Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017433/001.

Names and composition

"PRE-OP" is the commercial name of a drug composed of HEXACHLOROPHENE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017433/001 PRE-OP HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 480MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
006270/003 GAMOPHEN HEXACHLOROPHENE SOAP/TOPICAL 2%
006882/001 PHISOHEX HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
008402/001 PHISOHEX HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
017405/001 SOY-DOME HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
017411/001 HEXA-GERM HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%
017412/001 GERMA-MEDICA HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 1%
017412/002 GERMA-MEDICA ""MG"" HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
017413/001 SCRUBTEAM SURGICAL SPONGEBRUSH HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 330MG
017421/002 DIAL HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
017423/001 SEPTISOL HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
017424/001 SEPTISOL HEXACHLOROPHENE AEROSOL/TOPICAL 0.23%
017433/001 PRE-OP HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 480MG
017433/002 PRE-OP II HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 480MG
017446/001 PHISO-SCRUB HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 3%
017452/001 E-Z SCRUB HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 450MG
017460/001 SEPTI-SOFT HEXACHLOROPHENE SOLUTION/TOPICAL 0.25%
018363/001 HEXASCRUB HEXACHLOROPHENE SPONGE/TOPICAL 3%
018375/001 TURGEX HEXACHLOROPHENE AEROSOL/TOPICAL 3%
019055/001 TURGEX HEXACHLOROPHENE EMULSION/TOPICAL 3%

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Hernia Repair Pre-Op?
I'm 14 and have a Hernia Repair Pre-Op today. I was wondering what happens in the pre-op. Asked by Coletta Bocock 1 year ago.

A pre-op generally takes care of any paper work that neeeds to be done before the operation. Sometimes there are medical tests too. They may check your heart (ekg), blood pressure, do a few blood tests, etc. They will give you instructions on what to do the night before, and day of your surgery. For example, they may tell you not to eat anything after midnight, and tell you what time to arrive at the hospital. Good luck! Answered by Sommer Ankrum 1 year ago.

ask god. god will help you. Answered by Tisa Pfau 1 year ago.


Why is the Dr sending me for pre-op testing when I'm only having a minor procedure done under a spinal?
I had major surgery in August and pre-op testing was done at that time. I understand doing that because they want to make sure I'm healthy enough to be under anesthesia for 5 hours.I'm have a very minor procedure done under spinal anesthesia in 2 weeks, I'll be wide awake, just numb from the waist... Asked by Sherlyn Barera 1 year ago.

I had major surgery in August and pre-op testing was done at that time. I understand doing that because they want to make sure I'm healthy enough to be under anesthesia for 5 hours. I'm have a very minor procedure done under spinal anesthesia in 2 weeks, I'll be wide awake, just numb from the waist down, why do I need to go through all this again? I'm thinking it's just for the all mighty dollar bill. PS I'm in very good health. Answered by Renetta Milch 1 year ago.

Your pre-op testing is likely to be modified to your circumstances. There are some basics that can be overlooked if you are under age 40 and do not have any significant medical history. Anesthesia is very safe if you are healthy. It is like driving a car... you have to have a road map, check the weather, make sure the tire pressure is OK, fuel tank is full. The older the car and more miles the more risk of a problem. The anesthesia person will be the one steering, applying the gas and brakes... they will steer around any potholes on the drive. They need to chat with you and look at your records BEFORE the event... NOT during the emergency (you would no likely be available). If they take the risk and not do that... and something would happen... they would not have a legal leg to stand on. There are standards they have to follow... so it isn't a make money factor. It is a routine kind of thing... and there are alot of things that are behind the scenes that have to be planed for. Stuff like your size and weight...(to have the right equipment), If you would have to be suddenly entubated...they would know ahead if you are a difficult entubation and have all the specialty things available. If you are a difficult IV stick... will they have the options and time set aside. The list is actually pretty long... but, the patient is not aware of all the considerations that have to be made and planned for. If your records are complete...the visit with you will probably be 10 minutes or less... but the time behind the scenes much more. People can drop a blood pressure even with spinal anesthesia or have an unexpected drug reaction...these are the "potholes" ...that are NOT a problem to manage... IF, you anticipate or expect them. One thing...they might insist on having some baseline lab work. For example; a recent platelet count should be known before you do any kind of spinal anesthesia. You would be surprised at the number of people that think they are in "very good health" ...yet they have a string of risk factors they have no appreciation for. Obese patients are famous for that...they can be terrible for emergency entubation, hard to get and maintain venous access, hyperlipidemia leading to occult heartdisease --->that could predispose them to a variety of problems, respiratory issues (history of asthma or airway issues). Some of the worst problems can happen in the intial part of anesthesia not at the end of the 5 hours surgery. Not to scare you... but, it is possible for spinal anesthesia to get above the waist in rare situations... and that would be managed as general anesthesia without missing a beat...so you have to have all the history and background to cover that. To question or minimize the process makes as much sense as doing the equivalent to a commerical jet pilot before you board the plane. They don't have time to do that with each passenger... nor is it appropriate for the level of understanding they have for the non-educated person about weather, aerodynamics, flight engineering, and airline mechanics. Over the counter medications such as simple as asprin that are contraindicated or could lead to complications with spinal anesthesia (to give an example). They will probably screen for that in a medication list... some have to be stopped 3 to 5 days before surgery. There are choices of the safest way to handle asesthesia very individualized for you. If they are quized, questioned and doubted during the process...it really is frustrating and distracting to stay on target (to review the patient pre-operatively. Those are usually the patients that professionals try to avoid getting wrapped up in lengthy circular controlling conversations with. The less detail the better those types of patients do ....unfortunately. I hope I haven't aggravated you...but, there is a reason Anesthesiologist from 1st grade to completion.... have over 20 yrs wrapped up in education before they can take boards. They are usually in the top 2% of their HS class with lots of sciences, chemistry, math, and physics before they hit medical school and a long long residency program. Patients look foolish to take a challenging attitude unless it is a legitimate fear... not just to challenge the doctor for challenging sake. It is usually the ones that have a HS education or less that are the worst. Good Luck on your surgery... Answered by Francesca Detmer 1 year ago.

