Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 013621/001.

Names and composition

"PERTOFRANE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013621/001 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
013621/002 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013621/001 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
013621/002 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
014399/001 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
014399/003 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
014399/004 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
014399/005 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
014399/006 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
014399/007 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
071588/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071601/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071602/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071766/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071803/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071803/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071803/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
071864/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071865/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071866/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071867/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072099/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072100/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
072101/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072102/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
072103/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072104/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
074430/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074430/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
205153/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
205153/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
205153/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
205153/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
205153/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
205153/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
207433/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
207433/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
207433/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
207433/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
207433/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
207433/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
208105/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
208105/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
208105/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
208105/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
208105/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
208105/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG

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Answered questions

Anti depressants?
I have had a hard time finding an antidepressant that does not make me sick to my stomach. I found pamelor and it worked well but then gave me terrible headaches. But no GI problems which was great. Does anyone with knowledge on antidepressants know of one that is in the same category/type like pamelor? that would... Asked by Gertude Mcdunn 1 year ago.

I have had a hard time finding an antidepressant that does not make me sick to my stomach. I found pamelor and it worked well but then gave me terrible headaches. But no GI problems which was great. Does anyone with knowledge on antidepressants know of one that is in the same category/type like pamelor? that would not cause GI problems? thanks (zoloft and lexapro made me very very sick throwing up/diarrhea) Answered by Rey Mormon 1 year ago.

amitriptyline (Elavil®, Endep®) clomipramine (Anafranil®) desipramine (Norpramin®, Pertofrane®) dosulepin (dothiepin) (Prothiaden®) doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®) imipramine (Tofranil®) nortriptyline (Pamelor®) protriptyline (Vivactil®) trimipramine (Surmontil®) lofepramine All in the same category: Tricyclics. Answered by Mireille Annarino 1 year ago.

im currently in school for pharmacy tech...... and ive heard this alot about those 2 anti deppressants i thnink personally the best one to be on is the paxil it calms you down and makes you feel good.... ive never heard anything bad about this one you should give it a try i think it might help you Answered by Kacy Olejarski 1 year ago.


How many antidepressants are there on the market/are available?
Asked by Ramon Beyett 1 year ago.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)[edit] Citalopram (Celexa) Escitalopram (Lexapro, Cipralex) Paroxetine (Paxil, Seroxat) Fluoxetine (Prozac) Fluvoxamine (Luvox) Sertraline (Zoloft, Lustral) Zimelidine (Normud, Zelmid) and indalpine (Upstene) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but were withdrawn from the market. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)[edit] Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq) Duloxetine (Cymbalta) Levomilnacipran (Fetzima) Milnacipran (Ixel, Savella) Tofenacin (Elamol, Tofacine) Venlafaxine (Effexor) Serotonin modulators and stimulators (SMSs)[edit] Vilazodone (Viibryd) Vortioxetine (Brintellix) These drugs act as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agonize/antagonize various serotonin receptors. Serotonin antagonists and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs)[edit] Etoperidone (Axiomin, Etonin) Nefazodone (Nefadar, Serzone) – withdrawn/discontinued in many countries Trazodone (Desyrel) These drugs act as antagonists of various serotonin receptors and as weak monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs)[edit] Reboxetine (Edronax) Viloxazine (Vivalan) Atomoxetine (Strattera) is also sometimes used as an antidepressant, but is not specifically approved for this purpose. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs)[edit] Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) Amitriptylinoxide (Amioxid, Ambivalon, Equilibrin) Clomipramine (Anafranil) Desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane) Dibenzepin (Noveril, Victoril) Dosulepin (Prothiaden) Doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan) Imipramine (Tofranil) Lofepramine (Lomont, Gamanil) Melitracen (Dixeran, Melixeran, Trausabun) Nitroxazepine (Sintamil) Nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl) Noxiptiline (Agedal, Elronon, Nogedal) Pipofezine (Azafen/Azaphen) Protriptyline (Vivactil) Trimipramine (Surmontil) Butriptyline (Evadyne), demexiptiline (Deparon, Tinoran), imipraminoxide (Imiprex, Elepsin), iprindole (Prondol, Galatur, Tetran), metapramine (Timaxel), propizepine (Depressin, Vagran), and quinupramine (Kinupril, Kevopril) were also formerly marketed, but have since been discontinued. The following are also TCAs, but are atypical pharmacologically: Opipramol (Insidon) – sigma receptor agonist Tianeptine (Stablon) – unknown/unclear mechanism of action Amineptine (Survector, Maneon) is another atypical TCA, acting as a norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI), but was withdrawn from the market. Tiazesim (Altinil) is technically not a TCA, but it is a heterocyclic antidepressant that is very closely related, and similarly to various TCAs, it is no longer marketed. Tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs)[edit] Amoxapine (Asendin) Maprotiline (Ludiomil) Mianserin (Bolvidon, Norval, Tolvon) Mirtazapine (Remeron) Setiptiline (Tecipul) Mianserin, mirtazapine, and setiptiline are also sometimes described as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs). Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)[edit] Irreversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Isocarboxazid (Marplan) Phenelzine (Nardil) Tranylcypromine (Parnate) Many others, including benmoxin (Neuralex), iproclozide (Sursum), iproniazid (Marsilid), mebanazine (Actomol), nialamide (Niamid), octamoxin (Ximaol), pheniprazine (Catron), phenoxypropazine (Drazine), pivhydrazine (Tersavid), and safrazine (Safra) were used as antidepressants in the past, but have since been discontinued. Selective for MAO-B[edit] Selegiline (Eldepryl, Zelapar, Emsam) Reversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Caroxazone (Surodil, Timostenil) was formerly used as an antidepressant, but has been discontinued. Selective for MAO-A[edit] Metralindole (Inkazan) Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix) Pirlindole (Pirazidol) Toloxatone (Humoryl) These drugs are sometimes described as reversible inhibitors of MAO-A (RIMAs). Eprobemide (Befol) and minaprine (Brantur, Cantor) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but have been discontinued. Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Amisulpride (Solian) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for dysthymia Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Others[edit] Marketed[edit] Agomelatine (Valdoxan) – 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist – sometimes described as a norepinephrine-dopamine disinhibitor (NDDI) Bupropion (Wellbutrin) – NRI and non-competitive antagonist of various neuronal nACh receptors Ketamine (Ketalar) – primarily a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Tandospirone (Sediel) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist Teniloxazine (Lucelan, Metatone) – NRI and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Discontinued/withdrawn from the market[edit] α-Methyltryptamine [αMT] (Indopan) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agent (SNDRA), and weak RIMA Etryptamine [α-Ethyltryptamine (αET)] (Monase) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, SNDRA, and weak RIMA Medifoxamine (Cledial, Gerdaxyl) – dopamine reuptake inhibitor (DRI) and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Nefazodone (Serzone) - SARI Nomifensine (Merital, Alival) – NDRI Oxaflozane (Conflictan) – 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptor agonist Over-the-counter[edit] The following antidepressants are available both with a prescription and over-the-counter: Ademetionine [S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe)] (Heptral, Transmetil, Samyl) – cofactor in monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthesis Hypericum perforatum [St. John's Wort (SJW)] (Jarsin, Kira, Movina) – TRPC6 activator, and various other actions Oxitriptan [5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)] (Cincofarm, Levothym, Triptum) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Tryptophan (Tryptan, Optimax, Aminomine) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Adjunctive treatments[edit] Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Aripiprazole (Abilify) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as an adjunct for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Olanzapine (Zyprexa) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – approved as an adjunct for both major depressive disorder and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Risperidone (Risperdal) - not specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder (used off-label) Others[edit] Buspirone (BuSpar) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) – mood stabilizer (exact mechanism of action unknown) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Thyroxine (T4) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Triiodothyronine (T3) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Combination products[edit] Amitriptyline/perphenazine (Etafron) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Flupentixol/melitracen (Deanxit) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Olanzapine/fluoxetine (Symbyax) – SSRI and atypical antipsychotic combination – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Tranylcypromine/trifluoperazine (Parstelin) - MAOI and typical antipsychotic combination Currently in clinical trials (investigational)[edit] ALKS-5461 (buprenorphine/samidorphan) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist AV-101 (4-chlorokynurenine) – NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist Basimglurant (RG7090) – mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator CERC-301 (MK-0657) – NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) antagonist CERC-501 (LY-2456302) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist Esketamine – non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist LY-2940094 – nociceptin receptor antagonist NRX-1074 – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist NSI-189 – hippocampal neurotrophin (exact mechanism of action unknown) Rapastinel (GLYX-13) – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist RO4491533 – mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor negative allosteric modulator Tramadol (ETS6103/Viotra) – μ-opioid receptor agonist, δ- and κ-opioid receptor ligand, serotonin releasing agent (SRA), NRI, 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, NMDAR antagonist, α7 nAChR antagonist, M1 and M3 receptor antagonist, and TRPV1 agonist Answered by Sherman Bram 1 year ago.


