PLAVIX Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020839/001.

Names and composition

"PLAVIX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020839/001 PLAVIX CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
020839/002 PLAVIX CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
076273/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
076274/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
076274/002 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
076999/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
077665/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
077665/002 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
078004/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
078133/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
090307/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
020839/001 PLAVIX CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
090494/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
020839/002 PLAVIX CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
090540/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
090625/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
090844/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
091023/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
091216/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
201686/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
202266/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
202266/002 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
202925/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
202925/002 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
202928/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
203751/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
204165/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE
204165/002 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 300MG BASE
204359/001 CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE CLOPIDOGREL BISULFATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 75MG BASE

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Answered questions

How long to take Plavix after stents procedure its been a year?
I had a light heart attack November of 2008... and had two stents for blockage.. I am still on Plavix... I asked my cardiologist and the answer was to stay on a while longer... Asked by Laura Mendolia 1 month ago.

Plavix is used after stent placement to reduce the risk of clot formation in the stent (instent thrombosis), which could result in serious consequences, such as another heart attack. The risk of instent thrombosis is highest in the first few months after the stent was placed. Over time endothelial cells grow over the stent, which reduces the risk of instent thrombosis. The risk of instent thrombosis and therefore the length of Plavix treatment is dependent on the type of stent that was used. There are two basic types of stents referred to as bare metal stents or drug eluting stents. Plavix is recommended for a minimum of 1 month but ideally for 1 year after bare metal stent placement. For drug eluting stents the recommendation is to continue Plavix for a minimum of 12 months. The use of Plavix after 12 months is controversial. The risk of instent thrombosis is significantly reduced after 1 year and therefore there is less benefit from Plavix. Some experts recommend lifelong Plavix as long as a person does not have a reason not to take Plavix (e.g. history of bleeding.) There are some people that require mandatory lifelong Plavix though, such as those with multiple overlapping stents, multivessel stents, stents in coronary artery bypass grafts and stents at the site of vessel bifurcations. Most likely you do not have of those conditions. The decision to continue Plavix is dependent on the risk benefit ratio. The risks include bleeding and the benefits include a reduced risk of future heart attacks and cardiovascular death. If you are at risk of bleeding, then the risk outweighs the benefits and Plavix should not be continued. If you do not have a risk of bleeding and have a high risk of another heart attack, then it would be appropriate to continue Plavix for now and reevaluate in the future. The only person who can answer this for you is your Cardiologist. Answered by Mitzi Remy 1 month ago.

Plavix And Stents Answered by Chae Kimmell 1 month ago.

You were placed on plavix and lipitor. The changes of you getting a heart attack is great if your arteries were 99% blocked. Keep taking those drugs to help with the blockage. Having a stent put in will help keep the arteries open but if you don't improve your diet and exercise, the stent can be clogged. Remember to keep taking the plavix and lipitor- you should have a blood test every 3-6 months to see if the drugs are okay on your liver. Answered by Phung Mannes 1 month ago.

It depends on the type of stent.( Plavix = clopidogrel) Patients receiving a sirolimus-eluting stent need to receive clopidogrel plus aspirin for a minimum of 2 to 3 months following implantation, and those receiving a polymer-based paclitaxel-eluting intracoronary stent need to receive clopidogrel plus aspirin for a minimum of 6 months following stent implantation. All patients should receive aspirin therapy indefinitely. Thus the durations of clopidogrel therapy combined with aspirin that may be used range from one month to 3 months to 9 months to one year to life-long therapy! Answered by Zofia Patriquin 1 month ago.

I am a hospital pharmacist. The answer is forever because plavix can prevent heart attack and decreased mortallity rate in heart's disease patient. Answered by Bernice Hardey 1 month ago.

probably life long yo willhave to continue. Answered by Katelynn Ytuarte 1 month ago.


Is it dangerous to drink alcohol and take plavix and asprin.?
Asked by Vicki Pono 1 month ago.

