PROCAN SR Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 086065/001.

Names and composition

"PROCAN SR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Answered questions

Possible infection? I need opinions!!!?
We know that it is definately not the flu and as far as the medications, the doctors have said that none of them that he has taken would cause this. Asked by Jodee Desalle 3 months ago.

My grandpa is being hospitalized for a sickness that they are not finding. He has had a 102 degree fever since Thursday. His white blood count was at 2.7 on Friday, 2.4 on Saturday, then dropped to 1.8 on Sunday. They keep giving him antibiotics through an IV, but they are not stabilizing anything. They have done blood work, chest x-rays, tested urine, ekg and all tests are coming up normal except for the white cell count. What could this be? Answered by Veronique Ethen 3 months ago.

If he is taking a heart medication called procainamide (BRAND NAME: Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) it can cause all of his symptoms. Find out fast... A severe reduction in white blood cell count occurs relatively rarely with procainamide therapy and is more common with the sustained-release preparations. This side effect has caused death. For this reason, patients on sustained-release procainamide get a complete blood count every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment. A syndrome resembling lupus erythematosus, including fever, chills, joint pain, chest pain, and/or skin rash can occur with procainamide. The lupus-like syndrome is reversible after stopping of the drug. Rarely, procainamide can cause confusion, hallucinations, and depression. Answered by Annalee Higginbothan 3 months ago.

This decrease in WBC count is called leucopenia.many common medications can cause leukopenia (eg. minocyclen, a commonly prescribed antibiotic).Copper, Zinc deficiency may also cause this.morover the WBC count decreases in flu. Answered by Annamarie Poppell 3 months ago.

send me a message,i would like to contact you and help you. [email protected] Answered by Kaleigh Walkers 3 months ago.


Avelox and magnesium,aluminum?
im taking avelox antibiotic for my thorat bacterial infection....i brought guava juice today but i think it contains magnesium or aluminum....how long after taking avelox can i drink the guava juice???? Asked by Thao Folkerts 3 months ago.

It's difficult question, but i am trying to answer... Should avoid while taking Avelox: Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Avelox may make your skin more sensitive to sunburn. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen if you must be out in the sun while using Avelox. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun. Avelox can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. If this happens, avoid driving or doing anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Important information about Avelox: Take this medication for as many days as it has been prescribed for you even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may start to improve before the infection is completely treated. Avelox will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu. Do not use Avelox without first talking to your doctor if you or any member of your family have a heart condition known as long QT syndrome. Also, do not use Avelox if you are also using a heart rhythm medicine such as quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute), procainamide (Pronestyl, Procan SR), amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), sotalol (Betapace), and others. Certain other drugs can make Avelox less effective when taken at the same time. The following medicines should be taken at least 4 hours after or 8 hours before you take Avelox: antacids that contain magnesium, calcium, or aluminum (such as Tums, Rolaids, Maalox); the ulcer medicine sucralfate (Carafate); vitamin or mineral supplements that contain iron or zinc; didanosine chewable/buffered tablets or pediatric powder for oral solution (ddI, Videx, Videx Pediatric, and others). Avelox may make your skin more sensitive to sunburn. Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight or tanning beds, and wear protective clothing and sunscreen when you are outdoors. Call your doctor if you have severe burning, redness, itching, rash, or swelling after being in the sun. Answered by Ngan Ledsome 3 months ago.


What is Tachycardia?
I read that i might have it. been having fast heart rate Asked by Tisha Crespi 3 months ago.