Ideopathic neuropathy - no known cause. Has anyone got any info to offer?
I have had tingling in fingers and toes for over 3 months. Sometimes tingling radiates up legs and arms. Have had all bloodwork and EMG - nothing. Doctors can't find answers and want to leave diagnosis at "ideopathic" - i.e. no clue. I've been on line and only found that the doctors have being... Asked by Skye Scoles 1 year ago.

I have had tingling in fingers and toes for over 3 months. Sometimes tingling radiates up legs and arms. Have had all bloodwork and EMG - nothing. Doctors can't find answers and want to leave diagnosis at "ideopathic" - i.e. no clue. I've been on line and only found that the doctors have being doing the right thing. Any info would be most helpful. I don't want to accept "ideopathic". Thanks, anyone out there! Answered by Sparkle Nii 1 year ago.

Peripheral neuropathy can be broadly categorized by the type of nerve that has been damaged. The peripheral nervous system is made up of three types of nerves: motor nerves (responsible for voluntary movement) sensory nerves (responsible for sensing temperature, pain, touch, and limb positioning); including large and small fibers autonomic nerves (responsible for involuntary functions such as breathing, blood pressure, sexual function, digestion) Peripheral neuropathy also can be classified by where it occurs in the body. Nerve damage that occurs in one area of the body is called mononeuropathy, in many areas, polyneuropathy. When the disorder occurs in the same places on both sides of the body, the condition is called symmetric neuropathy. It also can be categorized by cause, such as diabetic neuropathy and nutritional neuropathy. When a cause cannot be identified, the condition is called idiopathic neuropathy How are diabetic neuropathies treated? The first treatment step is to bring blood glucose levels within the normal range to help prevent further nerve damage. Blood glucose monitoring, meal planning, physical activity, and diabetes medicines or insulin will help control blood glucose levels. Symptoms may get worse when blood glucose is first brought under control, but over time, maintaining lower blood glucose levels helps lessen symptoms. Good blood glucose control may also help prevent or delay the onset of further problems. As scientists learn more about the underlying causes of neuropathy, new treatments may become available to help slow, prevent, or even reverse nerve damage. As described in the following sections, additional treatment depends on the type of nerve problem and symptom. If you have problems with your feet, your doctor may refer you to a foot care specialist. Pain Relief Doctors usually treat painful diabetic neuropathy with oral medications, although other types of treatments may help some people. People with severe nerve pain may benefit from a combination of medications or treatments. Talk with your health care provider about options for treating your neuropathy. Medications used to help relieve diabetic nerve pain include tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline, imipramine, and desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane) other types of antidepressants, such as duloxetine (Cymbalta), venlafaxine, bupropion (Wellbutrin), paroxetine (Paxil), and citalopram (Celexa) anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin (Lyrica), gabapentin (Gabarone, Neurontin), carbamazepine, and lamotrigine (Lamictal) opioids and opioid-like drugs, such as controlled-release oxycodone, an opioid; and tramadol (Ultram), an opioid that also acts as an antidepressant Duloxetine and pregabalin are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration specifically for treating painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. You do not have to be depressed for an antidepressant to help relieve your nerve pain. All medications have side effects, and some are not recommended for use in older adults or those with heart disease. Because over-the-counter pain medicines such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen may not work well for treating most nerve pain and can have serious side effects, some experts recommend avoiding these medications. Treatments that are applied to the skin—typically to the feet—include capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches (Lidoderm, Lidopain). Studies suggest that nitrate sprays or patches for the feet may relieve pain. Studies of alpha-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, and evening primrose oil have shown that they can help relieve symptoms and may improve nerve function. A device called a bed cradle can keep sheets and blankets from touching sensitive feet and legs. Acupuncture, biofeedback, or physical therapy may help relieve pain in some people. Treatments that involve electrical nerve stimulation, magnetic therapy, and laser or light therapy may be helpful but need further study. Researchers are also studying several new therapies in clinical trials. Answered by Juan Frith 1 year ago.

