Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019510/004.

Names and composition

"PEPCID PRESERVATIVE FREE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of FAMOTIDINE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019510/004 PEPCID PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019462/001 PEPCID FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
019462/002 PEPCID FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
019510/001 PEPCID FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019510/004 PEPCID PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019527/001 PEPCID FAMOTIDINE FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 40MG per 5ML
020249/001 PEPCID PRESERVATIVE FREE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020325/001 PEPCID AC FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
020325/002 PEPCID AC FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
020752/001 PEPCID RPD FAMOTIDINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 20MG
020752/002 PEPCID RPD FAMOTIDINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 40MG
020801/001 PEPCID AC FAMOTIDINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 10MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020801/002 PEPCID AC FAMOTIDINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 20MG
020902/001 PEPCID AC FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
021712/001 FLUXID FAMOTIDINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 20MG
021712/002 FLUXID FAMOTIDINE TABLET, ORALLY DISINTEGRATING/ORAL 40MG
075062/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075062/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075192/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE Injectable/ Injection 10MG per ML
075193/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE Injectable/ Injection 10MG per ML
075194/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE Injectable/ Injection 10MG per ML
075302/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075302/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075311/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075311/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075312/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075400/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075404/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075457/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075457/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075486/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075488/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075511/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075511/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075512/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075591/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
075607/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075607/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075610/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075611/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075611/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075622/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075639/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075639/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075650/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075650/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075651/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075669/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075674/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075684/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075704/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075704/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075705/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075707/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075708/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075709/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075715/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET, CHEWABLE/ORAL 10MG
075718/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075718/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075729/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE IN PLASTIC CONTAINER FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
075758/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
075786/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075786/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075789/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075793/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075793/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075799/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075805/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
075805/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
075813/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075825/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075870/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075905/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
075942/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
076101/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
076322/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE (PHARMACY BULK) FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
076324/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
077146/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077351/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
077352/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
077352/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
077367/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
078641/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
078642/001 FAMOTIDINE PRESERVATIVE FREE FAMOTIDINE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
078916/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
078916/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
090283/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
090283/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
090440/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 40MG per 5ML
090837/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091020/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 40MG per 5ML
201695/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE SUSPENSION/ORAL 40MG per 5ML
201995/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE FOR SUSPENSION/ORAL 40MG per 5ML
206530/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
206530/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 40MG
206531/001 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
206531/002 FAMOTIDINE FAMOTIDINE TABLET/ORAL 20MG

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Answered questions

I've Been To Many Vets And Have No Answers Regarding Random, Severe Dog Vomiting?
Wow, you guys have all provided amazing and thorough answers, thank you! I am going to add a couple of details here, just in case it helps. My dog is a 6.5 year old Wheaten Terrier. The new grain free food I'm trying her on is Wellness Core brand, so hopefully that at least keeps her healthy. I've been... Asked by Tameka Hinsch 1 year ago.

I'm desperately trying to see if anyone has a clue about this issue or can give me some guidance. I have visited the vet (emergency included) about 5 times in the last 9 months over this problem and not one doctor has any clue what may be going on. I've had all sorts of tests for kidney issues, liver issues, pancreas, etc., and my dog is fine on all levels. Here's what's wrong: Every month or two, during the evening (always the evening and middle of the night!) my 6 year old wheaten terrier will begin vomiting violently. She begins licking all the floors in the house and eating weeds to try to make herself throw up more. She usually ends up regurgitating food a couple times, then she vomits older digested food, then she vomits liquid, then foam, then bile, then any sips of water she tries to drink. It's a terrifying ordeal for everyone that takes about 6 hours and 12 vomiting episodes before subsiding. I then fast her the next day, take her to the vet to get subcutaneous fluids for hydration, and then give her potato and chicken for the next few days with Pepcid AC and sometimes Cerenia for nausea. She then seems to go back to normal after a couple days. The vets have only ever suggested they believe it's food related, like she ate something bad. The problem is my dogs are house-dogs, only going outside to a fenced in potty area to do business, and they only go on walks leashed, my house is clean, they only eat dog food and dog treats on occasion. I am overzealous nowadays about keeping my eye on them, so I am fairly certain this is not caused by garbage or other random foodstuffs she's getting. My dog had been on Kibbles N Bits in her younger years and she did vomit a few times every 3 months or so, so we've had her on Kirkland food from Costco the past year. Other than the severe vomiting, she has not had any health changes. She's always been a somewhat lethargic dog since being a puppy. Mellow, good eater, likes to go on walks, chew her Nylabones, etc. I am now trying her on a grain free high end dog food in a desperate attempt to change the course of things, but I'm worried this won't help. I know for a fact she can't eat rice, as it gives her bad diarrhea. In case this matters, the dog burps after every meal and suffers from 'reverse sneezing' randomly. Please help me! Rest assured, we will be going back to the vet many, many times in the future. It would be great if I could ask the vet for specific tests I may not know of is all. Answered by Wan Moellman 1 year ago.

