Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020936/001.

Names and composition

"PAXIL CR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020936/001 PAXIL CR PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 12.5MG BASE
020936/002 PAXIL CR PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
020936/003 PAXIL CR PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 37.5MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020031/001 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
020031/002 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
020031/003 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
020031/004 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 50MG BASE
020031/005 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
020710/001 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per 5ML
020885/001 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020885/002 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020885/003 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020885/004 PAXIL PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020936/001 PAXIL CR PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 12.5MG BASE
020936/002 PAXIL CR PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
020936/003 PAXIL CR PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 37.5MG BASE
075356/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
075356/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
075356/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
075356/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
075566/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
075566/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
075566/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
075566/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
075716/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
075716/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
075716/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
075716/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076618/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076618/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076618/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
076618/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
076968/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
076968/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
076968/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
076968/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077082/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
077082/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
077082/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
077082/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077395/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE SUSPENSION/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE per 5ML
077584/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
077584/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
077584/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
077584/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
077873/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 12.5MG BASE
077873/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
078026/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
078026/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
078026/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
078026/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
078194/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
078194/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
078194/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
078194/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
078406/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
078406/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
078406/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
078406/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
078902/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
078902/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
078902/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
078902/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
091427/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 37.5MG BASE
203854/001 PAROXETINE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
203854/002 PAROXETINE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
203854/003 PAROXETINE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
203854/004 PAROXETINE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE
204134/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 12.5MG BASE
204134/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
204134/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 37.5MG BASE
204744/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 12.5MG BASE
204744/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 25MG BASE
204744/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 37.5MG BASE
205528/001 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
205528/002 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
205528/003 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
205528/004 PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE PAROXETINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE

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Answered questions

Weaning off Paxil CR?
I haave been on Paxil CR for the past 3 yrs. to help mask my panic disorder. It has worked well, but I feel the need to wean off and see if I can learn to cope on my own. I know to wean slowly,and I have studied the websites with advice, but these sites only mention Paxil not Paxil CR,(controlled release) which... Asked by Scott Lais 1 year ago.

I haave been on Paxil CR for the past 3 yrs. to help mask my panic disorder. It has worked well, but I feel the need to wean off and see if I can learn to cope on my own. I know to wean slowly,and I have studied the websites with advice, but these sites only mention Paxil not Paxil CR,(controlled release) which comes in different mg's. I did speak to my doctor, but she was not helpful in my attempt to wean slowly. She just wrote me a rx for half the dose I normally take. I do not have insurance so it is hard for me to save enough money to see another doctor for different advice. Can any one help me to wean slowly without cutting the pills,(they crumble)? Has anyone weaned from PaxilCR? How did it go? Answered by Derrick Requarth 1 year ago.

