Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017109/001.

Names and composition

"PREDNISONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PREDNISONE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017109/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040256/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040256/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040362/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040362/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040362/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040392/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040538/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040581/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040584/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040611/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040890/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080209/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080232/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080237/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080279/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080283/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080292/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080300/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080301/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080306/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080320/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080321/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080328/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080334/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080336/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080343/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080350/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080350/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080350/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080352/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080353/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080356/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080359/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080359/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080359/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080371/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080397/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080491/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080506/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080514/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080563/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080563/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080701/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080782/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083059/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083676/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083677/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
083807/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084122/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084133/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084134/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084236/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084275/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084283/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084341/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084417/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084440/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
084440/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
084440/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084634/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084662/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084774/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084913/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
084913/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085084/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
085115/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
085151/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085161/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085162/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085543/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085811/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085813/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086061/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086062/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086595/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086596/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086813/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086946/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086968/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087342/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087470/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087471/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087682/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087701/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087772/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087773/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087800/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
087801/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
087833/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087984/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087985/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087986/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088394/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
088395/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088396/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088465/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088703/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
088832/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088865/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
088866/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089028/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089245/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089246/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089247/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089387/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089388/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089389/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089597/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089598/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089599/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089726/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
089983/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089984/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
204867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 1MG
204867/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 2MG
204867/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
009766/001 METICORTEN PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
009766/002 METICORTEN PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
009986/002 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/005 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/006 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/007 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
009986/008 DELTASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
010962/002 PARACORT PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
017109/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040256/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040256/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040362/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
040362/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
040362/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040392/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
040538/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040581/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
040584/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040611/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
040890/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080209/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080223/001 SERVISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080232/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080237/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080279/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080283/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080292/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080293/001 DELTA-DOME PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080300/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080301/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080306/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080320/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080321/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080328/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080334/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080336/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080343/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080350/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080350/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080350/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080352/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080353/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080356/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080359/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
080359/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080359/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080371/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080397/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080491/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080506/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080514/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080563/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
080563/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080701/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
080782/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083009/001 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
083009/002 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083009/003 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
083009/004 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
083059/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083364/001 FERNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083676/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
083677/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
083807/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084122/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084133/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084134/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084236/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084275/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084283/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
084341/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
084417/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084440/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
084440/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
084440/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084634/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
084655/001 PREDNICEN-M PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084662/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084774/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
084913/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
084913/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085084/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
085115/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
085151/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085161/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085162/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
085543/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085811/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085813/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
085999/001 ORASONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086061/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086062/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086595/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
086596/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086813/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
086867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086946/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
086968/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087342/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087470/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087471/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087480/001 CORTAN PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087611/002 LIQUID PRED PREDNISONE SYRUP/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
087682/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087701/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
087772/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
087773/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087800/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 1MG
087801/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 2.5MG
087833/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
087984/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
087985/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
087986/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088394/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
088395/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088396/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
088465/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
088703/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
088810/001 PREDNISONE INTENSOL PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per ML
088832/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088865/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
088866/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
088867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089028/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089245/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089246/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089247/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089387/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089388/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089389/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089597/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
