PROAMATINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019815/001.

Names and composition

"PROAMATINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019815/001 PROAMATINE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
019815/002 PROAMATINE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
019815/003 PROAMATINE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
076577/002 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076514/002 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076449/002 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076449/001 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076449/003 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076514/001 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076514/003 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076577/001 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076577/003 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077746/001 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
077746/003 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077746/002 MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076725/002 ORVATEN MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076725/001 ORVATEN MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
019815/001 PROAMATINE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
076725/003 ORVATEN MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
019815/002 PROAMATINE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
019815/003 PROAMATINE MIDODRINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

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Answered questions

Proamatine Dosage for Low BP/ Vasovagal?
After passing out on the tilt table and my Dr. telling me I have vasovagal i was wondering if anyone had been on proamatine? I have been on this drug for about a week at a very low dose. I started out at 2.5 mg. for the day now I am up to 2.5 x 2 times a day.. But I still feel as though nothing has happened. I also... Asked by Collen Beetz 1 month ago.

After passing out on the tilt table and my Dr. telling me I have vasovagal i was wondering if anyone had been on proamatine? I have been on this drug for about a week at a very low dose. I started out at 2.5 mg. for the day now I am up to 2.5 x 2 times a day.. But I still feel as though nothing has happened. I also think a bit of my problem is anxiety So i took *1 pill of ex-stress which is suppose to help with anxiety... anyway... Anyone ever take proamatine and if so what dosage did you finally see results at? My questioning is because I have been out of work for 3 weeks with this crap of feeling faint and crazy low bp and i want my life back!! Answered by Benton Strawberry 1 month ago.

Proamatine (midrodine) is a very potent medication. The range from safe to dangerous dose is narrow. You can have normal / low BP one day, then dangerously high BP after a dose increase. For what it's worth, I just discharged an elderly man home on 7.5 mg three times daily. Good luck Answered by Curt Etling 1 month ago.


I have a question for any pharmacists out there.?
I was taking midodrine for low blood pressure. It was a small pink tablet. then, I switched pharmacies and when I got my midodrine at a different pharmacy, it was a larger white pill. The pharmacist just said, it was probably made by a different company and it is okay to look different. should I be concerned. Asked by Lizzie Twine 1 month ago.

Generic Name Midodrine; Brand Names ProAmatine - color- white- 2.5 mg Drug interaction * Midodrine increases the effects of digoxin and similar drugs, psychoactive medication, beta blocker, and other stimulants. Be very cautious when combining any of these drugs and midodrine. *People taking fludrocortisone must have their dosage reduced or salt intake lowered before starting midodrine. *Alpha blockers such as prazion, terazosin, and doxazosin can block midodrine's effects. Food interactions; none know Answered by Novella Moccasin 1 month ago.

im sure it is fine...many companies make the same pill but use different shapes colors etc. i have taken many that are different from company to company. try and do a RX look up online, but im sure it is the same pill. Answered by Karl Kneedler 1 month ago.

You'll be fine, the white midodrine is just a generic brand. Answered by Joetta Bilecki 1 month ago.


Is Ibuprofen ok to take with a pill that has to do with blood pressure?
Also pill I'm on is called Midorine HCL 5MG....Is taking half a pill a day. Time right now is about 1 am Asked by Tisha Panfil 1 month ago.

I know of no significant interactions between ibuprofen and Proamatine (midodrine). Answered by Stevie Ronsini 1 month ago.


How does one's menstrual cycle effect hemoglobin, hematocrit and so on.?
I just started proamatine (sp) calcium and ferrous sulfate, but the doc say 6 months to make a difference. Asked by Lane Bridenbaugh 1 month ago.

I was in the hospital with heart problems, it didn't have the strength to get the blood to my head still not sure what;s going on. While there they said that my: Hemoglobin - 10L Hematocrit- 33%L Ferritine-4L Irn- 26L Calcium- 8.3L There were some less significant results that were off. I had a positive tile table test and abnormal EKG. NOW, I am home and still feeling crappy and just started my cycle. What kind of effect will this has on my blood levels? Also up un to now, I have given blood regularly, does that have a profound effect on the blood? Answered by Temika Tullio 1 month ago.