Wow, you guys have all provided amazing and thorough answers, thank you! I am going to add a couple of details here, just in case it helps. My dog is a 6.5 year old Wheaten Terrier. The new grain free food I'm trying her on is Wellness Core brand, so hopefully that at least keeps her healthy. I've been giving her boiled chicken and potato the past few days and she seems okay with this, though now she is picking out the potato pieces and dropping them on the floor. I live in southern AZ, so it's entirely possible that homes in the neighboring area spray for scorpions, spiders, and weeds and that there is chemical carry over to our home. How to prove this, I have no idea, and I'm not even sure what we would do to help her in that case. My husband and I have stopped all pest treatment at our home in the last year in case that was a contributor. I have another dog, a mini-schnauzer of the same age, who is constantly with the wheaten and they eat all the same things and Answered by Lloyd Gaudin 1 year ago.

Grain-free is a good idea. Maybe you should try switching to a really good brand of food, like Blue Buffalo (they have plenty of grain-free meals), Canidae, Fromm, Wellness, Holistic Blend, etc. because I'm not exactly sure how good the Kirkland is. If you haven't read the ingredients, look at them and see if it has some type of meat (not just "meat" but specified, like chicken or beef), veggies, or fruit listed as one of the first ingredients. If it does, it's a good thing. If it has a corn product listed as one of the first, it's not good. Are there any food colorings? Is there any BHA or BHT (preservatives, even though I don't think that Costco would sell food with that)? Does it have any "meal" or "by-product"? How much protein content does it have (around 20%-25% is good)? If the food has any BHA/BHT, food coorings, "meal" or "by-product", corn, or soy, it's not a very good dog food. Maybe your dog just has a sensitive stomach? However, I don't think she would vomit THAT much if her stomach was sensitive. I used to have a labrador whose stomach was sensitive, and on occasion, he would randomly throw up his food, so we wouldn't feed him for the rest of the day, then give him food in the evening and he'd be fine. It took us a while to choose him a suitable dog food which didn't cause him to vomit. Whenever his tummy hurt, he vomited once or twice, maybe a third small time (on occasion), but never as much as you describe your dog to vomit. I am actually surprised they didn't find ANYTHING at all, because the vomiting of food, water, bile, foam, and all of this could be symptoms of pancreatitis. The labrador we had got pancreatitis later on and he vomited any food or water he consumed as well as bile (after not eating for several hours). When we took him to the vet (which is when we found out about his condition), he got an ultrasound, and the vet said that there was inflammation of his pancreas and that was what was causing him to throw up anything he consumed. Anyway, how many doctors tested the pancreas? If only one, consider taking another test at another doctor and getting a second opinion. Vets can really screw up sometimes. Also, another symptom of pancreatitis is the belly swelling up/bloating, so if you ever see this, it could be pancreatitis. That's as much as I can help you, I don't know what else it could possibly be. Oh, one more thing, next time your dog has one of those vomiting episodes, take her to the vet and ask them to do a very thourough ultrasound of the pancreas. Maybe the blood there for somet reason looks normal (maybe test isn't done right?) but the pancreas is actually inflamed. The vet will be able to see this on an ultrasound. If nothing shows up, ask them to look at the rest of the organs with an ultrasound. Answered by Modesta Nayman 1 year ago.

All good answers but I would definately put her on probiotics and some digestive enzymes. NaturesfarmacyWEST.com makes a good one or you can get some from a local health food store. This can help with the burping at least. The problem with putting dogs on an acid blocker like pepcid is that reduced acid means increased digestion time. And dog's stomachs empty fairly quickly. So giving her something that makes food sit in her stomach longer can only compound the problem. So by doing the opposite, giving probiotics and digestive enzymes, you are encouraging healthy gut flora and an environment that promotes optimal emptying time for the stomach. Good luck and I hope things are better soon! Answered by Sherron Mainiero 1 year ago.