089598/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089599/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
089726/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
089983/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
089984/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
202020/001 RAYOS PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 1MG
202020/002 RAYOS PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 2MG
202020/003 RAYOS PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG
204867/001 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 1MG
204867/002 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 2MG
204867/003 PREDNISONE PREDNISONE TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 5MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Prednisone?
Asked by Jared Schwartze 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Sharri Imaino 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Argelia Reisling 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Winter Pawlowski 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Carrie Fitterer 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Major Bossier 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Drucilla Christan 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Jeffrey Scothorn 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Fredda Dattilo 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Gussie Dupuy 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Lindy Levier 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Kathy Halse 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Marion Irby 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Dorsey Honzel 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Mildred Lundberg 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Casey Peckenpaugh 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Amalia Greggs 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Cheri Princevalle 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Rosalva Flannery 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Antonia Scantlin 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Nona Jaap 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Gwyn Busson 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Delpha Halko 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Machelle Mozzone 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Berta Koosman 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Dorine Buhrke 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Jesse Chovanec 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Noel Garstka 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Luella Svendsen 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Ethel Colt 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Nidia Tinsley 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Leo Aver 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Roxy Engelhardt 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Markus Sahady 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Leandra Wheeles 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Beryl Gilcrest 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Sidney Rinebold 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Rashad Sajovic 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Tabitha Glomb 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Monte Castile 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Rosamaria Manford 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Kamala Spirounias 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Karly Dubin 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Lauri Neff 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Erica Bacco 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Fonda Motten 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Nickole Holje 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Delisa Teter 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Loria Rosher 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Margart Booze 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Catherina Eves 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Abbey Robare 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Tammy Donigan 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Halina Satz 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Clyde Bisogno 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Elliot Behner 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Gracie Antonson 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Rory Odien 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Towanda Schnick 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Audria Schoeller 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Antony Phernetton 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Marylou Trotti 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Celine Downhour 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Annamarie Weiskopf 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Lila Stodden 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Corey Agamao 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Marcus Evering 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Gregorio Bettino 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Angelika Mill 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Elvina Bighorse 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Casey Cacibauda 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Deja Houchens 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Beverley Mandigo 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Vallie Kinsey 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Indira Cordano 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Verdie Sloon 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Libbie Schoppert 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Gloria Johnsrud 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Evangeline Onstott 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Fernando Rodde 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Pete Schrieber 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Renna Cruikshank 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Sheldon Castronovo 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Shanae Bosak 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Beverley Belanger 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Janey Pilant 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Michaela Gordey 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Chris Char 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Myrna Kintner 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Marva Sarpy 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Cheree Grosman 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Efren Canetta 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Lelah Zabka 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Mike Siniard 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Edythe Uniacke 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Ying Fearheller 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Wilhelmina Wener 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Rocky Moberley 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Gudrun Ruta 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Nyla Bable 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Elton Mennenga 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Leigh Cassetta 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Rickie Macvicar 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Marquis Dicioccio 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Danica Germany 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Reyna Fecko 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Aron Burbidge 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Amado Turcios 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Ian Qin 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Susannah Alberti 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Carlota Fontaine 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Glennie Ferrera 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Jake Beutel 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Ronald Macey 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Natosha Valenzula 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Carita Krell 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Roman Luckhardt 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Pandora Hauxwell 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Ileana Reesor 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Filomena Cecchetti 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Larhonda Pokora 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Homer Gearin 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Jenae Tibbert 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Kimbery Mohlke 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Liza Rod 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Loriann Sawtell 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Drucilla Shakespeare 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Zachary Red 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Agripina Muchow 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Tierra Pujols 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Beatris Funicello 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Irene Pforr 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Cesar Busuttil 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Malika Newfield 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Meri Desroches 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Lucila Lenzini 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Shizuko Griffen 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Malvina Everton 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Tawana Grode 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Verlie Rizza 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Fransisca Tillotson 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Maxine Howzell 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Karan Cronauer 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Buster Kasemeier 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Larraine Eckhardt 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Daniel Sebourn 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Kristel Farrell 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Adela Tinoco 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Isabelle Fillinger 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Neoma Roselle 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Thalia Boivin 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Dion Pesin 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Daria Colao 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Jesus Aguiler 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Israel Silence 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Pennie Kuboushek 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Ardis Pilchowski 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Susann Souza 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Dana Blystone 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Amiee Fontus 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Delicia Beckett 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Kyong Boydstun 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Donnette Starowitz 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Horace Fosnaugh 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Ronda Scarbrough 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Brittany Mcneill 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Sondra Galathe 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Bobette Vosburg 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Armida Cayabyab 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Nevada Cove 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Lashaunda Dragaj 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Martha Rumsey 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Long Amaro 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Adrianna Hoene 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Jenelle Danish 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Isabell Curbo 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Lakeshia Piper 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Andreas Hudas 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Shara Warick 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Georgeanna Michele 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Usha Crehan 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Adelaide Cangas 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Charlie Musetti 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Mitchel Larbi 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Sadye Aromin 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Stanley Maddison 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Carroll Ouimette 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Jamal Polcyn 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Kristin Blume 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Lizzette Thi 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Antony Solo 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Latisha Doukas 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Jeanna Heston 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Jeniffer Baldos 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Tim Topolski 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Shery Trautman 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Loise Klaassen 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Elizabeth Willick 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Nathalie Leflore 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Frederic Vodopich 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Pennie Skafidas 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Gaston Henchel 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Candis Durepo 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Angel Pennock 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Marcel Higdon 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Thanh Schmaling 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Hobert Saliva 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Karisa Briles 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Anya Shingleur 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Shirly Celius 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Ashley Reaume 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Gita Betzer 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Laurene Curbelo 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Marla Dold 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Ria Stillinger 