Home Treatment For Neuropathy Answered by Migdalia Eredia 1 year ago.

The short presentation below will reveal to you a little known neuropathy curing secret that has travelled over thousands of miles, to not only improving your current nerve pain symptoms, but completely eradicating them…permanently. Answered by Theo Vallandingham 1 year ago.

Idiopathic in medical terminology means that a cause is not found not that a cause is not present. In spite of all the developments, there are numerous medical conditions where nobody knows the exact reasons. Your problem shows off course some neurological deficit. It could be due to problem in the cervical spine or any deficiency of Vitamin like e,g B1. Take Neurobion tablets three times daily and see what happens. Answered by Rosina Girbach 1 year ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Elliot Rizzo 1 year ago.


Tell me what you think is the best anti-depresant drug available?
I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care.I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need... Asked by Rosina Trauscht 1 year ago.

I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care. I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need something that works without horrid side effects! Thanks for your opinion. Answered by Kiersten Qadir 1 year ago.

you know, i cant tell you about the best ant-anexty drug, because it depends on the persons body, me im very senstives, to where your husband my not be, here are some drugs that are perscribed for anxeity Azaspirones: Azaspirones is a class of drug effective in the treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) It works gradually over 2 to 4 weeks. It doesn't have any harsh side-effects and doesn't seem to cause sedation, nor memory and balance problems. It has not been said to cause that "out of it!" feeling. It also does not potentate alcohol. Azaspirones work slowly and people should not switch to benzodiazepines immediately. Example medications: BuSpar BENZODIAZEPINES Benzodiazepines are highly effective against panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. They are fast acting but can make you drowsy. Note: They can initiate withdrawal symptoms when discontinued. Working with your doctor can always help to reduce this issue. The most commonly used benzodiazepine is Xanax. Other commonly used benzodiazepines are Klonopin and Valium. Your doctor will probably start you out taking a low dosage. Then your doctor will gradually increase the dosage until anxiety is controlled. It will usually be prescribed for a short period (maybe 2 to 4 weeks) and then stop them as soon as possible. The habit-forming potential is high. Long-term use is not recommended because it can lead to dependence and withdrawal reactions when stopped. Never stop taking a Benzodiazepines suddenly if you have been taking it for more than a couple weeks. Your doctor will help you taper off the medicine. Example medications: Ativan, Centrax, Dalmane, Klonopin, Librium, Paxipam, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Xanax BETA BLOCKERS Beta Blockers By reducing the effect of adrenaline, The Beta Blockers are used to calm certain anxiety symptoms such as shaking, palpitations and sweating all over yourself. However, they do reduce blood pressure and slow the heartbeat so always talk to your doctor about the entire picture. The medication is fast acting and non-habit forming but should not be taken with other preexisting medical conditions (e.g. asthma, congestive heart failure, diabetes, vascular diseases, hyperthyroidism and angina). Beta-blockers are not FDA approved for the treatment of anxiety but are generally used to do so. Never take a double dose. Example medications: Inderal, Tenormin TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS Tricyclics (TCAs) Tricyclics are a non-addictive medication used to treat depression, mood disorders, bulimia, narcolepsy and anxiety-related disorders. There are studies showing its effective in reducing panic attacks. TCAs work very similar to SSRIs. Although, they have been known to produce weight gain in people using them - they can be very helpful in treating post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. TCAs help to return the levels of neurotransmitters toward a normal state. Remember, Tricyclics are highly dangerous in overdose. Example medications: Adapin , Anafranil, Elavil, Janimine, Ludiomil, Pamelor, Pertofrane, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, Vivactil MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS (MAOIs) MonoAmine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) MAOIs should rarely be used as first line treatment. Often, an MAOIs is indicated for patients who have failed to respond to some of the more commonly used drugs for depression and anxiety. It is then used in the treatment panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, other phobias, and hypochondriacal features. Depressed patients who are clinically characterized as having "atypical" or "nonedogenous" symptoms usually have a mix of anxiety and depression. This is when your doctor may issue an MAOIs. An issue that your doctor should talk to you about is the harsh interactions with many different foods and medications, wines and beer. Even cheese has Tyramine in it which will interact negatively with MAOIs. The specific foods & medications MUST be avoided while taking the drug. Other side-effects of MAOIs is a decrease in blood pressure, insomnia, moderate weight gain and reduced sexual response. Example medications: Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, Parnate SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake inhibitors are the latest in the treatment of anxiety disorders. They are used in the treatment of panic disorder, depression, OCD and other challenges usually require one does per day. They are now the most widely used drugs on planet earth. Studies have show a great improvement in individuals using the medication. Some common side-effects do include nausea, sexual difficulties and nervousness. s Example medications: Celexa, Desryl, Fluvoxamine, Paxil, Prozac, Serzone, Zoloft , Lexapro SERETONIN-NONREPINEPHRINE REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SNRIs) Serotonin-norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) – In addition to serotonin, SNRIs act on the brain chemical norepinephine. Example medications: Effexor & Wellbutrin