Plavix and aspirin as others have pointed out are platelet inhibitors and act to prevent your blood from "clotting" if an injury occurs. Plavix and aspirin are commonly prescribed together in cardiology patients who have peripheral vascular disease or have recently had a stent deployed. Most patients who are on this therapy do not have serious side effects unless they have an underlying clotting disorder. Your blood also has clotting factors. These two systems (platelets and clotting factors) work under different circumstances and have different functions but also work together. The platelets are first on the scene of an injury and create a microscopic mesh over the injury. Clotting factors once activated come by and fill in the mesh to create a complete scab over the wound. Having no platelets or clotting factors will cause excessive bleeding. Platelets are generated in your bone morrow. Clotting factors are generated by your liver. Your liver also metabolises medication and alcohol. So there is a potential for clotting factor production to be affected by alcohol. There also is a potential for drug metabolism to be affected by alcohol intake. The answer to whether alcohol affects the metabolism of plavix and aspirin or whether it affects your clotting process is a complicated one. The answer is probably yes. On the other hand you asked if it was dangerous. The answer to that is probably no - unless you drink heavily - greater than three drinks in a setting. It is especially dangerous if you have liver damage associated with drinking heavily over many years. In that sort of a case your liver does not produce clotting factors like it should due to years of injury - more drinking makes it worse. In sum the mechanisms for metabolising medication and alcohol, producing clotting factors and platelets are complicated processes but there is not direct interaction of light drinking with aspirin and plavix - therefore it is probably safe. I hope this helps. Good luck. Answered by Effie Sunshine 1 month ago.

Afternoon Mr President - what a great question from you there! To me, there is a clear double-thinking standard here, because from the list above it is obvious that Alcohol is responsible for more deaths than other sorts of drugs, but because it is widely available every where you go, it is classed as being more socially acceptable. However, you only have to open the papers these days to see that more and more violent crimes are linked to alcohol abuse, and people on the whole in the UK are drinking more. Like other drugs too, what can start out as recreational use can develop into addiction - how much of that is down to genetics, social background etc I am not sure, but I was reading in the paper that the amount of UK people who are struggling with drink problems has certainly gone up in the last few years - and can sometimes wait for over a year to get the right professional help. I like to have a drink indoors or go out with my friends so I am not pointing the finger or being a hypocrite here - I am aware of the risks of drinking, and choose to do so in moderation, but am only too aware of the slippery slide into alcoholism. My father lived and died an alcoholic, so I know first hand the terrible problems that alcohol can cause in people's lives. xxxxxx Answered by Ervin Coonse 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: is it dangerous to drink alcohol and take plavix and asprin.? Answered by Bonnie Loredo 1 month ago.

Absolutely, your blood won't clot properly if you drink and take any medication. The plavix and aspirin is OK to take together because together it can help you keep from having a heart attack. But DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL WITH IT. Plavix is already a blood thinner. You don't need it any thinner that it already is. So if you are doing that and drinking alcohol. Hope you have a good time in the hospital.. Answered by Bennie Digesare 1 month ago.

Plavix And Alcohol Answered by Amira Harrow 1 month ago.

Having heart problems and still want to drink alcohol when taking plavix and asprin?You are wasting the doctors and nurses times and efforts,You hurt your family members that love you.Most of all you are wasting subsidy using public fund .If i do that i feel bad ? How do you feel? Answered by Paulina Calabro 1 month ago.

Taking Plavix with Aspirin is dangerous, but alcohol has no anticoagulant properties. Be careful. Answered by Crysta Cable 1 month ago.

It's dangerous to take alcohol with any kind of medication. The instructions on the medication should specifically say under what conditions to take or not take the medicine. Answered by Serina Demyers 1 month ago.


Any cheap alternatives to expensive anti-clotting drug Plavix?
Asked by Tanika Scherz 1 month ago.

Here's the DL: Plavix is NOT an anti-clotting drug (in medicine, the semantics of this matter). Plavix is an anti-platelet agent. Coumadin (warfarin) is an anti-clotting agent. They work completely different and have different purposes. Some patients will be on both, others will only be on either or. Plavix has a cousin, Ticlid (ticlodipine). Ticlodipine is available generically but has some severe disadvantages and as such, is rarely ever used now that Plavix is sold. Ticlodipine came out first and think of it as the first child that the parents made all the big mistakes with. Ticlodipine is known to cause a dramatic drop in several of your white blood cells (very key parts of your immune system that fight infections- it can even wipe out nearly all of your immune system). Ticlodipine is also known to cause some pretty severe bleeds. In fact, ticlodipine has a Black Box Warning on it because of the impact on WBCs and the increased risk for bleeds. A black box warning is the strongest warning/precaution that the FDA can issue without pulling a drug off the market or making it available directly from the manufacturer only. Plavix does not have these black box warnings or severe side effects that ticlidopine does, so it is regarded to be much safer. Plavix also has a lot of good data and evidence for use in certain stroke patients, heart attack survivors, and those that receive stents (among other uses). Honestly, I can't remember selling ticlodipine at all in the last 3 years. And I highly doubt that your doctor would agree to switching you from Plavix to Ticlid. Some of you reading this will remember that Plavix's generic, clopidogrel, became available for about four days and then it was pulled from the market. Plavix is actually still under patent. A generic company found some loophole in the wording and manufactured and sold generic clopidogrel. Since Plavix is still under patent, the Plavix manufacturer sued the generic company and production came to a stand still. The drug industry provides such large profits that the generic company still made a boat load of money with only four days of clopidogrel on the market and a lawsuit to pay out. Crazy, huh? A new cousin to Plavix and Ticlid is set to come out very soon. It's name is Effient. I know it was undergoing priority review by the FDA a couple of months ago and I'm not sure where it is at right now. This may signal that Plavix will be coming off patent soon. I don't know how long Bristol-Meyer's patent for Plavix will last but hopefully it will be up soon. It's a great drug that saves lives but I know its crazy expensive and I'm aware that some patients just can't afford it. Answered by Aliza Duttry 1 month ago.