This topic will help you out: Ventricular tachycardia is a heart rhythm that originates in the ventricles and produces a heart rate of at least 120 beats per minute. Ventricular tachycardia may be thought of as a sequence of consecutive ventricular premature beats. Sometimes only a few such beats occur together, and then the heart returns to a normal rhythm. Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular tachycardia. Sustained ventricular tachycardia usually occurs in people with structural heart disease that damages the ventricles. Most commonly, it occurs weeks or months after a heart attack. It is more common among older people. However, rarely, ventricular tachycardia develops in young people who do not have structural heart disease. Symptoms and Diagnosis People with ventricular tachycardia almost always have palpitations. Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately or pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows. Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes ventricular fibrillation—a form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous. Electrocardiography Electrocardiography) is used to diagnose ventricular tachycardia and to help determine whether treatment is required. A portable ECG (Holter) monitor may be used to record heart rhythm over a 24-hour period. Treatment Ventricular tachycardia is treated when it causes symptoms or when episodes last more than 30 seconds even without causing symptoms. Sustained ventricular tachycardia often requires emergency treatment. If episodes cause blood pressure to fall to a low level, cardioversion is needed immediately. Drugs may be given intravenously to end or suppress ventricular tachycardia. The most commonly used drugs are lidocaineSome Trade Names XYLOCAINE , procainamideSome Trade Names PROCAN SR PRONESTYL , and amiodaroneSome Trade Names CORDARONE . Certain procedures may be performed to destroy the small abnormal area in the ventricles, identified by ECG, that is usually responsible for sustained ventricular tachycardia. They include radiofrequency ablation (delivery of energy of a specific frequency through an electrode catheter inserted in the heart) and open-heart surgery. If other therapy is ineffective, an automatic defibrillator (a small device that can detect an arrhythmia and deliver a shock to correct it) may be implanted. This procedure is similar to implantation of an artificial pacemaker. Answered by Mavis Pliml 3 months ago.

What Is Tachycardia Answered by Vivian Princiotta 3 months ago.

yeah, read all the others responses....you need to differentiate between the electrical activity of the heart which is seen on the ekg, and the functional pumping of the heart which is felt as a pulse or measured as the blood pressure. pulseless vtach would show as a fast ventricular rhythm on the ekg. then by checking the person, if you find no pulse this is technically an arrest because no matter what the heart is doing electrically, the heart is not pumping out enough blood to maintain perfusion to the body, therefor no pulse will be felt. this is often caused because the heart is beating so quickly, that the chambers do not have enough time to fill with blood, so not enough blood is available to be pumped out. now asystole is seen on an ekg as flat line, no electrical activity, and therefor no heart muscle pumping, so no perfusion, no pulse, also an arrest situation. Answered by Quyen Kuehner 3 months ago.

Extreme Tachycardia Answered by Linnie Karhoff 3 months ago.

Tachycardia refers to a rapid beating of the heart. By convention the term refers to heart rates greater than 100 beats per minute in the adult patient. Tachycardia may be a perfectly normal physiological response to stress. However, depending on the mechanism of the tachycardia and the health status of the patient, tachycardia may be harmful, and require medical treatment. In extreme cases, tachycardia can be life threatening. Tachycardia can be harmful in two ways. First, when the heart beats too rapidly, it may pump blood less efficiently. Second, the faster the heart beats, the more oxygen and nutrients the heart requires. This may leave patients feeling out of breath or cause angina. This can be especially problematic for patients suffering from ischemic heart disease. Answered by Chun Laface 3 months ago.

You answered your own question. Tachycardia = Fast HR. But what causes tachycardia is a whole another question. Several reasons for it and beyond scope of this forum. How old are you and what is your heart rate. Do you have any symptoms ? How did you find out you had tachycardia ? If it was at doctor's office, what made you go to doctor's office ? edited to add: Hey doc he/she didn't ask what is VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA. Poster was simply asking about tachy. Answered by Janel Lumpkins 3 months ago.

Tachycardia means faster than average heart rate. Average is the key word. Whether or not it's a problem depends on a lot of things. If you are seeing someone medical about it, good. If not you probably should, just to be on the safe side.Ventricular tachycardia and atrial (what I imagine you are having) are two different things. Atrial tachycardia by itself does _not_ cause v tach. Answered by Craig Angelino 3 months ago.

