Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019385/001.

Names and composition

"PERMAX" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PERGOLIDE MESYLATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019385/001 PERMAX PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.05MG BASE
019385/002 PERMAX PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.25MG BASE
019385/003 PERMAX PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 1MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019385/001 PERMAX PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.05MG BASE
019385/002 PERMAX PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.25MG BASE
019385/003 PERMAX PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 1MG BASE
076061/001 PERGOLIDE MESYLATE PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.05MG BASE
076061/002 PERGOLIDE MESYLATE PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.25MG BASE
076061/003 PERGOLIDE MESYLATE PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 1MG BASE
076094/001 PERGOLIDE MESYLATE PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.05MG BASE
076094/002 PERGOLIDE MESYLATE PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 0.25MG BASE
076094/003 PERGOLIDE MESYLATE PERGOLIDE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 1MG BASE

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Answered questions

Can anyone help find a lawyer to deal with requip case parallel to mirapex and permax?
Parkinsons drug inducing catastrophic compulsions that ruin marriages and peoples lives. Asked by Deangelo Daft 1 year ago.

I don't know what area you live in, but, type in Martindale Hubble in a search engine and you will find a site that will allow you to find lawyers and law firms by location, firm size, particular practice and so forth. Good luck. Make sure they don't ask for any money up front. Their fee should be based on whether you win anything or not and no more than a 1/3. Answered by Krystin Sewell 1 year ago.


How do i identify prescription pill i found? it is a large round pill that has a code # on the back.a625?
i found it on the floor and i just want to know what it is.. it has no score on it it is just round and large and it has a code thing on it that says a625. Asked by Jestine Gather 1 year ago.

Round? I know of a pill called Permax that used to be used to treat Parkinson's and is no longer on the market that says A625 on it but it's not really round. Check out the link it has a picture of it. Answered by Twanda Jecklin 1 year ago.

theres a couple of choices that have the 625 code number on it, but the only one that really matches your description is oxycodone (bright orange, round). the other choices can be it, but they arent round. sorry, thats the only things that it may be. Answered by Harlan Lava 1 year ago.

Why do want to know? Flush it! Answered by Adah Petts 1 year ago.


Hyperprolactenemia?
what is it? can i die? why do i have it? can i have kids? will it be with me forever? whats coming as far as treatments? Asked by Sammie Mahmoud 1 year ago.

This is a prolactin secreting non cancerous tumor of the pitutary gland. I have had this most of my adult life. For quite a long time, I took Parlodel, (bromocriptine), Permax,and then Dostinex, and the Dostinex actually shrunk it to the point it no longer shows up on a MRI, and I have been off the medication for two years and still have normal prolactin levels. I am not sure what causes them, but it can affect many systems in your body when it is uncontrolled. Mine started sometime in the early 1980's, before MRI, and I was very sick for about two years with everything from reproductive problems, neurological stuff, immune problems, and skin disorders. Once they found it, I was able to shrink and control it with medication. Since you know that you have it, if you are healthy otherwise, you may still be able to have kids. The main thing is that you are watched very closely in the end stages of pregnancy, because prolactin levels rise sharply and cause both milk production and uterine contractions, and in someone with a prolactioma, it can be dangerous. My doctor explained it as probably one of the reasons women used to die at childbirth, because of a ruptured pituitary. The tumor is actually fluid filled. They would probably take a child C-section for your safety. (My husband and I were too scared to try to have kids, but there are lots of women who do so safely.) Get a good neurologist and endocrinologist, and most likely it can be controlled with medications and not need surgery. From what I have heard, surgical removal of the tumor generally only lasts 5-6 years, and then it may grow back, but that was back in the mid 90's. Drastic cases have had complete removal of the pituitary gland, and that would require being on several hormones the rest of your life, and not being able to have kids. I doubt anyone does this anymore. The biggest pain for me was severe headaches and fainting, which is starting to show up in sore spots from all the falls. That was when I was on bromocriptine, and my prolactin levels were constantly fluctuating. The dostinex was much better for regulating and being more normal. Hope this helps. Its not a pleasant condition, but its not fatal. I know of three people with this, two women and one man, and one of the women has two kids. All live pretty normal lives, once the problem was discovered and treated. God bless. Answered by Sandie Vanderheide 1 year ago.

Hyperprolactinemia means your pituitary gland is making too much of a hormone called prolactin (the prolactin level measures over 25 ng/ml in most labs). This may be due to a benign tumor of the pituitary gland (pituitary adenoma), use of medications (birth control pills, antipsychotic medications, morphine), or use of marijuana. People who have an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) may have a mildly elevated prolactin level. Time of day may also affect prolactin levels, and borderline elevations should be confirmed by checking a level first thing in the morning before eating. Hyperprolactinemia is not all that uncommon -- in autopsy studies, between 10 and 30 percent of people have a pituitary adenoma, and in women who are amenorrheic (skipping periods for long stretches), a high prolactin level is found in one-third. Hyperprolactinemia may cause loss or irregularity of menstrual cycles, infertility due to lack of ovulation, and secretion of breast milk (ga lactorrhea). If a pituitary tumor grows large, it may cause headaches or impinge on the optic nerve, producing visual disturbances. If prolactin levels are elevated, and simple causes such as medication use have been ruled out, an X-ray of the head or a CT scan is done to look for a pituitary tumor. Treatment depends on symptoms, desire for pregnancy, and the size of the adenoma if one is found. Medical treatment is the first line in most cases and usually consists of bromocriptine (Parlodel). Nausea, headache and dizziness are common side effects with bromocriptine. Sometimes surgery is recommended to remove a pituitary adenoma. If prolactin levels are only slightly elevated and there are no symptoms, levels may merely be followed with periodic lab tests. General gynecologists may follow and treat patients with hyperprolactinemia. Complicated cases may be handled better by specialists such as reproductive or medical endocrinologists, and if surgery is indicated, it is done by a neurosurgeon. If you are not happy with the answers your doctor is giving you, you may wish to obtain a consultation with an endocrinologist. Answered by Kerstin Laban 1 year ago.

The drugs which you're taking now handle what's actual inflicting your situation. Homeopathy does not. that's barely water. do you be attentive to that to coach a homeopathic scientific care the homeopath will dilute a substance in water lots of cases that no longer one molecule of that substance is left? you could say that all of us it extremely is left is water. How can water help regularize your hormone tiers? it won't have the capacity to. I anticipate that in case you identify to renounce your cabergoline and shift to regardless of homeopathic therapy is given you, the indicators of hyperprolactenemia will come returned. believe your wellbeing practitioner, she knows what she's doing. She has the preparation and journey to look after situations consisting of yours. it is in sharp assessment to the homeopath who probable won't have the capacity to even diagnose an endocrine project consisting of hyperprolactenemia. stable luck! wish each little thing works out for the main suitable. Answered by Adalberto Bonapart 1 year ago.


Is RLS a potential precursor of Parkinson's Disease?
I was just diagnosed with RLS, and it's treated with the same kind of medication as PD. Asked by Laurena Basil 1 year ago.

