I should take them in AM or PM?
The reason for asking this here is two-fold.First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better.Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it.Thank you for all who... Asked by Regan Sellick 1 year ago.

I take the following medications: Ranitidine Gemfibrozil Metformin Benicar If you know the proper time of day to take these medications, I would love to hear it. If you know of a website that gives this information in a easy to understand fashion, I would also appreciate that as well. I am also looking for a website which allows me to enter all my medications and which tells me which should not be taken together because of their side-effects. Thank you for you help. Answered by Leeann Sherard 1 year ago.

The reason for asking this here is two-fold. First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better. Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it. Thank you for all who have given their two-cents worth. I really appreciate it, even from those who did not respond with an answer. Answered by Amee Roethle 1 year ago.

When you get your meds from the pharmacy they tell you when to take them. The info would be on the education page. These meds are not just AM or PM meds, they are also with or without food. Of course as usual, you could be off most of these meds if you would just watch your diet and exercise. You know I have to add that last little ditty. Love ya, Steph Answered by Coralie Batista 1 year ago.

How often do you take them? Metformin you should take before meals. Gemfribrozil 30 minutes before meals Benicar can be taken whenever, with or without food Ranitidine has many different types -s o it depends Answered by Julee Eder 1 year ago.

Metformin should be taken prior to meals as it is a diabetic medication. Ranitidine is Zantac which is for your stomach. You may take that AM and before bed if that is the way it is prescribed. Answered by Karole Spohr 1 year ago.

You Doctor and Pharmacist should both of advised you when to take your meds, and if they haven't should be reported. I think it is completely irresponsible of them. The doctor should also have told you if one interferes with the other. I would certainly be on the phone to either of them and not try to learn about it here. Answered by Lissa Toso 1 year ago.

are you me? I asked the same thing but I take about 22 different meds and was gonna go to the pharmacist and dump them out and ask him, but thats too much to do, so I just sit at home and get calls and letters from all these med companies that want me to be studied by them do to taking all their meds. good luck! Answered by Sondra Plecker 1 year ago.

all the medicines you mentioned are to be taken best in the morning at least and hour before having breakfast... most medicines are to be taken with food so it doesnt irritate the stomache. Answered by Helga Nazzaro 1 year ago.

Why in the world ask very important questions like those here? It's your health, you should be asking your dr. who knows you, not people who are basically total strangers. Answered by Herschel Hoskins 1 year ago.


Things take or do to help with muscular dystrophy?
My main problem with md is delayed muscle relaxation. This causes me some issues walking up stairs, lifting my leg out of the car after driving, hands not unclenching right away after doing something like turning the steering wheel or pusing a chair in even sometimes...and now there is sometimes and slight issue... Asked by Dannie Hilgers 1 year ago.

My main problem with md is delayed muscle relaxation. This causes me some issues walking up stairs, lifting my leg out of the car after driving, hands not unclenching right away after doing something like turning the steering wheel or pusing a chair in even sometimes...and now there is sometimes and slight issue with swallowing (this is new, the other things have been effecting me for about 10 years.) At this point, I am flat out scared and concerned. I want these things to go away, or at least do something that will alleviate these things, even if it doesn't cure anything. So far I try to drink plenty of water and do a variety or exercises with legs. I don't know what kind of things can be done with my hands though. Anyone know of anything that could help? Answered by Shawanna Haakenson 1 year ago.


What kind of serious illnesses that has palpitations as one of its symtoms?
Asked by Cinda Hanan 1 year ago.

Palpitations Symptoms & Signs Index Terms Related to Palpitations: Heart Palpitations; Heartbeat Sensations Palpitations are the unpleasant sensations of irregular and/or forceful beating of the heart in the chest. This symptom can be caused by a change in the rate or rhythm, or by an increase in the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. In some patients with palpitations, no heart disease or abnormal heart rhythms can be found. In others, palpitations result from abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias. Arrhythmias are heartbeats that are too slow, too rapid, irregular, or too early. MedicineNet Main Article on Palpitations Palpitations Causes of Palpitations Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Aortic Stenosis Atrial Fibrillation Depression Hyperthyroidism Hypoglycemia Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia Premature Ventricular Contractions Smoking and How to Quit Smoking Stress Other Causes of Palpitations Arrhythmia of Ventricle of Heart Bradycardia (very slow heartbeat) Fever Hypoxemia Medications (both Prescription and Non-prescription) Premature Atrial Contractions Examples of Medications for Palpitations amiodarone, Cordarone atenolol, Tenormin Calcium Channel Blockers metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL nifedipine, Adalat, Procardia procainamide, Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA quinidine, Quinaglute, Quinidex verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS Answered by Nana Mcghay 1 year ago.

Sounds like the flu. But just to be safe I would either take a trip to your ER, or make an appt with your doctor first thing in the morning. You dont want to take chances when it comes to your health. And there are so many things going around these days that have flu-like symptoms, its better to see an MD and be safe then to assume what it is and take the chance that it will go away or try to treat it yourself. Answered by Jonna Baters 1 year ago.

palpitations are rather common... you can be dehydrated, had to much caffine, adverse reaction to medication, and if your heart rate is over 160 BPM that is Severe Ventricular Tachycardia and you should call 911 ASAP! Oh that is if you are sitting down and not working out. Answered by Mack Luchesi 1 year ago.