You dont have tachycardia, youd be...dead or unconsious without a pulse Tachycardia or 'taching' is fast heart beat that is because of an irregular electrical pulse by your heart, if left untreated it leads to Ventricular Tachycardia which is life threating. Its not like a fast pulse from running. Answered by Carly Kodama 3 months ago.


Tachycardia Questions?
I don't think I'm very clear...random wasn't the best word to use...sorry. Here is a situation. I can be layin in bed at night and it will feel like my heart will stop and then race like crazy...sometimes it lasts a few seconds, minutes and I've had it last a few hours on a couple of occassions. ... Asked by Shanna Skultety 3 months ago.

I was wondering what causes Tachycardia....I have havd this random rapid heartbeat my whole life, but recently it has become very bad. My mother talked to her heart doctor and he said he's sure its a type of tachycardia....I can't remember what type. But I was wondering what can cause this? Are there any STDs that cause it? Just curious...although this happened before I have ever been "active" just not as much and severe. Also, how do they test for tachycardia? I am very afraid of going and getting tested/evaluated. Thanks! Answered by Crista Bramlette 3 months ago.

I don't think I'm very clear...random wasn't the best word to use...sorry. Here is a situation. I can be layin in bed at night and it will feel like my heart will stop and then race like crazy...sometimes it lasts a few seconds, minutes and I've had it last a few hours on a couple of occassions. It beats well over 100 beats per minute. Answered by Olin Rovere 3 months ago.

Ventricular Tachycardia: Ventricular tachycardia is a heart rhythm that originates in the ventricles and produces a heart rate of at least 120 beats per minute. Ventricular tachycardia may be thought of as a sequence of consecutive ventricular premature beats. Sometimes only a few such beats occur together, and then the heart returns to a normal rhythm. Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular tachycardia. Sustained ventricular tachycardia usually occurs in people with structural heart disease that damages the ventricles. Most commonly, it occurs weeks or months after a heart attack. It is more common among older people. However, rarely, ventricular tachycardia develops in young people who do not have structural heart disease. Symptoms and Diagnosis People with ventricular tachycardia almost always have palpitations. Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately or pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows. Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes ventricular fibrillation—a form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous. Electrocardiography (ECG) (see Symptoms and Diagnosis of Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders: Electrocardiography) is used to diagnose ventricular tachycardia and to help determine whether treatment is required. A portable ECG (Holter) monitor may be used to record heart rhythm over a 24-hour period. Treatment Ventricular tachycardia is treated when it causes symptoms or when episodes last more than 30 seconds even without causing symptoms. Sustained ventricular tachycardia often requires emergency treatment. If episodes cause blood pressure to fall to a low level, cardioversion is needed immediately. Drugs may be given intravenously to end or suppress ventricular tachycardia. The most commonly used drugs are lidocaineSome XYLOCAINE , procainamideSome PROCAN SR PRONESTYL , and amiodarone CORDARONE . Certain procedures may be performed to destroy the small abnormal area in the ventricles, identified by ECG, that is usually responsible for sustained ventricular tachycardia. They include radiofrequency ablation (delivery of energy of a specific frequency through an electrode catheter inserted in the heart) and open-heart surgery. If other therapy is ineffective, an automatic defibrillator (a small device that can detect an arrhythmia and deliver a shock to correct it) may be implanted. This procedure is similar to implantation of an artificial pacemaker. STDs are not a cause of Tachycardia, but they do involve any organ in the long run. There is nothing to be afraid in getting evaluated. Answered by Merry Rary 3 months ago.

Tachycardia literally means fast heart beat. In an adult, more than 100 beats per minute means tachycardia. An EKG can measure this, but you can also just take your pulse and count how many times you heart beats per minute - its really very easy. There are many many causes for tachycardia and its not worth speculating as to yours, however there is no STD which will cause it, so you don't need to worry there. As for the "random" component of your heartbeat, that does not necessarily relate to tachycardia. Answered by Maude Ladson 3 months ago.