i'm a nurse, i've got been one for 17 years. I additionally artwork in drug risk-free practices. NSAIDS are actually not banned in Europe, or everywhere else, for that be counted. Aspirin remains in use as a soreness reliever, anticoagulant agent international and has been around for over a a hundred years. Salicylate, the energetic element in aspirin, is modern in many vegetation, like feverfew. APAP, (aka Tylenol, or acetaminophen) isn't an NSAID, and is somewhat risk-free and effected while taken as directed. No drug is a hundred% risk-free. all human beings is unique and could react to something, including nuts, caffeine and protein in different techniques. particular, human beings do have reactions which impact liver, and the GI tract, however the main difficulty-loose one is disillusioned abdomen, often the effect of overdose or taking the medicine without nutrition. i could propose which you learn some stable internet website, like the EMEA or the FDA for innovations on drug impacts and interactions while you're searching for for determination remedies. Answered by Beth Leuthauser 1 month ago.

plavix is not the same as warfarin as they work in completely different ways. to my knowledge Plavix (cloprodigrel) is still under patent and therefore cannot be reproduced by generic manufacturer's Answered by Danilo Shopbell 1 month ago.

see if there is a generic for plavix. if not, talk to your doctor about a cheaper medicine. Answered by Sydney Uhrig 1 month ago.

Same drug (clopidogrel) is available in other countries at much cheaper rates. Answered by Thad Ader 1 month ago.

you shouldn't switch unless your dr says ok. there is coumadin which is generic and heparin Answered by Micah Bahar 1 month ago.


Will aspirin benefit as good as plavix for heart.?
taking plavix but expensive ,will aspirin replace it.. Asked by Wesley Zeidler 1 month ago.

Plavix is expensive. If you have drug eluding stents and were prescribed Plavix after they were put in, do not discontinue your Plavix until okay'd by your cardiologist. Plavix is crucial to take in the setting of drug eluding stents for at least 12 months. (On occassion, some will allow you stop it for surgery or procedure temporarily before then.) Plavix works as an adjuct to aspirin to keep stents patent. If you stop it too soon, you risk having your stent clot off and having a big heart attack. Please check with your doctor before stopping it. If you do not have a prescription plan or insurance, call the doctors office and see if you can apply for free plavix through the drug company. Also, some offices have samples of Plavix that they will give out. (They go FAST in our office, so people don't get many, but every bit helps.) Hope this helps. Answered by Mikaela Yeaton 1 month ago.

I don't know if the aspirin good as Plavix, you better ask your doctor for that. And Plavix shouldn't be expensive if you have a prescription insurance, I pay only $10 per prescription. Asprin about 100 mg a day is good to prevent heart attack. Why did u take the Plavix, what was your diagnose, i had an anxiety and the doctor today prescribed me Plavix, it has a lot of side affect , did you experience something like that?Consult your doctor, call her, don't just stop taking Plavix. Answered by Cecil Shouts 1 month ago.

For the most part yes. Plavix is usually used if aspirin cannot be used as in a allergy. They do work by 2 different mechanisms though, but basically they affect your platelets so they do not form clots. But you should consult your doctor before any changes Answered by Wilburn Sara 1 month ago.

There is much more comprehensive information to support the long term use of aspirin rather than Plavix as an anti-platelet drug and it remains the drug of choice. However in certain circumstances, for example after heart surgery both drugs are used together. Answered by Romelia Sella 1 month ago.

Not exactly. You can take one baby aspirin or 84 mg daily but not the same as taking Plavix. See if your doctor can prescribe a generic equivalent. Answered by Davida Tiedemann 1 month ago.

