PHOSLO Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019976/001.

Names and composition

"PHOSLO" is the commercial name of a drug composed of CALCIUM ACETATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019976/001 PHOSLO CALCIUM ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 667MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
021160/001 PHOSLO CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 333.5MG
021160/002 PHOSLO CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
021160/003 PHOSLO GELCAPS CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
078502/001 ELIPHOS CALCIUM ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 667MG
022581/001 PHOSLYRA CALCIUM ACETATE SOLUTION/ORAL 667MG per 5ML
019976/001 PHOSLO CALCIUM ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 667MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
077693/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 667MG
077728/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
091312/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
091561/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 667MG
201658/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
202127/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
202315/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
202420/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 667MG
202885/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE TABLET/ORAL 667MG
203135/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
021160/001 PHOSLO CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 333.5MG
203179/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
021160/002 PHOSLO CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG
203298/001 CALCIUM ACETATE CALCIUM ACETATE CAPSULE/ORAL 667MG

Ask a question

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Should a renal (dialysis patient) take both Phoslo and Hectorol at the same time?
Asked by Wendolyn Albracht 1 month ago.

When I was on dialysis I was on both.. and even now that I've had a transplant I'm still on both.. the Hectorol helps absorb the calcium.. Answered by Douglas Bramlett 1 month ago.

that is something for a doctor to answer.... Answered by Katelyn Wilkus 1 month ago.


How do you get phosphates levels down?
i have an adult child with asperger syndrome and was told that it is beause of high phosphate levels. It is getting very seious. this person is having trouble coping with everyday life. please someone HELP..........!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Asked by Temple Kuch 1 month ago.

Phoslo or calcium acetate is used to control hyperphosphotemia in renal patients. It is a prescription medication. You will need to have your son seen by someone who is experienced in treating this condition so he can get the proper evaluation and treatment for his disease. Answered by Logan Stoermer 1 month ago.

Get help from the Physician who diagnosed this child's disease. TRhis should not be something you get info from lay persons or random advice from the internet! Your childs health and well being should be atken seriously. Best of health to this child. Answered by Virgilio Tragesser 1 month ago.

You'd better take your child to hospital. We are here only with few experiences. Better save your child first. Maybe nurse annie can solve your problem, if she is here. Answered by Anita Hesch 1 month ago.

It is NOT from high phosphate levels. Answered by Nicolette Picart 1 month ago.

get some filters that will help Answered by Daniele Stoudemire 1 month ago.


What is the best herbal medicine to take to lower my phosphorus levels?
I'm on dialysis and my phosphorus levels. are 8.6 and they want me to take 9 phoslo pills a day and they make me sick. there has to be something herbal for me to take like calcium or something Asked by Eliz Wagener 1 month ago.

You can drink milk, or take some kind of calcium supplement. Calcium and Phosphorus have an inverse relationship, which means if one is high the other is low. The milk should do fine. Answered by Rossie Pattie 1 month ago.

If something as simple as calcium or milk would work, your doctors would have recommended that. They are specialists and they deal with this problem all the time. They KNOW what works and what doesn't for renal failure patients. There is NOTHING herbal that will be helpful. Sorry, but for your condition, you will have to take the phoslo. Answered by Susanna Venice 1 month ago.

both are roughly the same except when it comes to protein. ALMOST ALL veggies include a good amount of protein; fruits does not. Answered by Renay Isaiah 1 month ago.

You can't drink milk if you are on dialysis that is what my doc told me. I take calcium tabs they work good Answered by Jamal Hippe 1 month ago.

If you drink soda, stop immediately. It is high in phosphorous. Answered by Rey Wurl 1 month ago.


Why are fruits and fruit juices bad for patients with Chronic kidney disease?
My uncle is a patient with a CKD and the doctor prohibited him from drinking juices. i was wondering why? Asked by Vernell Naufzinger 1 month ago.

