Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018896/001.

Names and composition

"POTASSIUM ACETATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of POTASSIUM ACETATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018896/001 POTASSIUM ACETATE POTASSIUM ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MEQ per ML
206203/001 POTASSIUM ACETATE POTASSIUM ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MEQ per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018896/001 POTASSIUM ACETATE POTASSIUM ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MEQ per ML
206203/001 POTASSIUM ACETATE POTASSIUM ACETATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MEQ per ML

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Answered questions

How to prepare 3M potassium/sodium acetate?
Dear all, How do I prepare a solution of 3M potassium/sodium acetate from acetic acid and potassium/sodium hydroxide? Asked by Brain Engelkes 1 year ago.

C2H4O2 + NaOH = H2O + C2H3O2Na Acetic acid (60 gm) + sodium hydroxide ( 40 gm) = 100 gm water (18 gm) + sodium acetate (82 gm) = 100 gm Ratio reactants to products = 1:1 Molarity = moles / L, 3M = 3 moles / 1 L Acetic acid = 60 gm / total reactant 100gm = 1.8 moles Multiply by 3 = 1.8 moles or 180 grams Sodium Hydroxide = 40 gm / total reactant 100 mg = 1.2 moles or 120 grams. 180 grams acetic acid + 120 grams sodium hydroxide = 300 grams. 300 grams divided by 1 liter = 3M So in order to make 3 M sodium acetate combine solution, add 180 grams acetic acid and 120 grams sodium hydroxide with 1 liter of water. Answered by Dorsey Amedeo 1 year ago.

Yes but remember to do it in a volumetric flask and to wash out you weighing vessel into the flask too! Answered by Mallory Engblom 1 year ago.


Are these ionic compounds soluble or insoluble?
1. potassium acetate 2. mercury (II) flouride 3. mercury (II) acetate Asked by Sang Kyung 1 year ago.

potassium acetate Solubility in water 253 g/100 mL (20 °C) 492 g/100 mL (62 °C) Solubility in water25 g/100 mL (10°C)- mercury acetate Solubility in waterdecomposes mercury fluoride Answered by Wes Subert 1 year ago.


Potassium Acetate Formula?
I work in a molecular parisitology laboratory and was looking at a few chemicals needed for a solution for alkaline lysis in a bacterial plasmid prep protocol. I stumbled upon the formula for Potassium Acetate and noticed that in every source, the formula was listed as CH3CO2K. This surprised me as the cation... Asked by Jong Harres 1 year ago.

I work in a molecular parisitology laboratory and was looking at a few chemicals needed for a solution for alkaline lysis in a bacterial plasmid prep protocol. I stumbled upon the formula for Potassium Acetate and noticed that in every source, the formula was listed as CH3CO2K. This surprised me as the cation (K^+) is listed after the anion (CH3CO2^-). Convention taught me that it was the other way around. I asked a chemist in our building why this occurred and he didn't have an answer. Does anyone know why the formula for this Potassium salt is written this way? Is this something that can be correct for all ionic substances? Thanks in advance, Will M. Answered by Rogelio Losneck 1 year ago.

CH3CO2^- is usually written CH3COO^- It is the organic way to write the acetate ion. Acetic acid is CH3COOH and this is becasue the acidic H (the one at the end is associated with the COO grouping. In other words, we have this: -COOH and that - to te left of the C indicates where a bond would go. So, CH3COOK or CH3CO2K is written to follow the form of how acetic acid is written. You can write acetate in an inorganic way: C2H3O2^- and the K goes at the front in that case: KC2H3O2 HTH Answered by Carroll Piquette 1 year ago.

Formula For Potassium Acetate Answered by Shani Steve 1 year ago.

Potassium Acetate Formula Answered by Colene Cadmus 1 year ago.

Because acetic acid (CH3CO2H) is an organic compound. Organic chemistry is to study carbon, so organic formula lists carbon first, then hydrogen, then any other atoms connected alphabetically. When the hydrogen is lost, acetate ion (CH3CO2-) is formed. Potassium is not part of the acetic skeleton, so it is written at the end. General chemistry follows the IUPAC inorganic nomenclature: cation first follows by the anion. Potassium is positive, so it's written first. That's what you learnt before: KC2H3O2. Answered by Buford Bugbee 1 year ago.


Reaction between Sodium Acetate and Potassium Chloride?
Is there a reaction between the two? And if so, I just need the precipitate. I can't find if potassium acetate is insoluble or not. Any help is appreciated!! Asked by Royal Tierce 1 year ago.

A most important thing to remember : ALL Gr1 salts are soluble - so potassium acetate is soluble In addition: All acetates are soluble with any cation - so once again potassium acetate is soluble . And to check the easiest route you could have taken - check Wikipedia which states: Potassium acetate: Solubility in water 253 g/100 mL (20 °C) 492 g/100 mL (62 °C) Obviously extremely soluble Now to answer your question : There is no reaction between sodium acetate and potassium chloride . All you will have is a solution of dissolved ions. Answered by Cleo Zheng 1 year ago.