How to Stop Taking Paxil, Paxil CR: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your of the CR dosage by 12.5mg every four days. You should probably make it five days because Paxil's discontinuation syndrome is so harsh. That means putting up with the suck-*** side effects for longer, but trust me, it really sucks less this way. Based on the 15-20 hour half-life. If your doctor says something that's slower than that, go for it! I'm all for slower discontinuations. Four to five days is the fastest you can step down the dosage. How To Safely Stop Taking Psychiatric & Anti-Epileptic Medications Lots of people hit this site wanting to know how to stop taking their crazy meds. That's understandable. There are many good reasons to stop taking the meds. There are also many bad reasons to stop taking them. I'll try to help you sort out the good from the bad reasons. But if you do have good reasons, you have to stop taking the meds safely. Sudden or rapid discontinuation can lead to many problems. This guide is just to use to make sure that you and your doctor have worked out a good discontinuation schedule for a medication, presuming you have the luxury for such. You must work with your doctor! You are not qualified to make this decision on your own. Got that? What you and your doctor need to do is work out a discontinuation schedule for any medication. This is the reverse of the titration schedule (if any, which I'm actually against), which was the plan of how your dosage was increased. The discontinuation schedule is the plan of how you'll decrease the amount of a med you'll take. Ask your doctor what it is based on. There are three things a discontinuation schedule should be based on: the half-life of a drug looking for the return of any symptoms experience with taking someone off a med The last one is either other people going off the same med or you coming off of the same or other meds. Or both. If you're lucky enough to get an explanation from your doctor, the half-life of a psychiatric medication is often explained like this, "It's out of your body in that many hours, but it's still in your brain." That's a gross oversimplification, but it's close enough for government work. Here's a way to picture the half-life in action. Take a glass and fill it half full with some beverage. Now fill it the rest of the way with water. OK, now empty it half of the mixture out and top it off with water. Keep doing that until you have something you'd drink and that could pass as water. The number of times it took to do that is the half-life, expressed in a quantity of water, of a particular beverage. Try it with a different beverage and you'd get a different half-life. Half-life means how long it takes for half of the metabolites to get flushed out of your system. The half-lives of meds is expressed in time because the process of adding water to the glass is more-or-less constant in your body. And in the environment for the half-lives of radioactive materials. So using Effexor (venlafaxine), if you're down to your last 37.5mg dose after 20 hours you'll have 18.75mg left in your body. Twenty hours after that you'll have about 9.4mg left. And so forth until it's gone, about 80-100 hours after your final 37.5mg tablet. Please, don't get all Xeno's Paradoxical on me, after four or five passes, as it were, a med is so broken down that the effects shouldn't be noticeable. The only real variable is not if it's four or five times the length of the half-life, but if you metabolize the med quickly or slowly. These half-life numbers are the based on the arithmetic mean averages from clinical trials and studies. Read the pharmacokinetics section of the med's PI sheet carefully to see what the known range of a drug's half-life is. All right so where does this "In your brain but out of your body" come from? Well when they measure half-life in humans during the clinical trials it's by blood tests. With critters in earlier tests it's a different story. Anyway, the drugs do clear out of your blood a lot faster than they do from your brain. But they hang around other organs, usually your liver and kidneys, maybe others, for four to five times the period of the half-life. So while they do all their work in your brain and that's where they like to hang out, there are other parts of your body that the meds might be hanging around as well. It all depends on the med, your body and a host of other factors. So "Out of your body but still in your brain" is mostly true and covers much of the concept neatly in the time allowed in a typical doctor's appointment. Anyway, the metabolites that are in your liver, kidneys and digestive system are what might be causing a bunch of the side effects you're complaining about in the first place. So if you take the half-life of a med and multiply it by five that's the minimum number of hours between when you can next lower your dosage by whatever the lowest dosage the med comes in is. The problem, of course, is that some meds get metabolized more than once, they have active metabolites, or they have really short half-lives and you'd be coming off to fast to give yourself a good idea to know if it was a good idea or not to stop taking this particular med. However, I do note in most of the med's profiles what the minimum amount of time that I recommend is between stepping down each dosage. Monitor return of symptoms. Unless you're replacing one med with another you have to be on the lookout for symptoms coming back. In this case you'll want to reduce the dosages really slowly, taking a couple weeks at a time to get an idea of how you'll be doing with less and less of a med. You'll want to keep some kind of diary, a blog, something to keep track of how you feel every day. At some point if it starts to suck, then you know you've lowered your dosage too far. But, hey, maybe you can get along at a lower dosage! Nothing wrong with that. From what I've read on support fora and in e-mails I get I think a lot of people wind up on dosages that are too high. When it comes to affective mood disorders, panic/anxiety disorders and many other psychiatric disorders we can afford to experiment with lower dosages. Things may hurt us emotionally for a bit, but we can get back up to a dosage where we were OK and we'll be OK again. It's not that big a deal. For schizophrenia, for epilepsy and other disorders the decision to lower dosages isn't that simple. Again a doctor must always be involved with this decision. The most important thing to remember is this - your symptoms have gone away BECAUSE THE MEDS ARE WORKING! It's not necessarily because you've been cured. There are no cures for a lot of these disorders. It's not your fault that you're crazy, but it is your responsibility to stay as sane as possible. You're not the only person you hurt if you really flip out. If you've been taking anticonvulsants (also known as "mood stabilizers" in Bipolarland) for a few months or longer and need to stop, you can't stop cold turkey at all. Unlike stopping SSRIs the effects of sudden discontinuation aren't just viciously unpleasant, they are dangerous. You run the risk of having seizures on top of your bipolar getting worse. These run the gamut from partial complex or absence seizures to tonic-clonic grand mals. Maybe you'll have this problem, maybe you won't, there's no way to tell. If you never had a seizure before that doesn't mean you