Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018799/001.

Names and composition

"PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018799/001 PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 300MG per ML
018986/001 PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 300MG per ML
072224/001 PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 1GM per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014122/002 PROTOPAM CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
014134/001 PROTOPAM CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1GM per VIAL
018799/001 PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 300MG per ML
018986/001 PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 300MG per ML
072224/001 PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE PRALIDOXIME CHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 1GM per VIAL

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Answered questions

What 4 medicines can an EMT Basic administer in Virginia?
I'm taking an EMT Basic course, and the instructor has challenged us to find 4 medicines found ON AN AMBULANCE that an EMT Basic can administer in Virginia. I have three: activated charcoal, oxygen, and oral glucose. What is the fourth one? Thanks....I can't find the answer anywhere.....neither can... Asked by Hilario Cavill 1 year ago.

I'm taking an EMT Basic course, and the instructor has challenged us to find 4 medicines found ON AN AMBULANCE that an EMT Basic can administer in Virginia. I have three: activated charcoal, oxygen, and oral glucose. What is the fourth one? Thanks....I can't find the answer anywhere.....neither can anyone in the class. Answered by Inger Nirschl 1 year ago.

According to National Registry, and Ohio... it is Epinephrine. If not... in Ohio we have Pralidoxime Chloride Injectors in all of out squads (they are injected directly into the heart or thigh in the case of a Nerve Agent Poisoning). That could be the one, if an Epi isn't it. I never knew those were on the rig, until I got curious and opened up the mysterious yellow case. Answered by Lanette Beier 1 year ago.

Not sure about VA but in Pa we can give: Oxygen, Glucose, charcoal, Epinephrine, and Nitro(if the pt. has it) Answered by Moses Monaco 1 year ago.

What about epinephrine? Answered by Tenesha Hetcher 1 year ago.


Antidotes for drugs?
ok, im in nursing school and i have a tone of drugs i have been looking up and im having trouble finding antidotes or antagonist! the only ones that are shown in my drug book are the drugs that provide an analgesic opiod reaction and they are antagonized by Narcan. if any of you out there can give me a web site or... Asked by Millie Jennifer 1 year ago.

ok, im in nursing school and i have a tone of drugs i have been looking up and im having trouble finding antidotes or antagonist! the only ones that are shown in my drug book are the drugs that provide an analgesic opiod reaction and they are antagonized by Narcan. if any of you out there can give me a web site or something i would so appreciate it! thanks for your help! Answered by Ramonita Apana 1 year ago.