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Shantae Lundsford 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Xochitl Bentley 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Felipa Vanostberg 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Louetta Zitzloff 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Gabriela Grisby 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Josefa Timmermann 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Monty Csaszar 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Taylor Giandomenico 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Guillermo Pranger 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Magdalen Arie 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Antony Bofinger 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Susan Coody 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Tambra Lafosse 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Nelida Zmiejko 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Un Imgrund 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Tera Taussig 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Ashli Ramroop 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Jon Nantwi 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Sherrill Dabbraccio 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Ossie Mohseni 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Enedina Gabisi 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Harold Doubleday 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Lai Abdelwahed 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Gaston Berkebile 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Misha Lisboa 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Enoch Trecroci 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Brady Pallotta 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Nobuko Jermeland 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Sadye Griswould 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Tamela Zill 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Karen Finnefrock 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Emely Devillez 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Annalee Carwell 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Isadora Eschenburg 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Aundrea Shown 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Lance Dannels 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Fidel Frein 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Loyce Arenstam 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Thalia Spellman 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Laverne Resides 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Talisha Hoffses 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Ike Wicks 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Lyla Baczewski 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Gabriella Matthees 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Lovie Tewani 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Lady Kulik 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Dillon Ormes 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Madelaine Wanca 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Frances Drabek 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Franklin Lorimer 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Prudence Zicker 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Erica Bauder 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Makeda Opher 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Daine Warp 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Brendan Medhus 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Pearly Bugna 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Jannie Alouf 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Trula Mulville 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Donella Shove 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Mignon Fenimore 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Miguel Lillich 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Shavonda Morishito 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Ladonna Beahm 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Annette Kraasch 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Werner Iba 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Leena Gassen 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Tayna Downs 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Linette Gambrell 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Jovan Grigaliunas 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Maryetta Potanovic 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Kimberlee Queal 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Corrine Platas 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Ora Grandusky 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Celinda Charsky 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Arielle Mudd 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Douglas Mcillwain 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Hertha Kutner 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Stephani Bergsma 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Lynne Loran 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Priscila Criswell 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Ashely Gerth 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Christine Carlstrom 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Leandro Danaher 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Maple Ketchum 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Kenton Snachez 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Margaret Przybyla 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Brett Verone 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Sheldon Bodi 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Gigi Farwell 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Letty Evangelo 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Mireille Felch 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Yolande Brannon 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Allison Olecki 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by George Pesarchick 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Travis Schatz 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Merideth Huot 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Kacie Krofta 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Ruthe Goga 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Latoyia Grout 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Lilian Eisaman 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Arletta Haggis 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Madison Garing 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Hilde Patenaude 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Darnell Chee 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Harland Winborne 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Wynona Thrope 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Griselda Gangestad 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Teresia Matulewicz 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Romona Mendosa 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Art Allwood 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Kati Hasek 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Stacey Fukuroku 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Tabetha Eustis 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Jarred Coxey 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Na Besanson 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Randell Parter 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Edgar Bagan 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Lorenzo Walkers 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Shirley Riley 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Dung Shamonsky 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Tommie Schut 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Kandis Minter 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Tod Gala 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Carleen Blackard 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Mauricio Grady 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Kerri Vegher 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Mikaela Reimold 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Tyson Beaty 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Weston Vaulx 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Hilary Naves 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Shani Estus 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Dorsey Depaoli 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Alaina Casillo 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Meryl Fetterman 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Georgann Vanner 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Susanna Joynes 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Hilde Halgrimson 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Mandi Gailliard 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Kristopher Migliori 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Amos Ouye 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Ming Greenfield 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Norine Halgas 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Olga Pereria 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Sharri Berishaj 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Pinkie Petris 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Kamala Stachowski 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Maren Hofer 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Christina Bojanowski 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Jeromy Modert 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Tracey Mccarren 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Libby Foo 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Teri Okonski 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Felicitas Mcgary 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Lou Jandron 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Derick Crews 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Cordell Tudruj 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Jarrod Luvianos 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Frankie Pottle 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Lizzie Cerritos 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Jere Blunk 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Carmine Seligson 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Wilbert Barbone 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Johnetta Feinen 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Marcelle Kluver 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Christa Thistle 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Brandee Devaney 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Shiloh Malvern 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Raul Duch 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Yen Chech 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Keith Zboral 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Paige Molony 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Rosena Loffredo 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Cody Yonker 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Ruby Rylaarsdam 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Deandrea Sandage 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Dewayne Tabios 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Vivien Alexandropoul 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Shaun Sartore 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Ivy Vignola 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Jenelle Etchison 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Crissy Calloway 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Geralyn Vulgamore 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Buddy Gaskamp 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Diedre Feurtado 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Clarence Cambareri 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Napoleon Beliard 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Michel Hebard 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Addie Mcaleer 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Stewart Worsell 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Era Nishimura 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Mohammed Squires 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Vincent Labrador 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Kayleigh Conze 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Ciara Hunkins 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Shawna Mcnicholas 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Fatimah Vergara 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Laverna Monholland 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Antonia Moredock 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Mirna Lardydell 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Edmundo Schuring 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Annalee Gehrke 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Cami Straws 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Gretta Provins 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Otelia Asbill 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Armida Mccormick 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Ramonita Nahmias 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Renna Dominque 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Evalyn Mcneilly 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Daron Mai 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Vito Bickel 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Cody Khansari 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Reatha Grzyb 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Collene Pulice 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Wen Steigman 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Bud Leveston 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Mechelle Fillion 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Selina Glotfelty 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Kenda Nieratko 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Vanessa Haulk 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Towanda Siddiq 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Beverly Miland 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Tara Skeens 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Marcy Leyh 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Eve Grotelueschen 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Evie Stenson 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
Asked by Sal Germany 1 year ago.