ANTICONVULSANTS: Anticonvulsants were used for years in the treatment of epilepsy. Research has now shown anticonvulsants can be helpful in treating panic attacks and other psychiatric challenges and improve mood stabilization Example medications: Neurontin Valproic acid Other Sedatives/Hypnotics Sedative and hypnotics are drugs which slow down functions. Examples are: tranquilizers and sleeping pills. Their effects range from calming down anxiousness to promoting sleep. Benzodiazepines are sedative and hypnotics. (see Benzodiazepines) Example medications: Ambien, Lunesta, Sonata, Rozerem The list of Anti-anxiety medications: Actual dosage must be determined by the physician. BENZODIAZEPINES Ativan (Lorazepam) Ativan is an anti-anxiety sedative in the Benzodiazepinesclass. It is used in the treatment for the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. Some people suffering with insomnia due to anxiety may find this drug to be beneficial. The doctor may start you on 2 to 3 milligrams per day or at bedtime. Centrax Centrax is a Benzodiazepine which enhances the function of GABA and can help to calm the symptoms of General Anxiety GAD, Panic Disorder and Social Phobia. It is fast-acting and can make someone start to feel better within a couple days of treatment. Centrax and other benzodiazepines are potentially habit-forming and can cause drowsiness. Dalmane (Flurazepam) Dalmane is a Benzodiazepine and a hypnotic agent that can be used to treat some of the symptoms of anxiety - though it is also used in the treatment for insomnia characterized by difficulty in falling asleep and/or nocturnal awakenings. Klonopin (Clonazepam) Klonopin is an anticonvulsant Benzodiazepine used primarily in the treatment of seizure disorder but may also be used in the treatment of panic disorder and depression. Klonopin tablets have a K-shaped perforation in them. It is believed to work because of its ability to enhance the activity of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Librium (Chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride ) Librium is a Benzodiazepine. It is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of they symptoms of anxiety. It can also be used for withdrawal symptoms of alcoholism. Paxipam (Halazepam) Paxipam is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety. Doctors sometimes use it to relieve anxiety before surgery as well as the control of agitation used by alcohol withdrawal. Halazepam is not commercially available in the United States. Restoril (Temazepam ) Restoril is a Benzodiazepine used in the treatment of insomnia and sometimes used as a hypnotic sedative to relieve symptoms of anxiety. Serax (Oxazepam) Serax is one of the first benzodiazepines. It is used in the short-term management of anxiety, tension, irritability, agitation and anxiety associated with depression. Tranxene (Also known as Clorazepate and Azene) Tranxene is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety, nervousness and tension associated with an anxiety disorder. It has also been used to relieve the symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal as well as certain types of seizures. Tranxene works by balancing the chemicals that cause anxiety, withdrawal symptoms and seizures. The usual dosage your doctor might prescribe is 30 milligrams in small doses. Xanax (Alprazolam) Xanax is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term relief of mild to moderate anxiety, nervousness, tension (related to anxiety) and may be used to treat panic and depression. It has been also prescribed to help tremor, agoraphobia and certain symptoms of PMS. Xanax doesn't stay as long in your body as Valium does. BETA BLOCKERS Inderal (Propranolol) Inderal is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack. Tenormin (Atenolol) Because Tenormin is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack, This specific drug can also be prescribed to help treat abnormally rapid heart rhythms and stimulate the pace of the heart. Azaspirones BuSpar BuSpar is an antianxietyAzaspirone medication that has some of the properties of a Benzodiazepine It is used for the short-term relief of generaliz Answered by Roxanne Sweed 1 year ago.

The hysterectomy is going to give you horrible side effects!!! The hormones change drastically, especially considering what your age may be. I assume you are young because you had a baby. Celexa- works great, I tool it and it worked! Problem was I lost my sex drive completely! I can not handle that, if that is okay with you than I would try that first. A low dose 20 mg should be plenty. Paxil- seemed to work pretty good, with no side effects. Always try to stay on a low dose of any antidepressant. Sounds to me you need an anti-anxiety pill for all the effects of the hysterectomy. Hope this helps! Answered by Daryl Hugar 1 year ago.

Your sadness is understandable. So glad you're seeking Dr.'s care. Personally, I've never had problems with Zoloft and it's now available in generic. Its effects seemed strengthened when taking hormone replacement therapy. Unfortunately, trial-and-err with the psych drugs is the only way to find the medication that works for YOUR BODY. Answered by Debi Groody 1 year ago.

I've tried numerous medications and had given up on meds for years. I too hated the side effects. Unfortionatly my depression didn't give up on me. After my fourth visit to the psych ward I was transfered to a different hospital (I wasn't happy about ir at the time)which turned out to be the best thing for me. The doc's there convinced me to try meds again. They tried me on Welbutrin. It was a vast improvement. Answered by Laverna Marzan 1 year ago.

Zoloft. Prooved Answered by Awilda Placencia 1 year ago.

zoloft works for me www.dailystrength.org theres tons of people on there who have lost what you have...if you even need people to talk to, theyre there. that website has helped me more than any drug. Just talking to people who really care and who know exactly what you have/are going through....good luck and im so sorry Answered by Edward Bedenbaugh 1 year ago.


Anti depressants?
I have had a hard time finding an antidepressant that does not make me sick to my stomach. I found pamelor and it worked well but then gave me terrible headaches. But no GI problems which was great. Does anyone with knowledge on antidepressants know of one that is in the same category/type like pamelor? that would... Asked by Margie Kortum 1 year ago.