won't start flopping around like a fish out of water. The risk is worse if you're taking a lithium variant, and/or any antidepressant, especially Wellbutrin (bupropion hydrochloride). Anticonvulsants need to be gradually discontinued to prevent any seizure activity from happening. With gradual discontinuation the worst most people experience is slight dizziness, confusion and sensitivity to sound and/or light. If you're already taking another anticonvulsant and are in the therapeutic range already, then you can probably stop one cold turkey with little risk of seizures, presuming you have no past history of seizure activity. You'll feel other wacky effects, and those will vary from med to med, but you won't be risking seizures. Let me qualify that, it has to be an anticonvulsant that is known to be effective for you. If it's a new anticonvulsant, well, you just never know. The odds are in your favor at least. If you do have a history of seizure activity, stopping any anticonvulsant cold turkey is never a decision you should make based upon information gleaned from any stupid website on the goddamn Internet you jackass, you should be discussing that with at least two neurologists! Get off your computer and on the telephone and start making appointments! SSRI discontinuation syndrome. Read the article to learn more about it. SSRIs are some of the most physically addictive drugs in existence. Addictive isn't really the right word, you develop an intense physical and psychological dependency without a craving and urge to abuse them (unless you're bipolar, then you may abuse them), but addictive is close enough. To suddenly stop taking them is to feel so very much worse than you were feeling before you ever considered taking meds. There's a term, "brain shivers." You'll know it if you ever experience it. Mouse and I have kicked opiates and we have kicked SSRIs cold turkey. We'll take the opiate kick. If you're taking an atypical antipsychotic along with an SSRI, the discontinuation is often not nearly as bad, so if you have some Seroquel (quetiapine) on hand for insomnia, you'll want to take some for your SSRI discontinuation. Not everyone experiences SSRI discontinuation syndrome, and for those who do the effects range from mild to extreme. Not all doctors recognize this as an issue, so that sucks even more. Be sure to read the section about how long it takes for a med to clear out of your system and wait that long to taper down to the next stage in your dosage. And, as Paula writes in her article, invest in a pill splitter. Another option is to switch to the liquid form that many of the meds have available, that way you can reduce your dosage by as much as you damn well please and take as long as you can afford to discontinue to med. If it's really bad you may want to switch to liquid Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) for the final discontinuation. That can take a very long time, but because of Prozac's 9.3 day half-life it usually has the mildest discontinuation syndrome effects of all the SSRIs. The long half-life is a double-edged sword. If you're on a high dosage and especially sensitive to the discontinuation syndrome, it will take forever to get off of Prozac, but at least it won't be as bad as the other meds. If you're not as sensitive to the discontinuation syndrome, Prozac's long half-life makes it easier to discontinue than any of the other SSRIs. Abrupt discontinuation of high doses of benzodiazepines can lead to seizures in addition to dysphoria, insomnia, muscle cramps, vomiting and sweating. If you do wind up taking them daily for longer than four weeks and don't build up a tolerance and don't abuse them, be sure to refill your prescription a few days before running out, just in case something happens to prevent you from getting that refill when you do run out. Otherwise a normal discontinuation schedule is usually all it takes to safely and painlessly withdrawal from benzodiazepines. There's just one proviso - you can only discontinue from Xanax (alprazolam) using Xanax. All other benzos are interchangeable for purposes of discontinuation, but not Xanax. It figures that Xanax is the most addictive of them all. The withdrawal from atypical antipsychotics has been likened to taking small amounts of psychedelic drugs. Whether that is a good or bad thing is up to individual experience. Others get rebound symptoms for a day or two, sometimes longer and that's about it. The big problem is that the bipolar and the schizophrenic are the worst about stopping their meds. The good news is you can just start right back up on the atypicals and get back to where you were in controlling your symptoms. There isn't much in the way of good evidence if meds are effective if you stop them and start taking them again. So far I've found some studies that indicate you're screwed if you stop taking Paxil (paroxetine) and then want to start taking it again. I've come across some anecdotal evidence (i.e. people's experiences) that indicate the same for lithium, the valproates and Lamictal (lamotrigine). As mentioned above, the atypical antipsychotics seem to be OK with people who use them as required, as are the benzodiazepines. There are also people who rotate through SSRIs because of SSRI poop-out, with mixed results on Paxil's second use. The vaunted weight-loss effect of Topamax (topiramate) is a one-time offer. If you stop taking Topamax then take it again the odds are it won't affect your appetite. So you have to take into consideration that the med that is working well for you now may not work so well for you again if you stop taking it and want to take it again. Please read 12 Steps to Stay on Drugs to make sure you're not just addicted to some of your crazy behaviors. Strange as it may sound, some people are. There's also a physical condition known as anosognosia that prevents people from recognizing that they are ill. I think that it can be extended to where it prevents people from dealing with their illness in the proper way. It affects approximately 50% of the bipolar and schizophrenic communities. I'm pretty sure I have it. I went for years without getting the right meds to treat my bipolar and seizure disorders, and even now I have days when I want to throw away all of my meds and just go back to using my Soul of Iron to deal with all of my problems. It's just crazy so I don't do it. Just be damned sure you're stopping a med for the right reasons. For some disorders meds are temporary parts of an overall therapy strategy to get your brain working in a less messed-up way. For example - depression or panic/anxiety disorder the meds may be permanent or they may be temporary. But for epilepsy and bipolar disorder, for instance, the odds are that the meds, or some kind of treatment like VNS or TMS, is going to be a long-term, if not permanent part of your life. It's going to be many years of taking the right meds before you can even think of not taking any. Anticonvulsants ("Mood stabilizers") do, in theory, prevent the brain from getting into a state that causes seizures and/or mood swings. But it takes a long, long time to train your brain to stop acting that way. If it can happen at all. Epilepsy kills. Mood swings are dangerous. You are literally taking your life in your hands when you're considering a slow, steady discontinuation of anticonvulsants. Answered by Theodora Zigich 1 year ago.