Yup, this is a complicated question. Perhaps you can tell me which drugs you have and I can give you the antagonist or antidote. Narcan is primarily a full opioid antagonist at all three opioid receptors. However, some benzodiazepines have activity at the opioid receptors too, in addition to enhancing the activity of endogenous opioids. So Narcan is listed as an antagonist to use in benzodiazpine overdose. This isn't technically correct since the benzodiazepine antagonist is Flumazenil (Anexate). Other common examples of antagonists or antidotes are: Atropine for Muscarine poisoning Physostigmine for Atropine/Scopolamine poisoning. etc. EDIT: Right....few issues.....there are a number of drugs for which no specific antidote exists in the event of overdose. Supportive treatment is given. For example, start with the antihistamines. There is no specific antidote for antihistamines. Symptomatic treatment given (ie. gastric lavage, administration of charcoal and a cathartic). Tonic-clonic seizures can occur. These can be treated with anti-convulsants. Recurrent seizures treated by PHENYTOIN. Now if excess anti-cholinergic activity is taking place, that can be reversed with the Atropine antidote, PHYSOSTIGMINE. There are other issues that can surface (myocardial depression, QRS interval prolongation). Supportive treatment given for that too. Here is a general list: Overdose - "antidote"/antagonist * Anticholinergic poisoning - physostigmine * Atropine poisoning - Anticholinesterase and pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM) * Benzodiazepine overdose - flumazenil * Beta blocker poisoning - glucagon * Carbon monoxide poisoning - oxygen * Cyanide poisoning - 4-Dimethylaminophenol followed up with sodium thiosulphate or cobalamin * Digoxin poisoning - Fragment antigen binding(Fab) fragments that bind to digoxin (trade names Digibind and Digifab) * Ethylene glycol poisoning - ethanol or fomepizole * Extrapyramidal reactions associated with antipsychotic poisoning - diphenhydramine hydrochloride and benztropine (Trihexyphenidyl can be used in place of benztropine) * Heavy metal poisoning - chelators, calcium disodium edetate (EDTA), dimercaprol (BAL), penicillamine, and 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, succimer) * Heparin poisoning - protamine * Iron poisoning - deferoxamine * Isoniazid poisoning - pyridoxine * Methanol poisoning - ethanol or fomepizole * Methemoglobinemia poisoning - methylene blue * Opioid poisoning - naloxone (NARCAN) / for longer acting opioids like Methadone, it may be best to use a longer acting antagonist like Nalmefene * Paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning - N-acetylcysteine * Thallium poisoning - Prussian blue * Warfarin poisoning - vitamin K, phytonadione and fresh frozen plasma * In cases of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, the use of dantrolene and dopamine agonists (amantadine and bromocriptine) has been described Now for that list you gave me, I would like to point out that in Phenergan's case, it is an antihistamine yes, but it is also a phenothiazine with antipsychotic activity (albeit much lower than say chlorpromazine). Extra-pyramidal symptoms may occur in overdose. So follow the entry above for extra-pyramidal symptoms for anti-psychotics. For Pitocin and Methergine, no specific antidotes exist. For Dantrolene as an antidote, use is indicated in: a) the treatment of malignant hyperthermia induced in susceptible individuals by anaesthetic agents or skeletal muscle relaxants; b) the treatment of malignant neuroleptic syndrome; c) the treatment of hyperpyrexia due to poisoning with Strychnine, Cicuta species (water hemlock) or Phencyclidine (PCP), and perhaps also hyperpyrexia due to poisoning with amphetamines, cocaine, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), theophylline or monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Answered by Kelvin Lincicum 1 year ago.

Pitocin Antidote Answered by Coralee Mcgarry 1 year ago.

curare, norcuron, rocuronium, and the other non-depolarizing muscle relaxants can be reversed by edrophonium or neostigmine. Unfortunately they have side effects similar to nerve agents so you counter those with atropine or Robinul. However atropine can cross the blood brain barrier and make a patient slightly nuts, so you can counter that with Anti-lirium. Valium, Versed and the like can be countered with Romazicon. (mentioned above under a different brand name.) Ketamine....some say you can reverse some of its effects with aminophillin used for asthma. Your best bet would be get a poison control book as it is all about antidotes. Answered by Vance Justesen 1 year ago.

There are a couple of narcotic antagonists, an antagonist to benzodiazepines, and one for alcohols, but for the most part, there simply aren't any antidotes. Add acetylcysteine for treatment of acetaminophen/paracetamol overdoses, and you've pretty well covered the specific treatments. The vast bulk of toxicology treatment is less specific. Answered by Hyun Larosa 1 year ago.

i can't think of a book that has a list of antidotes... the ones i know are the common ones like for heparin_protamine s04, acetaminophen-acetylcystein...for coumadine its vit k.... so far thats all i can remember... :( Answered by Paul Tobey 1 year ago.


If i am i injected poison what can i do to stay alive?
Asked by Tammie Sinitiere 1 year ago.