If women have heavy bleeding or irregular bleeding, they often check for anemia because you can lose enough that you have a drop in iron and everything else associated with blood. If you aren't losing a lot, it normally doesn't make a difference. However, if you are low to start with-menstrual bleeding can cause it to be just a little lower and for you to feel worse. Donating blood shouldn't make a big difference other than fairly immediate effects, but that is why they check your iron levels before donating and tell you to drink a lot of fluid after donating. Answered by Trudie Abbasi 1 month ago.

Hematocrit 33 Answered by Kerstin Dafoe 1 month ago.

Menstruation does not affect blood levels much. Going by your report, u need to take supplements though Answered by Artie Hayoz 1 month ago.


My friend has low blood pressure, what should he do?
I think red grape juice might have caused it. Asked by Duane Leghorn 1 month ago.

Red grape juice does not cause hypotension. He should see a doctor. Treatment for hypotension (low blood pressure) depends on the cause. This information is from the source below. 1) Dehydration is treated with fluids and minerals (electrolytes). Mild dehydration without nausea and vomiting can be treated with oral fluids and electrolytes. Moderate to severe dehydration usually is treated in the hospital or emergency room with intravenous fluids and electrolytes. 2) Blood loss can be treated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. Continuous and severe bleeding needs to be treated immediately. 3) Septic shock is an emergency and is treated with intravenous fluids and antibiotics. 4)Blood pressure medications or diuretics are adjusted, changed, or stopped by the doctor if they are causing low blood pressure symptoms. 5) Bradycardia may be due to a medication. The doctor may reduce, change or stop the medication. Bradycardia due to sick sinus syndrome or heart block is treated with an implantable pacemaker. 6) Tachycardia is treated depending on the nature of the tachycardia. Atrial fibrillation can be treated with oral medications, electrical cardioversion, or a catheterization procedure called pulmonary vein isolation. Ventricular tachycardia can be controlled with medications or with an implantable defibrillator. 7) Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis is treated with blood thinners, intravenous initially with heparin, and oral warfarin (Coumadin) later. 8) Pericardial fluid can be removed by a procedure called pericardiocentesis. 9) Postural hypotension can be treated by increasing water and salt intake*, increasing intake of caffeinated beverages because caffeine constricts blood vessels, using compression stockings to compress the leg veins and reduce the pooling of blood in the leg veins, and in some patients, the use of a medication called midodrine (ProAmatine). The problem with ProAmatine is that while it increases blood pressure in the upright position, the supine blood pressure may become too high, thus increasing the risk of strokes. Mayo Clinic researchers found that a medication used to treat muscle weakness in Myasthenia gravis called pyridostigmine (Mestinon) increases upright blood pressure but not supine blood pressure. Mestinon, an anticholinesterase medication, works on the autonomic nervous system, especially when a person is standing up. Side effects include minor abdominal cramping or increased frequency of bowel movements. *Note: Increasing salt intake can lead to heart failure in patients with existing heart disease and should not be undertaken without consulting a doctor. 10) Postprandial hypotension refers to low blood pressure occurring after meals. Ibuprofen (Motrin) or indomethacin (Indocin) may be beneficial. 11) Vasovagal Syncope can be treated with several types of drugs such as beta blockers [for example, propanolol (Inderal, Inderal LA)], selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [fluoxetine (Prozac), escitalopram oxalate (Lexapro), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), citalopram (Celexa), fluvoxamine (Luvox)], fludrocortisone (Florinef) (a drug that prevents dehydration by causing the kidney(s) to retaining water). A pacemaker can also be helpful when a patient fails drug therapy. Answered by Carolee Mehis 1 month ago.

For a healthy person, low blood pressure has no negative consequences, but it would be good to see the doctor in case one or more of the following symptoms manifest themselves: dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting, lack of concentration, blurred vision, nausea, cold clammy pale skin, breathing quick and shallow, fatigue, depression and thirst. An extremely low blood pressure can diminish the flow of blood to the brain and other vital organs. This will lead to insufficient oxygen and nutrients which cause a shock. Don't take that too light; it can be a life threatening situation! It is quite common that your blood pressure lowers after eating. Postprandial hypotension as this is called, mostly affects older adults and can be prevented by eating small, low-carbohydrate meals. Now, if you think you can increase your blood pressure by eating fatty, salty food, start drinking and smoking and being a couch potato, you need a kick in the britches. No, Hypotension is no justification for adopting an unhealthy lifestyle. You can start by drinking more water, wearing compression socks and consult your doctor if medications or increasing some of your sodium intake might be in order. A healthy diet, eating small low carb meals and taking it slow when changing your position, will all be helpful. Leave aside silly notions about grape juice. You can start by reading the Bible, digesting a healthy dose of guidance and wisdom and prayers to God may be in order. Answered by Vernita Barbour 1 month ago.

eat regular meals. Answered by Paulette Muslim 1 month ago.