Maybe your inlove, hekhek! Answered by Lucille Buie 1 year ago.

high cholesterol thyroid problem Answered by Anjelica Zeeman 1 year ago.


Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Elliott Sirk 1 year ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Lauryn Bastien 1 year ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Emeline Marentez 1 year ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Louann Kolppa 1 year ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. lidianegrila@yahoo.com Answered by Terina Leemow 1 year ago.


What medications cause lupus?
what kinds of meds can contribute to Lupus? thank you Asked by Joleen Patock 1 year ago.

What Medicines Cause Drug-Induced Lupus? Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: Heart disease Thyroid disease Hypertension Neuropsychiatric disorders Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: procainamide (Pronestyl) hydralazine (Apresoline) quinidine (Quinaglute). The risk for developing lupus-like disease from any of the other 35 drugs is low or very low; with some drugs only one or two cases have been reported. Dozens of medications have been reported to trigger SLE. However, more than 90% of cases of "drug-induced lupus" occurs as a side effect of one of the following six drugs: hydralazine (Apresoline is used for high blood pressure); quinidine (Quinidine Gluconate, Quinidine Sulfate) and procainamide (Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) are used for abnormal heart rhythms; phenytoin (Dilantin) is used for epilepsy; isoniazid ([Nydrazid, Laniazid] used for tuberculosis); and d-penicillamine (used for rheumatoid arthritis). These drugs are known to stimulate the immune system and cause SLE. ..... Answered by Bernarda Nesvig 1 year ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Helaine Regan 1 year ago.


Macrolide antibiotics--does problem with one automatically rule out others?
I can't take Bactrim, it's a sulfa drug, and there's no question I can't take those. No penicillins, either. Asked by Eduardo Yeley 1 year ago.

I can't take zithromax, but I have taken another macrolide several times in the last few years (clarithromycin?), and don't recall having any trouble with it. But now they say I can't take it any more. I have had so many drug reactions in the past that there are very few antibiotics I can take, and don't want to cut this one off the list unless it's absolutely necessary. It's good for bronchitis, which I tend to get two or three times a year at least. My reaction to zithromax years ago was chest pain. The urgent care doctor I saw at the time (I was out of town) diagnosed pleurisy caused by the medicine. This sounds a little odd to me now that I think about it, but I suppose it's possible. Do you know anything about this kind of drug reaction? Can you give me information or intelligent questions to ask my doctor and pharmacist to get to the bottom of this? Thanks so much for your help. Answered by Percy Hannaway 1 year ago.

Having had pleurisy twice, I know how painful it is! I was uncertain, however, about its being caused by medicines because both times mine developed from a bad case of bronchitis. Here is what I found, with the part I doubted marked with *****: What causes pleurisy? Pleurisy can be caused by any of the following conditions: * Infections: bacterial (including those that cause tuberculosis), fungi, parasites, or viruses * Inhaled chemicals or toxic substances: exposure to some cleaning agents like ammonia * Collagen vascular diseases: lupus, rheumatoid arthritis * Cancers: for example, the spread of lung cancer or breast cancer to the pleura * Tumors of the pleura: mesothelioma or sarcoma * Congestion: heart failure * Pulmonary embolism: blood clot inside the blood vessels to the lungs. These clots sometimes severely reduce blood and oxygen to portions of the lung and can result in death to that portion of lung tissue (termed lung infarction). This, too, can cause pleurisy. * Obstruction of lymph channels: as a result of centrally located lung tumors * Trauma: rib fractures or irritation from chest tubes used to drain air or fluid from the pleural cavity in the chest ***** Certain drugs: drugs that can cause lupus-like syndromes (such as hydralazine [Apresoline], Procan [Pronestyl, Procan-SR, Procanbid - these brands no longer are available in the U.S.], phenytoin [Dilantin], and others) * Abdominal processes: such as pancreatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, gallbladder disease, and damage to the spleen. * Pneumothorax: air in the pleural space, occurring spontaneously or from trauma. Answered by Tomas Cedano 1 year ago.

It sounds like you need to talk with your pharmacist. I very often find myself correcting misconceptions about antibiotic allergies from my physician/NP/PA colleagues -- your pharmacist is well-positioned to get to the bottom of the issues and figure out what can/should be used for you. Answered by Jack Pigram 1 year ago.


What time is proper to take my medications? I take several. I do not know if I should take them in AM or PM?
The reason for asking this here is two-fold.First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better.Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it.Thank you for all who... Asked by Merry Barbe 1 year ago.

I take the following medications: Ranitidine Gemfibrozil Metformin Benicar If you know the proper time of day to take these medications, I would love to hear it. If you know of a website that gives this information in a easy to understand fashion, I would also appreciate that as well. I am also looking for a website which allows me to enter all my medications and which tells me which should not be taken together because of their side-effects. Thank you for you help. Answered by Sandra Mccormick 1 year ago.