It depends as to what poison was used. But the universal antidote for any oral poison is milk. Make sure you ambulate the poisoned person. to wear it off. You can take Ipecac; so vomiting will be induced. Now, if insulin was used ; you should eat a lot of chocolates Drink a lot of fluids o flush out the system. In the hospital; for severe cases, the patient is even hooked on to the dialysis machine.. , Otherwise, we use activated charcoal Ingested poisons are frequently treated by the oral administration of activated charcoal, which absorbs the poison, and then it is flushed from the digestive tract, removing a large part of the toxin. Poisons which are injected into the body (such as those from bites or stings from venomous animals) are usually treated by the use of a constriction band which limits the flow of lymph and/or blood to the area, thus slowing circulation of the poison around the body You might be interested in the complete list of poisons and their antidotes. Poison and Toxic Signs Acetaminophen (paracetamol) poisoning is given N-acetylcysteine as the antidote. Anticholinergic poisoning is given Physostigmine sulfate as the antidote. Benzodiazepine poisoning is given flumazenil as the antidote. Carbon monoxide poisoning is given oxygen as the antidote. Anticholinesterase poisoning is given atropine sulfate and Pralidoxime chloride 2-PAM as the antidote. Cyanide poisoning is given amyl nitrite, sodium nitrite, and thiosulfate as the antidote. Digoxin poisoning is given anti digoxin fab fragments as the antidote. Ethylene glycol poisoning is given ethanol or fomepizole as the antidote. Extrapyramidal signs poisoning is given diphenhydramine hydrochloride and benztropine mesylate as the antidote. Heavy metal poisoning is given chelators, calcium disodium edetate (EDTA), dimercaprol (BAL), penicillamine, and 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, succimer) as the antidote. Iron poisoning is given deferoxamine mesylate as the antidote. Isoniazid poisoning is given pyridoxine as the antidote. Methanol poisoning is given ethanol or fomepizole as the antidote. Methemoglobinemia poisoning is given methylene blue as the antidote. Opioid poisoning is given naloxone hydrochloride as the antidote. Thallium poisoning is given Prussian blue as the antidote. Warfarin poisoning is given vitamin K phytonadione and fresh frozen plasma as the antidote. Stay calm. Stress and rapid heartrate as well as rapid flow of adrenaline will speed the flow of the toxins. Try to call 911 and identify the poison injected in you. Answered by Ha Cali 1 year ago.

Call the Posion Control Center or 911. Who injected this poison into you? Answered by Junko Bagan 1 year ago.

Depending on the poison, something can be done at a hospital. Some posions are certain to kill you before you can call the ambulance, whilst others will kill you over several days despite the best medical treatment. Answered by Riva Hyske 1 year ago.

I was going to say if you ingested poison drink water with charcoal but Rosie C nailed it!!!! Take her advice, she gets my vote for best answer if this goes to vote. Answered by Roselee Criger 1 year ago.

i'm surprised u still keep ur Q open after seeing Rosie's answer! Answered by Maryland Pettaway 1 year ago.

which poison Answered by Guadalupe Swiler 1 year ago.


How does atropine work?
When somebody is poisoned by TTX, doctors will give you atropine to resolve the bradycardia. But why does this work? i thought TTX block the sodium channels and atropine block the acetylcholine receptors. I don't get why atropine works. anyone? Asked by Gemma Bohn 1 year ago.