GENERIC NAME: prednisone BRAND NAME: Deltasone, Orasone, Prednicen-M, Liquid Pred DRUG CLASS AND MECHANISM: Prednisone is an oral, synthetic (man-made) corticosteroid used for suppressing the immune system and inflammation. It has effects similar to other corticosteroids such as triamcinolone (Kenacort), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisolone (Prelone) and dexamethasone (Decadron). These synthetic corticosteroids mimic the action of cortisol (hydrocortisone), the naturally-occurring corticosteroid produced in the body by the adrenal glands. Corticosteroids have many effects on the body, but they most often are used for their potent anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in those conditions in which the immune system plays an important role. Such conditions include arthritis, colitis, asthma, bronchitis, certain skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions of the nose and eyes. Prednisone is inactive in the body and, in order to be effective, first must be converted to prednisolone by enzymes in the liver. Therefore, prednisone may not work as effectively in people with liver disease whose ability to convert prednisone to prednisolone is impaired PRESCRIPTION: yes GENERIC AVAILABLE: yes PREPARATIONS: Tablets of 2.5, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg. Oral solution or syrup of 5mg/5ml STORAGE: Store at room temperature 20-25°C (68-77°F), and keep away from moisture. PRESCRIBED FOR: Prednisone is used in the management of inflammatory conditions or diseases in which the immune system plays an important role. Since prednisone is used in so many conditions, only the most common or established uses are mentioned here. Prednisone most often is used for treating several types of arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, allergic reactions, asthma and severe psoriasis. It also is used for treating leukemias, lymphomas, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Corticosteroids, including prednisone, are commonly used to suppress the immune system and prevent the body from rejecting transplanted organs. Prednisone is used as replacement therapy in patients whose adrenal glands are unable to produce sufficient amounts of cortisol. DOSING: The initial dose of prednisone varies depending on the condition being treated and the age of the patient. The starting dose may be from 5 to 60 mg per day and often is adjusted based on the response of the condition being treated. Corticosteroids typically do not produce immediate effects and must be used for several days before maximal effects are seen. It may take much longer before conditions respond to treatment. Prolonged therapy with prednisone causes the adrenal glands to atrophy and stop producing cortisol. When prednisone is discontinued after a period of prolonged therapy, the dose of prednisone must be tapered (lowered gradually) to allow the adrenal glands time to recover. (See side effects.) It is recommended that prednisone be taken with food. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Prednisone may interact with estrogens and phenytoin (Dilantin). Estrogens may reduce the action of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) the active form of prednisone, prednisolone. As a result, the levels of prednisolone in the body may increase and lead to more frequent side effects. Phenytoin increases the activity of enzymes in the liver that break down (eliminate) prednisone and thereby may reduce the effectiveness of prednisone. Thus, if phenytoin is being taken, an increased dose of prednisone may be required. PREGNANCY: Corticosteroids cross the placenta into the fetus. Compared to other corticosteroids, however, prednisone is less likely to cross the placenta. Chronic use of corticosteroids during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. NURSING MOTHERS: Corticosteroids are secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in the nursing infant. Prednisone is less likely than other corticosteroids to be secreted in breast milk, but it may still pose a risk to the infant. SIDE EFFECTS: Side effects of prednisone and other corticosteroids range from mild annoyances to serious, irreversible damage, and they occur more frequently with higher doses and more prolonged treatment. Side effects include retention of sodium (salt) and fluid, weight gain, high blood pressure, loss of potassium, headache and muscle weakness. Prednisone also causes puffiness of the face (moon face), growth of facial hair, thinning and easy bruising of the skin, impaired wound healing, glaucoma, cataracts, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum, worsening of diabetes, irregular menses, rounding of the upper back ("buffalo hump"), obesity, retardation of growth in children, convulsions, and psychiatric disturbances. The psychiatric disturbances include depression, euphoria, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and even psychotic behavior. Prednisone suppresses the immune system and, therefore, increases the frequency or severity of infections and decreases the effectiveness of vaccines and antibiotics. Prednisone may cause osteoporosis that results in fractures of bones. Patients taking long-term prednisone often receive supplements of calcium and vitamin D to counteract the effects on bones. Calcium and vitamin D probably are not enough, however, and treatment with bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and risedronate (Actonel) may be necessary. Calcitonin (Miacalcin) also is effective. The development of osteoporosis and the need for treatment can be monitored using bone density scans. Answered by Karey Thronson 1 year ago.