Ask your Doctor before you make any change like that! KJL Answered by Kenny Branaugh 1 month ago.


Plavix and Lavix medicine is it the same?
is Plavix and Lavix medicine is the same or not? Asked by Rubin Krysh 1 month ago.

Plavix and Lavix medicine is it the same? Did you mean Plavix and Lasix?NO Generic Name: clopidogrel Brand Names: Plavix Plavix is used to prevent blood clots after a recent heart attack or stroke, and in people with certain disorders of the heart or blood vessels.Plavix keeps the platelets in your blood from coagulating (clotting) to prevent unwanted blood clots that can occur with certain heart or blood vessel conditions. Generic Name: furosemide Brand Names: Lasix Lasix is a loop diuretic (water pill) that prevents your body from absorbing too much salt, allowing the salt to instead be passed in your urine. Lasix treats fluid retention (edema) in people with congestive heart failure, liver disease, or a kidney disorder such as nephrotic syndrome. This medication is also used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). PS: Plavix or Lasix may also be used for other purposes. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Take care as always! Answered by Wilhemina Traversa 1 month ago.

Do you mean Plavix and Lasix? If so, these are different medications. Plavix is also known as clopidogrel. It is an anticoagulant. Lasix is also known as furosemide. It is a diuretic. Answered by Danny Mcinnes 1 month ago.


What are the some reactions to taking plavix?
Asked by Jame Gagel 1 month ago.

Plavix side effects Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Plavix and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: * nosebleed or other bleeding that will not stop; * black, bloody, or tarry stools; * coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds; * chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; * sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; * sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; or * pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, fever, and urinating more or less than usual. Continue taking Plavix and talk to your doctor if you have any of these less serious side effects: * stomach pain; * runny or stuffy nose, cough, sore throat; or * mild headache or dizziness. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. Answered by Laveta Clothey 1 month ago.


Is there a cheaper and comparable medicine other than plavix?
Asked by Sue Sekuterski 1 month ago.

Dear Asker! Plavix is classified under Antiplatelet Drugs category. Antiplatelet drugs are a group of powerful medications that prevent the formation of blood clots. When you are wounded, platelets arrive on the scene and group together, forming a blood clot that stops the bleeding. In many situations, this is a good thing. But platelets can also aggregate when injury to a blood vessel occurs, like during atherosclerosis. In this situation, the platelets cause blood clots to develop in an already stressed artery. Antiplatelet medications can prevent this process from occurring. Aspirin is the most common antiplatelet drug. Other antiplatelet drugs used to treat heart disease include Plavix (clopidogrel bisulfate) and Ticlid (ticlopidine hydrochloride). For what conditions are antiplatelets used? Antiplatelets may be prescribed for patients with a history of: * Coronary artery disease * Heart attack * Angina (chest pain) * Stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) * Peripheral artery disease Antiplatelets are also used: * After angioplasty and stent placement * After heart bypass surgery * To prevent the formation of blood clots in people with atrial fibrillation So you can use Aspirin which has the same action but is so far cheaper than Plavix. You may ask the pharmacist to choose other drugs which bear the generic name of Plavix , clopidogrel for a lower price. You can also use Ticpid (ticlodipine) as an alternative for Plavix. Ticpid is cheaper than Plavix too. Here is an extract of your reference: Eli Lilly challenges Bristol-Myers with blood thinner: Prasugrel vs Plavix (clopidogrel). Posted Nov 5th 2007 8:58AM by Douglas McIntyre Filed under: Products and services, Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMY), Lilly (Eli) (LLY) Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY)'s blood thinner Plavix is the second-largest selling drug in the world. It brought in over $3.4 billion in sales during the first nine months of this year. Eli Lilly (NYSE: LLY), however, believes it has a better treatment . According to The Wall Street Journal, its "new drug, known as prasugrel, is intended to treat patients on the verge of a heart attack." The new treatment can stop the build-up of platelets in the blood within thirty minutes Lilly has a number of drugs going "off patent" in the next seven years. If these are not replaced, 50% of the company's revenue is at risk. It is not clear how long it will take the FDA to approve the drug, if it ever will. The Journal writes that "in the head-to-head study, 9.9% of patients on prasugrel suffered either a heart attack, stroke or death from a cardiovascular cause, compared with 12.1% of those given Plavix. That is a 19% reduction in risk favoring prasugrel." With new drugs, though, there is always a catch. Prasugrel is 32% more likely than Plavix to cause major bleeding. Now the politics of drug approval will kick in. Experts for Bristol-Myers will say the new treatment is too dangerous and that Plavix is as close to perfect as a blood thinner can be. Lilly will claim that it can adjust the dose to cut down on bleeding and will get a legion of doctors to attest to that. In the end, the patient can bleed to death or have a heart attack. Does it matter how he died? Hope that may help you! Good luck! Answered by Kayce Fiecke 1 month ago.