ResuscitationInjections of atropine are used in the treatment of bradycardia (an extremely low heart rate), asystole and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in cardiac arrest. This works because the main action of the vagus nerve of the parasympathetic system on the heart is to decrease heart rate. Atropine blocks this action and, therefore, may speed up the heart rate. However, in the latest guidelines released by the American Heart association, atropine is no longer routinely indicated as a primary treatment modality in asystole and PEA.[2] The usual dosage of atropine in bradyasystolic arrest is 0.5 to 1 mg IV push every three to five minutes, up to a maximum dose of 0.04 mg/kg. For symptomatic bradycardia, the usual dosage is 0.5 to 1 mg IV push, may repeat every 3 to 5 minutes up to a maximum dose of 3 mg.[3] Atropine is also useful in treating second-degree heart block Mobitz Type 1 (Wenckebach block), and also third-degree heart block with a high Purkinje or AV-nodal escape rhythm. It is usually not effective in second-degree heart block Mobitz type 2, and in third-degree heart block with a low Purkinje or ventricular escape rhythm. Atropine is contraindicated in ischemia-induced conduction block, because the drug increases oxygen demand of the AV nodal tissue, thereby aggravating ischemia and the resulting heart block. One of the main actions of the parasympathetic nervous system is to stimulate the M2 muscarinic receptor in the heart, but atropine inhibits this action. [edit] Secretions and bronchoconstrictionAtropine's actions on the parasympathetic nervous system inhibits salivary, sweat, and mucus glands. This can be useful in treating hyperhidrosis, and can prevent the death rattle of dying patients. Even though atropine has not been officially indicated for either of these purposes by the FDA, it has been used by physicians for these purposes.[4] [edit] Treatment for organophosphate poisoningAtropine is not an actual antidote for organophosphate poisoning. However, by blocking the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, atropine also serves as a treatment for poisoning by organophosphate insecticides and nerve gases, such as Tabun (GA), Sarin (GB), Soman (GD) and VX. Troops that are likely to be attacked with chemical weapons often carry autoinjectors with atropine and obidoxime, which can be quickly injected into the thigh. Atropine is often used in conjunction with Pralidoxime chloride. Atropine is given as a treatment for SLUDGE (Salivation, Lacrimation, Urination, Diaphoresis, Gastrointestinal motility, Emesis) symptoms caused by organophosphate poisoning. Another mnemonic is DUMBBELSS, which stands for Diarrhea, Urination, Miosis, Bradycardia, Bronchoconstriction, Excitation (as of muscle in the form of fasciculations and CNS), Lacrimation, Salivation, and Sweating (only sympathetic innervation using Musc receptors). Some of the nerve agents attack and destroy acetylcholinesterase by phosphorylation, so the action of acetylcholine becomes prolonged, pralidoxime (2-PAM) is the cure for organophosphate poisoning because it can cleave this phosphorylation. Atropine can be used to reduce the effect of the poisoning by blocking muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which would otherwise be overstimulated by excessive acetylcholine accumulation. Answered by Sarina Anagnostou 1 year ago.

Atropine Heart Rate Answered by Alfonzo Laflam 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How does atropine work? When somebody is poisoned by TTX, doctors will give you atropine to resolve the bradycardia. But why does this work? i thought TTX block the sodium channels and atropine block the acetylcholine receptors. I don't get why atropine works. anyone? Answered by Lyn Fereira 1 year ago.


Tell me about the mysterious chemical weponed called VX?
Asked by Kai Piceno 1 year ago.

What It Is VX gas disrupts the transmission of communications between nerve cells. Symptoms of exposure to vx gas include increased heart rate and salivation, nausea, and vomiting. A fatal dose of vx nerve gas causes convulsions, respiratory paralysis, and death within several minutes. What It Does A fatal dose of vx gas causes convulsions, respiratory paralysis, and death within several minutes. Be Prepared The most effective treatment for VX gas is the immediate injection of a mix of the drugs atropine and pralidoxime chloride, which counteract the effects of the nerve agent on the peripheral nervous system and help victims breathe, and diazepam, which counteracts the central nervous system effects of VX nerve gas, including seizures. Answered by Glenna Mencl 1 year ago.

Normally, in the body, a molecule named acetylcholine relays electrical nerve impulses in your body (both going to and coming from the brain) going from one end of a nerve cell to the other end of the next nerve cell. Once acetylcholine "delivers its message", it is normally taken up by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, broken up, and spit back out so as to stop it from "delivering its message" anymore. The VX molecule is very similar in structure to acetylcholine and is also taken up by the acetylcholinesterase enzyme. However, the enzyme cannot break up VX and the molecule is bound irreversibly to the enzyme. This means that acetylcholine cannot be broken up once it has done its job. As a result, the nerve cells are in a constant state of sending an impulse, causing your nervous system to go haywire. Answered by Arron Spicker 1 year ago.

this was also on last season of 24, they released vx nerve gas in a mall. interesting they use real wmd's in their series...this season its a nuke...lets hope real life doesn't follow their story line ! Answered by Daniele Papelian 1 year ago.