The jury is still on the relationship of RLS and PD but not out on RLS being a Parkinson's disease precursor. It is thought that RLS symptoms may occur in PD patients after their diagnosis but that Restless Leg Syndrome is NOT a PD precursor. There are several PD medications which are also used for RLS but not all. Predominantly the dopaminergics which have been the primary PD meds for many years. Essentially this drug class of levodopa, a dopamine precursor, augments the dwindling dopamine supply in the PD brain by being absorbed in the small intestine and carried by the bloodstream to the brain where - unlike dopamine - the levodopa can cross the blood brain barrier where it is converted to dopamine. The FDA has not approved the most common PD med, Sinemet, because it is coupled with carbidopa which inhibits peripheral metabolism of levodopa in order to slow the process to prevent the lengthening medication effect off times, a side effect which can occur with prolonged usage. Nor has the FDA approved such drugs as Permax or Mirapex, both dopamine agonists due to the many negative side effects...I am guessing at the reason, not the lack of approval. Agonists act by binding to specific receptor sites to activate those sites. This class of drug is used in the early stages of the disease. Later is is no longer effective. Ropinirole (Requip) is the only drug in this class which appears to have been approved for RLS. Benzodiazepines, a group of sedatives such as diazepam, known to most of us as Valium, Restoril and clonazepam are often used because they can help with RLS insomnia. They are not that common in PD although sometimes used. My husband takes a specific calcium channel blocker for PD and not for his cardiac condition. The usage is off label but effective...in his case. Many medications are used as off-label usages but this does not always mean they are the best choices although sometimes they are. But the point I really want to make here is that although we now realize that my husband was exhibiting the very early precursor signs of PD for years before his diagnosis, the only thing that was DX'd and treated was his heart condition. Who knows, if he had been given this particular C-channel blocker instead of the beta blocker, perhaps the diagnosable onset of his PD would have been postponed. There are crossovers everywhere - that's what's so interesting about watching "House." It isn't just the craziness but the fact that the craziness is necessary to connect the interconnecting dots. Here's the thing, like PD, RLS is still considered predominantly idiopathic in origin...meaning....we're not sure yet. Both have a genetic aspect. With PD at this point about 15-20% of the cases are thought to be genetic with environmental triggers. In RLS almost 50% of the cases involve a family history suggesting that these cases may be genetic. In both PD and RLS, the younger the onset, the more the condition is considered to be genetically related. In RLS that progression appears to be slower, In PD, there may be too much iron, FE(II) may contribute to oxidative stress. In RLS it is anemia or too little iron that is a factor. When the iron deficiency is normalized, the RLS patient may see a reduction in symptoms. In PD there are clinical trials recruiting now to determine if CoQ10 in sufficient doses will provide symptom reduction. (My husband takes it for tremor reduction - we can tell when he's forgotten to take it.) In the which comes first and which second, my husband has more to worry about in terms of developing RLS than you do in developing PD. I really hope that eases your mind because it can be frightening to think OMG, I've got this bad thing, am I going to be getting something which can lead directly to my demise (Yes, it can despite what you may read) Since stress is a contributor to PD, you should stay calm and put this worry to bed Answered by Teena Bielec 1 year ago.

You'll find that many drugs have more than just one thing they help. There are all types of seizure medications that are also used in things like depression for an example. You'll also find that RLS is also more common today because they now have a name for it. Parkinson's is on the list of precursors but that doesn't mean you'll come down with it either. Listen to your doctor and follow his/her advise. They are the best ones to tell you about your health and any possible problems. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Kelli Flore 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Olimpia Domann 1 year ago.

That's correct but to the best of our knowledge restless legs doesn't progress to Parkinson's Answered by Sidney Mile 1 year ago.

I saw it happen in my dear son who is now deceased. Answered by Heather Minelli 1 year ago.


New good answers for Restless Leg Syndrome RLS?
Thank you very much Dawn, I think I'm going to suggest your cooling gel to her. It does sound like great thinking, a good idea in the first place! Thank you very much :-) Asked by Henry Degrate 1 year ago.

I know it's unlikely, but I hope for new good answers to help with Restless Leg Syndrome, RLS. I have found and learned of reported success treating RLS with: Iron, ferritin B Vitamins, especially B-6 and B-12 Vitamin E Magnesium, Magnesium sulfate, Magnesium complexes Calcium, calcium citrate, calcium carbonate Folic acid, folate (or juice from dark green vegetables, mixed 50/50 with carrot juice) Quinine water at bedtime (tonic water) Kava (about 300 mg) Mildly tight bandage on affected limb before sleep or when suffering Mild exercise Push-ups against a wall Vertical push-ups Mental exercise like Crossword puzzles Hypnosis Meditation Warm or cold baths Vibration of affected limb Electric nerve stimulation Acupuncture Avoiding Caffeine, Nicotine Klonopin Clonazepam Sinemet Bromocriptine Pergolide Fluvoxamine Opiates Amantidine Amitriptyline Bromocriptine Darvon (propoxyphene) Benzodiazepines L-dopa / carbidopa 100/25 to 250/25 Propoxyphene, about 100 mg Propranolol Permax (pergolide) Naloxone (naltrexone) Neurontin (gabapentin) Depakote (divalproex) Tyrosine Trazodone Dopaminergic agents Ambien (zolpidem) She is under good medical care, so rest easy that anything will be considered with her Doctors first. Thank you for any good advise to help a loved one suffering. Answered by Doug Sweat 1 year ago.

Have you tried DEEP FREEZE GEL! I suffer terribly from Restless Legs and have done for many years, Try Deep freeze Gel which is available at nearly all chemists is brilliant! It will not cure you but will help. I have tried the cheaper ones but I think it is the tingle of the gel that seems to do the job!! I am determined that I will not take medication. I have suffered for about 20 years and believe me I have tried all the old wifes tales! The spray works as well but works out quite expensive! It is worth a try!! Good luck!! Answered by Trish Heinzerling 1 year ago.

Hello RLS can be due to dopermine issues. An improvement in diet can help (foods to enhance natural dopermine), 5HTP can help, if she smoke's it can take a year from stopping before you see improvements, no stimulants of any kind before sleep - inc caffeine & sugar & stress reduction can all help. As with all these route results will not be instant. Medications for Parkinsons are avaliable, Mirapexin. Hypnotherapy can also be used. Therapy can also help where stress is an issue, especially if there is a chance it can be from something repressed. Pam Answered by Cecil Hemker 1 year ago.


Have Parkinsons and low blood pressure, dizziness, lightheadednesss anyone with similar problem?
I have parkinsons and low blood pressure affects me. When I am sitting it is normal 120/70 but falls to 80/40 when I stand up. I feel light headed and dizzy all day and even forced to sit down during chores or standing for a while. Taking Sinemet 100/25 - 3 half tabs per day. Neurologist has suggested a high... Asked by Daniel Cantey 1 year ago.

I have parkinsons and low blood pressure affects me. When I am sitting it is normal 120/70 but falls to 80/40 when I stand up. I feel light headed and dizzy all day and even forced to sit down during chores or standing for a while. Taking Sinemet 100/25 - 3 half tabs per day. Neurologist has suggested a high salt intake for time being. Diagnosed Sep 05, have had dizzyness continously since March 06. Answered by Minda Griepentrog 1 year ago.