I have had a hard time finding an antidepressant that does not make me sick to my stomach. I found pamelor and it worked well but then gave me terrible headaches. But no GI problems which was great. Does anyone with knowledge on antidepressants know of one that is in the same category/type like pamelor? that would not cause GI problems? thanks (zoloft and lexapro made me very very sick throwing up/diarrhea) Answered by Erik Gundrum 1 year ago.

amitriptyline (Elavil®, Endep®) clomipramine (Anafranil®) desipramine (Norpramin®, Pertofrane®) dosulepin (dothiepin) (Prothiaden®) doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®) imipramine (Tofranil®) nortriptyline (Pamelor®) protriptyline (Vivactil®) trimipramine (Surmontil®) lofepramine All in the same category: Tricyclics. Answered by Nova Benty 1 year ago.

im currently in school for pharmacy tech...... and ive heard this alot about those 2 anti deppressants i thnink personally the best one to be on is the paxil it calms you down and makes you feel good.... ive never heard anything bad about this one you should give it a try i think it might help you Answered by Collene Gilleland 1 year ago.


How many antidepressants are there on the market/are available?
Asked by Chauncey Hauskins 1 year ago.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)[edit] Citalopram (Celexa) Escitalopram (Lexapro, Cipralex) Paroxetine (Paxil, Seroxat) Fluoxetine (Prozac) Fluvoxamine (Luvox) Sertraline (Zoloft, Lustral) Zimelidine (Normud, Zelmid) and indalpine (Upstene) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but were withdrawn from the market. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs)[edit] Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq) Duloxetine (Cymbalta) Levomilnacipran (Fetzima) Milnacipran (Ixel, Savella) Tofenacin (Elamol, Tofacine) Venlafaxine (Effexor) Serotonin modulators and stimulators (SMSs)[edit] Vilazodone (Viibryd) Vortioxetine (Brintellix) These drugs act as serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agonize/antagonize various serotonin receptors. Serotonin antagonists and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs)[edit] Etoperidone (Axiomin, Etonin) Nefazodone (Nefadar, Serzone) – withdrawn/discontinued in many countries Trazodone (Desyrel) These drugs act as antagonists of various serotonin receptors and as weak monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs)[edit] Reboxetine (Edronax) Viloxazine (Vivalan) Atomoxetine (Strattera) is also sometimes used as an antidepressant, but is not specifically approved for this purpose. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs)[edit] Amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep) Amitriptylinoxide (Amioxid, Ambivalon, Equilibrin) Clomipramine (Anafranil) Desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane) Dibenzepin (Noveril, Victoril) Dosulepin (Prothiaden) Doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan) Imipramine (Tofranil) Lofepramine (Lomont, Gamanil) Melitracen (Dixeran, Melixeran, Trausabun) Nitroxazepine (Sintamil) Nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl) Noxiptiline (Agedal, Elronon, Nogedal) Pipofezine (Azafen/Azaphen) Protriptyline (Vivactil) Trimipramine (Surmontil) Butriptyline (Evadyne), demexiptiline (Deparon, Tinoran), imipraminoxide (Imiprex, Elepsin), iprindole (Prondol, Galatur, Tetran), metapramine (Timaxel), propizepine (Depressin, Vagran), and quinupramine (Kinupril, Kevopril) were also formerly marketed, but have since been discontinued. The following are also TCAs, but are atypical pharmacologically: Opipramol (Insidon) – sigma receptor agonist Tianeptine (Stablon) – unknown/unclear mechanism of action Amineptine (Survector, Maneon) is another atypical TCA, acting as a norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI), but was withdrawn from the market. Tiazesim (Altinil) is technically not a TCA, but it is a heterocyclic antidepressant that is very closely related, and similarly to various TCAs, it is no longer marketed. Tetracyclic antidepressants (TeCAs)[edit] Amoxapine (Asendin) Maprotiline (Ludiomil) Mianserin (Bolvidon, Norval, Tolvon) Mirtazapine (Remeron) Setiptiline (Tecipul) Mianserin, mirtazapine, and setiptiline are also sometimes described as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs). Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)[edit] Irreversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Isocarboxazid (Marplan) Phenelzine (Nardil) Tranylcypromine (Parnate) Many others, including benmoxin (Neuralex), iproclozide (Sursum), iproniazid (Marsilid), mebanazine (Actomol), nialamide (Niamid), octamoxin (Ximaol), pheniprazine (Catron), phenoxypropazine (Drazine), pivhydrazine (Tersavid), and safrazine (Safra) were used as antidepressants in the past, but have since been discontinued. Selective for MAO-B[edit] Selegiline (Eldepryl, Zelapar, Emsam) Reversible[edit] Non-selective[edit] Caroxazone (Surodil, Timostenil) was formerly used as an antidepressant, but has been discontinued. Selective for MAO-A[edit] Metralindole (Inkazan) Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix) Pirlindole (Pirazidol) Toloxatone (Humoryl) These drugs are sometimes described as reversible inhibitors of MAO-A (RIMAs). Eprobemide (Befol) and minaprine (Brantur, Cantor) were also formerly used as antidepressants, but have been discontinued. Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Amisulpride (Solian) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for dysthymia Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Others[edit] Marketed[edit] Agomelatine (Valdoxan) – 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist – sometimes described as a norepinephrine-dopamine disinhibitor (NDDI) Bupropion (Wellbutrin) – NRI and non-competitive antagonist of various neuronal nACh receptors Ketamine (Ketalar) – primarily a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Tandospirone (Sediel) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist Teniloxazine (Lucelan, Metatone) – NRI and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Discontinued/withdrawn from the market[edit] α-Methyltryptamine [αMT] (Indopan) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine releasing agent (SNDRA), and weak RIMA Etryptamine [α-Ethyltryptamine (αET)] (Monase) – multiple serotonin receptor agonist, SNDRA, and weak RIMA Medifoxamine (Cledial, Gerdaxyl) – dopamine reuptake inhibitor (DRI) and 5-HT2A receptor antagonist Nefazodone (Serzone) - SARI Nomifensine (Merital, Alival) – NDRI Oxaflozane (Conflictan) – 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C receptor agonist Over-the-counter[edit] The following antidepressants are available both with a prescription and over-the-counter: Ademetionine [S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe)] (Heptral, Transmetil, Samyl) – cofactor in monoamine neurotransmitter biosynthesis Hypericum perforatum [St. John's Wort (SJW)] (Jarsin, Kira, Movina) – TRPC6 activator, and various other actions Oxitriptan [5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)] (Cincofarm, Levothym, Triptum) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Tryptophan (Tryptan, Optimax, Aminomine) – precursor in serotonin biosynthesis Adjunctive treatments[edit] Atypical antipsychotics[edit] Aripiprazole (Abilify) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Lurasidone (Latuda) – specifically approved as an adjunct for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Olanzapine (Zyprexa) – specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder Quetiapine (Seroquel) – approved as an adjunct for both major depressive disorder and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Risperidone (Risperdal) - not specifically approved as an adjunct for major depressive disorder (used off-label) Others[edit] Buspirone (BuSpar) – 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid) – mood stabilizer (exact mechanism of action unknown) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Thyroxine (T4) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Triiodothyronine (T3) – thyroid hormone (THR agonist) – not specifically approved for depression (used off-label) Combination products[edit] Amitriptyline/perphenazine (Etafron) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Flupentixol/melitracen (Deanxit) – TCA and typical antipsychotic combination Olanzapine/fluoxetine (Symbyax) – SSRI and atypical antipsychotic combination – specifically approved as a monotherapy for depressive episodes in bipolar disorder Tranylcypromine/trifluoperazine (Parstelin) - MAOI and typical antipsychotic combination Currently in clinical trials (investigational)[edit] ALKS-5461 (buprenorphine/samidorphan) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist AV-101 (4-chlorokynurenine) – NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist Basimglurant (RG7090) – mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulator CERC-301 (MK-0657) – NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) antagonist CERC-501 (LY-2456302) – κ-opioid receptor antagonist Esketamine – non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist LY-2940094 – nociceptin receptor antagonist NRX-1074 – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist NSI-189 – hippocampal neurotrophin (exact mechanism of action unknown) Rapastinel (GLYX-13) – NMDA receptor glycine site partial agonist RO4491533 – mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptor negative allosteric modulator Tramadol (ETS6103/Viotra) – μ-opioid receptor agonist, δ- and κ-opioid receptor ligand, serotonin releasing agent (SRA), NRI, 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, NMDAR antagonist, α7 nAChR antagonist, M1 and M3 receptor antagonist, and TRPV1 agonist Answered by Raymundo Ruelle 1 year ago.


