Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 004782/001.

Names and composition

"PREMARIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
004782/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
004782/002 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
004782/003 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
004782/004 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.625MG
004782/005 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.9MG
004782/006 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.45MG
010402/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per VIAL
020216/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED CREAM/TOPICAL, VAGINAL 0.625MG per GM
021417/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ ORAL 0.3MG
021417/002 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ ORAL 0.45MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
004782/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 1.25MG
004782/002 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
004782/003 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.3MG
004782/004 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.625MG
004782/005 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.9MG
004782/006 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ORAL 0.45MG
010402/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per VIAL
020216/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED CREAM/TOPICAL, VAGINAL 0.625MG per GM
021417/001 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ ORAL 0.3MG
021417/002 PREMARIN ESTROGENS, CONJUGATED TABLET/ ORAL 0.45MG

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Answered questions

Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Garnet Wiedemann 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Bennett Guthmiller 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Lakita Sprole 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Jere Cockrin 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Dottie Ko 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Jeromy Umphrey 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Coralie Grimmius 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Alfredo Podeszwa 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Maxie Dopf 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Cathleen Blachly 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Austin Railey 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Kayleigh Defilippo 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Anastacia Zelmar 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Pilar Picon 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Nancey Caya 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Jacinto Feazelle 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Richelle Klepacki 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Albina Kulon 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Rudolf Mesquita 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Olive Mcrenolds 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Roxana Ortea 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Faustino Segarra 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Danita Sorzano 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Chante Hascup 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Cecil Balon 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Petra Pellish 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Angie Kozyra 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Gabrielle Horey 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Kimbra Valela 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Octavio Ammerman 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Christopher Byes 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Hermina Neptune 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Sherie Knell 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Dalia Drewer 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Carolina Roadarmel 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Mabel Desomma 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Omer Maiten 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Thomasine Warburg 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Ahmad Parsons 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Enriqueta Holzman 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Eddie Mayette 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Justin Sturdivant 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Maurice Kleeman 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Valentina Outzen 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Haywood Liljenquist 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Ashley Camic 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Ying Alf 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Randall Abramoff 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Leida Cicio 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Anastacia Drews 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Octavio Nevland 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Glynis Quatrevingt 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Adelaida Steidl 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by George Bries 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Joslyn Behlmer 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Shantae Onks 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Kathern Hiltbrand 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Josephine Karins 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Agustin Zottola 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Shirl Marchizano 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Jin Verga 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Evelia Buonassisi 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Rocco Buseck 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Jeremy Knoechel 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Kayce Laninga 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Jim Foder 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Cindie Scavuzzo 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Sherrie Muro 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Sharron Neiner 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Jay Fairall 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Michael Whiting 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Armando Rorabaugh 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Xiomara Froberg 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Daniela Minert 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Sha Kennerly 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Elizabet Wal 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Simon Handel 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Terra Brooksher 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Carmelo Neifert 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Buddy Kilton 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Lucio Politte 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Elena Villaquiran 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Aide Sage 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Shantell Dirkse 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Kattie Collelo 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Zora Keens 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Dwayne Gauer 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Maryjane Melito 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Christen Benusa 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Manual Cosen 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Nikki Galas 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Larhonda Mciltrot 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Virgie Pevy 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Jude Cuther 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Madaline Medas 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Zada Coop 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Kiera Raus 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Romelia Satsky 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Hertha Landero 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Leticia Selbo 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Nicolle Acker 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by John Brodell 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Chantel Smolka 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Jae Lampert 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Bianca Hollmann 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Dung Papan 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Mario Spurger 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Pam Corrie 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Roseann Manygoats 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Joie Cabading 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Romaine Mihalik 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Awilda Nogueda 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Jenni Schoville 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Ruben Duttweiler 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Ai Gowler 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Kerri Rorrer 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Violeta Alwine 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Miriam Gehri 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Jennette Bobbett 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Sylvester Rupertus 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Stacie Leto 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Penny Distasio 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Sidney Geney 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Oscar Sleper 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Marhta Calvin 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Debbra Vonniederhaus 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Robin Murri 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Nilsa Ricks 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Samira Leston 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Horace Hysinger 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Shaunta Belile 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Meri Shelburn 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Sabra Pebbles 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Georgianna Pidgeon 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Kristan Fornea 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Loria Lenoue 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Patrica Cesare 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Ardella Surdam 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Margarita Halek 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Lucius Folkerts 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Sherman Missel 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Merrilee Comish 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Niesha Latzig 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Darcey Orndorff 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Patrick Sperger 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Trinity Darwin 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Lavina Gron 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Vivienne Verburg 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Glennis Prester 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Marianne Brashears 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Inge Esquerra 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Valentine Lotan 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Lacy Prieto 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Keeley Kotarski 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Shu Dibenedetti 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Shaquita Civil 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Trent Mees 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Marti Vachula 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Tonie Feehly 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Marina Dunleavy 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Johna Ninneman 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Alden Arrollo 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Keisha Mirisola 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Leopoldo Gorder 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Gisele Terrones 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Juli Puiatti 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Catalina Denmon 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Elena Lafountain 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Orpha Bogart 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Ali Gaub 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Crystal Hjelm 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Nathan Alfredo 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Jerrod Moura 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Tennie Reinsch 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Thora Erway 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Romelia Sauders 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Shemeka Rittenour 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Yang Apodaca 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Jolynn Rothove 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Myrtis Oedekerk 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Ida Urmeneta 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Dulcie Naborg 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Maryetta Singewald 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Alexander Redstone 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Vivien Montori 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Valeri Hartwigsen 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Larue Schnarrs 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Elsa Weisse 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Lakenya Nacci 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Oswaldo Lander 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Milan Phebus 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Fiona Wimbish 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Milagros Hamic 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Saran Prisoc 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Keith Kho 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Agustina Kunzelman 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Nelle Sens 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Tiffanie Swancey 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Jenell Abina 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Aracelis Galley 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Olen Zingler 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Dana Gartland 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Lucinda Plummer 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Raylene Reph 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Josephina Dragon 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Agustin Bernardoni 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Elinore Sarault 2 years ago.