LOW BLOOD PRESSURE IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE Linda P. Miller, R.N., Med Individuals with Parkinson’s disease may experience low blood pressure (hypotension) at some point during their treatment course. When it does occur, the patient may recognize and report sensations such as dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness. If severe, hypotension can lead to fainting and/or falling. Normal blood pressure is regulated by specific reflexes in the nervous system. Parkinson’s disease can impair this reflex mechanism and result in lowered blood pressure. In addition to the disease process, anti-Parkinson’s medications as well as drugs used to treat other medical problems such as hypertension, heart disease, anemia or dehydration can directly affect blood pressure. Blood pressure decreases when blood vessels relax or lose their ability to constrict. If there is less fluid in the body, the circulating blood volume is decreased and blood pressure drops. The combined effect of these medications and other medical conditions may potentiate a hypotensive event. Low blood pressure usually presents itself as a side-effect of anti-Parkinson’s medications. Levodopa-carbidopa, dopamine agonists (Parlodel®, Permax®, Mirapex®, Requip®) and other anti-Parkinson’s agents, including Eldepryl®, Tasmar®, and Comtan®, may contribute to lowering the blood pressure as well as certain antidepressants and sleeping medications. Individuals have also used terms such as giddiness, sleepiness, tiredness, mental or visual blurring to describe what has actually turned out to be low blood pressure. These sensations will often intensify upon standing or after walking. Although any time of day is possible, many report the occurrence more in the early morning hours and/or 1-2 hours after receiving a dose(s) of medication. Normal blood pressure range is usually 100/60 to 140/90. Drops in blood pressure below 100/60 may result in the sensations mentioned above and a few individuals may not experience any warning signals. The emphasis is to seek the cause and treat the problem before an episode of fainting or falling occurs based on each person’s symptoms and associated conditions. Monitoring blood pressure should be routine in the comprehensive care plan of individuals with Parkinson’s disease. It is advisable that patients have their blood pressure taken in the sitting and standing positions periodically. MANAGEMENT OF POSTURAL HYPOTENSION There are a number of simple measures which can be employed to restore normal blood pressure regulation. 􀂃 Re-evaluate the patient's complete medication list. Adjustments of the medications themselves or the timing sequence might be all that is needed. 􀂃 Interventions such as increasing fluids and salt in the diet can be very effective. Drinking eight glasses of water per day and eating salty foods are commonly recommended. With more fluid in the body , circulating blood volume is enhanced and blood pressure increases. 􀂃 Drinking caffeinated coffee, in addition to adding fluid enhances blood vessel constriction, thus increasing blood pressure. 􀂃 Eat frequent, small meals as blood pressure is often lowered after a large meal. Alcohol should be avoided as it has a tendency to dilate blood vessels, contributing to lower blood pressure. 􀂃 Warm weather, hot baths, or any activities that cause blood vessels to relax should be avoided. 􀂃 Waist-high compression/support hose (i.e. Jobst® stockings or Sigvars® pantyhose) can be helpful in maintaining blood pressure. 􀂃 When rising from a lying position, sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes; then stand up slowly, holding on to a secure support. 􀂃 Raise the head of the bed 30-40 degrees as lying flat for a prolonged period of time can contribute to lower blood pressure. 􀂃 Occasionally, salt tablets or medications such as fludrocortisone (Florinef®) and Pro-Amatine (Midodrine®) are prescribed. By increasing blood volume and promoting vascular constriction, these drugs help raise blood pressure. The risks associated with using these drugs can be controlled with close medical supervision. Some patients respond better using a combination of treatments. Always consult with your healthcare provider if you experience the sensations described herein and especially before altering your medication schedule. Answered by Maple Denlinger 1 year ago.

I can't think of a reason why high blood sugar would cause low blood pressure, but they might have a mutual cause. For example, dehydration can lower blood pressure and raise blood sugar. An illness can do both, too. Have you been sick? Also, have you been diagnosed diabetic? That's a firmly diabetic reading, if accurate. Unless you're on a medication, like a steroid, there's no reason why a non-diabetic should ever be that high. Answered by Astrid Measom 1 year ago.


Best and latest medical tretment of parkinson,?
drug names of parkinson disease Asked by India Radomski 1 year ago.

The Food and Drug Administration approved Azilect (rasagiline), a new molecular entity, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug is a monoamine oxidase type--B (MAO-B) inhibitor that blocks the breakdown of dopamine, a chemical that sends information to the parts of the brain that control movement and coordination. Another New Treatment On May 9, 2007, FDA announced the approval of Neupro (rotigotine transdermal system), a skin patch designed to treat symptoms of early Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a drug not previously approved in the United States. Neupro, manufactured by Schwarz Bioscience of Research Triangle Park, N.C., is the first transdermal patch approved for the treatment of symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a member of the dopamine agonist class of drugs and is delivered continuously through the skin (transdermal) using a silicone-based patch that is replaced every 24 hours. A dopamine agonist works by activating dopamine receptors in the body, mimicking the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Other Alternatives: A Brain "Pacemaker" FDA approved an important tool for controlling Parkinson's tremors. The Activa Tremor Control Therapy consists of a wire surgically implanted deep within the brain and connected to a pulse generator, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, implanted near the collarbone. Whenever a tremor begins, patients can activate the device by passing a hand-held magnet over the generator. The system delivers a mild electrical stimulation that blocks the dysfunctional brain signals that cause tremor. Effects are often dramatic. "Before the implant, patients can't raise a glass of water or a spoonful of food to their mouths without spilling it or striking themselves in the face," says William Koller, M.D., neurology chairman at Kansas University Medical Center. "Within hours, these same patients are sipping tea from a cup and eating peas with a fork, with no signs of their disability." Surgery Options A brain operation shown to be helpful for many Parkinson's patients, especially those in late stages of the disease, is called pallidotomy. Doctors are not sure why the procedure works, but an October 1997 report in the New England Journal of Medicine stated that half of the patients in a pallidotomy study at Toronto Hospital, who before the surgery needed help in eating, dressing, and personal hygiene, were able to resume these activities independently. The study cautioned, however, that some of the surgery's effects diminished after two years and that the long-term effectiveness of the procedure still is unknown. Answered by Maurice Herz 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Angeles Gindi 1 year ago.

Isradipine is a medicine that has recently shown to possibly stop Parkinson's disease in it's tracks. The stardard treatments are Levadopa (L-dopa), Carbadopa, Simemet. Answered by Thalia Kolstad 1 year ago.

I help the right for someone to chosen, yet previous due time period abortions are really out of the question. through then a lady must have already favourite what she became gonna do. except medically mandatory previous due time period abortions must be banned. convinced I suggested it banned. I help options no longer abortions... Answered by Stefani Stallard 1 year ago.


Can anyone help find a lawyer to deal with requip case parallel to mirapex and permax?
Parkinsons drug inducing catastrophic compulsions that ruin marriages and peoples lives. Asked by Johnna Seemann 1 year ago.

I don't know what area you live in, but, type in Martindale Hubble in a search engine and you will find a site that will allow you to find lawyers and law firms by location, firm size, particular practice and so forth. Good luck. Make sure they don't ask for any money up front. Their fee should be based on whether you win anything or not and no more than a 1/3. Answered by Lorette Zachary 1 year ago.


How do i identify prescription pill i found? it is a large round pill that has a code # on the back.a625?
i found it on the floor and i just want to know what it is.. it has no score on it it is just round and large and it has a code thing on it that says a625. Asked by Crista Deluna 1 year ago.

Round? I know of a pill called Permax that used to be used to treat Parkinson's and is no longer on the market that says A625 on it but it's not really round. Check out the link it has a picture of it. Answered by Kasey Lessor 1 year ago.

theres a couple of choices that have the 625 code number on it, but the only one that really matches your description is oxycodone (bright orange, round). the other choices can be it, but they arent round. sorry, thats the only things that it may be. Answered by Cliff Mulchrone 1 year ago.

Why do want to know? Flush it! Answered by Gene Nelon 1 year ago.


Hyperprolactenemia?
what is it? can i die? why do i have it? can i have kids? will it be with me forever? whats coming as far as treatments? Asked by Collin Larence 1 year ago.