Did they not discuss toxic exposure? If the food was eaten ok the rest of the week, it's not the food. It's something else she's getting into. Do your neighbors do lawn treatments? Wind drift can bring this poison spray up to 2 houses away, putting it on your grass and exposing your dogs to it. There are also pesticides put around the house that a dog can react to (sprays for ants, box elder bugs, etc.). What did the dog do in the hours prior to the vomiting? Was she outdoors when something was sprayed? Did your city spray for mosquitoes or tent caterpillars after dark? Is someone watering their pesticide ladden garden and she's getting into the runoff? Is she chewing on something out there? Did they talk to you about pancreatitis? IBD? Have you tried her on some raw foods? Answered by Grace Keye 1 year ago.

take away the nylabone, made my dog sick to. Grain free is a good start, and stay away from the high nutrient foods like blue Buffalo. feed her a Salmon food this is easy on the stomach. After feeding her make her stay calm for about a half hour to allow the food to digest. If you are feeding her a food that the bites are small she may not be chewing them up so it may take the food longer to digest try a lager bite. Nutro has a grain free food and it is not that costly, also there are many foods with no corn wheat or soy witch can effect the belly. Nutro has a lamb or herring food that is corn wheat and soy free. If it continues see a different vet. Good luck Answered by Corinna Ruscher 1 year ago.

It sounds as though your dog has food allergies. Try her on Blue Buffalo. It's the best I know of to feed. I'd take her to an Allergist. Do you live anywhere close to a Veterinarian College, such as Auburn or Atlanta? If not, do try and locate one and make an appointment. Answered by Nobuko Dallago 1 year ago.

Did they rule out Megaoesophagus (caused by congenital blood vessel stricture malformation)? What about Giardia parasites - that can so easily by cyclical and start from bird poo in water or on the grass. Worm burden... has that been addressed? Answered by Kirstie Balding 1 year ago.

Try her on a raw diet. It could also be the dog is getting into something. Dogs vomit from time to time. Just like you or I do. Answered by Roma Shaud 1 year ago.

Has she been checked for trachea damage like a collapsed trachea? Answered by Vito Jaffy 1 year ago.


I have a peptic ulcer and no health insurance. I was wondering if anyone knows what I can do to stop the pain.
I've had this pain for years and I currently do not have health insurance and can not go to the doctor. For the past three days I have been in a lot of pain. I've tried milk, bananas, Zantac 150, and Pepcid AC and that was all in one day... I had moments when the pain wasn't as bad but it was still... Asked by Dionne Thormahlen 1 year ago.

I've had this pain for years and I currently do not have health insurance and can not go to the doctor. For the past three days I have been in a lot of pain. I've tried milk, bananas, Zantac 150, and Pepcid AC and that was all in one day... I had moments when the pain wasn't as bad but it was still there. If you have any ideas that would be great. Thanks! Answered by Lloyd Wrinkles 1 year ago.

Hi Deztani Here are some ideas on how to heal the issue. Causes of Peptic Ulcer In addition to bacterial and viral infections, peptic ulcer can also be caused by poor diet, food allergies, nutritional deficiencies, alcohol, smoking, and chronic stress. As mentioned above, various commonly used medications can also cause problems, especially asprin. In addition to aspirin, other NSAIDs linked to peptic ulcers include Advil, Clinoril, Feldene, Ibuprofen, Nalfon, Nuprin, Orudis, Oruvail, Relafen, and Tolectin. In severe cases of ulcer, internal bleeding can occur due to thinning of the lining of the stomach and/or intestines. Quick Action Plan for Peptic Ulcer 1. Avoid all sugars, refined carbohydrates, sodas, milk and dairy products, processed foods, preservatives, artificial sweeteners (especially aspartame), corn syrup, alcohol, white bread and white flour products, pastries, and hydrogenated and trans-fatty oils, as well as all foods to which your are allergic. 2. Emphasize organic, fresh vegetables and non-citrus fruits, organic grains, as well as organic, free-range meats and poultry and wild-caught fish. 3. Drink plenty of pure, filtered water throughout the day. 4. Miso soup and strained vegetable broth, made from cooking down a variety of organic vegetables, are healing and easy to digest, making them especially valuable for any digestive problems. 5. To reduce symptoms, eat small meals throughout the day, rather than following the traditional three large meals per day routine. 6. Certain herbs have anti-inflammatory properties, which can help repair the lining of the stomach and intestines. The best herbs for this are Echinacea and goldenseal, aloe vera, cayenne pepper, chamomile, licorice root, and slippery elm. 7. Therapeutic juices include raw cabbage juice by itself, or mixed with either carrot or celery juice; raw potato juice; wheatgrass juice; carrot, spinach juice; carrot juice; carrot, beet cucumber. 8. Soothing baths two to five nights a week can help to relieve symptoms. 9. If you smoke, stop, and also avoid exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke. In addition, learn how to effectively cope with and manage stress. 10. If you are currently taking aspirin or other NSAIDs, consider replacing them with safer, more effective natural remedies. 11. Nutritional supplements include vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin C, and zinc, taken with a multivitamin/multimineral formula. Essential fatty acids, especial omega-3 oils, are also recommended, as are bismuth and the amino acid L-glutamine. Linseed oil can also be effective. It can be added to salads or over drizzled lightly steamed vegetables. Herbal Medicine: Both Echinacea and goldenseal are useful for treating peptic ulcers because of their ability to improve immune function, as well as their anti-inflammatory properties, which can help repair the lining of the stomach and intestines. These herbs also have strong natural antibiotic properties, making them useful for dealing with bacterial infections that often cause peptic ulcer. Shiitake mushrooms can be helpful due to their antiviral properties, as can aloe vera, cayenne pepper, chamomile, licorice root, and slippery elm. Other useful herbs include calendula, linden flower, marshmallow, meadowsweet, and valerian. Soothing herbal infusions include one part chamomile and two parts marshmallow root, or one part chamomile and one part linden flower or valerian (take one teaspoon three times a day). Homeopathy: Useful homeopathic remedies include, Arsen alb., Acidum nit., Belladonna, Calendula, Hamamelis, Lachesis, Nux vomica, and Silicea. Best of health to you Answered by Brynn Pardy 1 year ago.