Weaning Off Paxil Answered by Teofila Swearegene 1 year ago.

Getting Off Paxil Answered by Jaymie Hartsfield 1 year ago.

Paxil CR is the same as Paxil. CR stands for controlled release meaning that it is released in a more regular way in your body. From what I have read, some people have a very difficult time getting off of the stuff even by "weaning". Good luck. Answered by Vernie Spivey 1 year ago.

I went off Paxil a few years ago. If I remember correctly. my doc lowered my dosage first for a month. Then I took one pill every other day for a week or two, then off completely. It was very difficult for me, but after a week or so, I was ok. Be sure that you want to do this, tho. I was on it for about 2 years, and thought the same as you, that I didn't need it, and I could manage on my own, and after about 6 months, I was back at the doc. She put me on Effexor. I am taking 225 mg a day and have been on it for a long time now, and I beleive I am a anti-depressant lifer. Sometimes I think I can go off, but then I remember that I am on them for a reason, and I feel normal BECAUSE I am taking them. I know they are very expensive, but if you can afford it, and are feeling better on them, maybe you should rethink going off. Just my opinion, tho. If you do wean, just remember, you will probably feel like crap for a week or so, but each day you will be a little better, and befor you know it, you'll be ok. Give it about 2 weeks after your last pill. Good Luck Answered by Juliette Henness 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil too for almost a year, and I hated the side effects of getting off. I would sit on the couch and it felt like the whole world was spinning. Paxil was the worst for side effects when getting off of it. I wouldn't worry, I think what your haveing is perfectly normal. If you are female, I didn't notice, it is now known that Paxil when pregnant causes congenital heart defects. I would let your doctor know of your symptoms and that will make you feel better. But I think you will be ok, I felt l ike crap comeing off of it too. Good luck Answered by Marnie Prima 1 year ago.