This is a prolactin secreting non cancerous tumor of the pitutary gland. I have had this most of my adult life. For quite a long time, I took Parlodel, (bromocriptine), Permax,and then Dostinex, and the Dostinex actually shrunk it to the point it no longer shows up on a MRI, and I have been off the medication for two years and still have normal prolactin levels. I am not sure what causes them, but it can affect many systems in your body when it is uncontrolled. Mine started sometime in the early 1980's, before MRI, and I was very sick for about two years with everything from reproductive problems, neurological stuff, immune problems, and skin disorders. Once they found it, I was able to shrink and control it with medication. Since you know that you have it, if you are healthy otherwise, you may still be able to have kids. The main thing is that you are watched very closely in the end stages of pregnancy, because prolactin levels rise sharply and cause both milk production and uterine contractions, and in someone with a prolactioma, it can be dangerous. My doctor explained it as probably one of the reasons women used to die at childbirth, because of a ruptured pituitary. The tumor is actually fluid filled. They would probably take a child C-section for your safety. (My husband and I were too scared to try to have kids, but there are lots of women who do so safely.) Get a good neurologist and endocrinologist, and most likely it can be controlled with medications and not need surgery. From what I have heard, surgical removal of the tumor generally only lasts 5-6 years, and then it may grow back, but that was back in the mid 90's. Drastic cases have had complete removal of the pituitary gland, and that would require being on several hormones the rest of your life, and not being able to have kids. I doubt anyone does this anymore. The biggest pain for me was severe headaches and fainting, which is starting to show up in sore spots from all the falls. That was when I was on bromocriptine, and my prolactin levels were constantly fluctuating. The dostinex was much better for regulating and being more normal. Hope this helps. Its not a pleasant condition, but its not fatal. I know of three people with this, two women and one man, and one of the women has two kids. All live pretty normal lives, once the problem was discovered and treated. God bless. Answered by Junita Nery 1 year ago.

Hyperprolactinemia means your pituitary gland is making too much of a hormone called prolactin (the prolactin level measures over 25 ng/ml in most labs). This may be due to a benign tumor of the pituitary gland (pituitary adenoma), use of medications (birth control pills, antipsychotic medications, morphine), or use of marijuana. People who have an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) may have a mildly elevated prolactin level. Time of day may also affect prolactin levels, and borderline elevations should be confirmed by checking a level first thing in the morning before eating. Hyperprolactinemia is not all that uncommon -- in autopsy studies, between 10 and 30 percent of people have a pituitary adenoma, and in women who are amenorrheic (skipping periods for long stretches), a high prolactin level is found in one-third. Hyperprolactinemia may cause loss or irregularity of menstrual cycles, infertility due to lack of ovulation, and secretion of breast milk (ga lactorrhea). If a pituitary tumor grows large, it may cause headaches or impinge on the optic nerve, producing visual disturbances. If prolactin levels are elevated, and simple causes such as medication use have been ruled out, an X-ray of the head or a CT scan is done to look for a pituitary tumor. Treatment depends on symptoms, desire for pregnancy, and the size of the adenoma if one is found. Medical treatment is the first line in most cases and usually consists of bromocriptine (Parlodel). Nausea, headache and dizziness are common side effects with bromocriptine. Sometimes surgery is recommended to remove a pituitary adenoma. If prolactin levels are only slightly elevated and there are no symptoms, levels may merely be followed with periodic lab tests. General gynecologists may follow and treat patients with hyperprolactinemia. Complicated cases may be handled better by specialists such as reproductive or medical endocrinologists, and if surgery is indicated, it is done by a neurosurgeon. If you are not happy with the answers your doctor is giving you, you may wish to obtain a consultation with an endocrinologist. Answered by Murray Sweetwood 1 year ago.

The drugs which you're taking now handle what's actual inflicting your situation. Homeopathy does not. that's barely water. do you be attentive to that to coach a homeopathic scientific care the homeopath will dilute a substance in water lots of cases that no longer one molecule of that substance is left? you could say that all of us it extremely is left is water. How can water help regularize your hormone tiers? it won't have the capacity to. I anticipate that in case you identify to renounce your cabergoline and shift to regardless of homeopathic therapy is given you, the indicators of hyperprolactenemia will come returned. believe your wellbeing practitioner, she knows what she's doing. She has the preparation and journey to look after situations consisting of yours. it is in sharp assessment to the homeopath who probable won't have the capacity to even diagnose an endocrine project consisting of hyperprolactenemia. stable luck! wish each little thing works out for the main suitable. Answered by Roselee Mckosky 1 year ago.


Is RLS a potential precursor of Parkinson's Disease?
I was just diagnosed with RLS, and it's treated with the same kind of medication as PD. Asked by Barb Rivali 1 year ago.

The jury is still on the relationship of RLS and PD but not out on RLS being a Parkinson's disease precursor. It is thought that RLS symptoms may occur in PD patients after their diagnosis but that Restless Leg Syndrome is NOT a PD precursor. There are several PD medications which are also used for RLS but not all. Predominantly the dopaminergics which have been the primary PD meds for many years. Essentially this drug class of levodopa, a dopamine precursor, augments the dwindling dopamine supply in the PD brain by being absorbed in the small intestine and carried by the bloodstream to the brain where - unlike dopamine - the levodopa can cross the blood brain barrier where it is converted to dopamine. The FDA has not approved the most common PD med, Sinemet, because it is coupled with carbidopa which inhibits peripheral metabolism of levodopa in order to slow the process to prevent the lengthening medication effect off times, a side effect which can occur with prolonged usage. Nor has the FDA approved such drugs as Permax or Mirapex, both dopamine agonists due to the many negative side effects...I am guessing at the reason, not the lack of approval. Agonists act by binding to specific receptor sites to activate those sites. This class of drug is used in the early stages of the disease. Later is is no longer effective. Ropinirole (Requip) is the only drug in this class which appears to have been approved for RLS. Benzodiazepines, a group of sedatives such as diazepam, known to most of us as Valium, Restoril and clonazepam are often used because they can help with RLS insomnia. They are not that common in PD although sometimes used. My husband takes a specific calcium channel blocker for PD and not for his cardiac condition. The usage is off label but effective...in his case. Many medications are used as off-label usages but this does not always mean they are the best choices although sometimes they are. But the point I really want to make here is that although we now realize that my husband was exhibiting the very early precursor signs of PD for years before his diagnosis, the only thing that was DX'd and treated was his heart condition. Who knows, if he had been given this particular C-channel blocker instead of the beta blocker, perhaps the diagnosable onset of his PD would have been postponed. There are crossovers everywhere - that's what's so interesting about watching "House." It isn't just the craziness but the fact that the craziness is necessary to connect the interconnecting dots. Here's the thing, like PD, RLS is still considered predominantly idiopathic in origin...meaning....we're not sure yet. Both have a genetic aspect. With PD at this point about 15-20% of the cases are thought to be genetic with environmental triggers. In RLS almost 50% of the cases involve a family history suggesting that these cases may be genetic. In both PD and RLS, the younger the onset, the more the condition is considered to be genetically related. In RLS that progression appears to be slower, In PD, there may be too much iron, FE(II) may contribute to oxidative stress. In RLS it is anemia or too little iron that is a factor. When the iron deficiency is normalized, the RLS patient may see a reduction in symptoms. In PD there are clinical trials recruiting now to determine if CoQ10 in sufficient doses will provide symptom reduction. (My husband takes it for tremor reduction - we can tell when he's forgotten to take it.) In the which comes first and which second, my husband has more to worry about in terms of developing RLS than you do in developing PD. I really hope that eases your mind because it can be frightening to think OMG, I've got this bad thing, am I going to be getting something which can lead directly to my demise (Yes, it can despite what you may read) Since stress is a contributor to PD, you should stay calm and put this worry to bed Answered by Dorethea Bonepart 1 year ago.

You'll find that many drugs have more than just one thing they help. There are all types of seizure medications that are also used in things like depression for an example. You'll also find that RLS is also more common today because they now have a name for it. Parkinson's is on the list of precursors but that doesn't mean you'll come down with it either. Listen to your doctor and follow his/her advise. They are the best ones to tell you about your health and any possible problems. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Mike Maddry 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Tamar Azahar 1 year ago.

That's correct but to the best of our knowledge restless legs doesn't progress to Parkinson's Answered by Magan Demattia 1 year ago.

