Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017433/002.

Names and composition

"PRE-OP II" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HEXACHLOROPHENE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017433/002 PRE-OP II HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 480MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
006270/003 GAMOPHEN HEXACHLOROPHENE SOAP/TOPICAL 2%
006882/001 PHISOHEX HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
008402/001 PHISOHEX HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
017405/001 SOY-DOME HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
017411/001 HEXA-GERM HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
017412/001 GERMA-MEDICA HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 1%
017412/002 GERMA-MEDICA ""MG"" HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
017413/001 SCRUBTEAM SURGICAL SPONGEBRUSH HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 330MG
017421/002 DIAL HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
017423/001 SEPTISOL HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
017424/001 SEPTISOL HEXACHLOROPHENE AEROSOL/TOPICAL 0.23%
017433/001 PRE-OP HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 480MG
017433/002 PRE-OP II HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 480MG
017446/001 PHISO-SCRUB HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 3%
017452/001 E-Z SCRUB HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 450MG
017460/001 SEPTI-SOFT HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
018363/001 HEXASCRUB HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 3%
018375/001 TURGEX HEXACHLOROPHENE AEROSOL/TOPICAL 3%
019055/001 TURGEX HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%

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Answered questions

Diagnosed with stage 4 thymic carcinoma but no metastasis show on scans?
My dad had an MRI in October for pre-op testing where a mass in his mediastinum (behind the right lung) was incidentally found. The biopsy of this mass showed malignancy; a poorly differentiated mass with hepatoid features. His official diagnoses is stage 4 thymic carcinoma. It is a large mass, it measured 12cm x... Asked by Marry Kenady 1 year ago.

My dad had an MRI in October for pre-op testing where a mass in his mediastinum (behind the right lung) was incidentally found. The biopsy of this mass showed malignancy; a poorly differentiated mass with hepatoid features. His official diagnoses is stage 4 thymic carcinoma. It is a large mass, it measured 12cm x 9cm x 6cm two months ago. However, the oncologist said the PET scan showed no metastasis. Can someone please explain to me how it is stage 4 if no metastasis were found? Answered by Martha Nassef 1 year ago.

The following stages are used for thymoma: (Stage I) cancer is found only within the thymus. All cancer cells are inside the capsule (sac) that surrounds the thymus. (Stage II) cancer has spread through the capsule and into the fat around the thymus or into the lining of the chest cavity. (Stage III) cancer has spread to nearby organs in the chest, including the lung, the sac around the heart, or large blood vessels that carry blood to the heart. (Stage IV) is divided into stage IVA and stage IVB, depending on where the cancer has spread. In (stage IVA), cancer has spread widely around the lungs and heart. In (stage IVB), cancer has spread to the blood or lymph system. Thymic carcinomas have usually spread to other parts of the body when diagnosed. The above info was taken from: Answered by Tisha Eelkema 1 year ago.


When dealing with breast cancer, How many stages are there when determining how badd the cancer is ??
Asked by Lyndsay Gede 1 year ago.

I've never heard of there being 5 stages, either. Just an addition to the stages listed, there can be stage 0, I, Ia, Ib, II, IIa, IIb, and so on. This all has to do with the size of the tumor and lymph node involvement. For example, my tumor was rather huge (7-10 cm), which automatically put me in the stage II section, but thankfully had no lymph nodes (which means that the cancer was contained within my breast). Therefore, I was classified as stage IIa/IIb. The only reason there is no definite classification for me is because the doctors could not get an exact reading of my tumor size, due to placement in the breast. I had to do pre-op chemo, which shrunk the tumor 99% (at least). It doesn't bother me that I don't officially know my staging. I'm satisfied at this point knowing that it hadn't hit the stage III point. The rest is in God's hands, right? Answered by Lesha Frappier 1 year ago.

I've never heart of 5 stages, and certainly have never heard of Stage 5. Sometimes they start at Stage 0 which isn't even really cancer. So it goes from Stage 1 to Stage 4. All but Stage 4 are "curable" meaning the cancer can be put into remission, possibly for the rest of her life. Stage 4 is incurable and will always recur, but can still be treated and life can be prolonged, often for many years. Answered by Doreen Freiheit 1 year ago.

there are 5 stages, you can just check it in Wikipedia or google it.. stage 0 is fine, stage 5 is worst.. and each stage have diffrent treatment.. search it, i was amazed there are many information i dont know.. Answered by Bette Panaro 1 year ago.