Ventricular tachycardia is a potentially lethal disruption of normal heartbeat (arrhythmia) that may cause the heart to become unable to pump adequate blood through the body. The heart rate may be 160 to 240 (normal is 60 to 100 beats per minute). Ventricular tachycardia may not cause symptoms in some people, but may be lethal in others -- it is a major cause of sudden cardiac death. Answered by Brigida Bettencourt 3 months ago.

First, let's get one thing straight: the term "tachycardia" refers to a fast heart beat. The term "palpitations" refers to the perception of one's heartbeat, which I think is what you are talking about. Usually, one is not aware of his or her own heartbeat, except when the heart rythm is abnormal. Of course, tachycardia is one cause of palpitations, but there are several conditions that may be responsible for palpitations, including hormonal diseases, metabolic alterations, anemia, and others. I would definetely recommend seeking professional medical attention. One of the easiest tests, is called a Holter electrocardiogram. This non-invasive study is painless and simply records your heart's electrical activity in a 24-hour period. It has a little button for you to press in case you feel the symptoms you are describing. Afterwards, the cardiologist analyzes the entire 24-hr recording of your heart, paying particular attention to those moments where you might have pressed the button. This method usually detects most types of arrythmias. If none are present, then you should undergo further testing. As always, the best weapon against any condition is knowledge. It is OK to feel afraid, but it is always better to detect a potentially treatable condition (even curable) as soon as possible, when it is still treatable. If you are as young as I think you are, you shouldn't worry that much. Most of the times it's due to benign conditions that require minimal, if any, treatment. Answered by Saul Douvier 3 months ago.

tachacardia is a heartbeat over 100 beats per minute at rest. What you are probably feeling is a pvc or pac a premature ventricular contraction or atrial contraction, happens to everyone, heart skips a beat then runs fast for a few secs to catch up. An EKG can put your mind at ease, but as a paramedic for over 20 years I don't think you have to worry. Answered by Tyrone Olton 3 months ago.

The Doc will listen to your heart, check blood pressure, maybe draw some blood to look for chemicals or enzymes, then order other tests such as chest xray, etc... all are painless and non invasive. This could be something simple or it can be serious, hope yours is the kind you out grow. Oh, I sure don't know of any STD that would cause this. Answered by Ranae Standefer 3 months ago.

Hi, Manda. Don't stress, but you do need to go to your physician and have this checked. There are many different causes for tachycardia, and if needed can be treated or monitored. Go to your doctor and get checked. It's not as involved to do a basic preliminary exam as you might think. Best Answered by Latia Woolums 3 months ago.

there are more causes of a rapid heart rate than can fit into this space. your normal heart rate (if you are an adult) is 60-100 beats per minute. go to your doctor and ask. get over your fear. Answered by Laquanda Torrie 3 months ago.

please dont hesitate going to be tested ! The sooner the better! It may not be anything serious but yet you won't know unless you go! Do your heart a favor goe today! Answered by Anette Bourdages 3 months ago.


My 10 year old girl has an extremly high heart rate.?
Cardiologist called me this morning. THe holz monitor showed no noticible defects other than the rapid heart rate.Doctor said it was called inapproproate sinus tachycardia, and said that it was not something to worry about. I disagree with this as I have been keeping track of her HR and its between 150 and 180... Asked by Diego Shenton 3 months ago.

My 10 yr old daughter has an ongoing and consitant heart rate of between 120 and 180. I have taken her to a pediatric cardiologist who had holtz monitoring and cardiac event monitoring done for her to determine the problem. the holtz monitor revealed no abnormal heart functions just the high rate. I know that this is not normal and it scares me she has chest pains, gets dizzy and experiences heart palpitations and light headedness. I am not sure what else to look at they checked here for SVT and so far all they can tell me is that she has tachacardia. Im sure that prolonged time with her heart rate high like this will hurt her or damage her heart. Any suggestions of questions to ask the dr. Answered by Gennie Laurole 3 months ago.