Potassium Acetate Solubility Answered by Elfreda Bottrell 1 year ago.

No reaction, just a mixture of water-soluble ions. Answered by Sarina Bestine 1 year ago.


Why do we use potassium acetate?
Asked by Wanita Simpson 1 year ago.

Potassium Acetate is used in the synthesis of medicines (antibiotics, potassium penicillins). It is used as a textile conditioner, catalyst in the production of polyurethanes, polymers and carbon black, It is also used in manufacturing of crystal glass. Answered by Rickie Pfeffer 1 year ago.


How would potassium acetate effect resting membrane potential?
How would the resting membrane potential change if you submerged the cell in a saturated solution of potassium acetate? Asked by Faustino Isbell 1 year ago.

The resting membrane potential is based on the pumping in of potassium and the pumping out of sodium in unequal amounts, namely 3 sodium ions out for every 2 potassium ions in (both of which have a +1 charge). Submerging the cell in a potassium acetate solution would increase the amount of potassium ions on the outside of the cell in addition to the already higher amount of positive charge due to the sodium ions. This makes the outside of the cell even more positive with respect to the internal environment, which would cause the resting membrane potential to increase in magnitude. Answered by Kyoko Overbee 1 year ago.

Mummy recommends it. Potassium acetate is used in mixtures applied for tissue preservation, fixation, and mummification. Most museums today use the formaldehyde-based method recommended by Kaiserling in 1897 and containing potassium acetate. Answered by Jenna Spry 1 year ago.

don't bother my head with that bullshit Answered by Cheyenne Whetstone 1 year ago.


What is the pH of a 0.01M solution of potassium acetate?
having much confusion with this one, any help appreciated Asked by Malisa Pollaro 1 year ago.

Potassium acetate is CH3COOK, which is the conjugate base form of CH3COOH. CH3COOH has a Ka value of 1.74E-5. CH3COOK reacts with water to form the conjugate acid form by: . . .CH3COOK + H2O <----> CH3COOH + OH- I. . . . 0.01. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0. . . . . . .0 E. . . 0.01 - x. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .x. . . . . . .x Kb = [CH3COOH][OH-]/[CH3COOK] Kb = 1E-14/Ka = 1E-14/1.74E-5 = 5.75E-10 5.75E-10 = x^2 / 0.01-x x = [OH-] = 2.40E-6 M pOH = -log[OH-] = 5.62 pH = 14 - pOH = 8.38 Answered by Karol Midy 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What is the pH of a 0.01M solution of potassium acetate? having much confusion with this one, any help appreciated Answered by Tierra Swinton 1 year ago.


What products form when you add potassium acetate and acetic acid?
CH3COOH and KCH3COO? ...i must use these to create a buffer solution with a pH of 4.10 for my ap chemistry class. if you know what steps to take toward figuring how to do this, please help me. i have no idea how to figure this out. Asked by Cathy Seaforth 1 year ago.

When you combine CH3COOH and KCH3COO all you do is set up an equilibrium between acetic acid, acetate (its conjugate base) and hydronium ions: CH3COOH ⇄ CH3COO– + H3O+ which I'll shorten to HA ⇄ A– + H+ to save space The pKa of acetic acid is 4.75. (pKa is just -logKa - that's base 10 log). Ka = [A–][H+]/[HA] so, pKa = -log[H3O+] - log[A–]/[HA] = pH - log[A–]/[HA] or pH = pKa + log[A–]/[HA] You create a buffer solution by adjusting the [A–]:[HA] ratio. In your case, you want to adjust the ratio so that 4.1 = 4.75 + log[A–]/[HA] or log[A–]/[HA] = - 0.65 or you want [A–]/[HA] = 10^-0.65 = 0.224 To prepare your buffer, you need to prepare a solution in which the molar concentration ratio of acetate to acetic acid is 0.224. Answered by Donny Fritzler 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What products form when you add potassium acetate and acetic acid? CH3COOH and KCH3COO? ...i must use these to create a buffer solution with a pH of 4.10 for my ap chemistry class. if you know what steps to take toward figuring how to do this, please help me. i have no idea how to figure this out. Answered by Sharolyn Fanion 1 year ago.


What mass (in grams) of potassium acetate, KC2H3O2, must be added to 82 mL of 0.010 M acetic acid to form...?
What mass (in grams) of potassium acetate, KC2H3O2, must be added to 82 mL of 0.010 M acetic acid to form a buffer solution with a pH of 5.24?              (Ka (HC2H3O2)= 1.8 x 10-5) Asked by Lisandra Hirschfeld 1 year ago.

pKa = 4.74 pH = pKa + log [acetate]/ [acetic acid] 5.24 - 4.74 = 0.5 10^0.5 = [acetate]/ 0.010 M 3.16 = [acetate]/ 0.010 [acetate]= 0.0316 moles potassium acetate = 0.0316 mol x 0.082 L=0.00259 mass = 0.00259 x 98.15 g/mol=0.254 g Answered by Eric Dornier 1 year ago.


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