I saw it happen in my dear son who is now deceased. Answered by Eliseo Mandich 1 year ago.


New good answers for Restless Leg Syndrome RLS?
Thank you very much Dawn, I think I'm going to suggest your cooling gel to her. It does sound like great thinking, a good idea in the first place! Thank you very much :-) Asked by Collen Tsuda 1 year ago.

I know it's unlikely, but I hope for new good answers to help with Restless Leg Syndrome, RLS. I have found and learned of reported success treating RLS with: Iron, ferritin B Vitamins, especially B-6 and B-12 Vitamin E Magnesium, Magnesium sulfate, Magnesium complexes Calcium, calcium citrate, calcium carbonate Folic acid, folate (or juice from dark green vegetables, mixed 50/50 with carrot juice) Quinine water at bedtime (tonic water) Kava (about 300 mg) Mildly tight bandage on affected limb before sleep or when suffering Mild exercise Push-ups against a wall Vertical push-ups Mental exercise like Crossword puzzles Hypnosis Meditation Warm or cold baths Vibration of affected limb Electric nerve stimulation Acupuncture Avoiding Caffeine, Nicotine Klonopin Clonazepam Sinemet Bromocriptine Pergolide Fluvoxamine Opiates Amantidine Amitriptyline Bromocriptine Darvon (propoxyphene) Benzodiazepines L-dopa / carbidopa 100/25 to 250/25 Propoxyphene, about 100 mg Propranolol Permax (pergolide) Naloxone (naltrexone) Neurontin (gabapentin) Depakote (divalproex) Tyrosine Trazodone Dopaminergic agents Ambien (zolpidem) She is under good medical care, so rest easy that anything will be considered with her Doctors first. Thank you for any good advise to help a loved one suffering. Answered by Dia Dicapua 1 year ago.

Have you tried DEEP FREEZE GEL! I suffer terribly from Restless Legs and have done for many years, Try Deep freeze Gel which is available at nearly all chemists is brilliant! It will not cure you but will help. I have tried the cheaper ones but I think it is the tingle of the gel that seems to do the job!! I am determined that I will not take medication. I have suffered for about 20 years and believe me I have tried all the old wifes tales! The spray works as well but works out quite expensive! It is worth a try!! Good luck!! Answered by Heriberto Valls 1 year ago.

Hello RLS can be due to dopermine issues. An improvement in diet can help (foods to enhance natural dopermine), 5HTP can help, if she smoke's it can take a year from stopping before you see improvements, no stimulants of any kind before sleep - inc caffeine & sugar & stress reduction can all help. As with all these route results will not be instant. Medications for Parkinsons are avaliable, Mirapexin. Hypnotherapy can also be used. Therapy can also help where stress is an issue, especially if there is a chance it can be from something repressed. Pam Answered by Ruthanne Rathgeb 1 year ago.


Have Parkinsons and low blood pressure, dizziness, lightheadednesss anyone with similar problem?
I have parkinsons and low blood pressure affects me. When I am sitting it is normal 120/70 but falls to 80/40 when I stand up. I feel light headed and dizzy all day and even forced to sit down during chores or standing for a while. Taking Sinemet 100/25 - 3 half tabs per day. Neurologist has suggested a high... Asked by Violette Printers 1 year ago.

I have parkinsons and low blood pressure affects me. When I am sitting it is normal 120/70 but falls to 80/40 when I stand up. I feel light headed and dizzy all day and even forced to sit down during chores or standing for a while. Taking Sinemet 100/25 - 3 half tabs per day. Neurologist has suggested a high salt intake for time being. Diagnosed Sep 05, have had dizzyness continously since March 06. Answered by Antonia Rhodarmer 1 year ago.

LOW BLOOD PRESSURE IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE Linda P. Miller, R.N., Med Individuals with Parkinson’s disease may experience low blood pressure (hypotension) at some point during their treatment course. When it does occur, the patient may recognize and report sensations such as dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness. If severe, hypotension can lead to fainting and/or falling. Normal blood pressure is regulated by specific reflexes in the nervous system. Parkinson’s disease can impair this reflex mechanism and result in lowered blood pressure. In addition to the disease process, anti-Parkinson’s medications as well as drugs used to treat other medical problems such as hypertension, heart disease, anemia or dehydration can directly affect blood pressure. Blood pressure decreases when blood vessels relax or lose their ability to constrict. If there is less fluid in the body, the circulating blood volume is decreased and blood pressure drops. The combined effect of these medications and other medical conditions may potentiate a hypotensive event. Low blood pressure usually presents itself as a side-effect of anti-Parkinson’s medications. Levodopa-carbidopa, dopamine agonists (Parlodel®, Permax®, Mirapex®, Requip®) and other anti-Parkinson’s agents, including Eldepryl®, Tasmar®, and Comtan®, may contribute to lowering the blood pressure as well as certain antidepressants and sleeping medications. Individuals have also used terms such as giddiness, sleepiness, tiredness, mental or visual blurring to describe what has actually turned out to be low blood pressure. These sensations will often intensify upon standing or after walking. Although any time of day is possible, many report the occurrence more in the early morning hours and/or 1-2 hours after receiving a dose(s) of medication. Normal blood pressure range is usually 100/60 to 140/90. Drops in blood pressure below 100/60 may result in the sensations mentioned above and a few individuals may not experience any warning signals. The emphasis is to seek the cause and treat the problem before an episode of fainting or falling occurs based on each person’s symptoms and associated conditions. Monitoring blood pressure should be routine in the comprehensive care plan of individuals with Parkinson’s disease. It is advisable that patients have their blood pressure taken in the sitting and standing positions periodically. MANAGEMENT OF POSTURAL HYPOTENSION There are a number of simple measures which can be employed to restore normal blood pressure regulation. 􀂃 Re-evaluate the patient's complete medication list. Adjustments of the medications themselves or the timing sequence might be all that is needed. 􀂃 Interventions such as increasing fluids and salt in the diet can be very effective. Drinking eight glasses of water per day and eating salty foods are commonly recommended. With more fluid in the body , circulating blood volume is enhanced and blood pressure increases. 􀂃 Drinking caffeinated coffee, in addition to adding fluid enhances blood vessel constriction, thus increasing blood pressure. 􀂃 Eat frequent, small meals as blood pressure is often lowered after a large meal. Alcohol should be avoided as it has a tendency to dilate blood vessels, contributing to lower blood pressure. 􀂃 Warm weather, hot baths, or any activities that cause blood vessels to relax should be avoided. 􀂃 Waist-high compression/support hose (i.e. Jobst® stockings or Sigvars® pantyhose) can be helpful in maintaining blood pressure. 􀂃 When rising from a lying position, sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes; then stand up slowly, holding on to a secure support. 􀂃 Raise the head of the bed 30-40 degrees as lying flat for a prolonged period of time can contribute to lower blood pressure. 􀂃 Occasionally, salt tablets or medications such as fludrocortisone (Florinef®) and Pro-Amatine (Midodrine®) are prescribed. By increasing blood volume and promoting vascular constriction, these drugs help raise blood pressure. The risks associated with using these drugs can be controlled with close medical supervision. Some patients respond better using a combination of treatments. Always consult with your healthcare provider if you experience the sensations described herein and especially before altering your medication schedule. Answered by Ilse Guler 1 year ago.

I can't think of a reason why high blood sugar would cause low blood pressure, but they might have a mutual cause. For example, dehydration can lower blood pressure and raise blood sugar. An illness can do both, too. Have you been sick? Also, have you been diagnosed diabetic? That's a firmly diabetic reading, if accurate. Unless you're on a medication, like a steroid, there's no reason why a non-diabetic should ever be that high. Answered by Grant Neeser 1 year ago.