prednisone is an anti inflammatory drug used for asthma, lupus M S, sarcoidosis and other illnesses this a steroid but not the kind body builders use this is a powerful drug caution must be taken I hope you never have to take it Answered by Deidre Monteforte 1 year ago.

a steroid drug used for against inflammation. useful for treating asthma, acute attacks of emphysema, severe inflamation such as in inflamatory bowel disease, arthritis, some skin problems Answered by Missy Leitch 1 year ago.

a steroid used to reduce swelling, it should taken under the directions of a doctor, Answered by Sheldon Spanton 1 year ago.

Non- anabolic steriod Answered by Alfred Gushee 1 year ago.


Is prednisone a diuretic?
Asked by Irving Bautista 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works. Prednisone is also sometimes used with antibiotics to treat a certain type of pneumonia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: headache dizziness difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep inappropriate happiness extreme changes in mood changes in personality bulging eyes acne thin, fragile skin red or purple blotches or lines under the skin slowed healing of cuts and bruises increased hair growth changes in the way fat is spread around the body extreme tiredness weak muscles irregular or absent menstrual periods decreased sexual desire heartburn increased sweating Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: vision problems eye pain, redness, or tearing sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures depression loss of contact with reality confusion muscle twitching or tightening shaking of the hands that you cannot control numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands upset stomach vomiting lightheadedness irregular heartbeat sudden weight gain shortness of breath, especially during the night dry, hacking cough swelling or pain in the stomach swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs difficulty breathing or swallowing rash hives itching Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child Answered by Shayne Grossmeyer 1 year ago.

I don't blame you for wanting to remove prednisone from your system. It is not the most pleasant drug. Unfortunately, I don't think a diuretic would make a difference. Diuretics increase water excretion through the kidneys, but I don't think steroids (like prednisone) are excreted through the kidneys, so it shouldn't have any effect. Also, there is another reason you don't want to remove prednisone too quickly from your body. Steroids should always be removed slowly (tapered). Some serious side-effects can occur if you stop taking them too quickly, so just go by what your doctor says, and don't take any extra drugs without consulting him/her first. I hope this helps, and good luck. Answered by Elinore Torrain 1 year ago.

I lost 30 lbs in 3 days after being put on prednisone for a kidney problem! It was obviously all water weight so clearly yes prednisone can have the same effect as a diuretic. This is one of those mystery drugs that the medical profession does not fully understand. One of the listed side effects is actually weight GAIN, so it depends on things that aren't well understood. It is not a drug to be taken casually! Answered by Christiane Sanos 1 year ago.

Its a steroid, maybe it can also act as a diuretic. but I always thought that a body retains water with the drug. Below is list of side effects. Answered by Faith Sauberan 1 year ago.

No, it's a hormone, specifically a type of hormone called a "corticosteroid." .It's most-commonly used for inflammation in ones joints. And--yes--it can make you all puffed-up with water retention. My mom had R.A., and that's what happened to her. Answered by Shakia Epperheimer 1 year ago.

No, it does not have diuretic activity. Answered by Gemma Kurban 1 year ago.

no its a anti-inflammatory Answered by Vida Corporal 1 year ago.

no, it is a steroid Answered by Shauna Auiles 1 year ago.


Medical Question...Prednisone.?
A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now.Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times... Asked by Cyril Mosinski 1 year ago.

A close friend of mine, female in her late 20s, has had some skins issues for around 2 years now. Basically she has small scabs and scars appearing on her arms and legs (without a reasonable explanation)...The really look like ciggarette burns, ranging in size from the head of an eraser to about 3 times that...Its not something that is extremely unsightly, but obviously noticeable and takes a toll on her mentally...Aside from a little fatigue, but nothing major, there are no other true side effects. She has seen allergist, GPs, gynos, amongst other professionals who can't seem to diagnose it. They've taken biopsies of the skins, done CBC/ANA tests, tested for lupus, tested for leukemia, tested for various allergies, amongst many other things. Anyway, long story short it has been frustrating that nobody can find out what it is....Not but about a week ago she was prescribed an ointment by a dermatologist - for a seemingly unrelated issue - that contained the active ingredient Prednisone. Remarkably the sores have responded very well to this ! Does this limit it down in anyone's mind what we might be looking at ? Answered by Elmer Adalja 1 year ago.

The prednisone is a steroid anti-inflammatory. Doctors will prescribe this if they know or if they don't know what is going on--so long as they believe the underlying process is an inflammatory one. So, prednisone and other steroids are given for a lot of different inflammatory disorders, many of which it seems they can not ascribe to your friend's situation. If the prednisone works to relieve your friend's scabs and such, it sadly doesn't give us too much information, other than the disease process responds to prednisone--like many other diseases do. Your friend needs to continue pressing on for a diagnosis. Tell her not to quit. One of the posters here betrays a certain ignorance about the medical field, and that is that "if they can't figure it out, no one can." Let me just tell you that I've seen lay people make diagnoses that so-called "professionals" miss. The professionals are generally great at what they do, but my friend, laying someone's livelihood in the hands of just a few individuals who can't arrive at a diagnosis, then calling it quits, would be foolish. Keep pressing on, posting to help your friend. You never know when you'll get your diagnosis. Best of luck to you and your friend. Answered by Prince Cocola 1 year ago.