What 4 medicines can an EMT Basic administer in Virginia?
I'm taking an EMT Basic course, and the instructor has challenged us to find 4 medicines found ON AN AMBULANCE that an EMT Basic can administer in Virginia. I have three: activated charcoal, oxygen, and oral glucose. What is the fourth one? Thanks....I can't find the answer anywhere.....neither can... Asked by Casey Geoffrey 1 year ago.

I'm taking an EMT Basic course, and the instructor has challenged us to find 4 medicines found ON AN AMBULANCE that an EMT Basic can administer in Virginia. I have three: activated charcoal, oxygen, and oral glucose. What is the fourth one? Thanks....I can't find the answer anywhere.....neither can anyone in the class. Answered by Lahoma Passeri 1 year ago.

According to National Registry, and Ohio... it is Epinephrine. If not... in Ohio we have Pralidoxime Chloride Injectors in all of out squads (they are injected directly into the heart or thigh in the case of a Nerve Agent Poisoning). That could be the one, if an Epi isn't it. I never knew those were on the rig, until I got curious and opened up the mysterious yellow case. Answered by Madlyn Pinney 1 year ago.

Not sure about VA but in Pa we can give: Oxygen, Glucose, charcoal, Epinephrine, and Nitro(if the pt. has it) Answered by Golden Jeanbaptiste 1 year ago.

What about epinephrine? Answered by Kandy Zolondek 1 year ago.


Antidotes for drugs?
ok, im in nursing school and i have a tone of drugs i have been looking up and im having trouble finding antidotes or antagonist! the only ones that are shown in my drug book are the drugs that provide an analgesic opiod reaction and they are antagonized by Narcan. if any of you out there can give me a web site or... Asked by Tatum Pigford 1 year ago.

ok, im in nursing school and i have a tone of drugs i have been looking up and im having trouble finding antidotes or antagonist! the only ones that are shown in my drug book are the drugs that provide an analgesic opiod reaction and they are antagonized by Narcan. if any of you out there can give me a web site or something i would so appreciate it! thanks for your help! Answered by Nilda Aihara 1 year ago.