Best and latest medical tretment of parkinson,?
drug names of parkinson disease Asked by Thu Luhmann 1 year ago.

The Food and Drug Administration approved Azilect (rasagiline), a new molecular entity, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug is a monoamine oxidase type--B (MAO-B) inhibitor that blocks the breakdown of dopamine, a chemical that sends information to the parts of the brain that control movement and coordination. Another New Treatment On May 9, 2007, FDA announced the approval of Neupro (rotigotine transdermal system), a skin patch designed to treat symptoms of early Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a drug not previously approved in the United States. Neupro, manufactured by Schwarz Bioscience of Research Triangle Park, N.C., is the first transdermal patch approved for the treatment of symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a member of the dopamine agonist class of drugs and is delivered continuously through the skin (transdermal) using a silicone-based patch that is replaced every 24 hours. A dopamine agonist works by activating dopamine receptors in the body, mimicking the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Other Alternatives: A Brain "Pacemaker" FDA approved an important tool for controlling Parkinson's tremors. The Activa Tremor Control Therapy consists of a wire surgically implanted deep within the brain and connected to a pulse generator, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, implanted near the collarbone. Whenever a tremor begins, patients can activate the device by passing a hand-held magnet over the generator. The system delivers a mild electrical stimulation that blocks the dysfunctional brain signals that cause tremor. Effects are often dramatic. "Before the implant, patients can't raise a glass of water or a spoonful of food to their mouths without spilling it or striking themselves in the face," says William Koller, M.D., neurology chairman at Kansas University Medical Center. "Within hours, these same patients are sipping tea from a cup and eating peas with a fork, with no signs of their disability." Surgery Options A brain operation shown to be helpful for many Parkinson's patients, especially those in late stages of the disease, is called pallidotomy. Doctors are not sure why the procedure works, but an October 1997 report in the New England Journal of Medicine stated that half of the patients in a pallidotomy study at Toronto Hospital, who before the surgery needed help in eating, dressing, and personal hygiene, were able to resume these activities independently. The study cautioned, however, that some of the surgery's effects diminished after two years and that the long-term effectiveness of the procedure still is unknown. Answered by Reynalda Warnes 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Dillon Gillespi 1 year ago.

Isradipine is a medicine that has recently shown to possibly stop Parkinson's disease in it's tracks. The stardard treatments are Levadopa (L-dopa), Carbadopa, Simemet. Answered by Lilly Casuat 1 year ago.

I help the right for someone to chosen, yet previous due time period abortions are really out of the question. through then a lady must have already favourite what she became gonna do. except medically mandatory previous due time period abortions must be banned. convinced I suggested it banned. I help options no longer abortions... Answered by Katrina Gigliotti 1 year ago.


Can anyone help find a lawyer to deal with requip case parallel to mirapex and permax?
Parkinsons drug inducing catastrophic compulsions that ruin marriages and peoples lives. Asked by Kaylee Sigona 1 year ago.

I don't know what area you live in, but, type in Martindale Hubble in a search engine and you will find a site that will allow you to find lawyers and law firms by location, firm size, particular practice and so forth. Good luck. Make sure they don't ask for any money up front. Their fee should be based on whether you win anything or not and no more than a 1/3. Answered by Jena Saccone 1 year ago.


How do i identify prescription pill i found? it is a large round pill that has a code # on the back.a625?
i found it on the floor and i just want to know what it is.. it has no score on it it is just round and large and it has a code thing on it that says a625. Asked by Jackson Gheewala 1 year ago.

Round? I know of a pill called Permax that used to be used to treat Parkinson's and is no longer on the market that says A625 on it but it's not really round. Check out the link it has a picture of it. Answered by Luanne Denzer 1 year ago.

theres a couple of choices that have the 625 code number on it, but the only one that really matches your description is oxycodone (bright orange, round). the other choices can be it, but they arent round. sorry, thats the only things that it may be. Answered by Terry Mccolloch 1 year ago.

Why do want to know? Flush it! Answered by Ricarda Lutes 1 year ago.


Hyperprolactenemia?
what is it? can i die? why do i have it? can i have kids? will it be with me forever? whats coming as far as treatments? Asked by Vennie Manrriquez 1 year ago.

This is a prolactin secreting non cancerous tumor of the pitutary gland. I have had this most of my adult life. For quite a long time, I took Parlodel, (bromocriptine), Permax,and then Dostinex, and the Dostinex actually shrunk it to the point it no longer shows up on a MRI, and I have been off the medication for two years and still have normal prolactin levels. I am not sure what causes them, but it can affect many systems in your body when it is uncontrolled. Mine started sometime in the early 1980's, before MRI, and I was very sick for about two years with everything from reproductive problems, neurological stuff, immune problems, and skin disorders. Once they found it, I was able to shrink and control it with medication. Since you know that you have it, if you are healthy otherwise, you may still be able to have kids. The main thing is that you are watched very closely in the end stages of pregnancy, because prolactin levels rise sharply and cause both milk production and uterine contractions, and in someone with a prolactioma, it can be dangerous. My doctor explained it as probably one of the reasons women used to die at childbirth, because of a ruptured pituitary. The tumor is actually fluid filled. They would probably take a child C-section for your safety. (My husband and I were too scared to try to have kids, but there are lots of women who do so safely.) Get a good neurologist and endocrinologist, and most likely it can be controlled with medications and not need surgery. From what I have heard, surgical removal of the tumor generally only lasts 5-6 years, and then it may grow back, but that was back in the mid 90's. Drastic cases have had complete removal of the pituitary gland, and that would require being on several hormones the rest of your life, and not being able to have kids. I doubt anyone does this anymore. The biggest pain for me was severe headaches and fainting, which is starting to show up in sore spots from all the falls. That was when I was on bromocriptine, and my prolactin levels were constantly fluctuating. The dostinex was much better for regulating and being more normal. Hope this helps. Its not a pleasant condition, but its not fatal. I know of three people with this, two women and one man, and one of the women has two kids. All live pretty normal lives, once the problem was discovered and treated. God bless. Answered by Drema Massar 1 year ago.

Hyperprolactinemia means your pituitary gland is making too much of a hormone called prolactin (the prolactin level measures over 25 ng/ml in most labs). This may be due to a benign tumor of the pituitary gland (pituitary adenoma), use of medications (birth control pills, antipsychotic medications, morphine), or use of marijuana. People who have an underactive thyroid (hypothyroidism) may have a mildly elevated prolactin level. Time of day may also affect prolactin levels, and borderline elevations should be confirmed by checking a level first thing in the morning before eating. Hyperprolactinemia is not all that uncommon -- in autopsy studies, between 10 and 30 percent of people have a pituitary adenoma, and in women who are amenorrheic (skipping periods for long stretches), a high prolactin level is found in one-third. Hyperprolactinemia may cause loss or irregularity of menstrual cycles, infertility due to lack of ovulation, and secretion of breast milk (ga lactorrhea). If a pituitary tumor grows large, it may cause headaches or impinge on the optic nerve, producing visual disturbances. If prolactin levels are elevated, and simple causes such as medication use have been ruled out, an X-ray of the head or a CT scan is done to look for a pituitary tumor. Treatment depends on symptoms, desire for pregnancy, and the size of the adenoma if one is found. Medical treatment is the first line in most cases and usually consists of bromocriptine (Parlodel). Nausea, headache and dizziness are common side effects with bromocriptine. Sometimes surgery is recommended to remove a pituitary adenoma. If prolactin levels are only slightly elevated and there are no symptoms, levels may merely be followed with periodic lab tests. General gynecologists may follow and treat patients with hyperprolactinemia. Complicated cases may be handled better by specialists such as reproductive or medical endocrinologists, and if surgery is indicated, it is done by a neurosurgeon. If you are not happy with the answers your doctor is giving you, you may wish to obtain a consultation with an endocrinologist. Answered by Alvina Casarella 1 year ago.