Patients with CKD should pay attention to the intake of fluid. FLUID RESTRICTION There is usually no restriction in the amount of fluids you can drink until severe kidney disease (Stage 4 or 5) is reached. The amount of urine your kidneys can make will usually not decrease until it is almost time to begin dialysis. It is called “kidney failure” because eventually the kidneys fail to make urine. PHOSPHORUS Phosphorus is a mineral found in almost all foods. Normal kidneys will balance the amount of phosphorus in our bodies. However, when the kidneys fail to eliminate this in the urine, the phosphorus will increase in the blood. High phosphorus foods will need to be limited and/or avoided. A medication called a phosphate binder (such as Oscal, Phoslo and Tums) may be ordered by your physician to be taken every time you eat. This medication will bind the phosphorus in the food and eliminate it in the stool. Control of phosphorus is very difficult for kidney disease patients. Ignoring this problem can lead to bone disease with pain in the back and joints. High phosphorus foods to eliminate are: Milk (any kind) - Start learning to use a milk substitute like Cremora (powdered) or Coffeemate (liquid) - Beans (red, black, white), Black Eyed Peas, Lima Beans, Nuts, Chocolate, Yogurt, Cheese, Liver, Sardines, Desserts made with milk ANEMIA Healthy kidneys make a hormone that helps make red blood cells. One of the symptoms of kidney disease is anemia, which causes weakness, tiredness and shortness of breath. Your kidney doctor may give you an injection called “Procrit.” This may help improve your anemia. The doctor may also order iron injections because in order to make red blood cells, you will need enough iron. Unfortunately, in some people the special diet will not provide enough iron and iron pills would be taken. VITAMINS Diseases of the heart and blood vessels remain the number one health problem in the U.S. Recently, a new risk factor has been identified in kidney disease patients. It is an amino acid called homocysteine. Over 75 percent of dialysis patients have increased homocysteine levels. Too much homocysteine in the blood has been found to be associated with increased risk of heart disease, stroke and blood vessel disease. Studies have shown that homocysteine levels in the blood are strongly influenced by these specific vitamins: Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 and Vitamin B6. The American Heart Association has indicated that a reasonable therapeutic goal should be less than 10 micromoles per liter. Ask your kidney doctor if you should be taking a special vitamin to help prevent high levels of homocysteine. DIABETICS Since about 40 percent of all kidney disease patients are diabetic, it is important to know about good control of your blood sugar. There is a special blood test called a “hemoglobin A1C.” This test tells what your blood sugars have been in the past two to three months. The normal range is 4.5 to 6.0 percent. Poor control of blood sugar contributes to the progression of your kidney disease. Be sure to ask your doctor how you are doing with blood sugar control. It may be necessary to be referred to a diabetes educator for help. Sample Menu: 40-50 grams protein (For non diabetic man 5’7” tall and 150 pounds (70 kilos) with CKD) BREAKFAST • 1/2 cup (4 ounces) orange juice • 1 English muffin or 2 slices bread • At least one tablespoon margarine with jelly • Coffee or tea with non-dairy creamer and sugar SNACK • 2 canned pear halves in heavy syrup LUNCH • 2 slices white bread • At least 2 tablespoons mayonnaise with lettuce and tomato • 1 ounce chicken (such as a small thigh) or 1 hard boiled egg • 2 canned peach halves in heavy syrup • 7-UP, lemonade or Hawaiian Punch SNACK • Baked apple with 1/2 cup non-dairy whipped topping DINNER • 3-4 ounces steak (weigh after cooking, without bone) , sauté in tablespoons olive oil • 1 small baked potato with at least 2 tablespoons margarine • 1/2 cup fresh green beans, carrots or broccoli with margarine • Lettuce, onions, cucumbers, green pepper • At least 2 tablespoons olive oil with vinegar or lemon • 1/8 apple or cherry pie with 1/2 cup fruit sorbet (this is not sherbet) • Iced tea with sugar and lemon or Sprite SNACK • 1 small banana and 10 vanilla wafers • Coffee or tea with non-dairy creamer and sugar If you had any other question about the kidney you can contact me and I will consult the experts in our hospital: [email protected] skype:q1045389353 Answered by Marty Zeherquist 1 month ago.