Yup, this is a complicated question. Perhaps you can tell me which drugs you have and I can give you the antagonist or antidote. Narcan is primarily a full opioid antagonist at all three opioid receptors. However, some benzodiazepines have activity at the opioid receptors too, in addition to enhancing the activity of endogenous opioids. So Narcan is listed as an antagonist to use in benzodiazpine overdose. This isn't technically correct since the benzodiazepine antagonist is Flumazenil (Anexate). Other common examples of antagonists or antidotes are: Atropine for Muscarine poisoning Physostigmine for Atropine/Scopolamine poisoning. etc. EDIT: Right....few issues.....there are a number of drugs for which no specific antidote exists in the event of overdose. Supportive treatment is given. For example, start with the antihistamines. There is no specific antidote for antihistamines. Symptomatic treatment given (ie. gastric lavage, administration of charcoal and a cathartic). Tonic-clonic seizures can occur. These can be treated with anti-convulsants. Recurrent seizures treated by PHENYTOIN. Now if excess anti-cholinergic activity is taking place, that can be reversed with the Atropine antidote, PHYSOSTIGMINE. There are other issues that can surface (myocardial depression, QRS interval prolongation). Supportive treatment given for that too. Here is a general list: Overdose - "antidote"/antagonist * Anticholinergic poisoning - physostigmine * Atropine poisoning - Anticholinesterase and pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM) * Benzodiazepine overdose - flumazenil * Beta blocker poisoning - glucagon * Carbon monoxide poisoning - oxygen * Cyanide poisoning - 4-Dimethylaminophenol followed up with sodium thiosulphate or cobalamin * Digoxin poisoning - Fragment antigen binding(Fab) fragments that bind to digoxin (trade names Digibind and Digifab) * Ethylene glycol poisoning - ethanol or fomepizole * Extrapyramidal reactions associated with antipsychotic poisoning - diphenhydramine hydrochloride and benztropine (Trihexyphenidyl can be used in place of benztropine) * Heavy metal poisoning - chelators, calcium disodium edetate (EDTA), dimercaprol (BAL), penicillamine, and 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, succimer) * Heparin poisoning - protamine * Iron poisoning - deferoxamine * Isoniazid poisoning - pyridoxine * Methanol poisoning - ethanol or fomepizole * Methemoglobinemia poisoning - methylene blue * Opioid poisoning - naloxone (NARCAN) / for longer acting opioids like Methadone, it may be best to use a longer acting antagonist like Nalmefene * Paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning - N-acetylcysteine * Thallium poisoning - Prussian blue * Warfarin poisoning - vitamin K, phytonadione and fresh frozen plasma * In cases of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, the use of dantrolene and dopamine agonists (amantadine and bromocriptine) has been described Now for that list you gave me, I would like to point out that in Phenergan's case, it is an antihistamine yes, but it is also a phenothiazine with antipsychotic activity (albeit much lower than say chlorpromazine). Extra-pyramidal symptoms may occur in overdose. So follow the entry above for extra-pyramidal symptoms for anti-psychotics. For Pitocin and Methergine, no specific antidotes exist. For Dantrolene as an antidote, use is indicated in: a) the treatment of malignant hyperthermia induced in susceptible individuals by anaesthetic agents or skeletal muscle relaxants; b) the treatment of malignant neuroleptic syndrome; c) the treatment of hyperpyrexia due to poisoning with Strychnine, Cicuta species (water hemlock) or Phencyclidine (PCP), and perhaps also hyperpyrexia due to poisoning with amphetamines, cocaine, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), theophylline or monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Answered by Norene Labuda 1 year ago.

Pitocin Antidote Answered by Evia Escott 1 year ago.

curare, norcuron, rocuronium, and the other non-depolarizing muscle relaxants can be reversed by edrophonium or neostigmine. Unfortunately they have side effects similar to nerve agents so you counter those with atropine or Robinul. However atropine can cross the blood brain barrier and make a patient slightly nuts, so you can counter that with Anti-lirium. Valium, Versed and the like can be countered with Romazicon. (mentioned above under a different brand name.) Ketamine....some say you can reverse some of its effects with aminophillin used for asthma. Your best bet would be get a poison control book as it is all about antidotes. Answered by Daria Bindas 1 year ago.

There are a couple of narcotic antagonists, an antagonist to benzodiazepines, and one for alcohols, but for the most part, there simply aren't any antidotes. Add acetylcysteine for treatment of acetaminophen/paracetamol overdoses, and you've pretty well covered the specific treatments. The vast bulk of toxicology treatment is less specific. Answered by Marna Maldanado 1 year ago.

i can't think of a book that has a list of antidotes... the ones i know are the common ones like for heparin_protamine s04, acetaminophen-acetylcystein...for coumadine its vit k.... so far thats all i can remember... :( Answered by Rikki Blechinger 1 year ago.


If i am i injected poison what can i do to stay alive?
Asked by Sergio Niess 1 year ago.