Cardiologist called me this morning. THe holz monitor showed no noticible defects other than the rapid heart rate. Doctor said it was called inapproproate sinus tachycardia, and said that it was not something to worry about. I disagree with this as I have been keeping track of her HR and its between 150 and 180 most days.This cannot be normal. Im calling the doc for a second opinion. Answered by Len Clavijo 3 months ago.

This section which I have specially searched out from maerck manual will help is to question your doctor about, please read carefully and note it down: Buy the Book Print This Topic Email This Topic Pronunciations arrhythmia atrial electrocardiography fibrillation tachycardia ventricular ventricular fibrillation ventricular tachycardia Ventricular tachycardia is a heart rhythm that originates in the ventricles and produces a heart rate of at least 120 beats per minute. Photographs ECG: Ventricular Tachycardia ECG: Ventricular Tachycardia Ventricular tachycardia may be thought of as a sequence of consecutive ventricular premature beats. Sometimes only a few such beats occur together, and then the heart returns to a normal rhythm. Ventricular tachycardia that lasts more than 30 seconds is called sustained ventricular tachycardia. Sustained ventricular tachycardia usually occurs in people with structural heart disease that damages the ventricles. Most commonly, it occurs weeks or months after a heart attack. It is more common among older people. However, rarely, ventricular tachycardia develops in young people who do not have structural heart disease. Symptoms and Diagnosis People with ventricular tachycardia almost always have palpitations. Sustained ventricular tachycardia can be dangerous because the ventricles cannot fill adequately or pump blood normally. Blood pressure tends to fall, and heart failure follows. Sustained ventricular tachycardia is also dangerous because it can worsen until it becomes ventricular fibrillation—a form of cardiac arrest. Sometimes ventricular tachycardia causes few symptoms, even at rates of up to 200 beats per minute, but it may still be extremely dangerous. Electrocardiography (ECG) (see Symptoms and Diagnosis of Heart and Blood Vessel Disorders: Electrocardiography) is used to diagnose ventricular tachycardia and to help determine whether treatment is required. A portable ECG (Holter) monitor may be used to record heart rhythm over a 24-hour period. Treatment Ventricular tachycardia is treated when it causes symptoms or when episodes last more than 30 seconds even without causing symptoms. Sustained ventricular tachycardia often requires emergency treatment. If episodes cause blood pressure to fall to a low level, cardioversion is needed immediately. Drugs may be given intravenously to end or suppress ventricular tachycardia. The most commonly used drugs are lidocaineSome Trade Names XYLOCAINE , procainamideSome Trade Names PROCAN SR PRONESTYL , and amiodaroneSome Trade Names CORDARONE . Certain procedures may be performed to destroy the small abnormal area in the ventricles, identified by ECG, that is usually responsible for sustained ventricular tachycardia. They include radiofrequency ablation (delivery of energy of a specific frequency through an electrode catheter inserted in the heart) and open-heart surgery. If other therapy is ineffective, an automatic defibrillator (a small device that can detect an arrhythmia and deliver a shock to correct it) may be implanted. This procedure is similar to implantation of an artificial pacemaker. Answered by Ebonie Faigin 3 months ago.

I don't know where you live, but if this were my child, I would definitely get another opinion. If you are in California-go to UC Davis, or Stanford. If you don't live in California, contact these places by either phone or email, and ask them where to go in your state. Don't give up on this. It's happening for a reason, and, I agree, it can more than likely hurt her heart. Good luck to you both. Answered by Jaime Brandle 3 months ago.

Tachycardia is treatable so either go back to the peds cardiolgist or find a new one and get a clear answer as to what is going on. Answered by Archie Bargar 3 months ago.


What does in mean to test positive fo anti nuclear antibody on a blood test?
Asked by Catrice Paro 3 months ago.

Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are unusual antibodies that can bind to certain structures within the nucleus of the cells. They are found in patients whose immune system may be predisposed to cause inflammation against their own body tissues. ANAs are indicative of the potential presence of an autoimmune illness such as systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, polymyositis, scleroderma, Hashimoto thyroiditis, juvenile diabetes mellitus, Addison disease, vitiligo, pernicious anemia, glomerulonephritis, and pulmonary fibrosis. ANAs can also be found in patients with chronic infections and cancer. Many medications including procainamide (PROCAN SR), hydralazine, and dilantin can stimulate the production of ANAs. A positive test result may suggest an autoimmune disease, but further specific testing is required to assist in making a final diagnosis. The presenting symptoms, if any, are also important in making a final diagnosis. ANA test results can be positive in people without any known autoimmune disease. While this is not common, the frequency of a false positive ANA result increases as people get older. Answered by Jettie Guerry 3 months ago.

It means the immune system is making chemicals that may attack parts of the body such as joints. It matters how strongly positive the test is. A weak test usually doesn't mean much. The test can turn positive with older age and that doesn't mean much either. Lupus is an example of a health problem that can have a positive anitnuclear antibody test. A rheumatologist is a type of doctor that can help regarding this. Answered by Cara Thady 3 months ago.

A high ana test result is usually considered by medical professionals to be an indicator that something serious MIGHT be going on in a person's body. The problem, I think, is that it's too non-specific to know where further investigation might be indicated. If your mom and sister are not experiencing any worrisome symptoms, their doctors might decide to take a "wait and see" approach and test the ana levels again later. Sometimes it just means that the body is dealing with some inflammation or infection that will resolve itself. If the levels stay high after another test, I think they should then have further tests done to try to determine what's going on. Answered by Yasmine Vargis 3 months ago.

It means your immune system is producing antibodies to your own body. Although some healthy people can have titres of around 1:10-1:40 (range estimates vary), over that may be suggestive of an autoimmune condition. You're allergic to yourself, basically. :-) Answered by Velvet Safrit 3 months ago.

A positive ANA is suggestive for but not speciffically diagnostic for certain connective disease states. Other testing and clinical information is needed to make a specific diagnosis. It is potentially positive in SLE, drug induced lupus, Sjogrens, scleroderma, rheumatoid, polymyositis and Mixed Connective Tissue Disease. Correlation with one of four Fluorescent patterns is helpful. Answered by Mikel Brunetti 3 months ago.


Macrolide antibiotics--does problem with one automatically rule out others?
I can't take Bactrim, it's a sulfa drug, and there's no question I can't take those. No penicillins, either. Asked by Eulalia Northcut 3 months ago.

I can't take zithromax, but I have taken another macrolide several times in the last few years (clarithromycin?), and don't recall having any trouble with it. But now they say I can't take it any more. I have had so many drug reactions in the past that there are very few antibiotics I can take, and don't want to cut this one off the list unless it's absolutely necessary. It's good for bronchitis, which I tend to get two or three times a year at least. My reaction to zithromax years ago was chest pain. The urgent care doctor I saw at the time (I was out of town) diagnosed pleurisy caused by the medicine. This sounds a little odd to me now that I think about it, but I suppose it's possible. Do you know anything about this kind of drug reaction? Can you give me information or intelligent questions to ask my doctor and pharmacist to get to the bottom of this? Thanks so much for your help. Answered by Billie Vielman 3 months ago.

