PRO-BANTHINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 008732/002.

Names and composition

"PRO-BANTHINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE.

Answered questions

What do these medication orders mean?
No. I am not a nurse, nor am I going to be a nurse. But thank you for your concern, :D Asked by Theron Shatz 3 months ago.

bumetanide 0.5mg PO tid today, then 0.5mg bid x 1 day, then D/C ciprofloxacin 200mg IV q 12 hr furosemide 40mg IV push now, then 20mg po q day Pro-Banthine tabs 15mg i a.c. Keflex 250mg #20 Sig: tab i qid with food Humulin-R insulin Sig: U-30 q am 30 min ac breakfast and U-20 30 min ac evening meal Answered by Reanna Godines 3 months ago.

Bumetanide 0.5mg by mouth three times daily today, then 0.5mg twice daily for one day then discontinue Ciprofloxacin 200mg by IV every 12 hours Furosemide 40mg through IV push now then 20mg daily Pro-Banthine 15mg before meals Keflex 250mg one tablet four times daily with food Humulin-R 30units every morning 1/2 hour before breakfast and 20units every evening 1/2 before dinner. Insulin is injected subcutaneously and usually is in a concentration of 100units/mL Answered by Pearly Sevcik 3 months ago.

The Pharm tech is correct with 2 exceptions. furosemide 40mg IV push now then 20mg by mouth daily Keflex 250mg dispense 20 tabs. Directions: Take 1 tablet 4 times a day with food Answered by Waneta Scism 3 months ago.

I hope you're not a nurse. And I really hope those aren't your medication orders. You're one sick puppy if they are. Answered by Shannon Lingad 3 months ago.


Can i take an anti nausea medicine while taking percocet?
Are there any anti nausea medicines that i can take while on percocet? (its too late in the evening to ask my doctor or a pharmacist) Asked by Sigrid Saxena 3 months ago.

With respect to certain drugs, here is a partial list of things NOT to take with oxycodone (percocet). As you see, Dramamine is on this list. Also, please note that BENADRYL has moderate interaction with Percocet and they shouldn't be taken togther (not on this list, it is available in a PDR - Physician's Desk Reference) BTW - Benadryl is for allergic reactions, not anti-nausea : Cold or allergy medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression or anxiety can add to sleepiness caused by oxycodone. Tell your doctor if you regularly use any of these medicines, or any other narcotic pain medicine. Before taking Percocet, tell your doctor if you are using any of the following drugs: * glycopyrrolate (Robinul); * mepenzolate (Cantil); * atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop); * bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare); * a bronchodilator such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or * irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine). I'd recommend eating ginger. You won't have drug interactions and will reduce the wear and tear on your liver/kidneys from taking medicine (which, of course, is sometimes necessary, but best to avoid if possible). Medicinal Uses and Indications (for ginger): Today, health care professionals commonly recommend to help prevent or treat nausea and vomiting associated with motion sickness, pregnancy, and cancer chemotherapy. It is also used as a digestive aid for mild stomach upset, as support in inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may even be used in heart disease or cancer. In addition to providing relief from nausea and vomiting, ginger extract has long been used in traditional medical practices to reduce inflammation. In fact, many health care professionals use ginger to help treat health problems associated with inflammation, such as arthritis and ulcerative colitis. In a study of 261 people with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, those who received a ginger extract twice daily experienced less pain and required fewer pain-killing medications compared to those who received placebo. Although a few studies have shown a benefit of ginger for arthritis, one trial found that the herb was no more effective than ibuprofen (a medication frequently used to treat OA) or placebo in reducing symptoms of OA. Motion Sickness Several studies suggest that ginger may be more effective than placebo in reducing symptoms associated with motion sickness. In one trial of 80 novice sailors (prone to motion sickness), those who took powdered ginger experienced a significant reduction in vomiting and cold sweating compared to those who took placebo. Similar results were found in a study with healthy volunteers. While these results are promising, other studies suggest that ginger is not as effective as medications in reducing symptoms associated with motion sickness. In a small study of volunteers who were given ginger (fresh root and powder form), scopolamine (a medication commonly prescribed for motion sickness), or placebo, those receiving the medication experienced significantly fewer symptoms compared to those who received ginger. Conventional prescription and nonprescription medicines that decrease nausea may also cause unwanted side effects, such as dry mouth and drowsiness. Given the safety of ginger, many people find it a welcome alternative to these medications to relieve motion sickness. Answered by Hedwig Segouia 3 months ago.