What does a feline gingivectomy typically cost?
My 1 yr old kitty has what I believe is stage I or II gingivitis from my research online. I've tried a topical gel which heped for a while but his gums have gotten a little worse and the vet recommends a gingivectomy. My question is two-fold, hopefully someone in the field can help me out: 1.) How effective is... Asked by Kristy Donatien 1 year ago.

My 1 yr old kitty has what I believe is stage I or II gingivitis from my research online. I've tried a topical gel which heped for a while but his gums have gotten a little worse and the vet recommends a gingivectomy. My question is two-fold, hopefully someone in the field can help me out: 1.) How effective is this procedure at preventing recurrence of gingivitis if I am religious with the gel and tooth brushing post-op? 2.) What do these procedures typically cost with anesthesia and post-op painkillers (if necessary) thrown in? Answered by Tomasa Frankina 1 year ago.

1) often when a kitty that young has periodontal disease, it can be genetic. They have bad teeth, and not much is going to stop that. Brushing will certainly help though. But this sounds like a cat that you'll need to be taking to the vet for annual visits so that his teeth can be checked. Sometimes this is the beginning of an autoimmune disease called stomatitis. Something to discuss with your vet, of course, but you can also do some research online. In very simple terms the cat's "allergic" to their teeth - it starts out with gingivitis, then progresses to lesions on the gums, and eventually all the teeth need to be pulled. Of course, your cat may or may not develop it, but a little research can be a good thing. 2) I am sure your cat needs a basic dental, with a thorough cleaning under the gum line (just like people). Costs of course vary widely depending on where you live, and if the vet is going to do pre-op bloodwork ($85-200). The basic dental can cost between $150-400 again depending on the cost of living where you are. Pain meds are generally not necessary unless there are extraction but those generally cost $20-35. The cost of NOT doing a dental is very high - just like in humans untreated periodontal disease can lead to kidney and heart disease, as the inflammation/infection pours bacteria into the system. Call the vet - most are very happy to prepare an estimate for you. And February is something like pet dental month, and *most* vets will discount their dentals during the month - mine does by 20%. Answered by Amelia Badder 1 year ago.

Gingivectomy Cost Answered by Antonia Mcmulen 1 year ago.


Medical Diagnosis/Physiology Questions. AreUSmartEough?
A friend of mine was diagnosed nine months ago as having an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Instead of the classic abdominal incision and clamping the aorta procedure, they used a much less invasive procedure of inserting an aortic stent by way of the femoral arteries. In order to choose the proper stent whose... Asked by Rory Baranski 1 year ago.

A friend of mine was diagnosed nine months ago as having an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Instead of the classic abdominal incision and clamping the aorta procedure, they used a much less invasive procedure of inserting an aortic stent by way of the femoral arteries. In order to choose the proper stent whose openings matched the branches off of the abdominal aorta, a pre-op angiogram was done. The only anatomical deviation from normal was an extremely very small extra renal artery on the left. This small extra artery is present in about 19% of the population. No opening was made in the stent to match it, since most stents are pretty much standard issue. The procedure was done, post-operative recovery was normal and my friend returned to a full active life within two weeks, as if nothing had even been done to him. In asking how he felt, he commented that the only weird thing was that after a life of perfect blood pressure, his family doctor had noted that his blood pressure was now suddenly running around 145/90 mmHg and put my friend on 25 mg/day of Toprol. When he asked his family physician why his blood pressure had risen after the surgery, the doctor didn't know. What was it? Answered by Dollie Phelka 1 year ago.

Dear Chap or Chapette, I have the answer for you. The accessory renal artery supplies its own piece of kidney; the main renal artery does not give blood to this little piece. Now, when the stent was deployed, this little artery was quite compromised. Consequently, the little piece of kidney it serviced was also quite compromised. Its reaction is to release a hormone called renin into the bloodstream. Normally, this would be released when the blood pressure is low, to get the blood pressure back to normal (via some secondary hormones called angiotensin I->II and aldosterone). This piece of kidney doesn't know the blood pressure to the rest of the body is actually normal, and now it is making it higher than it needs to be. Hope that answers it for you. Answered by Abigail Riebeling 1 year ago.

Blood pressure is determined by the pressure the heart has to use to pump the blood throughout the body. If it was truly normal before and is greater now a great person to ask about that is the surgeon if you can get a hold of him. Also how often did he check it before the surgery? Because it changes so often every second...So it could be he just didn't check it much before and has a history of high blood pressure without knowing it Also family history plays into blood pressure a lot. And if he was sick enough to need this surgery it is a good potential that he had high blood pressure. Answered by Angelika Escorza 1 year ago.