Well at the opposite of everybody that has responded your query I gotta say the clinical procedure labored in our case.My mother was once identified with breast melanoma a couple of months in the past and went to the general public health center for medication.We had been all very blissful with the outcome and the medication she has recieved.Everyone was once very pleasant,all had been relatively inclined to support her,to notify us.Whenever we get again there for a examine up(she has been of the cures for approximately part a yr now) everybody is continuously relatively pleasant,asking her how the whole thing goes and so forth.Sure the ready traces are commonly lengthy and sure,we additionally paid the normal fakelaki for the operation however that was once handiest on account that my father desired the leader of surgical procedure to participate in the operation on my mom(if he hadn't continued on that guy on my own and an extra,much less skilled health care provider had performed it we do not have needed to pay whatever).She was once additionally very blissful with the medication she bought a couple of years again whilst she wanted surgical procedure for an extra hindrance,plenty of confident experiences from my mother.i have no idea if our case is the exception of the rule of thumb,I do understand even though that we have got the pleasant medical professionals in Europe probably,ok the amenities don't seem to be continuously the pleasant,however I do consider the ones persons try and doing the pleasant they may be able to beneath the occasions they ought to paintings in.And you do not desire to pay attention approximately the horror experiences I've heard approximately the medical professionals in my different nation(Netherlands).My mother who's dutch says that she's going to not ever return to Holland for clinical medication it doesn't matter what's fallacious together with her and that she could choose someone of her household being dealt with right here rather of wherever else... Answered by Tenisha Kridel 1 year ago.

Prednisone is used to treat many different conditions such as allergic disorders, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis, or breathing disorders. If it's working then be happy sounds like the skin disorder she has is responding to this corticosteroid drug well so once they actually give the disorder a name she will probably fell better knowing exactly what it is she has. However for now if it's working then let it do it's job. Answered by Simone Gassoway 1 year ago.

Not trying to be mean, but if the experts who have examined her can't arrive at a conclusive diagnosis then you won't find a reliable one here. Skin issues like this can be very hard to figure out. I'd just accept its part of who she is and be happy that all the scary stuff has been ruled out. Answered by Nola Ondrusek 1 year ago.


What foods should I eat/avoid while on prednisone?
I am on a 2 week regimen just to see if it works, I started out at 40 mg and am now down to 30 mg. My stomach has been sooooo upset though and I'd like to know if I should alter my diet in any particular way so my body doesn't react as severely. Thanks! Asked by Noelia Clabough 1 year ago.

Marie, Prednisone is a synthetic hormone commonly referred to as a corticosteroid or "steroid." (These medicines are not the same "steroids" as the drugs taken by bodybuilders.) Prednisone is used to treat many illnesses, especially those associated with inflammation. It is truly a remarkable and often life-saving medication. Unfortunately, prednisone can stimulate the appetite, and weight gain is a common and unwanted side effect. Not everyone who takes prednisone will gain weight; in part it depends on how much drug you take and for how long you take it. But most people taking the medicine chronically will gain some weight. There is no "magic diet” to prevent you from gaining weight with prednisone, or to make you lose the weight already gained. Like all weight-reduction diets, it is all about calories. You lose weight when you burn off more calories than you eat. To successfully lose weight while on prednisone, you need to reduce your caloric intake despite the appetite stimulation and try to increase your exercise to burn the calories. If you are just starting the prednisone, you want to make sure you do not increase your intake of food (and calories) right away, so you do not gain unwanted weight. No one popular diet has been shown to be better than any other. A few simple rules apply to almost all successful diets, including diets for people on prednisone- Make healthy food choices. Choose healthy foods including fruits and vegetables, and avoid those that can contribute to heart disease. Exercise. Even if exercise alone may not be enough to make you lose weight, it will help with weight control. Develop an eating schedule and stick to it. While taking prednisone, if you eat when you feel hungry, you will be eating all the time. Keep a food diary. Write down everything you eat. Shop from a list when you go shopping so you don't buy food you don't need. Some people on prednisone also need to be on a low-salt diet, and some need supplemental calcium or potassium. Speak with your doctor about this. You may also ask to be referred to a nutritionist to get more specific recommendations about your diet to best manage your weight while on prednisone. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Conrad Knisely 1 year ago.

In a matter of fact there is. You can cut down on the amount of dog food and add low sodium canned green beans in it's place. Of course, it would be even better if you used fresh or frozen beans, but the canned just makes it easier because they are already pre-cooked. Answered by Aleisha Sturm 1 year ago.

Should I eat before I take prendesone . . Answered by Danny Tasto 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
Heres what i have taken: 1 month- 15mg 1 month- 12.5mg 1 month- 10mg 1 month- 7.5mg 1 month- 5mg 1 month- 4mg 1 month- 3mg 1 month- 2mg I have been depressed and anxious for no reason. Is this normal? Asked by Tim Brunow 1 year ago.

Yes... prednisone can bring out bouts of depression and/or exacerbate depression that already exists. Additional symptoms may include: Swelling of the face, often referred to as "moon face" or "chipmunk cheeks"; some patients feel ugly and say that they do not recognize themselves in the mirror. Remember, these changes are reversible. A hump on the upper part of the back; this hump is made of fat, not bone. Bloating or swelling of the abdomen. Weight gain; prednisone may cause a great increase in appetite. Weight gain can be controlled by a low calorie diet, by exercise and by avoidance of salt. Avoid salty foods and do not add any salt. Stomach problems; to ease the burning, try taking prednisone with food. This problem may require anti-ulcer medication. Mood changes; sometimes the change is for the better. However, depression may be made worse by prednisone. Insomnia; patients may have difficulty sleeping at nights. Shakiness; patients may have feelings of being "hyper: or that "things are running fast inside my head". Weakness of the thigh muscles; patients may have difficulty in climbing stairs, getting out of the bath or getting up from a chair or toilet seat. Interruption of the menstrual cycle; periods may stop altogether. Increased risk of infections; patients may have more infections including some caused by germs that the body is normally resistant to. Answered by Louis Kasowski 1 year ago.