Ideopathic neuropathy - no known cause. Has anyone got any info to offer?
I have had tingling in fingers and toes for over 3 months. Sometimes tingling radiates up legs and arms. Have had all bloodwork and EMG - nothing. Doctors can't find answers and want to leave diagnosis at "ideopathic" - i.e. no clue. I've been on line and only found that the doctors have being... Asked by Kera Bangle 1 year ago.

I have had tingling in fingers and toes for over 3 months. Sometimes tingling radiates up legs and arms. Have had all bloodwork and EMG - nothing. Doctors can't find answers and want to leave diagnosis at "ideopathic" - i.e. no clue. I've been on line and only found that the doctors have being doing the right thing. Any info would be most helpful. I don't want to accept "ideopathic". Thanks, anyone out there! Answered by Rosaura Klunk 1 year ago.

Peripheral neuropathy can be broadly categorized by the type of nerve that has been damaged. The peripheral nervous system is made up of three types of nerves: motor nerves (responsible for voluntary movement) sensory nerves (responsible for sensing temperature, pain, touch, and limb positioning); including large and small fibers autonomic nerves (responsible for involuntary functions such as breathing, blood pressure, sexual function, digestion) Peripheral neuropathy also can be classified by where it occurs in the body. Nerve damage that occurs in one area of the body is called mononeuropathy, in many areas, polyneuropathy. When the disorder occurs in the same places on both sides of the body, the condition is called symmetric neuropathy. It also can be categorized by cause, such as diabetic neuropathy and nutritional neuropathy. When a cause cannot be identified, the condition is called idiopathic neuropathy How are diabetic neuropathies treated? The first treatment step is to bring blood glucose levels within the normal range to help prevent further nerve damage. Blood glucose monitoring, meal planning, physical activity, and diabetes medicines or insulin will help control blood glucose levels. Symptoms may get worse when blood glucose is first brought under control, but over time, maintaining lower blood glucose levels helps lessen symptoms. Good blood glucose control may also help prevent or delay the onset of further problems. As scientists learn more about the underlying causes of neuropathy, new treatments may become available to help slow, prevent, or even reverse nerve damage. As described in the following sections, additional treatment depends on the type of nerve problem and symptom. If you have problems with your feet, your doctor may refer you to a foot care specialist. Pain Relief Doctors usually treat painful diabetic neuropathy with oral medications, although other types of treatments may help some people. People with severe nerve pain may benefit from a combination of medications or treatments. Talk with your health care provider about options for treating your neuropathy. Medications used to help relieve diabetic nerve pain include tricyclic antidepressants, such as amitriptyline, imipramine, and desipramine (Norpramin, Pertofrane) other types of antidepressants, such as duloxetine (Cymbalta), venlafaxine, bupropion (Wellbutrin), paroxetine (Paxil), and citalopram (Celexa) anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin (Lyrica), gabapentin (Gabarone, Neurontin), carbamazepine, and lamotrigine (Lamictal) opioids and opioid-like drugs, such as controlled-release oxycodone, an opioid; and tramadol (Ultram), an opioid that also acts as an antidepressant Duloxetine and pregabalin are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration specifically for treating painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. You do not have to be depressed for an antidepressant to help relieve your nerve pain. All medications have side effects, and some are not recommended for use in older adults or those with heart disease. Because over-the-counter pain medicines such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen may not work well for treating most nerve pain and can have serious side effects, some experts recommend avoiding these medications. Treatments that are applied to the skin—typically to the feet—include capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches (Lidoderm, Lidopain). Studies suggest that nitrate sprays or patches for the feet may relieve pain. Studies of alpha-lipoic acid, an antioxidant, and evening primrose oil have shown that they can help relieve symptoms and may improve nerve function. A device called a bed cradle can keep sheets and blankets from touching sensitive feet and legs. Acupuncture, biofeedback, or physical therapy may help relieve pain in some people. Treatments that involve electrical nerve stimulation, magnetic therapy, and laser or light therapy may be helpful but need further study. Researchers are also studying several new therapies in clinical trials. Answered by Ashlie Mccall 1 year ago.