I really think you need to go to a Doctor. that is sympathetic to your case, dump the Doctor you're seeing they get a kickback from the drug company. See if you can find a Doctor into natural remedies. Its worth the extra money your health is at stake. Answered by Annalisa Dossey 1 year ago.


Paxil - CR Advise.?
I've been prescribed Paxil CR 12.5. Any advise would be wonderful. I have been on Anything and Everything. I plan to become pregnant in a couple of months (hopefully) and would not want this to effect me in anyway. Any advise would be greatly appreciated. God Bless!! Asked by Emiko Borromeo 1 year ago.

Paxil is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor which means that this drug keeps the neurotransmiters to stay in the synasis b/n 2 nerve cells longer. You mentioned that you've been on anything and everything. I wish you can be more specific about it. For antidepressants to work, you have to give it a long trial period before deciding whether it works or not. If you have recurring depressions, then you should stay on the medication for a much longer time period. Paxil is consider class-c when it comes to pregancy. The study is done on animal and it might but not an absolute answer that it might cause some problem. But human studies are inconclusive. Basically it boils down to the benefit vs risk ratio. In your situation I would think the benefit out weight the risk. Let's say if there is a 1000 women who are like you while not on any medication vs. 1000 women who are totally healthy, which group do you think will have a higher probability of having a totally health baby? So if a 1000 women who are like you while on paxil vs. 1000 women who are totally healthy, which group would have more totally health baby? Then can you credit the difference b/c of the medication or it is just the fact that your genetics is different. Do a Yahoo search for 'Paxil & pregnancy' and you will find more articles that you can read up on your own. Answered by Breana Volker 1 year ago.

Oh bless your heart~ First and foremost you need to consult an ob/gyn and discuss your current medications~you need to do this well ahead of considering a pregnancy~also consult your psychiatrist~ Discuss this with these doctors and get second opinions if you can~ You also are going to run a higher risk for postpartum depression~ Babies add more stress to your life as wonderful as they are~ First and foremost you need to take care of you as you are the most important person in the world~once you are on level ground then you will be more prepared for a baby~and a baby is not going to cure your disorders~ I know I sound some what cold~yet I thought it would help my "issues" and it did not~ It takes at the very least 12 weeks for most of the medications to build in your system to an advisable level~and never, never just stop taking them cold turkey~I have and I suffered! Sweetheart I hope that you can find the medication that helps you~I take a combination of things~every system is different~it takes time to find the right stuff~when you do you will feel much better~then you can take on the pregnancy issue~ Make sure you get plenty of exercise~just a good walk helps your system and mind feel much better~ I wish you the very best~you will be content I promise~just give it all the proper time and you will be a better person for your patients~ May the sparkles in life land upon you~!~ Paroxetine is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Paroxetine affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Paroxetine is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Paroxetine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Paroxetine may cause heart defects or serious, life-threatening lung problems in newborn babies whose mothers take the medication during pregnancy. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant during pregnancy. If you are planning a pregnancy, or if you become pregnant while taking paroxetine, do not stop taking the medication without first talking to your doctor. Answered by Marth Corkran 1 year ago.


Does the paxil has any side effects??
Asked by Delena Carreon 1 year ago.