It is always a good idea to have pre-op testing done and the last tests are 4 months old. Depending on your age you are more prone to complications from anesthesia including heart rhythm issues or electrolyte imbalances. I just had a gallbladder attack in october, went to the ER and had lots of lab work, EKG and Chest x-ray and when I had surgery in November. They repeated some of the things. Its just better to be safe than sorry and if you have insurance they will most likely cover it. I had to have pregnancy tests for both my colons copy and the surgery and they were all of a week apart. Answered by Marybeth Henggeler 1 year ago.

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it's probably to protect themselves. if they had done the surgery without pre-op testing and something had gone wrong, they'd be open for lawsuits or something. Answered by Lakiesha Abitong 1 year ago.

it's just a precaution, just in case. Answered by Tawanna Lytch 1 year ago.


In medical terms, what is "pre-op"?
Asked by Orval Zicafoose 1 year ago.

Pre-op is the period before a surgery that begins with whatever orders the doctor has given you to get ready for surgery. For example, don't take medications X, Y, and Z, have these labs drawn and present at this place at this time. The pre-op period ends when the surgery/procedure begins. Answered by Roxie Garib 1 year ago.

It's the necessary testing that goes into making sure you're physically able to undergo surgery. They'll take a complete medical history and run a ton of tests to make sure you can manage the operation. Hope this helps. Answered by Lakendra Connie 1 year ago.

pre-op things that are done to a patient before a surgical procedure. this may include chest x-ray, blood work, ct scan and other tests to determine if said patient is eligible for the surgical procedure Answered by Valeri Etheridge 1 year ago.

Means Pre-Operative, like while they are preparing you for surgery Answered by Hui Waldo 1 year ago.

It either means the condition you're in before necessary surgery or it could mean a transsexual who hasn't undergone sexual reassignment surgery. Answered by Kristeen Troutner 1 year ago.


What is a Pre OP?
My doctor says i need to have a pre op today, before my gallbaldder surgery. what is this? do i need to fasten? is this Lab Blood work? Asked by Emeline Kotecki 1 year ago.

A pre-op checks labs like your pt(protime ) to check your clotting factor so that you will not hemmorage after the surgery. They usually do an EKG to determine if you are healthy enough for the procedure and they will check vitals like your blood pressure and pulse. Answered by Lenora Kates 1 year ago.

its an examination to see if you are fit for surgery. You don't need to be fasting. Yes they will most likely take blood just to check if everything is OK Answered by Lyman Aultz 1 year ago.

Yes, it's most likely blood work. If you had to fast, they would have probably told you. You might want to call just in case. Answered by Anette Mbonu 1 year ago.


What happens in a pre op for induction?
I'm getting induced next Thursday and next Wednesday I go in for pre op. What exactly do they do for the pre op? Thanks! Asked by Jenell Scarpello 1 year ago.

The pre op is for paperwork, and they will go over all aspects of the induction & labor process. They will also ask you personal questions like: breastfeeding or no, private room or not, how soon do you want to leave the hospital, pain meds or no.....etc And on the actual induction day...well here anyways they tell you to be there at 6am, you spend an hour doing paper work signing stuff etc, vitals etc, then they bring you into a room, hook you up to an IV, and the fetal monitors. They then put the induction medication through the IV. (For me) the contractions were hard within 3 hours. After that it's Answered by Rosella Trivino 1 year ago.

Blood Pressure etc normal Dr.appt things. The day of induction you will show up at hospital, you will dress in hospital gown blood pressure etc. Eventually they will do an IV for fluids, with the fluids there will also be a pump that will only give the amount of Pitocin the Dr. orders to go through the IV. As contractions start, the Dr. will determine any different amounts of the Pitocin is necessary. Its just like a regular labor, you just need a jump start, I was induced with all 4 of my children. Good Luck, and God Bless Answered by Jonnie Keeling 1 year ago.


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