Medicine Percocet Answered by Viki Capellan 3 months ago.

Nausea Medicine Phenergan Answered by Jesse Lucchini 3 months ago.

If this condition you have is Chronic, then I would certainly be asking your doctor for a referral to a Pain Management Centre. At these centres they specialise in treating long term pain. As a result of that they are far more proficient than the average GP You will usually find one associated with any hospital that has a dedicated Orthopaedic and Spinal Centre. For example here in Sydney Australia there is an excellent one attached to The Royal North Shore Hospital. I'm assuming from what you've said the underlying condition is also being looked at from a treatment point. If its treatable then there must be a concentration on doing so along with the pain management ( Research shows better recovery when pain is properly managed). If the condition is not treatable then that is even greater reason to have a more professional approach to the management of the resulting pain. Answered by Werner Manfre 3 months ago.

there are a number of anti-nausea medicines you can take on Percocet. The good ones are all prescription though. It's 9 pm on a Sunday. It's too late unless you can get the on-call doctor and convince them to call something in to the 24 hour Walgreen's. Answered by Librada Fiora 3 months ago.

over the counter meds will be of NO help whatsoever. as a matter...my experience...anti acid med will actually prolong the misery. I know the last thing you feel like doing is eating but this will work. If you drink ANY alcohol you can be in for some serious nausea. Last time this happened to me I ate one piece of whole wheat bread dry and it was like magic. Should add forget the Pepto...does zero. Answered by Jaquelyn Bellusci 3 months ago.

You can take Benedryl. A lot of the time, phenergan is prescribed with pain meds to avoid vomiting. Benedryl and phenergan both are antihistamines Answered by Trevor Shebby 3 months ago.


Urinary Retention Problem?
My Dad has given up drinking, and the main problem is, he cannot urinate. He has no urge or feeling to urinate, and when he does it is in very small amounts and it is of a very dark yellow colour. He also has no desire for thirst. There is no pain. I REPEAT: There is no pain- anywhere. No discomfort. Does anyone... Asked by Leonida Tutaj 3 months ago.

My Dad has given up drinking, and the main problem is, he cannot urinate. He has no urge or feeling to urinate, and when he does it is in very small amounts and it is of a very dark yellow colour. He also has no desire for thirst. There is no pain. I REPEAT: There is no pain- anywhere. No discomfort. Does anyone here know what could be causing the urinary retention? You know that feeling when your busting to go for a whiz? That means your bladder is full. He does not get that feeling. What is going on? Please Help! Answered by Leroy Mullenix 3 months ago.

Urinary retention can be caused by an obstruction in the urinary tract or by nerve problems that interfere with signals between the brain and the bladder. If the nerves aren't working properly, the brain may not get the message that the bladder is full. Even if you know that your bladder is full, the bladder muscle that squeezes urine out may not get the signal that it is time to push, or the sphincter muscles may not get the signal that it is time to relax. A weak bladder muscle can also cause retention. -Nerve Disease or Spinal Cord Injury: Many events or conditions can damage nerves and nerve pathways. Some of the most common causes are: vaginal childbirth infections of the brain or spinal cord diabetes stroke accidents that injure the brain or spinal cord multiple sclerosis heavy metal poisoning pelvic injury or trauma -Prostate Enlargement: As a man ages, his prostate gland may enlarge. Doctors call the condition benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or benign prostatic hypertrophy.As the prostate enlarges, the layer of tissue surrounding it stops it from expanding, causing the gland to press against the urethra like a clamp on a garden hose. As a result, the bladder wall becomes thicker and irritable. The bladder begins to contract even when it contains small amounts of urine, causing more frequent urination. Eventually, the bladder weakens and loses the ability to empty itself, so urine remains in the bladder. -Infection: Infections cause swelling and irritation, or inflammation. A urinary tract infection (UTI) may cause retention if the urethra becomes inflamed and swells shut. -Surgery: During surgery, anesthesia is often administered to block pain signals, and fluid is given intravenously to compensate for possible blood loss. The combination may result in a full bladder with impaired nerve function. Consequently, many patients have urinary retention after surgery. -Medication: Many medicines work by calming overactive nerve signals. Various classes of drugs that block various signals may be used to treat allergies, stomach cramps, muscle spasms, anxiety, or depression. The drugs that may cause urinary retention include: antihistamines to treat allergies: fexofenadine (Allegra) diphenhydramine (Benadryl) chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) cetirizine (Zyrtec) anticholinergics/antispasmodics to treat stomach cramps, muscle spasms, and urinary incontinence: hyoscyamine (Levbid, Cystospaz, Anaspaz, Gastrosed) oxybutynin (Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol) tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA) propantheline (Pro-Banthine) tricyclic antidepressants to treat anxiety and depression: imipramine (Tofranil) amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor) doxepin (Novo-Doxepin, Sinequan) -Bladder Stone: A stone formed anywhere in the urinary tract may become lodged in the bladder. If the stone is large enough, it can block the opening to the urethra like a bathtub plug. -Cystocele and Rectocele: A cystocele occurs when the wall between a woman's bladder and her vagina weakens and allows the bladder to droop into the vagina. The abnormal position of the bladder may cause urine to remain trapped. In a rectocele, the rectum droops into the back wall of the vagina. -Urethral Strictur: A stricture is a narrowing or closure of a tube. Men may have a narrowing of the urethra, usually caused by scarring after a trauma to the penis. Infection is a less common cause of scarring and closure in the urethra. Answered by Cheryle Lutke 3 months ago.