Having had pleurisy twice, I know how painful it is! I was uncertain, however, about its being caused by medicines because both times mine developed from a bad case of bronchitis. Here is what I found, with the part I doubted marked with *****: What causes pleurisy? Pleurisy can be caused by any of the following conditions: * Infections: bacterial (including those that cause tuberculosis), fungi, parasites, or viruses * Inhaled chemicals or toxic substances: exposure to some cleaning agents like ammonia * Collagen vascular diseases: lupus, rheumatoid arthritis * Cancers: for example, the spread of lung cancer or breast cancer to the pleura * Tumors of the pleura: mesothelioma or sarcoma * Congestion: heart failure * Pulmonary embolism: blood clot inside the blood vessels to the lungs. These clots sometimes severely reduce blood and oxygen to portions of the lung and can result in death to that portion of lung tissue (termed lung infarction). This, too, can cause pleurisy. * Obstruction of lymph channels: as a result of centrally located lung tumors * Trauma: rib fractures or irritation from chest tubes used to drain air or fluid from the pleural cavity in the chest ***** Certain drugs: drugs that can cause lupus-like syndromes (such as hydralazine [Apresoline], Procan [Pronestyl, Procan-SR, Procanbid - these brands no longer are available in the U.S.], phenytoin [Dilantin], and others) * Abdominal processes: such as pancreatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, gallbladder disease, and damage to the spleen. * Pneumothorax: air in the pleural space, occurring spontaneously or from trauma. Answered by Camellia Grinter 3 months ago.

It sounds like you need to talk with your pharmacist. I very often find myself correcting misconceptions about antibiotic allergies from my physician/NP/PA colleagues -- your pharmacist is well-positioned to get to the bottom of the issues and figure out what can/should be used for you. Answered by Hisako Honsberger 3 months ago.


What medications cause lupus?
what kinds of meds can contribute to Lupus? thank you Asked by Kathryne Davers 3 months ago.

What Medicines Cause Drug-Induced Lupus? Lupus-inducing drugs are typically those used to treat chronic diseases. No obvious common denominator links the drugs that are likely to cause lupus. The list includes medicines used to treat: Heart disease Thyroid disease Hypertension Neuropsychiatric disorders Certain anti-inflammatory agents and antibiotics. At least 38 drugs currently in use can cause DILE. However, most cases have been associated with these three: procainamide (Pronestyl) hydralazine (Apresoline) quinidine (Quinaglute). The risk for developing lupus-like disease from any of the other 35 drugs is low or very low; with some drugs only one or two cases have been reported. Dozens of medications have been reported to trigger SLE. However, more than 90% of cases of "drug-induced lupus" occurs as a side effect of one of the following six drugs: hydralazine (Apresoline is used for high blood pressure); quinidine (Quinidine Gluconate, Quinidine Sulfate) and procainamide (Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid) are used for abnormal heart rhythms; phenytoin (Dilantin) is used for epilepsy; isoniazid ([Nydrazid, Laniazid] used for tuberculosis); and d-penicillamine (used for rheumatoid arthritis). These drugs are known to stimulate the immune system and cause SLE. ..... Answered by Beatriz Borgerding 3 months ago.

Some drugs used to control high blood pressure and tuberculosis can cause drug induced lupus which goes away when you stop the medication.These are the most common. If you already have lupus, these drugs could make it flare. Sulfa based antibiotics can also cause flares. Answered by Shad Denenberg 3 months ago.


ANA Homogeneous Pattern???
My Dr, called me and told me that my blood work came back and that I have to see a specialist for this Homogeneous Pattern, I have an appt but just wondering if anyone knows what this can mean? I've done some research but can't find any real clear answers. Thanks! Asked by Oleta Cutter 3 months ago.

The level of the titer is important. The higher the # is more likely the diagnosis. Homogeneous pattern can indicate Lupus (and) or mixed connective tissue disease. Elevated ANA levels are also found in juvenile diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, patients with infections (virus or bacteria), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, biliary cirrhosis, alcoholic liver disease, Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroiditis, blood disease (ex. idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic anemia), cancers (ex. melanoma, breast, lung, kidney, ovarian and others), skin diseases (ex. psoriasis, pemphigus), as well as in the elderly and those with a family history of rheumatic diseases. There are also medications that can cause ANAs to be produced. Such as, procainamide (Procan SR), hydralazine, and dilantin. It can also mean nothing at all. But your dr. will order a lot of lab work to pin point just what is going on. Probable test will be dsDNA, DNP, ssDNA, Anti Smith, CRP, and Sed rate. Answered by Doretha Chiarito 3 months ago.