What are the dangers of having low blood pressure?
Anything out there that can help with bringing it under control?? Asked by Cortney Schnitzler 1 month ago.

People who have lower blood pressures have a lower risk of strokes, kidney disease, and heart diseases. Athletes, people who exercise regularly, people who maintain ideal body weights, and non-smokers, tend to have lower blood pressures. Therefore, low blood pressure is desirable as long as it is not low enough to cause symptoms and damage to organs in the body. When the blood pressure is not sufficient to deliver enough blood to the organs of the body, the organs do not work properly and may be permanently damaged. For example, if insufficient blood flows to the brain, brain cells do not receive enough oxygen and nutrients, and a person can feel light-headed, dizzy, or even faint. Going from a sitting or lying position to a standing position often brings out the symptoms of low blood pressure. This occurs because standing causes blood to “settle” in the veins of the lower body, and this can lower the blood pressure. If the blood pressure is already low, standing can make the low pressure worse to the point of causing symptoms. (The development of light-headedness, dizziness, or fainting upon standing caused by low blood pressure is called orthostatic hypotension. Normal individuals are able to compensate rapidly for the low pressure created by standing with the responses discussed previously and do not develop orthostatic hypotension.) Dehydration is treated with fluids and minerals (electrolytes). Mild dehydration without nausea and vomiting can be treated with oral fluids and electrolytes. Moderate to severe dehydration usually is treated in the hospital or emergency room with intravenous fluids and electrolytes. Blood loss can be treated with intravenous fluids and blood transfusions. If bleeding is continuing, it needs to be treated as well. Septicemia is treated with intravenous fluids and antibiotics. Blood pressure medications or diuretics are adjusted, changed, or stopped by the doctor if they are causing low blood pressure symptoms. Bradycardia may be due to a medication. The doctor may reduce, change or stop the medication. Bradycardia due to sick sinus syndrome or heart block is treated with an implantable pacemaker. Tachycardia is treated depending on the nature of the tachycardia. Atrial fibrillation can be treated with oral medications, electrical cardioversion, or a catheterization procedure called pulmonary vein isolation. Ventricular tachycardia can be controlled with medications or with an implantable defibrillator. Pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis is treated with blood thinners, intravenous heparin initially and oral warfarin later. Pericardial fluid can be removed by a procedure called pericardiocentesis. Postural hypotension can be treated by increasing water and salt intake, using compression stockings to compress the leg veins and reduce the pooling of blood in the veins, and, in some patients, the use of a medication called proamatine (Midodrine). The problem with proamatine is that while it increases blood pressure in the upright position, the supine blood pressure may become too high, thus increasing the risk of strokes. Mayo clinic researchers found that a medication used to treat muscle weakness in Myasthenia gravis called pyridostigmine (Mestinon) increases upright blood pressure but not supine blood pressure. Mestinon is an anticholinesterase medication that works on the autonomic nervous system, especially when a person is standing up. Side effects of pyridostigmine include minor abdominal cramping or increased frequency of bowel movements. Increasing salt intake can lead to heart failure in patients with existing heart disease and should not be undertaken without consulting a doctor Answered by Stefanie Journeay 1 month ago.

Death. Go to your doctor, it's very common. Answered by Corrie Graben 1 month ago.