The drugs which you're taking now handle what's actual inflicting your situation. Homeopathy does not. that's barely water. do you be attentive to that to coach a homeopathic scientific care the homeopath will dilute a substance in water lots of cases that no longer one molecule of that substance is left? you could say that all of us it extremely is left is water. How can water help regularize your hormone tiers? it won't have the capacity to. I anticipate that in case you identify to renounce your cabergoline and shift to regardless of homeopathic therapy is given you, the indicators of hyperprolactenemia will come returned. believe your wellbeing practitioner, she knows what she's doing. She has the preparation and journey to look after situations consisting of yours. it is in sharp assessment to the homeopath who probable won't have the capacity to even diagnose an endocrine project consisting of hyperprolactenemia. stable luck! wish each little thing works out for the main suitable. Answered by Laree Neverman 1 year ago.


Is RLS a potential precursor of Parkinson's Disease?
I was just diagnosed with RLS, and it's treated with the same kind of medication as PD. Asked by Page Cyganiewicz 1 year ago.

The jury is still on the relationship of RLS and PD but not out on RLS being a Parkinson's disease precursor. It is thought that RLS symptoms may occur in PD patients after their diagnosis but that Restless Leg Syndrome is NOT a PD precursor. There are several PD medications which are also used for RLS but not all. Predominantly the dopaminergics which have been the primary PD meds for many years. Essentially this drug class of levodopa, a dopamine precursor, augments the dwindling dopamine supply in the PD brain by being absorbed in the small intestine and carried by the bloodstream to the brain where - unlike dopamine - the levodopa can cross the blood brain barrier where it is converted to dopamine. The FDA has not approved the most common PD med, Sinemet, because it is coupled with carbidopa which inhibits peripheral metabolism of levodopa in order to slow the process to prevent the lengthening medication effect off times, a side effect which can occur with prolonged usage. Nor has the FDA approved such drugs as Permax or Mirapex, both dopamine agonists due to the many negative side effects...I am guessing at the reason, not the lack of approval. Agonists act by binding to specific receptor sites to activate those sites. This class of drug is used in the early stages of the disease. Later is is no longer effective. Ropinirole (Requip) is the only drug in this class which appears to have been approved for RLS. Benzodiazepines, a group of sedatives such as diazepam, known to most of us as Valium, Restoril and clonazepam are often used because they can help with RLS insomnia. They are not that common in PD although sometimes used. My husband takes a specific calcium channel blocker for PD and not for his cardiac condition. The usage is off label but effective...in his case. Many medications are used as off-label usages but this does not always mean they are the best choices although sometimes they are. But the point I really want to make here is that although we now realize that my husband was exhibiting the very early precursor signs of PD for years before his diagnosis, the only thing that was DX'd and treated was his heart condition. Who knows, if he had been given this particular C-channel blocker instead of the beta blocker, perhaps the diagnosable onset of his PD would have been postponed. There are crossovers everywhere - that's what's so interesting about watching "House." It isn't just the craziness but the fact that the craziness is necessary to connect the interconnecting dots. Here's the thing, like PD, RLS is still considered predominantly idiopathic in origin...meaning....we're not sure yet. Both have a genetic aspect. With PD at this point about 15-20% of the cases are thought to be genetic with environmental triggers. In RLS almost 50% of the cases involve a family history suggesting that these cases may be genetic. In both PD and RLS, the younger the onset, the more the condition is considered to be genetically related. In RLS that progression appears to be slower, In PD, there may be too much iron, FE(II) may contribute to oxidative stress. In RLS it is anemia or too little iron that is a factor. When the iron deficiency is normalized, the RLS patient may see a reduction in symptoms. In PD there are clinical trials recruiting now to determine if CoQ10 in sufficient doses will provide symptom reduction. (My husband takes it for tremor reduction - we can tell when he's forgotten to take it.) In the which comes first and which second, my husband has more to worry about in terms of developing RLS than you do in developing PD. I really hope that eases your mind because it can be frightening to think OMG, I've got this bad thing, am I going to be getting something which can lead directly to my demise (Yes, it can despite what you may read) Since stress is a contributor to PD, you should stay calm and put this worry to bed Answered by Lashell Zedian 1 year ago.

You'll find that many drugs have more than just one thing they help. There are all types of seizure medications that are also used in things like depression for an example. You'll also find that RLS is also more common today because they now have a name for it. Parkinson's is on the list of precursors but that doesn't mean you'll come down with it either. Listen to your doctor and follow his/her advise. They are the best ones to tell you about your health and any possible problems. Good luck and God Bless Answered by Weldon Kveton 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Chantal Boggus 1 year ago.

That's correct but to the best of our knowledge restless legs doesn't progress to Parkinson's Answered by Milda Abina 1 year ago.

I saw it happen in my dear son who is now deceased. Answered by Shenika Schaffter 1 year ago.


New good answers for Restless Leg Syndrome RLS?
Thank you very much Dawn, I think I'm going to suggest your cooling gel to her. It does sound like great thinking, a good idea in the first place! Thank you very much :-) Asked by Neal Wishum 1 year ago.

I know it's unlikely, but I hope for new good answers to help with Restless Leg Syndrome, RLS. I have found and learned of reported success treating RLS with: Iron, ferritin B Vitamins, especially B-6 and B-12 Vitamin E Magnesium, Magnesium sulfate, Magnesium complexes Calcium, calcium citrate, calcium carbonate Folic acid, folate (or juice from dark green vegetables, mixed 50/50 with carrot juice) Quinine water at bedtime (tonic water) Kava (about 300 mg) Mildly tight bandage on affected limb before sleep or when suffering Mild exercise Push-ups against a wall Vertical push-ups Mental exercise like Crossword puzzles Hypnosis Meditation Warm or cold baths Vibration of affected limb Electric nerve stimulation Acupuncture Avoiding Caffeine, Nicotine Klonopin Clonazepam Sinemet Bromocriptine Pergolide Fluvoxamine Opiates Amantidine Amitriptyline Bromocriptine Darvon (propoxyphene) Benzodiazepines L-dopa / carbidopa 100/25 to 250/25 Propoxyphene, about 100 mg Propranolol Permax (pergolide) Naloxone (naltrexone) Neurontin (gabapentin) Depakote (divalproex) Tyrosine Trazodone Dopaminergic agents Ambien (zolpidem) She is under good medical care, so rest easy that anything will be considered with her Doctors first. Thank you for any good advise to help a loved one suffering. Answered by Lissa Kemmerlin 1 year ago.

Have you tried DEEP FREEZE GEL! I suffer terribly from Restless Legs and have done for many years, Try Deep freeze Gel which is available at nearly all chemists is brilliant! It will not cure you but will help. I have tried the cheaper ones but I think it is the tingle of the gel that seems to do the job!! I am determined that I will not take medication. I have suffered for about 20 years and believe me I have tried all the old wifes tales! The spray works as well but works out quite expensive! It is worth a try!! Good luck!! Answered by Paulette Krucke 1 year ago.

Hello RLS can be due to dopermine issues. An improvement in diet can help (foods to enhance natural dopermine), 5HTP can help, if she smoke's it can take a year from stopping before you see improvements, no stimulants of any kind before sleep - inc caffeine & sugar & stress reduction can all help. As with all these route results will not be instant. Medications for Parkinsons are avaliable, Mirapexin. Hypnotherapy can also be used. Therapy can also help where stress is an issue, especially if there is a chance it can be from something repressed. Pam Answered by Artie Anewalt 1 year ago.