There is a crap load of side affects. I looked really white and nauseous when I was on it. Answered by Hannah Dedman 1 year ago.


Prednisone side effects?
I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any... Asked by Lane Brignoni 1 year ago.

I am on and have been for awhile: promethazine (12.5mg), seroquel(25mg), zoloft(25mg), and zantac(5ml, twice a day). All these medications have caused weight loss. I am however worried about the side effects of my new medicine prednisone(60mg) that I was put on today for crohn's disease. Will this cause any large amounts of weight gain? I'm ok with a few pounds but nothing more. It has made me lose my apitite rather than increase it, is that a good sign I won't gain? Answered by Dwain Yater 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a synthetic steroid closely related to the natural hormone cortisol made by the adrenal glands to combat stress and inflammation. There are three categories of steroids, and this one is a corticosteroid (cortisol, as the name suggests, is made in the cortex, or outer layers, of the adrenal). Side effects are divided into those from short-term use and those from chronic use, such as for several weeks, months or years. For Crohn's disease, it can be either. Your doctor will probably keep you on the lowest does that works for you for the shortest time possible. In the short run, like a week, corticosteroids like Prednisone can cause a little water retention and a little weight gain and appetite stimulation. It interferes with the action of insulin, and your glucose will go up a little, but you won't feel that or care unless you are diabetic. I put a diabetic on pulse steroids on Monday (big dose day 1 and 2 with tapering doses over a week and then stop) and warned him that his glucose, which he checks continually, will be higher. Corticosteroids also make some people feel euphoric, which is a great feeling, but still a side effect. None of this usually matters, and short-term use of steroids is very safe and often effective. If you're lucky, that's what you're doing now and it will work to quell the flair that I know that you must be having to get this prescription. And if your luck continues to hold out, you wont need intervention again soon, and that when you do, a pulse for a week will do it again and again. If you're unlucky, it won’t work. In between is where it works, but only when you're taking it, which means either abandoning it or taking it daily. 60 mg is a nuke dose, and is typical for a pulse, going to 40mg in a day or two, then 20mg, 10mg, 5mg and stop. But if your having a major flair with lots of bloody diarrhea, your doc may be thinking of keeping you on high doses for a week or a month, and trying to bring it down to zero if he/she can, or at least under 10mg if he can. But if every time you take it you get relief but every time you taper, you flair, you may be on 10 or 20mg a day indefinitely: chronic corticosteroid therapy. In that case, you have some more serious side effects to consider, although they will be worth the risk, one being adrenocortical failure (low blood pressure, abdominal pain, dehydration, electrolyte = sodium, potassium etc disturbances). This would happen if you tapered or stopped your Prednisone too abruptly after weeks or more of use. The reason is that you are getting more corticosteroid by mouth than your own gland normally makes, and the body knows it. So it shuts off the signal to make cortisol, which is a hormone called ACTH made in the anterior pituitary hanging from the bottom of the brain above and between the eyes. This hormone stimulates the adrenal cortex to secrete. But on high dose steroids, it shuts off, and in its absence, the adrenocortex shrinks and shuts down like a muscle that you stop using, Within a few weeks, the adrenal can't make the usual daily dose of cortisol, and if you take away the Prednisone, you'll learn what corticosteroids do by experiencing their deficiency: adrenal failure (Addison's syndrome). In this state, you are dependent on your pills. Not forever. You could go on a taper: 20 then 18 then 20 then 16 then 18 then 16 then 14 etc and wean down to zero as you adrenocortex wakes up under the influence of a whipping from pituitary ACTH telling it to wake up. But the transformation from steroid dependency to normal takes weeks and a weaning regimen. There are a few other important bad effects seen in some but not all chronic steroid users, including gallstones, ulcers, cataracts, steroid-induced diabetes (goes away when the steroids go away) and osteoporosis. Also, the drug Levaquin, an excellent antibiotic, can cause the Achilles tendon to rupture. You can see why we have a love hate relationship with corticosteroids like Prednisone (and cortisol and dexamethisone). They’re lifesavers for some people with inflammatory disease like Crohn’s, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. But they’re treacherous to work with. The choice to use them is close to a no-brainer. Short-term and pulse anytime they might help, long term only when no other treatment makes life bearable, and in those cases, you not only have no choice but to use them, it’s a fair trade. If it’s the difference between a normal life and cataracts in ten years and painful bloody squirts for ten years, take the steroids. Therefore, we don’t use them when we don’t have to. We use short-term pulse or low dose therapy when it works, and chronic steroids at whatever dose is necessary if that’s the hand we’re dealt. BTW, the other two categories of steroids besides [1] corticosteroids are [2] mineralocorticoids like aldosterone that regulate fluid, electrolyte and acid-base homeostasis of the blood and interstitial fluids at the kidney, and [3] Answered by Shirely Poulisse 1 year ago.