It depends as to what poison was used. But the universal antidote for any oral poison is milk. Make sure you ambulate the poisoned person. to wear it off. You can take Ipecac; so vomiting will be induced. Now, if insulin was used ; you should eat a lot of chocolates Drink a lot of fluids o flush out the system. In the hospital; for severe cases, the patient is even hooked on to the dialysis machine.. , Otherwise, we use activated charcoal Ingested poisons are frequently treated by the oral administration of activated charcoal, which absorbs the poison, and then it is flushed from the digestive tract, removing a large part of the toxin. Poisons which are injected into the body (such as those from bites or stings from venomous animals) are usually treated by the use of a constriction band which limits the flow of lymph and/or blood to the area, thus slowing circulation of the poison around the body You might be interested in the complete list of poisons and their antidotes. Poison and Toxic Signs Acetaminophen (paracetamol) poisoning is given N-acetylcysteine as the antidote. Anticholinergic poisoning is given Physostigmine sulfate as the antidote. Benzodiazepine poisoning is given flumazenil as the antidote. Carbon monoxide poisoning is given oxygen as the antidote. Anticholinesterase poisoning is given atropine sulfate and Pralidoxime chloride 2-PAM as the antidote. Cyanide poisoning is given amyl nitrite, sodium nitrite, and thiosulfate as the antidote. Digoxin poisoning is given anti digoxin fab fragments as the antidote. Ethylene glycol poisoning is given ethanol or fomepizole as the antidote. Extrapyramidal signs poisoning is given diphenhydramine hydrochloride and benztropine mesylate as the antidote. Heavy metal poisoning is given chelators, calcium disodium edetate (EDTA), dimercaprol (BAL), penicillamine, and 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, succimer) as the antidote. Iron poisoning is given deferoxamine mesylate as the antidote. Isoniazid poisoning is given pyridoxine as the antidote. Methanol poisoning is given ethanol or fomepizole as the antidote. Methemoglobinemia poisoning is given methylene blue as the antidote. Opioid poisoning is given naloxone hydrochloride as the antidote. Thallium poisoning is given Prussian blue as the antidote. Warfarin poisoning is given vitamin K phytonadione and fresh frozen plasma as the antidote. Stay calm. Stress and rapid heartrate as well as rapid flow of adrenaline will speed the flow of the toxins. Try to call 911 and identify the poison injected in you. Answered by Chun Bauske 1 year ago.

Call the Posion Control Center or 911. Who injected this poison into you? Answered by Reiko Loterbauer 1 year ago.

Depending on the poison, something can be done at a hospital. Some posions are certain to kill you before you can call the ambulance, whilst others will kill you over several days despite the best medical treatment. Answered by Tess Pansullo 1 year ago.

I was going to say if you ingested poison drink water with charcoal but Rosie C nailed it!!!! Take her advice, she gets my vote for best answer if this goes to vote. Answered by Bernardo Hier 1 year ago.

i'm surprised u still keep ur Q open after seeing Rosie's answer! Answered by Alisia Bunten 1 year ago.

which poison Answered by Lilli Jefford 1 year ago.


How does atropine work?
When somebody is poisoned by TTX, doctors will give you atropine to resolve the bradycardia. But why does this work? i thought TTX block the sodium channels and atropine block the acetylcholine receptors. I don't get why atropine works. anyone? Asked by Abraham Vankampen 1 year ago.