Just a few decades ago, doctors thought a blood pressure reading of 160/95 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) was an acceptable target rate for most Americans. Today, those numbers are regarded as dangerously high, and blood pressure lower than 120/80 is considered optimal for good health. The ongoing downward revision of blood pressure standards had led some people to assume that just as you can't be too thin or too rich, your blood pressure can't be too low. But that's not always the case. Many people who have low blood pressure (hypotension) are healthy and have no signs or symptoms related to lower than normal readings. But for others, low blood pressure can cause dizziness and fainting or indicate serious heart, endocrine or neurological disorders. Severely low blood pressure can deprive the brain and other vital organs of oxygen and nutrients, leading to shock, a life-threatening conditionSome people with low blood pressure are in peak physical condition with strong cardiovascular systems and a reduced risk of heart attack and stroke. For these people, low blood pressure, rather than being a cause for concern, is a cause for celebration. But low blood pressure can also signal an underlying problem, especially when it drops suddenly or is accompanied by signs and symptoms such as: Dizziness or lightheadedness Fainting (syncope) Lack of concentration Blurred vision Nausea Cold, clammy, pale skin Rapid, shallow breathing Fatigue Depression Thirsto the amount of pressure in your arteries when your heart is at rest between beats. Although you can get an accurate blood pressure reading at any given time, blood pressure isn't static. It can vary considerably in a short amount of time — sometimes from one heartbeat to the next, depending on your body position, breathing rhythm, stress level, physical condition, the medications you take, what you eat and drink, and even the time of day. Blood pressure is usually lowest at night and rises sharply on waking. Blood pressure: How low can you go? Current guidelines identify normal blood pressure as lower than 120/80 — many experts think 115/75 is optimal. Higher readings indicate increasingly serious risks of cardiovascular disease. Even blood pressures formerly considered healthy — 120 to 139 systolic and 80 to 89 diastolic — are now believed to increase the risks. Low blood pressure, on the other hand, is much harder to quantify. Some experts define low blood pressure as readings lower than 90 systolic or 60 diastolic — you need have only one number in the low range for your blood pressure to be considered lower than normal. In other words, if your systolic pressure is a perfect 115, but your diastolic pressure is 50, you're considered to have lower than normal pressure. Yet this can be misleading because what constitutes low blood pressure is highly relative, varying considerably from one person to another. For that reason, doctors often consider chronically low blood pressure too low only if it causes noticeable signs and symptoms. On the other hand, a sudden fall in blood pressure can be dangerous. A change of just 20 mm Hg — a drop from 130 systolic to 110 systolic, for example — can cause dizziness and fainting when the brain fails to receive an adequate supply of blood. And precipitous plunges, especially those caused by uncontrolled bleeding, severe infections or allergic reactions can, be life-threatening. How low blood pressure gets that way Low blood pressure can be a boon when it results from a healthy lifestyle. Athletes and people who exercise regularly, for example, tend to have lower blood pressure than do people who aren't as fit. So, in general, do nonsmokers and people who eat well and maintain a normal weight. But in some instances, low blood pressure can be a sign of serious, even life-threatening disorders. And although the reason for lower than normal blood pressure isn't always clear, doctors know that the following factors can cause or contribute to low and sometimes to dangerously low readings: Pregnancy. Because a woman's circulatory system expands rapidly during pregnancy, blood pressure is likely to drop. In fact, during the first 24 weeks of pregnancy, systolic pressure commonly drops by five to 10 points and diastolic pressure by as much as 10 to 15 points. Medications. A number of drugs can cause low blood pressure, including diuretics and other drugs that treat hypertension; heart medications such as beta blockers; drugs for Parkinson's disease; tricyclic antidepressants; Viagra, particularly in combination with nitroglycerine; narcotics, and alcohol. Other prescription and over-the-counter medications may cause low blood pressure when taken in combination with high blood pressure drugs. Heart problems. Among the heart conditions that can lead to low blood pressure are an extremely low heart rate (bradycardia), problems with heart valves, heart attack and heart failure. These are conditions in which your heart may not be able to circulate enough blood to meet your body's needs. Endocrine problems. These include an underactive or overactive thyroid (hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism), adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) low blood sugar and in some cases, diabetes. Dehydration. Fever, vomiting, severe diarrhea, overuse of diuretics, and strenuous exercise can all lead to dehydration, a potentially serious condition in which your body loses more water than you take in. Even mild dehydration, a loss of as little as 1 percent to 2 percent of body weight, can cause weakness, dizziness and fatigue. Far more serious is hypovolemic shock, a life-threatening complication of dehydration. It occurs when low blood volume causes a sudden drop in blood pressure and a corresponding reduction in the amount of oxygen reaching your tissues. If untreated, severe hypovolemic shock can cause death within a few minutes or hours. Blood loss. A significant loss of blood from major trauma or severe internal bleeding reduces blood volume, leading to a severe drop in blood pressure. Severe infection (septic shock). Septic shock can occur when bacteria leave the original site of an infection — most often in the lungs, abdomen or urinary tract — and enter the bloodstream. The bacteria then produce toxins that affect your blood vessels, leading to a profound and life-threatening decline in blood pressure. Allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). Anaphylactic shock is a sometimes fatal allergic reaction that can occur in people who are highly sensitive to drugs such as penicillin, to certain foods such as peanuts, or to bee or wasp stings. This type of shock is characterized by breathing problems, hives, itching, a swollen throat and a sudden, dramatic fall in blood pressure. Postural (orthostatic) hypotension. This is a sudden decrease in systolic pressure, usually at least 20 mm Hg, when you stand up from a sitting or prone position. Ordinarily, blood pools in your legs whenever you stand, but your body compensates for this by increasing your heart rate and constricting blood vessels, thereby ensuring that enough blood returns to your brain. But in people with postural hypotension, this compensating mechanism fails and blood pressure falls, leading to dizziness, lightheadedness, blurred vision and even fainting. Postural hypotension can occur for a variety of reasons including dehydration, prolonged bed rest, diabetes, heart problems, burns, excessive heat, large varicose veins, adrenal insufficiency, and certain neurological disorders such as diabetic autonomic neuropathy and alcoholic polyneuropathy. A number of medications can also cause postural hypotension, particularly drugs used to treat high blood pressure — diuretics, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors — as well as antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants and drugs for Parkinson's disease. Ironically, people with postural hypotension due to neurological disorders usually have high blood pressure when they're lying down, even during sleep, when blood pressure typically falls to its lowest levels. Postural hypotension is especially common in older adults who are more likely to use antihypertensive drugs and to have problems with blood pressure regulation than younger people are. But it can also affect young, otherwise healthy people who stand up suddenly after sitting with their legs crossed for long periods or after working for a time in a squatting position. Multiple system atrophy with orthostatic hypotension. Also called Shy-Drager syndrome, this rare disorder causes progressive damage to the autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, breathing and digestion. Although multiple system atrophy can involve muscle tremors, slowed movement, problems with coordination and speech, and incontinence, its main characteristic is severe orthostatic hypotension in combination with very high blood pressure when lying down. Multiple system atrophy can't be cured and usually proves fatal within seven to 10 years of diagnosis. Postprandial hypotension. A problem that almost exclusively affects older adults, postprandial hypotension is a sudden drop in blood pressure after a meal. Just as gravity pulls blood to your feet when you stand, a large amount of blood flows to your digestive tract after you eat. Ordinarily, your body counteracts this by increasing your heart rate and constricting certain blood vessels to help maintain normal blood pressure. But in some people these mechanisms fail, leading to dizziness, faintness, and falls. Postprandial hypotension is more likely to affect people with high blood pressure or autonomic nervous system disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Lowering the dose of antihypertensive drugs and eating small, low-carbohydrate meals may help reduce symptoms. Neurally mediated hypotension. Unlike orthostatic hypotension, this disorder causes blood pressure to drop after standing for long periods, leading to symptoms such as dizziness, nausea and fainting. Although the end result is similar, neurally mediated hypotension differs from orthostatic hypotension in other important respects: It primarily affects young people, for instance, and rather than resulting from failed blood pressure regulation, it seems to occur because of a miscommunication between the heart and the brain. When you stand for extended periods, your blood pressure falls as blood pools in your legs. Normally, your body then makes adjustments to normalize your blood pressure. But in people with neurally mediated hypotension, nerves in the heart's left ventricle actually signal the brain that blood pressure is too high, rather than too low, and so the brain lessens the heart rate, decreasing blood pressure even further. This causes more blood to pool in the legs and less blood to reach the brain, leading to lightheadedness and fainting. Nutritional deficiencies. A lack of the essential vitamins B-12 and folic acid can cause anemia, which in turn can lead to low blood pressure Treatment Low blood pressure that doesn't cause signs or symptoms rarely requires treatment. In symptomatic cases, the appropriate therapy depends on the underlying cause, and doctors usually try to address the primary health problem — dehydration, heart failure, diabetes or hypothyroidism, for example — rather than low blood pressure itself. When hypotension is drug-induced, treatment usually involves changing the dose of the medication or stopping it entirely. If it's not clear what's causing hypotension or no effective treatment exists, the goal is to raise your blood pressure and reduce signs and symptoms. Depending on your age, health status and the type of hypotension you have, this may be accomplished in several ways: Increased salt intake. Experts usually recommend limiting the amount of salt in your diet because sodium can raise blood pressure, sometimes dramatically. But for people with low blood pressure, that can be a good thing. Still, it's not quite as simple as dousing your salads with one of the new designer salts such as fleur de sel. Because excess sodium can lead to heart failure, especially in older adults, it's important to check with your doctor before upping your salt intake. Increased water. Although nearly everyone can benefit from drinking more water, this is especially true of people with low blood pressure. Fluids increase blood volume and help prevent dehydration, both of which are important in treating hypotension. Compression stockings. The same elastic stockings and leotards commonly used to relieve the pain, swelling, and blood stagnation of varicose veins may help reduce the pooling of blood in your legs. Medications. Doctors traditionally have used the drug midodrine to raise standing blood pressure levels in people with orthostatic hypotension. But many of those people have high blood pressure when sitting or lying down and at night, when blood pressure typically declines. In addition to increasing standing blood pressure, midodrine also raises already-high supine pressure, leading to the possibility of strokes. Now it appears that another drug, pyridostigmine (Mestinon), increases standing blood pressure without affecting supine pressure. Answered by Pinkie Fesh 1 month ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Stanford Kressler 1 month ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Tamatha Sthilaire 1 month ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Maura Hershberg 1 month ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Amber Lily 1 month ago.