I had the same thing, eliminate beef for a while, try grilled 40 oz chicken cutlets with no preservatives or solution added to chicken also eat small portions throughout day drink alkaline water 8.0 or higher I use eternal from new Zealand natural water alkaline it kills pepsin. add aloe juice if you have coughing or as a extra also UNE Galviscon liquid or tablets it coats the stomach and the only antacid THAT STOPS THE SPLASH BACK INTO THE ESAPHAGUS. very important I healed with these things no corn, or broccoli or fatty meats for 6 months... Answered by Venetta Lorion 1 year ago.


Suggestion for stomach ulcer medicine?
Well, here goes...I just found out I have a stomach ulcer. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what the best medication is to take for this from experience? My doc prescribed Pepcid. Surely there's got to be something better than this! Asked by Skye Wymore 1 year ago.

Hi ROdam Here are some remedies to correct your issue. Causes of Peptic Ulcer In addition to bacterial and viral infections, peptic ulcer can also be caused by poor diet, food allergies, nutritional deficiencies, alcohol, smoking, and chronic stress. As mentioned above, various commonly used medications can also cause problems, especially asprin. In addition to aspirin, other NSAIDs linked to peptic ulcers include Advil, Clinoril, Feldene, Ibuprofen, Nalfon, Nuprin, Orudis, Oruvail, Relafen, and Tolectin. In severe cases of ulcer, internal bleeding can occur due to thinning of the lining of the stomach and/or intestines. Quick Action Plan for Peptic Ulcer 1. Avoid all sugars, refined carbohydrates, sodas, milk and dairy products, processed foods, preservatives, artificial sweeteners (especially aspartame), corn syrup, alcohol, white bread and white flour products, pastries, and hydrogenated and trans-fatty oils, as well as all foods to which your are allergic. 2. Emphasize organic, fresh vegetables and non-citrus fruits, organic grains, as well as organic, free-range meats and poultry and wild-caught fish. 3. Drink plenty of pure, filtered water throughout the day. 4. Miso soup and strained vegetable broth, made from cooking down a variety of organic vegetables, are healing and easy to digest, making them especially valuable for any digestive problems. 5. To reduce symptoms, eat small meals throughout the day, rather than following the traditional three large meals per day routine. 6. Certain herbs have anti-inflammatory properties, which can help repair the lining of the stomach and intestines. The best herbs for this are Echinacea and goldenseal, aloe vera, cayenne pepper, chamomile, licorice root, and slippery elm. 7. Therapeutic juices include raw cabbage juice by itself, or mixed with either carrot or celery juice; raw potato juice; wheatgrass juice; carrot, spinach juice; carrot juice; carrot, beet cucumber. 8. Soothing baths two to five nights a week can help to relieve symptoms. 9. If you smoke, stop, and also avoid exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke. In addition, learn how to effectively cope with and manage stress. 10. If you are currently taking aspirin or other NSAIDs, consider replacing them with safer, more effective natural remedies. 11. Nutritional supplements include vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin C, and zinc, taken with a multivitamin/multimineral formula. Essential fatty acids, especial omega-3 oils, are also recommended, as are bismuth and the amino acid L-glutamine. Linseed oil can also be effective. It can be added to salads or over drizzled lightly steamed vegetables. Best of health to you Cheers Answered by Ming Bloemker 1 year ago.