Paxil CR is approved only for adults 18 years and over. There are benefits and risks when using antidepressants. Depression and other illnesses can lead to suicidal thoughts or behavior whether or not you are taking antidepressants. In some children and teens, antidepressants increase suicidal thoughts or actions. You and your family should watch closely and call the doctor right away, if you have worsening depression, thoughts of suicide, or sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior (for example feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or not being able to sleep), especially at the beginning of treatment or after any change in dose. The reason that there have been some suicides with any and all antidepressants is the fact that when people are severely depressed they don't have the energy, drive or interest in doing anything at all. Most of them only sleep or sit for hours staring at blank walls. When this same person(s) decide to make a change for the better and get their life back, they start taking antidepressants which start to lift their depression. Unfortunately, on the road to being completely undepressed, you have to pass through the level of being mildly depressed. At this stage of depression, a person is more energetic, driven and is thinking more about his depression and problems than he was when he was severely depressed. It is at this time, that many people make the move to do away with themselves. It has nothing to do with the drug itself - only the level of depression the person is experiencing. The depressed person still needs to get help, but if that person is severely depressed and is taking antidepressant drug therapy, then someone should be responsible enough to keep watch on them during the mildly depressed period. This takes love and committment but the outcome for the depressed person is a life worth living. I have added some additional info for you below. In most cases, you can take Paxil CR with other medications. However, medicines known as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), thioridazine or pimozide should not be taken while you are taking Paxil CR. There may be other medicines that don't react well with Paxil CR, so be sure to tell your healthcare provider about any prescription and over-the-counter medications that you are taking. As with any prescription medication, Paxil CR may cause some side effects, which are usually mild to moderate and may fade or disappear completely over time. A common side effect of Paxil CR is nausea, which may be lessened by taking it with food. Other side effects may include injury, infection, diarrhea, constipation, decreased appetite, sleepiness, weakness, dry mouth, insomnia, dizziness, tremor, yawning, sweating, abnormal vision and sexual side effects. If you should experience any side effects, be sure to report them to your healthcare provider as soon as possible and follow his/her advice. I took Paxil without any problems and found it was good for anxiety as well as depression. Answered by Reinaldo Henkensiefken 1 year ago.

I agree you should look for another doctor. I went on Paxil over a year ago (now trying to go off). I had some side effects, but I went on the medication GRADUALLY, as I hope you are too. I started with a small dose of 5 or 10 mg, and then increased in increments of 5 mg. So it was 5 mg for one week, then 10 mg for a week or so, then 15 mg for a week or so, then 20 mg. which is the strength I've been at since then. If you went from zero to 20 that may explain the severity of side effects. Good luck. Answered by Lorita Lacina 1 year ago.

I gained weight on paxil Answered by Dennis Carre 1 year ago.

I went from around 175 to upper 180s, plus there were some sexual side affects. Though, given the benefit of taking it, it was a no-brainer - I'd do it again if I had to. Answered by Magdalena Jeavons 1 year ago.

It most certainly does, I was taking that drug briefly (about 3 weeks), and ended up in the ER due to the strenght of the side effects. Answered by Zack Sustaire 1 year ago.

If you have been prescribed a medication you need to speak to you doctor about it. Take it as it indicates on the label. My male friend had problems with ejaculation. He could not ejaculate as he once did, it took forever. I have a female friend that had a problem with orgasm, she couldn't but she would rather not be depressed. It was worth it to her to keep taking it. Answered by Donovan Rekemeyer 1 year ago.

read the label and the instructions Answered by Stephani Bernabo 1 year ago.

MAYBE DEPENDS Answered by Golden Nitz 1 year ago.


Paxil CR...How do I go off of it?
I have been on Paxil CR for about a year. I recently missed a dose, it was the worst feeling that you could imagine. I felt like a drug addict. I couldn't stop throwing up, I was dizzy, sweating, shivering. HORRIBLE! After this happened I realized I can't live like this, completely dependent on Paxil. I... Asked by Micheal Mosby 1 year ago.

I have been on Paxil CR for about a year. I recently missed a dose, it was the worst feeling that you could imagine. I felt like a drug addict. I couldn't stop throwing up, I was dizzy, sweating, shivering. HORRIBLE! After this happened I realized I can't live like this, completely dependent on Paxil. I can't be scared to miss a dose. I want to be off of it. My doctor isn't exactly the best doctor in the world and don't want to ask for her help, she is quite strange! haha. So I would like to know how I should take myself off of it? Help! Please! Answered by Roseanna Farren 1 year ago.