I would start by changing your everyday habits for the better. Stop taking pills for headaches. You could be addicted to headache pills. Did you know most headache medicine has caffeine in it. Caffeine opens up your capillaries so blood can flow smoother for a quick fix, but is highly addictive and will only serve as a crutch in the long run. Try not drinking soda and stay away from coffee and other drinks with too much caffeine and sugar. Try getting more exercise. If you exercise daily,( just a 30 minute walk will help), this will open your capillaries naturally. I think you should listen to what your body is telling you. You are obviously restless and need to be working your body out more so you can sleep. I'm sure you're mentally stressed as well. The exercise and eating properly will take care of both your physical and mental needs I believe. Answered by Chris Pretzer 1 month ago.

I couldn't just sit around and do nothing like my doctors suggested. They didn't want me to do anything or to take herbs or herbal remedies, but I had to try something - they just wanted me to do dialysis! This program allowed me to take control of my health. I went from Stage 4 to Stage 3 kidney disease. It was easy to do and my BUN, creatinine and anemia are all in better ranges. Reversing Your Kidney Disease? Answered by John Tyacke 1 month ago.

not all fruits that he can't eat.as to fruit juices,becaue there are so much water in the juices,so it may influence his kidney. in addition, some juices contain much potassium, so it may be bad for your uncle's condition. Answered by Adelia Simcic 1 month ago.


My mother is dialysis; since starting, she feels awful, there is a constant pain in one spot on her back.?
She is nauseated and weak all of the time. She takes BP med, phoslo, hectorol, midodrine, iron tablets, warfarin, lyrica, and klor con, I think these meds are making her sick. Hectorol and phoslo seem to contradict each other--I also feel that she really didn't need to be on dialysis so soon. ... Asked by Zenia Lanpher 1 month ago.

She is nauseated and weak all of the time. She takes BP med, phoslo, hectorol, midodrine, iron tablets, warfarin, lyrica, and klor con, I think these meds are making her sick. Hectorol and phoslo seem to contradict each other--I also feel that she really didn't need to be on dialysis so soon. Question/comments from anyone who has answers. Also can one just stop the dialysis and live? We are tempted to only take the BP med and pain med. HELP! Answered by Isobel Liebross 1 month ago.

I feel for you and your mother ... I have lived this life Ok first you need to know what percentage her kidneys are WORKING what ever percentage will determine how long she would live without the dialysis They figure this by tests ultrasounds etc. My mother was at 20 percent for both kidneys and they told her that she would live 5 years without and a normal lifetime with this was at the age of 40 .... she passed away at 45 while on the machine she suffered a massive heart attack I dont mean to scare you but it is a bad result of dialysis and you need to be aware of this possibility. Second sadly dialysis helps many but what they dont tell you is that most experience exactly what your mother is ... the minute you start it seems to zap any and all energy you have or ever had. Some may be able to go to dialysis in the morning and the mall in the evening but most do good to go from the dialysis machine to the car without feeling like they ran a marathon. Pain is another side effect of kidney failure and depending on why her kidneys failed is also another factor My mothers legs got hard a cement and she eventually was not able to stand up longer then to switch from the wheel chair to the toilet or bed and that was chancy she also ended up with severe diahrhea which nothing cured. The pain on her back can be her kidney. Just do some things and concider this advice from a previous caregiver/relative of a dialysis patient Tell your mom you love her every day Make each day mean something to both of you Ease her pain as you can ... hot rags, back rubs, massages, comfort foods, watch a movie with her, talk about your life current and past, sit with her all hours bear her moans and cries then take it to God or your higher power on her behalf If someone picks her up for dialysis walk to the vehicle with her If she has the opportunity for transplant do what you can to get her on the list ... she may never get the donation but at least get on the list respect her wishes ... from wanting a bottle of perfume she cant really afford to not wanting to make a stink cause her family doesnt share the responsibilty of her condition and avoid visiting If you are the caregiver take a bath each day put bubbles or lotion in it make sure you are in there for 1 hr. This is your escape from all you will see during this ride with your mom If someone else is the caregiver give them an hour or two break even if its just so they can go grocery shopping .... these lil breaks are very needed. Most important Be a part of her medical care.... let the doctors know you are concerned, let them hear your voice they tend to think they are only dealing with the actual patient on dialysis if no one speaks up and most of the time you know her better then they do and even if you call them on a mistake they will be impressed that you knew what you knew You are in my thoughts and may you have a blessed season. Good Luck and give your mom a hug Answered by Vania Freudiger 1 month ago.