What medications can cause Urinary retention (difficulty peeing) as a Side Effect?
Asked by Chandra Studler 3 months ago.

•antihistamines to treat allergies ◦fexofenadine (Allegra) ◦diphenhydramine (Benadryl) ◦chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) ◦cetirizine (Zyrtec) •anticholinergics/antispasmodics to treat stomach cramps, muscle spasms, and urinary incontinence ◦hyoscyamine (Levbid, Cystospaz, Anaspaz, Gastrosed) ◦oxybutynin (Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol) ◦tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA) ◦propantheline (Pro-Banthine) •tricyclic antidepressants to treat anxiety and depression ◦imipramine (Tofranil) ◦amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) ◦nortriptyline (Aventyl, Pamelor) ◦doxepin (Novo-Doxepin, Sinequan) Answered by Setsuko Szumigala 3 months ago.

Any drug that has anticholinergic side effects (gives you dry mouth) may Answered by Louanne Gelo 3 months ago.

hmm good quesdtion Answered by Armandina Forinash 3 months ago.


Gastritis symptoms, how to relieve them?
I have heartburn and my stomach is gurgling. How can I make this stop from bothering me the rest of the schoolday? I took an omeprazole pill but it isn't for immediate relief Asked by Nicki Dinuzzo 3 months ago.

I had TMJ for the longest time. About a year ago I went to the orthodontist and got braces. After about 6 months or so it went away. Moral of the story? Go to your dentist. Answered by Rachel Flitt 3 months ago.


What medicine dries saliva?
I don't know the names of the 2 meds the doctor gave her but both caused bad side effects. She has had ALS since 2011.She is a real fighter and is praying for a miracle. The doctors want to reduce her saliva, so she doesn't choke. She is posting daily on facebook. She can't use her hands and has a... Asked by Amina Hempton 3 months ago.

I don't know the names of the 2 meds the doctor gave her but both caused bad side effects. She has had ALS since 2011.She is a real fighter and is praying for a miracle. The doctors want to reduce her saliva, so she doesn't choke. She is posting daily on facebook. She can't use her hands and has a suction machine and hospice as of a few days age. She has excellent care. i cut and pasted your answers to her private messages. Thank you for the answers! Answered by Kandra Bouley 3 months ago.

I wish you'd listed which medications she's already tried, that's what people posting here usually do. I'll start with meds I'm familiar with. There's glycopyrrolate (Robinul). This has been ordered for and administered to patients with MS and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease with no side effects. We also use it for trach patients who have excessive secretions. It's hasn't caused a problem yet. It should work for some one with ALS. Glycoprryolate can be taken by mouth or by injection. Glycopyrrolate shouldn't be used by people with certain conditions but I don't believe ALS is one of them. Some more that I'm familiar with are atropine oral drops (Sal-Tropine), amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor) and the scopolamine transdermal patch (Transderm Scop). Along with one of these medicaitons, adding imipramine (Tofranil) given at bedtime, reduces anxiety and saliva and promotes sleep. One med I'm not as familiar with is propantheline (Pro-Banthine), I've never given this to a patient. I also need to know how advanced her condition is. If she can swallow or spit out/wipe away the extra saliva, she should do so. If she's reached the point where it's gotten to be too much, she should have a suction machine at home with a canister and a few Yankauer suction catheters. Answered by Angila Oshiro 3 months ago.