I wish I could tell everyone that not only is Paxil CR is biggest joke in psychiatry (regular Paxil works just as well) but putting a person on Paxil should be considered after many other drugs fail. It causes the most extreme "dependency," it has the highest chance of causing discontinuation syndrome (withdrawal) and the discontinuation is typically bad. The fact your doctor prescribed Paxil CR is reason enough to leave. However you CAN NOT just stop the medication. Normally what happens it you are switched the the drug Prozac because it has a very long half life so the blood concentration is more level where as Paxil has more up and downs. Although your reaction to missing one dose is completely bazaar, especially the CR version. If you are afraid of asking her for help then why bother going? It is a waste of time and money to see a doctor and not say what is really going on or not actually telling her what your concerns are. I also want to address one thing that is a serious problem. Antidepressants and what you went through have absolutely NOTHING to do with addiction. It is a simple fact, that is why antidepressant "withdrawal" is technically called discontinuation syndrome, to try to separate antidepressants from drugs of abuse like heroin and cocaine. Addiction is not psychical, addiction is psychological dependency it is caving and "needing" a drug. An addict would do anything to get more drugs. Does that sounds like you? I'm guessing no. What antidepressants can cause it physical dependency (also the term "physical addiction" is not real or correct). Many drugs from heroin to prednisone to Afrin nasal spray to laxatives can all cause physical dependency. Addiction is consequences, loss of friends, family, jobs, money, arrests, and so on yet still refusing to stop the drug. Is the person on 1,000 mg of IV morphine for terminal cancer an addict? I doubt it yet if the morphine would be turned off the pain and misery would horrific. So you are NOT an addict. Also you might consider using another drug like Lexapro or Zoloft because they have a low rate of discontinuation syndrome and if it happens it is mild yet Paxil is by far the worst. If antidepressants help you, there is not need to just stop. It is good to use a different one but don't let fear stop you from having a better life. And in reality a lot of people are "dependent" on drugs, a diabetic requires insulin, a person who has has a transplant requires immunosuppressants, a person with HIV can be in a lot of trouble if even a couple of doses are skipped. There is a difference between "needing" heroin and needing a medication that helps you. I have some medical problems and if I got stranded on an island I would have problems without the medications. Yet I need them to live a normal life and for most people it is worth it. Governments even have plans for emergency situations (like a disaster) for dealing with people dependent on drugs- be it morphine (either legally or illegally) or an antidepressant. If you really just want to stop antidepressants forever you need to come up with a plan with a doctor. Some people need a week or two and some need months, especially with what you take. But typically switching to Prozac is best if you want to stop it all but if antidepressants help you you don't need to throw that away, you just need to get on better medications and be confident that if you need to you can reduce the dose and stop the drug. Answered by Mara Bazaldua 1 year ago.

This sounds like a rather extreme reaction for missing one dose. If you have such little confidence in your doctor, you definitely need to get a new one right away! Stay on your prescribed dose until you meet with a doctor who will assist you in getting off the Paxil slowly. Keep in mind that you were prescribed this medication for a reason, and getting off of it might not be in your best interest, either. Answered by Trista Noone 1 year ago.

Paroxetine can be a ***** to come off. You didn't say how much your on, but I was on 40mg for over a year and had to reduce the dosage very slowly. Switch to immediate release then knock a few mg off over 4-5 days until you get down to 10mg, then it should be a lot easier. You will have to cut the tablets into half and quarters this is why you need to switch to IR. It just takes time and patience and will power as with any drug. Answered by Dagmar Szweda 1 year ago.

I was on paxil for 10 years and I tried to go off the cold turkey but I kept cryying and I figured that I would be on it forever. but. I finally made a search on paxil and found out that the reason I was crying everytime I tried to go off the stuff was that crying was one of side effects of going off. /so I than knew that I could go off the crap. I did wean myself off the stuff, until I finally got off it. You may expiernce alot of miserable side affects but if you can do it good for you. Maybe you looked up the webb. on paxil, if you did you should know that there was a class action law suit for paxil there was alot of people commiting suicide on the poison. Well good luck and dont give up the idea of weaning off slowly.n April Answered by Marica Laino 1 year ago.