Anything that is "severe" in the pain department needs to be given attention by a physician. If you are having problems standing and this has been going on, you need to get into see a doc at the Emergency Room, a general surgeon, or an urgent care doc TODAY. Start making phone calls. Answered by Jude Puglia 1 month ago.


How do I become familiar with this medication list?
Like a week before school my prof. emailed me this medication list to be familiar with and write up....Is there an easier way to look up all these meds and not have to write them out? She wants me to do a drug sheet for each...Medications ListTypeMedicationAnalgesic/ UrinaryPhenazopyridine... Asked by Abigail Bastarache 1 month ago.

Like a week before school my prof. emailed me this medication list to be familiar with and write up....Is there an easier way to look up all these meds and not have to write them out? She wants me to do a drug sheet for each... Medications List TypeMedication Analgesic/ UrinaryPhenazopyridine (Pyridium) Ditropan Detrol AntibioticAmikain Amoxicillin Amoxicillin/ Clavulanic Acid Amhotericin B Ampicillin Ampicillin/ Sulbactam (Unasym) Azthromycin Bactracin Cefazolin Cefazolin 1/ Metronidazole Ceftazidime Cefuroxime Ciprofloxacin Clindamycin Clotrimazole Trouche Demeclocycline Dicloxacillin Doxycycline Erythromycin Fluconazole Gentamicin AntibioticIsoniazid (INH) Ketoconazole Levofloxacin Linezolid (Zyvox) Metronidazole (Flagyl) Miconazole Neomycin Sulfate (Bacitracin) Nystatin Oxacillin Penicillin G Benz/ Procaine Penicillin G Benzathine Penicillin G Potassium Penicillin G Procaine Penicillin V Potassium Piperacillin Piperacillin/ Tazobactam (Zosyn) Polymyxin B Sulfate (Neosporin) Pyrazinamide Rifampin Tetracycline Tobramycin Tygacil Unasym Vancomycin AnticoagulantEnoxaparin Heparin Warfarin Vitamin K Antiemetic-5- HT3- AntagonistCompazine, Zofran Class II Controlled SubstanceHaldol Codiene Fentanyl Hydromorphone Meperidine HCL (Demerol) Methadone HCL Methylphenidate HCL (Ritalin) Morphine Oxycodone Oxycodone 5 mg/APAP 325 mg Class III-V Controlled SubstanceAcetaminophen/ Codeine 120/12 Acetaminophen/ Codeine 300/30 Alprazolam Clonazepam Codeine/ Calcium Iodide Diazepam Diphenoxylate 2.5 mg/ Atrophine (Lomotil) Guifenesine/ Codeine 200/20 Hydrocodone 5mg/ APAP 500mg Lorazepam Midazolam Class III-V Controlled SubstancePhenobarbital Propoxyphene (Darvon) Temazepam (Restoril) Zolpidem CorticosteroidsBetamethasone Cortisone Acetate Dexamethasone Hydrocortisone Methylprednisolone Predinisolone Prednisone Flu Prophylaxis& Pneumonia vaccine IV Nutritional AgentsTPN/PPN LaxativesColace Senikot S Lactulose Citrate of Magnesia M.O.M. Lasix& Bumex Spironolactone (Aldactone) Quinapril (Accupril) Metoprolol XL (Toprol) Diltiazem CD (Tazar) Digixon (Lanoxin) Atenolol (Tenormin) Amiodarone (Cordorone)Coreg Nadolol (Corgard) Betapace (Altace) Respiratory MedsXopenex Albuterol Atrovent Beclomethasone Budisonide (Pulmicort) Mucomyst Olanzcypine (Zyprexa) Fluctretine (Prozac)& Zoloft, Buspar Alprazolan (Xanax)& Wellbutrin Lecothyroxine (Synthroid) Ferrous Sulfate Calcium Carbonate Aldentronate Updates were made by staff and I didn’t have time to check for doubles. Please add the following: Pancreas? Kayexalate Megace Phoslo Iron (Feosol) MVI (multivitamin) Actos Namenda Metformin Insulin all types Sinemet Narcan Romazicone Nulytely Librium Answered by Houston Santacroce 1 month ago.