Home Treatment For Neuropathy Answered by Mirna Stevinson 1 year ago.

The short presentation below will reveal to you a little known neuropathy curing secret that has travelled over thousands of miles, to not only improving your current nerve pain symptoms, but completely eradicating them…permanently. Answered by Hermina Rousch 1 year ago.

Idiopathic in medical terminology means that a cause is not found not that a cause is not present. In spite of all the developments, there are numerous medical conditions where nobody knows the exact reasons. Your problem shows off course some neurological deficit. It could be due to problem in the cervical spine or any deficiency of Vitamin like e,g B1. Take Neurobion tablets three times daily and see what happens. Answered by Iola Odenheimer 1 year ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Tabitha Abeyta 1 year ago.


Tell me what you think is the best anti-depresant drug available?
I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care.I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need... Asked by Monique Obholz 1 year ago.

I have tried several: Lexipro, Cymbalta and could not stand the side effects. Got off both meds with doctor's care. I am taking the drug for depression following pregnancy loss and emergency hysterectomy. I am so hormonal and angry all the time. The doc just says let's try a new medicine, I need something that works without horrid side effects! Thanks for your opinion. Answered by Julie Leazer 1 year ago.

you know, i cant tell you about the best ant-anexty drug, because it depends on the persons body, me im very senstives, to where your husband my not be, here are some drugs that are perscribed for anxeity Azaspirones: Azaspirones is a class of drug effective in the treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) It works gradually over 2 to 4 weeks. It doesn't have any harsh side-effects and doesn't seem to cause sedation, nor memory and balance problems. It has not been said to cause that "out of it!" feeling. It also does not potentate alcohol. Azaspirones work slowly and people should not switch to benzodiazepines immediately. Example medications: BuSpar BENZODIAZEPINES Benzodiazepines are highly effective against panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder and social phobia. They are fast acting but can make you drowsy. Note: They can initiate withdrawal symptoms when discontinued. Working with your doctor can always help to reduce this issue. The most commonly used benzodiazepine is Xanax. Other commonly used benzodiazepines are Klonopin and Valium. Your doctor will probably start you out taking a low dosage. Then your doctor will gradually increase the dosage until anxiety is controlled. It will usually be prescribed for a short period (maybe 2 to 4 weeks) and then stop them as soon as possible. The habit-forming potential is high. Long-term use is not recommended because it can lead to dependence and withdrawal reactions when stopped. Never stop taking a Benzodiazepines suddenly if you have been taking it for more than a couple weeks. Your doctor will help you taper off the medicine. Example medications: Ativan, Centrax, Dalmane, Klonopin, Librium, Paxipam, Restoril, Serax, Tranxene, Xanax BETA BLOCKERS Beta Blockers By reducing the effect of adrenaline, The Beta Blockers are used to calm certain anxiety symptoms such as shaking, palpitations and sweating all over yourself. However, they do reduce blood pressure and slow the heartbeat so always talk to your doctor about the entire picture. The medication is fast acting and non-habit forming but should not be taken with other preexisting medical conditions (e.g. asthma, congestive heart failure, diabetes, vascular diseases, hyperthyroidism and angina). Beta-blockers are not FDA approved for the treatment of anxiety but are generally used to do so. Never take a double dose. Example medications: Inderal, Tenormin TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS Tricyclics (TCAs) Tricyclics are a non-addictive medication used to treat depression, mood disorders, bulimia, narcolepsy and anxiety-related disorders. There are studies showing its effective in reducing panic attacks. TCAs work very similar to SSRIs. Although, they have been known to produce weight gain in people using them - they can be very helpful in treating post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. TCAs help to return the levels of neurotransmitters toward a normal state. Remember, Tricyclics are highly dangerous in overdose. Example medications: Adapin , Anafranil, Elavil, Janimine, Ludiomil, Pamelor, Pertofrane, Sinequan, Surmontil, Tofranil, Vivactil MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS (MAOIs) MonoAmine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) MAOIs should rarely be used as first line treatment. Often, an MAOIs is indicated for patients who have failed to respond to some of the more commonly used drugs for depression and anxiety. It is then used in the treatment panic disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, other phobias, and hypochondriacal features. Depressed patients who are clinically characterized as having "atypical" or "nonedogenous" symptoms usually have a mix of anxiety and depression. This is when your doctor may issue an MAOIs. An issue that your doctor should talk to you about is the harsh interactions with many different foods and medications, wines and beer. Even cheese has Tyramine in it which will interact negatively with MAOIs. The specific foods & medications MUST be avoided while taking the drug. Other side-effects of MAOIs is a decrease in blood pressure, insomnia, moderate weight gain and reduced sexual response. Example medications: Eldepryl, Marplan, Nardil, Parnate SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Selective Serotonin Re-uptake inhibitors are the latest in the treatment of anxiety disorders. They are used in the treatment of panic disorder, depression, OCD and other challenges usually require one does per day. They are now the most widely used drugs on planet earth. Studies have show a great improvement in individuals using the medication. Some common side-effects do include nausea, sexual difficulties and nervousness. s Example medications: Celexa, Desryl, Fluvoxamine, Paxil, Prozac, Serzone, Zoloft , Lexapro SERETONIN-NONREPINEPHRINE REUPTAKE INHIBITORS (SNRIs) Serotonin-norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) – In addition to