There is a generic called Clopidogrel which could be cheaper. Just ask a pharmacist if there are any other generics available for Plavix. Answered by Elsy Blome 1 month ago.

Hi! I don't really know what Plavix is BUT, when I'm prescribed something I always go to CHEMIST WAREHOUSE, (there are many outlets, just look up directory) and they have the biggest and cheapest range of medicines. Try this site and take it from there. www.ChemistDirect.com.au/Chemist. Good luck. Answered by Forest Frady 1 month ago.


What is plavix used for the heart?
plavix 75 MG was issued to my husband for a heart blockage Asked by Danilo Sancen 1 month ago.

Plavix is a drug that is designed to decrease platelet aggregation, in other words, it makes them less 'sticky'. Platelets are a component of blood which assists in clotting it. Normally, they circulate freely, but where an injury occurs, like a cut, or in this case, inflammation of the coronary arteries from plaque build up, they tend to 'stick' and cause a clot or thrombus. Since your husband's coronary arteries are narrowed by plaque from atherosclerotic heart disease, if a clot blocks the opening in the artery, the tissue downstream gets starved for oxygen and can die. This is what causes a heart attack (or myocardial infarction, in medical speak). Your doctor is trying to reduce your husband's chances of a heart attack. However, plavix is expensive, and may be no more effective than a daily aspirin in preventing heart attacks. Speak with your doctor if you want a cheaper alternative, otherwise it's a fine drug. Answered by Ebonie Santacruce 1 month ago.

Plavix is used to help the blood flow through the arteries so plaque wont form. This is usually given to people after a bypass or when someone has a stent put in. Answered by Lenore Romack 1 month ago.

Cholestrol medication. Which blocks your heart...Listen if the is over weight he needs to loose it NOW..Also he need to exercise like running, bicycling..anything to get his heart rate up...Usually this occurs because of your bad diet...Change it NOW!!!!! Answered by Shirley Whitacre 1 month ago.


What would happen if I didn't take plavix for 7 days?
I have been on plavix for 2 years, I need to stop taking if for 7 days. What would be the effects for stopping the plavix for 7 days? Asked by Johnie Resenz 1 month ago.

Plavix is an antiplatelet agent that thins the blood. Usually people are put on it because they have had or are at high risk for heart problems/heart attacks or strokes. Plavix is irreversible and the effects of thinning the blood takes 7-10 days to reverse after you have stopped taking it. If you have certain types of cardiac stents, it can be quite dangerous to stop the plavix due to a very high risk of a heart attack, especially if the stent was recently inserted. If not, stopping the plavix for 7 days shouldnt be a problem. Why are you stopping the plavix? If it is for an operation, then you dont have a choice, as you need to be off it or you will bleed too much during surgery. I assume that you have cleared this with your doctor already so you should be fine. Answered by Gaston Getzlaff 1 month ago.


Blood clots on Plavix?
I'm 52 and have been on Plavix for four years. Recently my family and I took a trip to California, an eight to nine hour drive, and on the way back I got blood clots in my legs, and had to be hospitalized when they migrated to my lungs. I had a stroke when I was 46, and so if the clots got to my last standing... Asked by Maricela Stableford 1 month ago.

I'm 52 and have been on Plavix for four years. Recently my family and I took a trip to California, an eight to nine hour drive, and on the way back I got blood clots in my legs, and had to be hospitalized when they migrated to my lungs. I had a stroke when I was 46, and so if the clots got to my last standing artery it could have killed me. The doctors don't know why I got them while on Plavix, and now I have to be on coumadin for 6 months or for the rest of my life. Does anyone know why this could be happening, or has anyone else experienced it? Answered by Iluminada Dorio 1 month ago.

Plavix is an antiplatelet agent. If you have increase in coagulation factors or other proteins which cause your blood to clot fast then Plavix alone will not prevent clots. You should be tested for conditions that cause hypercoagulability. 46 is young for a stroke, was it due to high blood pressure? If it was due to a clot then you may have a coagulopathy. Coumadin works to inhibit the function of clotting factors and prevents further clotting. Are you being seen by a hematologist? Answered by Bruce Lijewski 1 month ago.


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