That's a hell of a list. Honestly the only way you're going to get them memorized is either to give them regularly (if you're a nurse) or to write them all down. Write down what they are for, dosages, side effects, etc. Literally doing it helps you get them down. You already have many of them separated by their effects which is good and is a starting point. Answered by Mike Jappa 1 month ago.

OMG this is a dream come true for me! I used to be a CPht and I miss it. I don't know if *you* have ever worked in a pharmacy but they keep a giant brown book that includes the information on every single drug known to man. It's the stuff you'd find in the folded pamphlet that accompanies drugs inside the bottles. I worked for Walgreens, but it's been a couple of years. I'm not sure if they still keep it around, call the Pharmacist on duty and ask about it. See if it's available anywhere else, like a medical library you might have access to? Answered by Harry Meilleur 1 month ago.

Yes, it can turn into a mental ilness. Don't listen to the other two people who responded. An overactive imagination about success and wealth and other things of that nature can lead to frustration and possibly into a serious mental condition. You need to focus on reasonable and real things, and It doesn't help you are on anti-depressants. Answered by Petra Barlowe 1 month ago.


Which of the Foods are high in Phosphorus and which are low? Which of these foods would you recommend?
Which of the Foods are high in Phosphorus and which are low? Which of these foods would you recommend to a patient on Hemodialysis? Chocolates, Grapes, Nuts, Macaroni and cheese, Cola, Cabbage, Cranberry juice, Apple cider, Lettuce, Pizza What are Phoslo , Renvela ?Why are they used by Hemodialysis patients? Asked by Kathryn Hagar 1 month ago.

Which of the Foods are high in Phosphorus and which are low? Which of these foods would you recommend to a patient on Hemodialysis? Chocolates, Grapes, Nuts, Macaroni and cheese, Cola, Cabbage, Cranberry juice, Apple cider, Lettuce, Pizza What are Phoslo , Renvela ? Why are they used by Hemodialysis patients? Answered by Ollie Alcina 1 month ago.

I don't know anything about Hemodialysis. Here is what all people should eat: Fresh Raw Fruit and vegetables Avoid: Processed food -mac & cheese Sugar - Chocolate Soda of all kinds Pizza - Hydrogenated Oil, white bread, and cheese, nothing is healthy about Pizza too bad it's so delicious Good luck Answered by Chae Hranchak 1 month ago.