Have Parkinsons and low blood pressure, dizziness, lightheadednesss anyone with similar problem?
I have parkinsons and low blood pressure affects me. When I am sitting it is normal 120/70 but falls to 80/40 when I stand up. I feel light headed and dizzy all day and even forced to sit down during chores or standing for a while. Taking Sinemet 100/25 - 3 half tabs per day. Neurologist has suggested a high... Asked by Fritz Tutela 1 year ago.

I have parkinsons and low blood pressure affects me. When I am sitting it is normal 120/70 but falls to 80/40 when I stand up. I feel light headed and dizzy all day and even forced to sit down during chores or standing for a while. Taking Sinemet 100/25 - 3 half tabs per day. Neurologist has suggested a high salt intake for time being. Diagnosed Sep 05, have had dizzyness continously since March 06. Answered by Mari Nawrocki 1 year ago.

LOW BLOOD PRESSURE IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE Linda P. Miller, R.N., Med Individuals with Parkinson’s disease may experience low blood pressure (hypotension) at some point during their treatment course. When it does occur, the patient may recognize and report sensations such as dizziness, lightheadedness, or weakness. If severe, hypotension can lead to fainting and/or falling. Normal blood pressure is regulated by specific reflexes in the nervous system. Parkinson’s disease can impair this reflex mechanism and result in lowered blood pressure. In addition to the disease process, anti-Parkinson’s medications as well as drugs used to treat other medical problems such as hypertension, heart disease, anemia or dehydration can directly affect blood pressure. Blood pressure decreases when blood vessels relax or lose their ability to constrict. If there is less fluid in the body, the circulating blood volume is decreased and blood pressure drops. The combined effect of these medications and other medical conditions may potentiate a hypotensive event. Low blood pressure usually presents itself as a side-effect of anti-Parkinson’s medications. Levodopa-carbidopa, dopamine agonists (Parlodel®, Permax®, Mirapex®, Requip®) and other anti-Parkinson’s agents, including Eldepryl®, Tasmar®, and Comtan®, may contribute to lowering the blood pressure as well as certain antidepressants and sleeping medications. Individuals have also used terms such as giddiness, sleepiness, tiredness, mental or visual blurring to describe what has actually turned out to be low blood pressure. These sensations will often intensify upon standing or after walking. Although any time of day is possible, many report the occurrence more in the early morning hours and/or 1-2 hours after receiving a dose(s) of medication. Normal blood pressure range is usually 100/60 to 140/90. Drops in blood pressure below 100/60 may result in the sensations mentioned above and a few individuals may not experience any warning signals. The emphasis is to seek the cause and treat the problem before an episode of fainting or falling occurs based on each person’s symptoms and associated conditions. Monitoring blood pressure should be routine in the comprehensive care plan of individuals with Parkinson’s disease. It is advisable that patients have their blood pressure taken in the sitting and standing positions periodically. MANAGEMENT OF POSTURAL HYPOTENSION There are a number of simple measures which can be employed to restore normal blood pressure regulation. 􀂃 Re-evaluate the patient's complete medication list. Adjustments of the medications themselves or the timing sequence might be all that is needed. 􀂃 Interventions such as increasing fluids and salt in the diet can be very effective. Drinking eight glasses of water per day and eating salty foods are commonly recommended. With more fluid in the body , circulating blood volume is enhanced and blood pressure increases. 􀂃 Drinking caffeinated coffee, in addition to adding fluid enhances blood vessel constriction, thus increasing blood pressure. 􀂃 Eat frequent, small meals as blood pressure is often lowered after a large meal. Alcohol should be avoided as it has a tendency to dilate blood vessels, contributing to lower blood pressure. 􀂃 Warm weather, hot baths, or any activities that cause blood vessels to relax should be avoided. 􀂃 Waist-high compression/support hose (i.e. Jobst® stockings or Sigvars® pantyhose) can be helpful in maintaining blood pressure. 􀂃 When rising from a lying position, sit on the edge of the bed for a few minutes; then stand up slowly, holding on to a secure support. 􀂃 Raise the head of the bed 30-40 degrees as lying flat for a prolonged period of time can contribute to lower blood pressure. 􀂃 Occasionally, salt tablets or medications such as fludrocortisone (Florinef®) and Pro-Amatine (Midodrine®) are prescribed. By increasing blood volume and promoting vascular constriction, these drugs help raise blood pressure. The risks associated with using these drugs can be controlled with close medical supervision. Some patients respond better using a combination of treatments. Always consult with your healthcare provider if you experience the sensations described herein and especially before altering your medication schedule. Answered by Margy Gaufusi 1 year ago.

I can't think of a reason why high blood sugar would cause low blood pressure, but they might have a mutual cause. For example, dehydration can lower blood pressure and raise blood sugar. An illness can do both, too. Have you been sick? Also, have you been diagnosed diabetic? That's a firmly diabetic reading, if accurate. Unless you're on a medication, like a steroid, there's no reason why a non-diabetic should ever be that high. Answered by Darnell Conney 1 year ago.


Best and latest medical tretment of parkinson,?
drug names of parkinson disease Asked by Camilla Tyacke 1 year ago.

The Food and Drug Administration approved Azilect (rasagiline), a new molecular entity, for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug is a monoamine oxidase type--B (MAO-B) inhibitor that blocks the breakdown of dopamine, a chemical that sends information to the parts of the brain that control movement and coordination. Another New Treatment On May 9, 2007, FDA announced the approval of Neupro (rotigotine transdermal system), a skin patch designed to treat symptoms of early Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a drug not previously approved in the United States. Neupro, manufactured by Schwarz Bioscience of Research Triangle Park, N.C., is the first transdermal patch approved for the treatment of symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Rotigotine is a member of the dopamine agonist class of drugs and is delivered continuously through the skin (transdermal) using a silicone-based patch that is replaced every 24 hours. A dopamine agonist works by activating dopamine receptors in the body, mimicking the effect of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Other Alternatives: A Brain "Pacemaker" FDA approved an important tool for controlling Parkinson's tremors. The Activa Tremor Control Therapy consists of a wire surgically implanted deep within the brain and connected to a pulse generator, similar to a cardiac pacemaker, implanted near the collarbone. Whenever a tremor begins, patients can activate the device by passing a hand-held magnet over the generator. The system delivers a mild electrical stimulation that blocks the dysfunctional brain signals that cause tremor. Effects are often dramatic. "Before the implant, patients can't raise a glass of water or a spoonful of food to their mouths without spilling it or striking themselves in the face," says William Koller, M.D., neurology chairman at Kansas University Medical Center. "Within hours, these same patients are sipping tea from a cup and eating peas with a fork, with no signs of their disability." Surgery Options A brain operation shown to be helpful for many Parkinson's patients, especially those in late stages of the disease, is called pallidotomy. Doctors are not sure why the procedure works, but an October 1997 report in the New England Journal of Medicine stated that half of the patients in a pallidotomy study at Toronto Hospital, who before the surgery needed help in eating, dressing, and personal hygiene, were able to resume these activities independently. The study cautioned, however, that some of the surgery's effects diminished after two years and that the long-term effectiveness of the procedure still is unknown. Answered by Retha Lamp 1 year ago.

The Parkinson's Reversing Breakthrough? Answered by Ronni Dummett 1 year ago.

Isradipine is a medicine that has recently shown to possibly stop Parkinson's disease in it's tracks. The stardard treatments are Levadopa (L-dopa), Carbadopa, Simemet. Answered by Veta Gallante 1 year ago.

I help the right for someone to chosen, yet previous due time period abortions are really out of the question. through then a lady must have already favourite what she became gonna do. except medically mandatory previous due time period abortions must be banned. convinced I suggested it banned. I help options no longer abortions... Answered by Pricilla Antilla 1 year ago.


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