serotonin, SNRIs act on the brain chemical norepinephine. Example medications: Effexor & Wellbutrin ANTICONVULSANTS: Anticonvulsants were used for years in the treatment of epilepsy. Research has now shown anticonvulsants can be helpful in treating panic attacks and other psychiatric challenges and improve mood stabilization Example medications: Neurontin Valproic acid Other Sedatives/Hypnotics Sedative and hypnotics are drugs which slow down functions. Examples are: tranquilizers and sleeping pills. Their effects range from calming down anxiousness to promoting sleep. Benzodiazepines are sedative and hypnotics. (see Benzodiazepines) Example medications: Ambien, Lunesta, Sonata, Rozerem The list of Anti-anxiety medications: Actual dosage must be determined by the physician. BENZODIAZEPINES Ativan (Lorazepam) Ativan is an anti-anxiety sedative in the Benzodiazepinesclass. It is used in the treatment for the symptoms of anxiety or anxiety associated with depressive symptoms. Some people suffering with insomnia due to anxiety may find this drug to be beneficial. The doctor may start you on 2 to 3 milligrams per day or at bedtime. Centrax Centrax is a Benzodiazepine which enhances the function of GABA and can help to calm the symptoms of General Anxiety GAD, Panic Disorder and Social Phobia. It is fast-acting and can make someone start to feel better within a couple days of treatment. Centrax and other benzodiazepines are potentially habit-forming and can cause drowsiness. Dalmane (Flurazepam) Dalmane is a Benzodiazepine and a hypnotic agent that can be used to treat some of the symptoms of anxiety - though it is also used in the treatment for insomnia characterized by difficulty in falling asleep and/or nocturnal awakenings. Klonopin (Clonazepam) Klonopin is an anticonvulsant Benzodiazepine used primarily in the treatment of seizure disorder but may also be used in the treatment of panic disorder and depression. Klonopin tablets have a K-shaped perforation in them. It is believed to work because of its ability to enhance the activity of GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Librium (Chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride ) Librium is a Benzodiazepine. It is used in the treatment of anxiety disorders or for the short-term relief of they symptoms of anxiety. It can also be used for withdrawal symptoms of alcoholism. Paxipam (Halazepam) Paxipam is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety. Doctors sometimes use it to relieve anxiety before surgery as well as the control of agitation used by alcohol withdrawal. Halazepam is not commercially available in the United States. Restoril (Temazepam ) Restoril is a Benzodiazepine used in the treatment of insomnia and sometimes used as a hypnotic sedative to relieve symptoms of anxiety. Serax (Oxazepam) Serax is one of the first benzodiazepines. It is used in the short-term management of anxiety, tension, irritability, agitation and anxiety associated with depression. Tranxene (Also known as Clorazepate and Azene) Tranxene is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term treatment of anxiety, nervousness and tension associated with an anxiety disorder. It has also been used to relieve the symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal as well as certain types of seizures. Tranxene works by balancing the chemicals that cause anxiety, withdrawal symptoms and seizures. The usual dosage your doctor might prescribe is 30 milligrams in small doses. Xanax (Alprazolam) Xanax is a Benzodiazepine used in the short-term relief of mild to moderate anxiety, nervousness, tension (related to anxiety) and may be used to treat panic and depression. It has been also prescribed to help tremor, agoraphobia and certain symptoms of PMS. Xanax doesn't stay as long in your body as Valium does. BETA BLOCKERS Inderal (Propranolol) Inderal is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack. Tenormin (Atenolol) Because Tenormin is a beta blocker used in the management of symptoms in anxiety, panic attacks, phobias and aggressive behavior. It can also be used in the treatment of various medical problems such as high blood pressure, migraines, irregular heartbeats and to prevent a second heart attack, This specific drug can also be prescribed to help treat abnormally rapid heart rhythms and stimulate the pace of the heart. Azaspirones BuSpar BuSpar is an antianxietyAzaspirone medication that has some of the properties of a Benzodiazepine It is used for the short-term relief of generaliz Answered by Palmira Ferrari 1 year ago.

The hysterectomy is going to give you horrible side effects!!! The hormones change drastically, especially considering what your age may be. I assume you are young because you had a baby. Celexa- works great, I tool it and it worked! Problem was I lost my sex drive completely! I can not handle that, if that is okay with you than I would try that first. A low dose 20 mg should be plenty. Paxil- seemed to work pretty good, with no side effects. Always try to stay on a low dose of any antidepressant. Sounds to me you need an anti-anxiety pill for all the effects of the hysterectomy. Hope this helps! Answered by Allene Brodes 1 year ago.

Your sadness is understandable. So glad you're seeking Dr.'s care. Personally, I've never had problems with Zoloft and it's now available in generic. Its effects seemed strengthened when taking hormone replacement therapy. Unfortunately, trial-and-err with the psych drugs is the only way to find the medication that works for YOUR BODY. Answered by Sherrell Loffier 1 year ago.

I've tried numerous medications and had given up on meds for years. I too hated the side effects. Unfortionatly my depression didn't give up on me. After my fourth visit to the psych ward I was transfered to a different hospital (I wasn't happy about ir at the time)which turned out to be the best thing for me. The doc's there convinced me to try meds again. They tried me on Welbutrin. It was a vast improvement. Answered by Sol Stegeman 1 year ago.

Zoloft. Prooved Answered by Shu Maj 1 year ago.

zoloft works for me www.dailystrength.org theres tons of people on there who have lost what you have...if you even need people to talk to, theyre there. that website has helped me more than any drug. Just talking to people who really care and who know exactly what you have/are going through....good luck and im so sorry Answered by Teri Daleus 1 year ago.


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