Breast Cancer?
Don'tlikebees', THANK YOU!! so very much. It is good to see that you are doing alright. I'll pray for the best for you. I will also make sure to give you 10pts tomorrow. I am also not forgetting the answerer who has a mother going through the difficult time as well. Asked by Kelley Pyanowski 1 year ago.

Treatment varies for every patient. First, a clinical and medical diagnosis is necessary. This is done by an ultrasound, mammogram, and finally a biopsy. Many doctors like to do a bilateral breast MRI as well. An MRI actually saved my life when I was diagnosed. On the surface, my breast cancer looked to be rather small, but the MRI showed that my lump went directly towards my chest wall, and was between 7-10 cm! Much different than the original 2 cm I was told! After diagnosis, a treatment plan is determined. Often this is done after pathology comes back and determines staging, grade, and receptors. Staging is much broader than most people think. There is stage 0, 1, 1a, 1b, etc. Grade determines how aggressive the cancer is. Grading can be I, II, or III. Grade I is the least aggressive and III is the most aggressive. Receptors determine if your cancer "feeds' off of estrogen, progesterone, or the her2neu protein. Some women (like myself) are "triple negative" which means their cancer was just basically a lousy curse-it just happened. If women are er/pr positive, or her2neu positive, they can get treatment after chemo/surgery-like tamoxifen or herceptin. Triple negative women currently have no after treatment. The upside to this is that trip. neg. women respond best to chemo. I had a 99 percent success rate with my chemo. As for the order of treatment, women often do surgery, chemo, and then radiation. Other women do pre-op chemo (I did). This is often to reduce the size of the tumor for a better cosmetic effect. Other times, it's to be sure that your body responds to the chemo. Other times, it's to get the rampant cancer under control right away. Surgery is now something that is truly up to the patient (something I hated). You can decide on your own if you get a lumpectomy, unilateral mastectomy, or bilateral mastectomy. You can also decide if you want reconstruction, and if you want that right away or later. There are numerous reconstruction options. Tissue expanders with implants put in later, a TRAM-flap, a DIEP, nothing at all........again, you are left to choose. Afterwards, many patients get radiation. The amount is determined by the doc. I had 36 treatments (the last 3 were "boost" treatments). And, now that I am done, I go for check-ups to all my docs every 3 months. I have this piggy-backed so I am basically going to a doctor as often as possible. My own cancer was aggressive and rare, so I don't mind checking in with a doc all the time. Answered by Sherman Balyeat 1 year ago.

Just to add a bit to Don'tlikebees' excellent answer (has to be your BA). The patient doesn't always get to choose what type of surgery they have - sometimes, as in my case, mastectomy is the only option. As well as the tumour, I had extensive pre-cancer cells. Nor is there an option in the UK for bilateral mastectomy if the cancer is in one breast - most doctors don't like to remove the healthy breast - I know a couple of women who've had it done but they really had to fight for it. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not deemed necessary in every case - some people have neither, especially where the cancer is stage 1 Answered by Debrah Clovis 1 year ago.

It depends on what stage the cancer is in. My mom's was stage 4 before they found it. She just had a biopsy and then for the past three years she's been having chemo therapy and radiation. She usually gets chemo once a week for three weeks and then gets a week off and just does this constantly. She has had the other parts that it has traveled to radiated as well. Her brain for example, was radiated every day for 12 days. So, really, it all depends on the stage of the cancer and what the patient wishes to do. Every case is different! Hope that helps. Answered by Dorothy Stutzman 1 year ago.

1. Diagnosis 2. Surgery:lumpectomy, mastectomy with lymph node dissection 3. Radiation therapy 4. Targeted therapies:cancer treatment that targets specific cancer cells 5. Hormonal therapy 6. Chemo-therapy Alternate therapies would be yoga, meditation and acupuncture. It is of the utmost importance to continue routine check-ups every year. Good luck! Answered by Lynnette Sayles 1 year ago.

we don't know the reason. If we did, we'd be waiting to keep away from it and cope with it better. indications are uncommon. I had a purple rash modern-day from the tumor inflicting tissue alterations. The lump became into particularly great yet my document in no way detected it. No concerns nevertheless; it is totally treatable, large now. Answered by Darcy Cockerham 1 year ago.

First is palable exam of breast Lump is found or not the next step is Mammograms Mammograms are compared to baseline Lump: Biopsy is next procedure Lumpectomy or mastectomy Chemo and or Radiation Follow up visits to a slew of doctors! Answered by Nanci Kopper 1 year ago.


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