Weed. Not trying to be a smartass. But Weed. Answered by Caroll Siffert 3 months ago.


Bed Wet!!!?
I am feeling very shy to ask this but any way I have to get a solution for this. I am 21 yrs old. but still i use to bed wet sometimes. I need to know how i can overcome this problem. PLease help me!!! Its very important for me since i use to go out a lot. Please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Lashaunda Yurek 3 months ago.

One of the main causes of bed wetting in adults is alcohol abuse. Being too drunk to get out of bed, or respond to the signal the body sends when one's bladder is full. Often all these people need to do is not drink as much. Of course, there are also many people who don't abuse alcohol but suffer from nocturnal urination. There can be many causes, from anatomical reasons, to sleep problems. The inability to control the bladder is a very common condition in a lot of adults. There are even medications available by prescription like darifenacin (Enablex), dicyclomine (Antispas, Bentyl), flavoxate (Urispas), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Levbid, Levsin), methantheline (Banthine, Pro-Banthine), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Ditropan XL, Oxytrol), solifenacin (VESIcare), tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA), and trospium (Sanctura). Please don't be shy about asking your doctor. With so many medications available, it should be pretty apparent that doctors have heard of the problem often. P.S. Don't even consider the answer that tells you to take Amitriptyline. It is a seditive used to treat depression and anxiety, and will only make you less aware of the need to empty your bladder during sleep. Answered by Palma Detjen 3 months ago.

Take amytryptyline 10mg tab at bed time for 45 days. Answered by Lonny Sherfey 3 months ago.

try not to drink to much water before you go to bed. force yourself to go to the bathroom before you go to bed. I don't know. see your doctor. Good luck! Answered by Wallace Sylla 3 months ago.

Do your dong in a knot if you've been drinking Answered by Terence Ares 3 months ago.

Go see your doctor. He might be able to help!!!! Answered by Caterina Schill 3 months ago.

see a doc there is pills for that Answered by Jeannette Lawernce 3 months ago.


Will taking vicodin......?
will takin vicodin while on medication for a bacterial infection lesson the effects of my antibacterial meds? Asked by Shara Lobach 3 months ago.

It shouldn't. Vicodin has no published interactions with antibacterial medications. Vicodin has known interaction issues with: * antidepressants such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), clomipramine (Anafranil), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), and others * an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) * atropine (Donnatal, and others), benztropine (Cogentin), dimenhydrinate (Dramamine), glycopyrrolate (Robinul), mepenzolate (Cantil), methscopolamine (Pamine), or scopolamine (Transderm-Scop) * bladder or urinary medications such as darifenacin (Enablex), flavoxate (Urispas), oxybutynin (Ditropan, Oxytrol), tolterodine (Detrol), or solifenacin (Vesicare) * a bronchodilator such as ipratropium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva); or * irritable bowel medications such as dicyclomine (Bentyl), hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others), or propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Answered by Jeanett Attia 3 months ago.

I was taking Vicodin for shingles pain at the same time I was taking meds for diverticulitis (it hasn't been the best year for me... lol) and I didn't have a problem. Answered by Valencia Cleland 3 months ago.

my mom takes it all of the time alongside with percs,morphine,zanex,oxy,darvoset,tyleno... I say greater & no she has no physcial ailment-she's a junky. I won't even take regularly used asprin because of the fact of her i'm scared Answered by Afton Dar 3 months ago.

since you are supposed to have been prescribed vicodin your doc would have surely advised you....if not then ask them Answered by Yahaira Voeltz 3 months ago.


Palmar hyperhidrosis?
I have hyperhidrosis in my hands and I've had it for as long as I can remember,it's greatly affecting my life,I play flute and it always slips out of my hand,I'm afraid to hold hands with boys,I can't do so many things with people for fear they will touch my hands and feel how wet they are!!How do I... Asked by Sharmaine Macneil 3 months ago.