Implications of Premarin?
I'm doing a report on Premarin. I have to write about the biological, social, ethical, economic and environmental implications of the drug. I have so far written about the ethics (the way the horses/foals are treated) but don't know about the other implications ... Could anyone please give me some ideas ? Asked by Lawrence Runyons 2 years ago.

Premarin® stands for Pregnant Mares' Urine (PREgnant MARes' urINe); PMU for short (we spell it both ways, with an "e", PREgnant MARes' urINE which is the older name used in Canada, and without -- which is the more popular recent spelling, and the one that is a U.S. registered trademark). Premarin (including Prempro, Premphase, Prempac, and Premelle) is a drug made up of conjugated estrogens obtained from the urine of pregnant mares -- put out in many forms (pills, creams, injections, patches, vaginal rings) and is used to reduce the symptoms of menopause in women or women who have had a hysterectomy. It is also prescribed to nearly eliminate the risk of osteoporosis (the brittling of bones) and reduce the chance of heart disease in women over 50. As of November 2003, approximately nine million American women are still taking some form of Premarin (1 million women in the United States were still taking Prempro pills as of June 2003, down from the 3.4 million taking the drug before the negative Women's Health Initiative study results became known). This is a reduction of 25% from the high figure of approximately 12 million women taking PMU based medications in 1999. See also HorseAid's "Prognosis for Premarin". About a third of the approximately fifty-five million post menopausal women in the United States are on estrogen replacement therapy (ERT), or hormone replacement therapy (HRT), and of them, about 49% currently use PMU based products (down from a high of 79% in 1999) -- while there are a number of estrogens excreted by the pregnant mare, estrone sulfate, equilin, and equilenin are the most significant. It is the only human estrogen replacement drug that is derived from an animal (hormones beginning with the letter "e" are specific to equines, hormones beginning with the letter "h" are specific to humans). The company that distributes and markets it world-wide, Ayerst Organics Ltd. (the world's only producer of PMU) is a subsidiary of Wyeth Inc. (Wyeth Laboratories, Inc. traces its roots to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.A., where, in 1860, John Wyeth and his brother Frank established a drugstore). Wyeth Inc. is the world's eight largest drug maker (2003), falling from the seventh position it had held for many years. What's in it? Premarin tablets contain: • estrone • equilin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilin Together with smaller amounts: • 17 alpha-estradiol • equilenin • 17 alpha-dihydroequilenin as salts of their sulfate esters Premarin tablets also contain the following inactive ingredients: • calcium phosphate tribasic • calcium sulfate anhydrous (white tablet only) • calcium sulfate • carnauba wax • cellulose • glyceryl monooleate • lactose • magnesium stearate • methylcellulose • pharmaceutical glaze • polyethylene glycol • stearic acid • sucrose • talc • titanium dioxide ALL Premarin medications are non-synthetic organic, and ALL Premarin is derived from estrogens extracted from Pregnant Mares' Urine (PMU). If you ever doubt where Premarin comes from, just break open a pill and smell it! How Long Has This Drug Been in Use? Introduced in 1942, long before synthetic or non PMU organic alternatives existed. Premarin was one of the first drugs available when hormonal therapy for menopause was introduced. The industry thrived (mostly in Ontario, Canada) for decades until allegations of catheterized mares living in squalor and foals being mistreated could no longer be ignored. The Ontario Government stepped in and issued regulations tied to licensing, citing, and revoking permits (PMU Farm Act, 1968-69, Regulation No. 217/70). In 1975, it became American Home Products (now Wyeth Inc.) biggest selling and most successful ever prescription drug. How Long Has HorseAid Been Involved in The PMU/Premarin Controversy? Since 1986. HorseAid was the first equine welfare organization to do an in depth "hands-on" (and on-site) investigation into the operation of the PMU farms and the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. Up until that time, no animal rights/welfare organization had ever reported on the horse abuses that were occurring on the majority of the PMU farms or the linked risks in taking HRT medications. This was before the advent of the public Internet or Web, so our information had to gathered the "old fashioned way", by on-site visits and following the paper and money trails of the various aspects of the PMU/Premarin industry. We published the results of that initial 1986/87 investigation (with photographs) in our 1988 Fall/Winter issue of Equine Times News (ET-News, forerunner