If your Ulcer is a result of GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease aka Acid Reflux) then I suggest first getting medication to calm down that, such as Prilosec or Nexium. If you are taking any medications like Antibiotics, Bisphosphonates(Fosamax, Boniva, Actonel), Iron supplements, Pain relievers (ibuprofen, Advil, Motrin, Neproxen, aspirin), Potassium supplements, Anticholinergics(Ditropan), Calcium channel blockers, Narcotics (opioid, Lortab, Norco, Vicodin),Progesterone, Quinidine, Sedatives or tranquilizers, or Theophylline, you should probably lessen the amount or stop taking it all together. you might consider asking your doctor to order an EGD, and see if they van take biopsies to check for any abnormalities in your stomach tissue.You should probably get a test done to see if you have H. pylori bacteria in your stomach (they just take a blood sample and send it to lab, should be back in about ten days) and if you do you should try treating it with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), such as nexium or zantac, and certain antibiotics(I don't know the name of these). you should also ask to be tested for Helicobacter, a bacteria commonly associated with ulcers. after you start taking medicine to cure any bacteria you have you should start with a diet avoiding any Acidic food, gaseous foods, spicy foods, and foods that generally upset your stomach. that with the help of the Dexilant should let your Ulcers heal. I hope this helps! Answered by Noelle Senesenes 1 year ago.

Stomach ulcers are treated for 2 weeks with 2 antibiotics combined with a stomach acid inhibitor. It sounds like you got only half the treatment. Answered by Shanae Gendron 1 year ago.

there is no way to acually 'cure' it.... therer are lots of remedys that may take the pain of it away like just vertually antacids ( doctors will prescribe good ones but a ulcer will never just get up and leave. i keep mine under control with just taking it easy on fizzy drinks, coffee and alcohol (oh and acidic foods like olives) good luck! Answered by Arlean Buhrke 1 year ago.

I found some good info here. Answered by Theresia Boddeker 1 year ago.


My cat keeps vomiting and I have no clue why?
Lol, Tonya, I said he's on grain free food, so no, there's no wheat or corn. Asked by Shaniqua Nard 1 year ago.

A long time ago, my cat was on science diet. When I found out that Science Diet isn't really a good food, I switched him to a more natural dry cat food (By Nature Organics). I was forced to switch to a different cat food a couple years after made by Organix. He puked fairly often on both of the more natural dry foods.. He had a problem with gorging his food, though, and his vomit usually consisted of whole pieces of kibble. Eventually I switched all of my cats to wet food (Wellness grain free chicken) because I found it it's just way better for them, and on top of that one of my other two cats had bladder crystals so she needed to be on a wet food. Also, I thought it would probably help my male kitty with the vomiting issue since it pretty much already pre-digested right out of the can. But unfortunately, he's still throwing up, so now I'm just getting really worried. He's not losing any weight though; it's really strange. Is it possible he developed some kind of food allergy? I fear going to the vet and asking (though I will eventually just to figure out what the issue is) because I think they're going to tell me to put my cat on some crappy Hill's prescription diet that they sell there at the office that's filled with gluten. Answered by Jeni Marseilles 1 year ago.

Any vet pushing the crappy regular Hills food isn't a good vet. Some of the PRESCRIPTION foods are better though, especially the diabetic one. There are other options on all prescription foods, you're not limited to Hills. Royal Canin does a full line, they're much better with their ingredients. However, you have a cat who is ill, waiting isn't doing him any good, and trying to guess his problem means it's not being taken care of. Get him in for a checkup and talk to the vet about what it IS and what it ISN'T. Until you know, you can't fix anything. If it's a bowel obstruction, that's deadly. If it's a food allergy, the 'cure' is to switch to a food with fewer ingredients to narrow down the list of what's causing the problem. You ask which to start with and see if there is improvement. If it's IBD that means the cat isn't absorbing right with the stomach and upper intestine--he needs a different food. If it's a highly touchy stomach, it could be as simple as giving the cat 1/4 tablet of Pepcid A/C once a day (it's cat safe). Ours had that issue. Take a poop sample in, they need to see what's coming out the other end, and if he has an internal parasite or a stomach bacteria like guardia causing the problem. Bring in the can labels so they can see what he's eating. One of ours had an allergy reaction to rosemary extract, we had to put her on a food where it was far lower down in the ingredient list and she improved. Another had reactions to certain preservative chemicals in canned and dry food. We had to switch him to 1/2 raw and 1/2 canned to get his system to calm down. Answered by Fidel Pauls 1 year ago.


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