Ana Homogeneous Answered by Shanna Sonterre 3 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: ANA Homogeneous Pattern??? My Dr, called me and told me that my blood work came back and that I have to see a specialist for this Homogeneous Pattern, I have an appt but just wondering if anyone knows what this can mean? I've done some research but can't find any real clear answers. Thanks! Answered by Trent Wylde 3 months ago.

ANA is an abnormal antibody to nuclear proteins. It occurs in Lupus ans other connective tissue disorders but it can occure in the normal population as well. So its important to interperate with with your symotoms. The higher the titre the more significant (ei 1:40 doesn't mean much but 1:256 is more significant) WBC is lowish but hard to know what that means in absence of other info. Answered by Cyril Billiter 3 months ago.


What kind of serious illnesses that has palpitations as one of its symtoms?
Asked by Sharyl Maclauchlan 3 months ago.

Palpitations Symptoms & Signs Index Terms Related to Palpitations: Heart Palpitations; Heartbeat Sensations Palpitations are the unpleasant sensations of irregular and/or forceful beating of the heart in the chest. This symptom can be caused by a change in the rate or rhythm, or by an increase in the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. In some patients with palpitations, no heart disease or abnormal heart rhythms can be found. In others, palpitations result from abnormal heart rhythms called arrhythmias. Arrhythmias are heartbeats that are too slow, too rapid, irregular, or too early. MedicineNet Main Article on Palpitations Palpitations Causes of Palpitations Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Aortic Stenosis Atrial Fibrillation Depression Hyperthyroidism Hypoglycemia Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) Paroxysmal Atrial Tachycardia Premature Ventricular Contractions Smoking and How to Quit Smoking Stress Other Causes of Palpitations Arrhythmia of Ventricle of Heart Bradycardia (very slow heartbeat) Fever Hypoxemia Medications (both Prescription and Non-prescription) Premature Atrial Contractions Examples of Medications for Palpitations amiodarone, Cordarone atenolol, Tenormin Calcium Channel Blockers metoprolol, Lopressor, Toprol XL nifedipine, Adalat, Procardia procainamide, Pronestyl; Procan-SR; Procanbid propranolol, Inderal, Inderal LA quinidine, Quinaglute, Quinidex verapamil, Calan, Verelan, Verelan PM, Isoptin, Covera-HS Answered by Harriette Mccommons 3 months ago.

Sounds like the flu. But just to be safe I would either take a trip to your ER, or make an appt with your doctor first thing in the morning. You dont want to take chances when it comes to your health. And there are so many things going around these days that have flu-like symptoms, its better to see an MD and be safe then to assume what it is and take the chance that it will go away or try to treat it yourself. Answered by Ardelle Tarrien 3 months ago.

palpitations are rather common... you can be dehydrated, had to much caffine, adverse reaction to medication, and if your heart rate is over 160 BPM that is Severe Ventricular Tachycardia and you should call 911 ASAP! Oh that is if you are sitting down and not working out. Answered by Leila Whittlesey 3 months ago.

Maybe your inlove, hekhek! Answered by Jami Scullion 3 months ago.

high cholesterol thyroid problem Answered by Christiane Fontanini 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
086065/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
086468/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
087510/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
088489/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
007335/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/004 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
007335/005 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
017371/001 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
017371/002 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 375MG
017371/003 PRONESTYL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
020545/001 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
020545/002 PROCANBID PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
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083553/002 PROCAPAN PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
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084604/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
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086065/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
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087361/001 PRONESTYL-SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
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087510/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
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088489/001 PROCAN SR PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 1GM
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088535/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
088636/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
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088959/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
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089029/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
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089042/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 750MG
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089219/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 250MG
089220/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 375MG
089221/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 500MG
089256/001 PROCAINAMIDE HCL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 100MG per ML
089257/001 PROCAINAMIDE HCL PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 500MG per ML
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089369/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 250MG
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089528/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
089529/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089537/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 500MG per ML
089840/001 PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE PROCAINAMIDE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG

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