of our current Running Free publication) under the heading, "The Pill that Kills". In 1993, Animal People Magazine published an extensive article on the PMU farm abuses, also noting the suspected health risks to women taking PMU based medications. HorseAid collaborated with APM on some of the statistics for that article. APM was the first wide circulation magazine to do such a report. Both of these articles appeared long before PMU farms abuses and Premarin based medications became a favorite fundraising issue for some of the organizations that later became involved in the controversy. HorseAid was also first to publish the PMU/Premarin controversy on the Internet — in 1994, under the page heading "PREgnant MARes' urINe, Curse or Cure?". Second only to the HorseAid equine rescue and adoption programs, our PMU/Premarin research has been HorseAid's greatest expenditure in both funds and volunteer resources. Why Are There Still PMU ("pee") Farms in Existence? Good question. HRT drugs containing PMU, like the hormone replacement insulin before it, can now be 100% synthesized or organically compounded PMU free.In 1982, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the use of insulin derived from recombinant-DNA techniques (using bacteria cultures) for diabetic patients who, heretofore, relied solely on insulin derived from the pancreases of pigs to control their disease ("pig"* sincerely thanks you, FDA!). So, like we no longer use pigs for human hormone replacement sources, we shouldn't (and don't have to) use horses either. (*"the pig" content courtesy of Universal City Studios, Inc. © 1996, All Rights Reserved) However, the FDA ruled in 1997, that because of the delta 8,9 DHES factor that the synthetics and non PMU organics lack, "generic" forms of the drug do not meet the "identical active ingredients/efficacy" test that is required under the federal Waxman-Hatch Act of 1984 of a "generic substitute". Formerly, the FDA classified delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate (named after the new molecule's shape) as an "impurity", now it's a "concomitant" (concomitants are defined by what they are not. They are not active ingredients and they are not impurities -- both the USPC and the FDA had declined in the past to re categorize delta 8,9 as an active ingredient). Since the FDA readily admits it has no conclusive clinical proof what role, if any, delta 8,9 DHES plays in Premarin ERT/HRT (the FDA's Office of Clinical Pharmacology and Biopharmaceuticals found that "none of the pharmokinetic data presented by the firm [Wyeth] can be interpreted as demonstrating that delta 8,9 or its metabolite 17-B is essential to the estrogenic activity of Premarin." — also adding that "the data submitted by Wyeth was either incomplete or conflicting."), and since Wyeth has advanced no valid clinical claims for delta 8,9 DHES -- instead asking for the new "concomitant" category so it could use its patent on delta 8,9 to block its competitors from adding delta 8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate to any new synthetic or organic generic. HorseAid wonders what led to this "sudden" about-face by the FDA? We are sure we will get an honest answer to that question when "pig"* (who as you know, loves horses) also learns to sing a different tune. While Wyeth-Ayerst and the FDA would like women to believe that the above decision was based on good health management practices, in reality -- it was the lobbyists that steered the FDA toward this decision (which seems to be entirely politically motivated), is full of unresolved conflict of interest issues, and characterized by some very questionable political maneuvering. On March 24th, 1999, the FDA approved the New Drug Application (NDA) of Duramed Pharmaceuticals' "Cenestin" brand of plant based conjugated estrogens. It is important to note that Duramed Pharmaceuticals filed a NDA for Cenestin instead of the previous Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) used when requesting a drug be classed as a generic to an already existing branded drug, thus not requesting the FDA classify Cenestin as a direct replacement generic form of Premarin (the previous ANDA, which the FDA denied, was to class Cenestin as a generic form of Wyeth-Ayerst's drug Premarin). Duramed Pharmaceuticals however, was unsuccessful in marketing the drug as an "alternative" to Premarin. Despite synthetic and non PMU based organic FDA-approved alternatives (Ogen, Estrace, Estradiol Transdermal System, Estradiol tablets, Estropipate, Estrone, Meneste, and Cenestin, to name a few), production of the PMU based organic material is good for the Canadian agricultural industry. As in America, there aren't many ways for farmers to make a living anymore. Most of the Canadian PMU farms have re-emerged in Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan, where there are relatively few laws governing the industry as there are i Answered by Ebony Prekker 2 years ago.