Prednisone can cause GI upset, it can make you jittery or cause insomnia and fluid retention. These are the signs a person can detect. However, you have been prescribe prednisone for a condition which highly warrants it and you have to outweigh the benefit of taking it over the risk. It might be that after you get your condition somewhat under control, the prednisone can be reduced and maybe even phased out. Don't worry about the potential to gain weight, Just do what you need to do in order to take care of yourself and your disease. Answered by Venus Traycheff 1 year ago.

Fluid retention is a major side effect of prednisone therapy. Take with food otherwise it will cause gastric upset. Changes in appetite occurs on an individual basis. Some lose their appetite, for others the appetite increases. Answered by Delmar Boocks 1 year ago.


Prednisone?
my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help... Asked by Bess Nazzise 1 year ago.

my husband has been prescribed prednisone, 30 mg/day for a lung disease. The doctor says he will be on it for about 2 years, with gradually descreasing dosage. He's only been on it for 2 1/2 weeks now, but he's getting acne, shakiness, sore joints/muscles...he's miserable. Are there any ways to help fight the side effects of prednisone? or are there any alternatives out there? Answered by Takako Garnto 1 year ago.

below are some of the side affect for prednisone: changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your arms, legs, moon face, neck, breasts, and waist). sleep problems (insomnia), mood changes; acne, dry skin, thinning skin, bruising or discoloration; slow wound healing; increased sweating; headache, dizziness, spinning sensation; nausea, stomach pain, bloating my doctor wants me to take 50mg everyday but I requested to take 100mg every other day. This way, can lower the side affects. I have been taken this amount for 7 weeks I am still feeling ok. Some people with this dosage may gain around 10lbs to 15lbs a month. I gain about 2lbs and only thing i don't look as firm. I also tried to control my diet. I took less than 2000mg sodium per day for the days that i don't need to take the pills and take half of the amount of sodium on the day that i need to take the pills. always look at the sodium contents when you shop. get rid of any junk food in your fridge. also store alot of veggies and fruit at home because prednisone makes you hungry. bewared of the sodium percentage on salad dressing. I have read an article today that taken good amount of protassium will help slow down the process of moon face. Banana, Grape, Grape fruit will give you good amount of protassium. During the medication, you will feel dizzy and tired all day long. Don't give your self any excuse. Some easy exercises will help. I hit the gym at lease 3 times weekly and spent 1- 2 hours every time. I walk about 30mins on treadmill for 2.5-3 speed. Some light weight training to tone my mucles. 10- 20 mins basket ball. (I used don't know how to play basket ball). You also have to make sure that your doctor have given you below medicines together with prednisone. - calcium (Long term use of prednisone cause lack of calcium and join pain) - medicine for protecting your stomach. prednisone may cause stomache. - fish oil (i think it's good for preventing diabetic. Long term use of prednisone may cause diabetic. I think fish oil helps me with my moodswing) Tell your husband this is not the end of world. try to think positive. He's not the only one taken this medicine. Since this is the only choice than we have to accept it and try to like it because he's going to be fine again in 2 years right? family support is very important. Don't show him that you are anxious too. Other wise he will be more nervous. Try to keep him busy with something if posible. He will think too much if he has too much free time. Some times our imagination makes us feel the aches and it may not be as bad. 2 years is not a short period of time. I know how he feels.be positive and hope he get well soon. Sorry for my poor grammers and typos.... I hope above can help you. If you have any questions you can email me on sally60381@yahoo.com. Answered by Carma Bakey 1 year ago.


What is the use of prednisone?
Asked by Dianne Rudisell 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a corticosteroid used for a whole lot of things, but based on your other question, I'm guessing that it was prescribed to you to suppress your immune system. When you get poison ivy/oak/sumac, etc., the reaction that you see (and feel) is actually the result of your immune system fighting off the foreign material -- an allergic reaction. This isn't helpful -- of themselves, these plants are harmless. It's your immune system that's causing the itchy rash. So the reasoning is, use the prednisone to shut down your immune system a little and relieve the itching. While you're on prednisone, you should be aware that since your immune system isn't functioning at 100%, you'll be more prone to getting infections or catching diseases from other people. So stay away from sick people. Prednisone is also notorious for causing upset stomach, which you can alleviate by taking it with a full meal. Also, it may disturb your sleep, so if the doctor's dosing instructions allow, take it early in the morning. Answered by Pa Bartholic 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid used in many different disease processes, generally for the purpose of reducing inflammation. Answered by Galina Afton 1 year ago.

Prednisone is a steroid that is used by doctors for treating bronchial asthma and other illnesses that may have inflammation. It may be in tablet or injectible vial form. Answered by Lean Divens 1 year ago.


Related

Browse by letter
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

© Medications.li 2015-2017 - All rights reserved