ResuscitationInjections of atropine are used in the treatment of bradycardia (an extremely low heart rate), asystole and pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in cardiac arrest. This works because the main action of the vagus nerve of the parasympathetic system on the heart is to decrease heart rate. Atropine blocks this action and, therefore, may speed up the heart rate. However, in the latest guidelines released by the American Heart association, atropine is no longer routinely indicated as a primary treatment modality in asystole and PEA.[2] The usual dosage of atropine in bradyasystolic arrest is 0.5 to 1 mg IV push every three to five minutes, up to a maximum dose of 0.04 mg/kg. For symptomatic bradycardia, the usual dosage is 0.5 to 1 mg IV push, may repeat every 3 to 5 minutes up to a maximum dose of 3 mg.[3] Atropine is also useful in treating second-degree heart block Mobitz Type 1 (Wenckebach block), and also third-degree heart block with a high Purkinje or AV-nodal escape rhythm. It is usually not effective in second-degree heart block Mobitz type 2, and in third-degree heart block with a low Purkinje or ventricular escape rhythm. Atropine is contraindicated in ischemia-induced conduction block, because the drug increases oxygen demand of the AV nodal tissue, thereby aggravating ischemia and the resulting heart block. One of the main actions of the parasympathetic nervous system is to stimulate the M2 muscarinic receptor in the heart, but atropine inhibits this action. [edit] Secretions and bronchoconstrictionAtropine's actions on the parasympathetic nervous system inhibits salivary, sweat, and mucus glands. This can be useful in treating hyperhidrosis, and can prevent the death rattle of dying patients. Even though atropine has not been officially indicated for either of these purposes by the FDA, it has been used by physicians for these purposes.[4] [edit] Treatment for organophosphate poisoningAtropine is not an actual antidote for organophosphate poisoning. However, by blocking the action of acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, atropine also serves as a treatment for poisoning by organophosphate insecticides and nerve gases, such as Tabun (GA), Sarin (GB), Soman (GD) and VX. Troops that are likely to be attacked with chemical weapons often carry autoinjectors with atropine and obidoxime, which can be quickly injected into the thigh. Atropine is often used in conjunction with Pralidoxime chloride. Atropine is given as a treatment for SLUDGE (Salivation, Lacrimation, Urination, Diaphoresis, Gastrointestinal motility, Emesis) symptoms caused by organophosphate poisoning. Another mnemonic is DUMBBELSS, which stands for Diarrhea, Urination, Miosis, Bradycardia, Bronchoconstriction, Excitation (as of muscle in the form of fasciculations and CNS), Lacrimation, Salivation, and Sweating (only sympathetic innervation using Musc receptors). Some of the nerve agents attack and destroy acetylcholinesterase by phosphorylation, so the action of acetylcholine becomes prolonged, pralidoxime (2-PAM) is the cure for organophosphate poisoning because it can cleave this phosphorylation. Atropine can be used to reduce the effect of the poisoning by blocking muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which would otherwise be overstimulated by excessive acetylcholine accumulation. Answered by Kemberly Cerda 1 year ago.

Atropine Heart Rate Answered by Tamekia Vanepps 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: How does atropine work? When somebody is poisoned by TTX, doctors will give you atropine to resolve the bradycardia. But why does this work? i thought TTX block the sodium channels and atropine block the acetylcholine receptors. I don't get why atropine works. anyone? Answered by Elvin Soun 1 year ago.


Tell me about the mysterious chemical weponed called VX?
Asked by Carola Fathy 1 year ago.

What It Is VX gas disrupts the transmission of communications between nerve cells. Symptoms of exposure to vx gas include increased heart rate and salivation, nausea, and vomiting. A fatal dose of vx nerve gas causes convulsions, respiratory paralysis, and death within several minutes. What It Does A fatal dose of vx gas causes convulsions, respiratory paralysis, and death within several minutes. Be Prepared The most effective treatment for VX gas is the immediate injection of a mix of the drugs atropine and pralidoxime chloride, which counteract the effects of the nerve agent on the peripheral nervous system and help victims breathe, and diazepam, which counteracts the central nervous system effects of VX nerve gas, including seizures. Answered by Billie Godby 1 year ago.

Normally, in the body, a molecule named acetylcholine relays electrical nerve impulses in your body (both going to and coming from the brain) going from one end of a nerve cell to the other end of the next nerve cell. Once acetylcholine "delivers its message", it is normally taken up by the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, broken up, and spit back out so as to stop it from "delivering its message" anymore. The VX molecule is very similar in structure to acetylcholine and is also taken up by the acetylcholinesterase enzyme. However, the enzyme cannot break up VX and the molecule is bound irreversibly to the enzyme. This means that acetylcholine cannot be broken up once it has done its job. As a result, the nerve cells are in a constant state of sending an impulse, causing your nervous system to go haywire. Answered by Emilia Syphard 1 year ago.

this was also on last season of 24, they released vx nerve gas in a mall. interesting they use real wmd's in their series...this season its a nuke...lets hope real life doesn't follow their story line ! Answered by Concepcion Hecht 1 year ago.


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