The reason for asking this here is two-fold. First, I consider the brain-trust of members of YA to be second to none. When we get multiple responses, it is all the better. Second, it helps others who also have the same type of question get an answer without them having to ask it. Thank you for all who have given their two-cents worth. I really appreciate it, even from those who did not respond with an answer. Answered by Otelia Kutcher 1 year ago.

When you get your meds from the pharmacy they tell you when to take them. The info would be on the education page. These meds are not just AM or PM meds, they are also with or without food. Of course as usual, you could be off most of these meds if you would just watch your diet and exercise. You know I have to add that last little ditty. Love ya, Steph Answered by Ling Sadat 1 year ago.

How often do you take them? Metformin you should take before meals. Gemfribrozil 30 minutes before meals Benicar can be taken whenever, with or without food Ranitidine has many different types -s o it depends Answered by Elwanda Sterley 1 year ago.

Metformin should be taken prior to meals as it is a diabetic medication. Ranitidine is Zantac which is for your stomach. You may take that AM and before bed if that is the way it is prescribed. Answered by Nelida Dockal 1 year ago.

You Doctor and Pharmacist should both of advised you when to take your meds, and if they haven't should be reported. I think it is completely irresponsible of them. The doctor should also have told you if one interferes with the other. I would certainly be on the phone to either of them and not try to learn about it here. Answered by Khalilah Pezzulo 1 year ago.

are you me? I asked the same thing but I take about 22 different meds and was gonna go to the pharmacist and dump them out and ask him, but thats too much to do, so I just sit at home and get calls and letters from all these med companies that want me to be studied by them do to taking all their meds. good luck! Answered by Lizeth Kapelke 1 year ago.

all the medicines you mentioned are to be taken best in the morning at least and hour before having breakfast... most medicines are to be taken with food so it doesnt irritate the stomache. Answered by Genna Harcey 1 year ago.

Why in the world ask very important questions like those here? It's your health, you should be asking your dr. who knows you, not people who are basically total strangers. Answered by Kari Sanlucas 1 year ago.


Things take or do to help with muscular dystrophy?
My main problem with md is delayed muscle relaxation. This causes me some issues walking up stairs, lifting my leg out of the car after driving, hands not unclenching right away after doing something like turning the steering wheel or pusing a chair in even sometimes...and now there is sometimes and slight issue... Asked by Maud Mitschke 1 year ago.

My main problem with md is delayed muscle relaxation. This causes me some issues walking up stairs, lifting my leg out of the car after driving, hands not unclenching right away after doing something like turning the steering wheel or pusing a chair in even sometimes...and now there is sometimes and slight issue with swallowing (this is new, the other things have been effecting me for about 10 years.) At this point, I am flat out scared and concerned. I want these things to go away, or at least do something that will alleviate these things, even if it doesn't cure anything. So far I try to drink plenty of water and do a variety or exercises with legs. I don't know what kind of things can be done with my hands though. Anyone know of anything that could help? Answered by Jeanene Sudo 1 year ago.


What kind of serious illnesses that has palpitations as one of its symtoms?
Asked by Olen Moulding 1 year ago.

Palpitations Symptoms & Signs Index Terms Related to Palpitations: Heart Palpitations; Heartbeat Sensations Palpitations are the unpleasant sensations of irregular and/or forceful beating of the heart in the chest. This symptom can be caused by a change in the rate or rhythm, or by an increase in the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. In some patients with palpitations, no heart disease or abnormal heart rhythms can be found. In others, palpitations result from abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias. Arrhythmias are heartbeats that are too slow, too rapid, irregular, or too early. MedicineNet Main Article on Palpitations Palpitations Causes of Palpitations Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Aortic Stenosis Atrial Fibrillation Depression Hyperthyroidism Hypoglycemia Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia Premature Ventricular Contractions Smoking and How to Quit Smoking Stress Other Causes of Palpitations Arrhythmia of Ventricle of Heart Bradycardia (very slow heartbeat) Fever Hypoxemia Medications (both Prescription and Non-prescription) Premature Atrial Contractions Examples of Medications for Palpitations amiodarone, Cordarone atenolol, Tenormin Calcium Channel Blockers metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL nifedipine, Adalat, Procardia procainamide, Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA quinidine, Quinaglute, Quinidex verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS Answered by Iris Crigler 1 year ago.

Sounds like the flu. But just to be safe I would either take a trip to your ER, or make an appt with your doctor first thing in the morning. You dont want to take chances when it comes to your health. And there are so many things going around these days that have flu-like symptoms, its better to see an MD and be safe then to assume what it is and take the chance that it will go away or try to treat it yourself. Answered by Vivien Kopecky 1 year ago.

palpitations are rather common... you can be dehydrated, had to much caffine, adverse reaction to medication, and if your heart rate is over 160 BPM that is Severe Ventricular Tachycardia and you should call 911 ASAP! Oh that is if you are sitting down and not working out. Answered by Claudia Cremonese 1 year ago.

Maybe your inlove, hekhek! Answered by Callie Pin 1 year ago.

high cholesterol thyroid problem Answered by Otilia Fearheller 1 year ago.


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