Alright...dumb question....but I'm curious to know what PREMARIN is?
nevermind i got it Asked by Thelma Knaphus 2 years ago.

Premarin® is a medication that may be available in pill or cream form, and contains several types of estrogens. The company Pfizer manufactures this brand-name drug, but there are generic forms and a few other companies that synthesize this medicine from the collected urine of pregnant horses. A number of animal rights groups are opposed to collection methods and housing of mares used to create the medication, and the overall use of Premarin® has declined in recent years. This is not so much due to ethical objections, but more resulting from concerns about risks of using hormone replacement therapy. The most common reasons to prescribe Premarin® are to alleviate symptoms associated with menopause. These include strong symptoms of vaginal dryness, mood changes, hot flashes, and others. In particular, the medicine may be recommended if women have total hysterectomies long before they would ordinarily experience menopause. In these cases, the medication or other hormone replacement therapies (HRT) could be recommended. Some women also take the drug during onset or after normal menopause when symptoms of declining estrogen become severe. Dosage of this medicine in pill form is similar to the way birth control pills are dispensed. People may take it for a little over three weeks and then take a break of five days before starting it again. Cyclical dosing isn’t always used, and the dose dispensed depends on a patient’s medical condition. Important warnings about hormone replacement therapy apply to drugs like Premarin®. HRT elevates the risk for certain cancers of the breast and reproductive tract. It may be associated with higher risk for heart disease and blood clot disorders like stroke. People with family history of these cancers or elevated heart disease or stroke risk should not use this medicine. Those who do need to be especially vigilant in performing breast self-exams, and should report any changes or lumps felt to doctors. Some side effects may occur with Premarin®. Women might note increase in body hair, nausea, headaches, and weight loss or gain. The breasts may become swollen or tender, libido may decrease, and women may have an increase in vaginal discharge. Other effects may include bloating in the stomach or cramping. More severe adverse effects include jaundice or yellowing the skin and the whites of the eyes, which may indicate liver problems. Allergic reactions with hives, difficulty breathing and swelling of the face occasionally occur and is medically urgent. Severe migraines, very heavy menstrual bleeding, a sense of confusion or any suggestion of heart attack or stroke are indications to get medical help immediately. Many drugs interact with Premarin®, including some antidepressants, some mood stabilizers, blood thinners, seizure drugs and certain forms of drugs for diabetes. It’s important to bring a full list of medications, including any herbal supplements or over the counter drugs, to the doctor’s so these can be evaluated before a prescription is given. Knowing personal and family medical history is also valuable in determining whether drugs like Premarin® are appropriate. Answered by Catarina Wisehart 2 years ago.