Is any of these medications a type of viagra?
i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the... Asked by Richard Eusebio 1 month ago.

i have cigna insurance.my insurance might cover part or all of the cost for viagra pills.under miscellanious,in the cigna website,it has these names listed,is any of these other medications a type of viagra(other than viagra)is it the ones with(pa) on the side of the name? MISCELLANEOUS: allopurinol amylase/lipase/protease azathioprine balsalazide cabergoline (QL) calcitriol desmopressin folic acid leucovorin methotrexate mycophenolate naltrexone (QL) tizanidine zaleplon Ambien CR Asacol Asacol HD Canasa Cellcept Colazal Dipentum Epipen (QL) Epipen Jr. (QL) Fosrenol Lialda Megace ES Pentasa Prefera-OB Pulmozyme (PA) Renvela Revatio (PA) Spiriva Synarel (PA, QL) Thalomid Trexall Tussionex Viagra (PA) Zemplar Adrenaclick Ambien Apriso Arava (PA) Coartem (QL) Edluar (ST) Lariam (PA, QL) Malarone (PA) Nimotop Nuvigil Orap Phoslo Priftin Provigil Sonata Sucraid Answered by Edra Slightam 1 month ago.

No. Viagra is the only one. I'm not sure what the PA means, but it is probably the only ED oral medication covered. You know there are several oral ED treatments and my guess is that Viagra is the preferred one, meaning it will have the lowest co-pay and if the Dr. writes for another med, they will substitute Viagra for it. Call the insurance co to make sure. They will typically only allow 6-8 tablets a month. Answered by Jennine Skalecki 1 month ago.

There are possible choices to this drug however they do not have the identical dramatic outcome. Your pal demands to don't forget why there's a drawback with ED. The drug is not a treatment, it is a banded. When the blood waft is blocked or bogged down it'll final result the role of the frame to get an erection. Advise your pal to don't forget the reason of the drawback first. This would possibly contain a difference in nutrition, cleaning and dietary supplements. Also your pal is also taking an excessive amount of of the drug. Answered by Lorraine Dempewolf 1 month ago.

None of the rest of them are (other than Viagra). These are probably the medications that are on the formulary (allowed list) for your insurance. Answered by Mitchell Titman 1 month ago.


How do you control phorphorus during renal disease?
I am searching for an herbal remedy although any answers will be welcome! Asked by Felton Arledge 1 month ago.

Renal osteodystrophy can also be treated with changes in diet. Reducing dietary intake of phosphorus is one of the most important steps in preventing bone disease. Almost all foods contain phosphorus, but it's especially high in milk, cheese, dried beans, peas, nuts, and peanut butter. Limit drinks such as cocoa, dark sodas, and beer. Often, medications such as calcium carbonate (Tums), calcium acetate (PhosLo), sevelamer hydrochloride (Renagel), or lanthanum carbonate (Fosrenol) are prescribed with meals and snacks to bind phosphorus in the bowel. These decrease the absorption of phosphorus into the blood. Be sure your phosphate binder is aluminum-free because aluminum can be toxic and cause anemia. A renal dietitian can help develop a dietary plan to control phosphorus levels in the blood. Exercise has been found to increase bone strength in some patients. It's important, however, to consult a doctor or health care professional before beginning any exercise program. A good treatment program, including proper attention to dialysis, diet, and medications, can improve your body's ability to repair bones damaged by renal osteodystrophy. Answered by Louanne Ardinger 1 month ago.


Dialysis Question?
My dad is on dialysis. His arm is always itching, does anyone know why? his arm looks horrible because of all the itching he does, it always bleeding and has scabs. Asked by Quintin Hoguet 1 month ago.

I am a dialysis Tech, and his phosporous is probably on the high side. Is PO4 range for a dialysis patient should be 3.5 to 5.5. when PO4 is high it causes your skin to itch and robs calcium from the bones making them brittle. If he has been drinking dark colas, eating cheeses nuts or other dairy products this will cause is PO4 to be high. Ask your nurse about his PO4 value. He might be on a binder of some sort like renagel or phoslo or may be even tums. If he is not and his PO4 is still high ask your dialyis charge nurse to call the doc to get a binder to take with meals to help bring down this PO4. Answered by Sindy Roudybush 1 month ago.

Probably just irritation because of the medication and the treatments itself. He should avoid scratching, which could cause infection and tell the doctor who may recommend something for it. Answered by Araceli Trenbeath 1 month ago.


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