My mom is really sick?
most of you wont know what this is, but she has this disease called autonomic neuropothy( i think i spelled it right) and they think she has some chronic fatigue stuff. but anyway if u know about this disease you would know that they dont really have a cure yet. my mom has it really bad and she can't go to work... Asked by Denisha Hand 1 month ago.

most of you wont know what this is, but she has this disease called autonomic neuropothy( i think i spelled it right) and they think she has some chronic fatigue stuff. but anyway if u know about this disease you would know that they dont really have a cure yet. my mom has it really bad and she can't go to work anymore or really do anything. does anybody have any tips or know any doctors or names of medication tht might help her. id b really thankful if you would give me an answer... thanks! Answered by Romeo Distaffen 1 month ago.

The proper spelling is Autonomic Neuropathy. I must admit, I had to look this one up, as I'd never heard of it before. Here is what I found as far as treatment goes: Treatment is supportive and may need to be long-term. Several treatments may be attempted before a successful one is found. Various strategies may be used to reduce symptoms in the feet, legs, and arms. These include: •Florinef and salt tablets to increase fluid volume in blood vessels •Fludrocortisone or similar medications to reduce postural hypotension •Medications to help with salt and fluid retention •Proamatine to prevent a drop in blood pressure when standing •Sleeping with the head raised •Use of elastic stockings Treatments for reduced gastric motility include: •Medications that increase gastric motility (such as Reglan) •Sleeping with the head raised •Small, frequent meals Diarrhea, constipation, bladder problems, and other symptoms are treated as appropriate. These symptoms may respond poorly to treatment. Drugs that block bladder contractions may be used to help with urinary control problems. I'm sorry you mom is suffering. I have Fibromyalgia, so I know chronic distress. Wish her well for me. You must be a very good daughter or son (sorry I can't tell by your avatar), and I'm sure she is proud of you. Blessings Answered by Mariana Kusko 1 month ago.


What can i do to prevent the effects of my Orthostatic hypotension?
Asked by Stephen Boughter 1 month ago.