Premarin is a mixture of estrogen hormones used to treat symptoms of menopause such as hot flashes, and vaginal dryness, burning, and irritation. Other uses include prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, and replacement of estrogen in women with ovarian failure or other conditions that cause a lack of natural estrogen in the body. Premarin is sometimes used as part of cancer treatment in women and men. Answered by Casey Dubuc 2 years ago.


Can someone explain to me about the medicine called Premarin?
I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a... Asked by Mayra Masuda 2 years ago.

I have been looking around on the internet trying to find different descriptions for the medicine but i am unable to find one that makes sense to me. This is important so anything that you guys can offer is greatly appreciated. What are good things? Is there bad things? What does the medicine do? Is it a pill or a cream? Where can i buy it? Thank you all. Answered by Sixta Armesto 2 years ago.

Premarin is the commercial name for a medication consisting primarily of conjugated estrogens. Isolated from mares' urine (pregnant mares' urine), it is manufactured by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (part of Pfizer since January 2009) and has been marketed since 1942. The bad thing is that research starting in 1975 showed substantially increased risk of endometrial cancer. Since 1976 the drug has carried a label warning about the risk. As part of the Women's Health Initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, a large-scale clinical trial for Hormone Replacement Therapy showed that long-term use of progestin and estrogen may increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, blood clots, and breast cancer. Following these results, Wyeth experienced a significant decline in its sales of Premarin, Prempro (conjugated equine estrogens) and related hormones, from over $2 billion in 2002 to just over $1 billion in 2006. The medicine's medication may help treat and prevent osteoporosis caused by estrogen deficiency when combined with diet, calcium, and exercise. It's a pill. I'm not sure where you can buy it but it should be in your local pharmacy. Hope I helped :) Answered by Porsha Isa 2 years ago.

To add to Sparly's excellent answer: it's prescription only, so any pharmacy can fill that prescription for you. Answered by Clarissa Amboise 2 years ago.


What is the premarin?
Asked by Yon Rosentrater 2 years ago.

Premarin is a prescription medication that is a mixture of natural equine (horse) estrogens. As an estrogen medication, it can help with several conditions, such as treating menopausal symptoms, preventing osteoporosis, and reducing the symptoms of certain cancers. Premarin comes in the form of a tablet and is taken once a day. Possible side effects include headaches, joint pain, and vaginal bleeding. Answered by Delena Mcghay 2 years ago.


How long until premarin take affect?
Asked by Rickie Danielson 2 years ago.

Just so you know - PREMARIN is made from Pregnant Mare's Urine. It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. They are kept in narrow stalls with a partial body harnness on them for a majority of their pregnancy and are often injured. They recieve inadequite food and water to keep the urine more concentrated to lower shipping costs. When the foals are born, the mares and foals are moved to the Foal Barns. The foals are allowed to nurse for 4 months MAX! It is the main ingredient in the perscription drug Premarin and Prempro. The mares used to get this urine are kept in horrible conditions. The mares are bred immediatly after giving birth so their urine can be collected again as soon as possible. The mares are not treated right and are often beaten. They are never groomed or shod or seen by the veterinarian. They have mud and manure caked on their coat and when they can't breed any longer they too are sent to slaughter - - as well as their BABIES!!! Many women don't know what the cost is for their comfort. While they are being comforted, the horses that supply that comfort are suffering!!!! Answered by Dagny Dorland 2 years ago.