I have hyperhidrosis in my hands and I've had it for as long as I can remember,it's greatly affecting my life,I play flute and it always slips out of my hand,I'm afraid to hold hands with boys,I can't do so many things with people for fear they will touch my hands and feel how wet they are!!How do I stop the sweating?!It's only in my hands,everywhere else in my body is perfectly fine!! Answered by Alise Landor 3 months ago.

I also suffer from hyperhidrosis. Gah it sucks and you feel scared to touch stuff and people and everyone thinks your a snob cuz you dont want to touch them! Anyways, I went to my doc told him i had hyperhydrosis and that it was really effecting me, he sent my for a blood test to make sure it wasnt something serious, and then perscribed me to pro-banthine. It says take it 3 times a day but i get too dehydrated. I take mine once a day and after about 10-20 minutes my hands are nice and dry! xxx good luck Answered by Keitha Hopple 3 months ago.


Sweating problem. MAJOR!?
I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause... Asked by Velma Egel 3 months ago.

I;ve got this major problem with sweating. I sweat very easily. Like the simpilest task and i;ll start sweating like a freight train. Like running the sweeper. I sweat every where. Armpits, whole head, arms, butt, feet, etc. and it really sucks cause when i'm with friends or in gym class its embarrassing cause i have to where baggy clothes, my hair up, and we can;t shower. i never get to dress in what i want. and it really sucks. Is there any way i can stop this? Answered by Karla Woolcock 3 months ago.

Excess sweating is known as hyperhidrosis. There are several treatments available, as you have all over sweating problems unfortunately topical treatments, prescription anti-perspirants and botox injections (belive it or not botox is licensed (and regularly used) for the treatment of under-arm perspiration) won't help you, you need a medication. these medications can be affective: Glycopyrrolate (Robinul) Propantheline (Pro-Banthine) Oxybutynin Hydrochloride (Ditropan) Indomethacine (indocid) Diltiazem (cardizem) Clonidine (Catapres) Propranolol (Inderal) Oxprenolol (Trasicor) these herbs can be affective if you are not comfortable with medications: Burdock Astragalus Belladonna Oh and AVOID caffine drinks, spicy foods and alcohol! Answered by Giovanni Lerra 3 months ago.

yeah you probably do have hyperhydrosis..( excessive sweating).i heard about it on mystery diagnosis. If you speak to a doctor about it he can give you some solutions....or medication...for the mean time a good thing to do would be to use secret clinical strength and in places you sweat put baby powder to help wick away some of the moisture and get a travel size baby powder bottle to carry in your purse or bookbag for school...hope this helps. speak to your doctor and good luck.....also if you're open minded a surprising thing to help stop sweating is botox...some celebs even have it injected in their underaarms before a red carpet so they don't sweat and mess up expensive gowns, i've seen it injected into a 40 year old mans pits who sweated excessively and it helped him stop sweating so much also...but talk to your doc b4 taking this next step to see if he has an alternative. Answered by Filiberto Wagon 3 months ago.

Some people just have overactive sweat glands. I do too, it's not a big deal, just shower after you exercise, and put on a lot of deodorant. That way even if you do sweat it won't smell. Sweat isn't a big deal, just relax and don't even think about it. :) Answered by Vannessa Thresher 3 months ago.

i sweat excessively and all i do is wear white clothing.. i also highly recommend to not use antipersperant. Answered by Jacelyn Toomes 3 months ago.

my friend had a similar problem and she went to the doctor and gave her some medication Answered by Donita Tenerowicz 3 months ago.

idk i seriously have the same problem i use antiperspirent, but it does not work at all (i use dove clinical waterproof antiperspirent) i'm sweatin all under my armpits. idc if my hands get sweaty cus a lot of people have sweaty palms . tell me if you find a trick. Answered by Fallon Raybon 3 months ago.

you need to relax and take it easy thats what i think Answered by Cristi Rohrer 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008732/002 PRO-BANTHINE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008732/003 PRO-BANTHINE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008843/001 PRO-BANTHINE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008732/002 PRO-BANTHINE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008732/003 PRO-BANTHINE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
008843/001 PRO-BANTHINE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 30MG per VIAL
080927/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
080927/002 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
080928/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
080977/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
083029/002 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
083151/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
083706/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
084428/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
084541/002 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
085780/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
087663/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
088377/001 PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE PROPANTHELINE BROMIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG

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