Treatment Even when the cause of orthostatic hypotension cannot be treated, certain measures can often reduce or eliminate symptoms. For example, susceptible people should not sit or stand up rapidly or remain standing still for long periods. They should sit or stand up slowly. Wearing fitted elastic stockings up to the waist may help reduce pooling of blood in the leg veins. If orthostatic hypotension results from prolonged bed rest, gradually increasing the time spent sitting up each day may help. Several measures help maintain blood volume. People with orthostatic hypotension should drink plenty of fluids and little or no alcohol. People who do not have heart failure or high blood pressure are often told to salt their food liberally or to take salt tablets. However, a doctor's supervision is necessary, because a high-salt diet can lead to heart failure in certain people, particularly older people. For people who have severe symptoms, taking hormones that cause salt to be retained, such as fludrocortisoneSome Trade Names FLORINEF , can increase blood volume. However, use of such hormones increases the risk of heart failure, particularly for older people and people who have heart disease. Use of fludrocortisoneSome Trade Names FLORINEF can also cause a loss of potassium, so taking a potassium supplement may be necessary. MidodrineSome Trade Names PROAMATINE may be taken with fludrocortisoneSome Trade Names FLORINEF to help prevent blood pressure from falling. MidodrineSome Trade Names PROAMATINE constricts arterioles, thereby reducing their capacity to hold blood and increasing resistance to blood flow. If these measures are ineffective, other drugs (such as pindololSome Trade Names VISKEN and clonidineSome Trade Names CATAPRES ), which work in various ways, may help relieve orthostatic hypotension in certain people. However, the risk of side effects from these drugs may make their use undesirable, particularly by older people. Answered by Keitha Manvelito 1 month ago.

The best way to prevent the dizziness associated with orthostatic hypotension, (which I'm guessing is what you're asking) is to get up from a lying or sitting to a standing position slowly. When getting up from lying, be sure to sit for 2 to 3 minutes first, then stand. Don't go straight from laying down to standing. That's the best prevention. There's not really anything else you can do. Answered by Milda Gascho 1 month ago.

If you have hypovolemia 1. Drink Drink Drink. You probaby aren't drinking 8 glasses of water a day. Try to. 2. Drink Gatorade instead of soda. 3. Take Salt Tablets (after speaking with your doctor) Also using support hose (Like TED hose) and getting up slowly and not changing positions quickly. Answered by Simon Leander 1 month ago.

orthostatic hypotension is a sign of dehydration and hypovolemia. keep well hydrated and try getting up slower. Answered by Donovan Hollis 1 month ago.

if lying down sit on the side of the bid 30 seconds or so befor standing,then stand for 30 seconds or so befor walking , take it slow when getting up lots of luck Answered by Al Benavidez 1 month ago.


My daughter has orthostatic hypotension, her case is sever.she has tried several drugs whats the best way to raise her blood pressure?
Asked by Marline Newsome 1 month ago.

Gloria - The treatment for orthostatic hypotension depends on the underlying cause. Your daughter's doctor should try to address the underlying health problem — dehydration or heart failure, for example — rather than the low blood pressure itself. For mild orthostatic hypotension, one of the simplest treatments is to sit or lie down immediately after feeling lightheaded upon standing. Symptoms of orthostatic hypotension usually disappear. When low blood pressure is caused by medications, treatment usually involves changing the dose of the medication or stopping it entirely. The doctor may suggest several lifestyle changes, including drinking enough fluids, such as water; drinking little to no alcohol; avoiding walking during hot weather; elevating the head of the bed; and standing up slowly. The doctor may also suggest exercise programs to strengthen the leg muscles. If your daughter also has high blood pressure, the doctor might suggest increasing the amount of salt in her diet. If her blood pressure drops after eating, the doctor may recommend small, low-carbohydrate meals. •Compression stockings. Compression stockings and garments or abdominal binders may help reduce the pooling of blood in the legs and reduce the symptoms of orthostatic hypotension. •Medications. Several medications, either used alone or together, can be used to treat orthostatic hypotension. For example, the drug fludrocortisone is often used to help increase the amount of fluid in the blood, which raises blood pressure. Doctors often use the drug midodrine (ProAmatine) to raise standing blood pressure levels. It works by limiting the ability of the blood vessels to expand, which in turn raises blood pressure. Droxidopa (Northera) may be prescribed to treat orthostatic hypotension associated with Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy or pure autonomic failure. Other medications, such as pyridostigmine (Regonol, Mestinon), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), caffeine and epoetin (Epogen, Procrit), are sometimes used, too, either alone or with other medications for people who aren't helped with lifestyle changes or other medications a doctor Answered by Georgeanna Witczak 1 month ago.

Lot's of salt and no exercise for a month should do the trick. Answered by Shelley Sahsman 1 month ago.

Dave:I dont know why the thumb went down? anyway yes she eats an incredable amount of salt and even takes fludrocortisone. still not enough but thanks that would work for most Answered by Yvette Horeth 1 month ago.


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