About two weeks before youll feel a difference. Thats how it was with me anyway. About a month into it, youll really notice more improvements. Answered by Leslie Vandercook 2 years ago.


My doctor wants me to take Premarin, but I understand it’s made from horse urine. Is this true?
Asked by Porter Due 2 years ago.

Premarin is a hormone replacement therapy. The word "Premarin" is a conjugation of the words "PREgnant MARes uRINe". It is extracted from the urine of pregnant horses. Just because a chemical is extracted from urine does not in itself make it "dirty" or unpleasant. If you have issues about using animals to make therapeutic drugs for humans then you should be guided by your own conscience - always remembering that every single drug given to people has, by law, to be tested on animals first to make sure it's safe. On the subject of safety, Premarin is associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer - I trust your doctors has informed you of the risk Answered by Winnie Kales 2 years ago.

Yes, as previous answers have stated, but a lot of drugs are antibodies made in mice, insulin is produced by bacteria and yeast, and a treatment for C. Difficile colitis is putting a relatives poop into the patient's stomach. All of those things are very effective treatment even if they seem gross. Answered by Janice Galleher 2 years ago.

premarin is a product from wyeth derle company. this is being manufactured from the urine of pregnant mare. this is a group of estrogens used in hormone replacement therapy. since this is from natural source so it has least side effects and drug interactions, many of the medicines are being manufacrured by the animal sources and we are taking them without knowing it. if you'll think about that it'll be difficult to you to manage. so just follow your doctor. nobody knows more than your doctor so have faith on him/her. Answered by Frank Bettner 2 years ago.


Can Premarin cause anxiety?
I have been taking Premarin for approx 3 months. Much of this time I have been feeling very very anxious and even have physical symptoms.... Asked by Hong Terrall 2 years ago.

What are the possible side effects of Premarin? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop taking this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; pain or swelling in your lower leg; abnormal vaginal bleeding; migraine headache; pain, swelling, or tenderness in your stomach; confusion, problems with memory or concentration; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet; or a breast lump. Continue taking Premarin and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: mild nausea, vomiting, bloating, stomach cramps; breast pain, tenderness, or swelling; freckles or darkening of facial skin; increased hair growth, loss of scalp hair; changes in weight or appetite; problems with contact lenses; vaginal itching or discharge; changes in your menstrual periods, decreased sex drive; or headache, nervousness, dizziness, tired feeling. Here's what I found, and anxiety is not one of the symptoms, but it sounds like you need to talk this over with your doctor. You have to tell him about the physical symptoms you are having. Good luck. Answered by Benjamin Tremmel 2 years ago.

It's best to use premarin as little as you can. Just the minimal amount, a minimal amount of times for a minimal period of time. There are side effects, so watch out for them, things like: bloating of stomach change in sexual desire cramps of lower stomach darkening of the skin diarrhea (mild) dizziness (mild) headaches (mild) loss of appetite migraine headaches nausea problems with wearing contact lenses vomiting (usually with high doses) and a lot more. I would suggest researching a little more about this. And I would also suggest talking to your mom, though you're uncomfortable doing so. I think if you just say something, and just get it over with, then it will be easier in the future to talk about it. Plus your mom can probably help a lot. Good luck. Answered by Eulalia Cambronne 2 years ago.

Premarin is made of horse urine, among other things. Who knows what sort of reaction one can have? Talk to your doctor. Good luck. Answered by Aracely Burkert 2 years ago.

I have read some litterature about panic attacks. But they allways seem to have a more scientific approach and that is nothing I need in my struggle to survive those horrible panic attacks. This is a "hand on" and very practical book. I felt it was written to me. I am sure that you are going to feel the same. Joe Barry writes exactly how I think. The examples are perfectly described. And the method is genius. I recommend this book and thanks Joe Barry for writing it. It changes your life Answered by Temple Gelbart 2 years ago.


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