Simon is correct. To further elaborate, you should never try go off a long term drug suddenly. You need to taper the dose gradually, with a doctor monitoring. Another issue to note is that you must NEVER cut a sustained-release (SR) or controlled-released (CR) tablet. You can suffer an overdosage. Switch to plain tablets, but you 'll need to tailor the plain tablets to your needs first. Thats why you need the doctor to be working hand-in-hand with you to taper your medicine. Answered by Claire Kuza 1 year ago.

Get a new doctor. You don't want your life in her hands from the way you make her sound. Find someone that cares and that you can trust. Both the answers before me were correct though. Answered by Nathanael Rentfro 1 year ago.


Pregnacy and Paxil CR?
I found out I was pregnant a coulple of weeks ago and ran out of medication and couldn't afford to buy it about 4-5 days already but now I have it here. The problem is that I don't know if I should take it I know that they said it's a hazard for the baby but that stoping abruptly is also a hazard.... Asked by Zachariah Albers 1 year ago.

I found out I was pregnant a coulple of weeks ago and ran out of medication and couldn't afford to buy it about 4-5 days already but now I have it here. The problem is that I don't know if I should take it I know that they said it's a hazard for the baby but that stoping abruptly is also a hazard. Please don't post rude remarks on why im asking here. I just wanted to see if someone has possibly being in the same situation or close to it to give some kind of advise. I go see my doctor on the 24th of this month the prenatal doctor that is. Answered by Andra Woolman 1 year ago.

I was on paxil when I found out I was pregnant with my first. My doctor quickly weened me off it and kept me off while pregnant. My hormones evened out and I was fine. Talk to your doctor about what is best for you. Each situation is different. Even if your doc appointment isn't for a bit you can call and ask for advice on the paxil till then. They may reccomend a lower does or just take you off it. Answered by Earl Dawber 1 year ago.


Psychiatrist gave me 12.5 mg of paxil cr?
i asked him about this drug and he said it will get rid of my depression and give me more energy during the day because i wont be depressed as much. does anybody take this drug what are or were ur experiences with it? does it help with ur depression? any bad side effects? fyi, im an 18 year old male Asked by Caterina Sadeghi 1 year ago.

I dont take it. But I am a pharmacy technician and we fill this drug often this is my answer: How Paxil CR Helps Depression may be related to a chemical imbalance in the brain. Serotonin is one of these chemicals. One way to treat it is to adjust the levels of serotonin. Paxil CR can help reduce the symptoms of depression (including associated anxiety symptoms) by adjusting the balance of serotonin. In medical studies, Paxil CR effectively relieved depression and its associated anxiety symptoms. Treatment and older adults Older adults may be more sensitive to taking medicine. Therefore, the healthcare provider may start older adults on a lower dose of medicine. Older adults are more likely to be on other medications for other health problems, so the side effects of medicines and the results of combining medicines must be considered by the healthcare provider. Important Safety Information Prescription Paxil CR is not for everyone. Don't take with MAOIs, thioridazine or pimozide. Paxil CR is generally well tolerated. As with many medications, there can be side effects. Some of the side effects may include infection, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, constipation, decreased appetite, dizziness, sweating, tremor, sexual side effects, injury, yawning, weakness, insomnia, abnormal vision or sleepiness. Talk to your doctor if you are taking prescription medication known as triptans, which are used for migraine or cluster headaches. When used in combination with Paxil CR or other antidepressant treatments, these drugs may lead to potentially life-threatening complications. Paxil CR is approved only for adults 18 years and over. In some children and teens, antidepressants increase suicidal thoughts or actions. Young adults, especially those with depression, may be at increased risk for suicidal actions. Whether or not you are taking antidepressants, you or your family should call the doctor right away if you have worsening depression, thoughts of suicide, or sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior (for example feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or not being able to sleep), especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose. Don't stop taking Paxil CR before talking to your doctor since side effects may result from stopping the medicine, particularly when abrupt. Symptoms some patients have reported on stopping Paxil CR include: dizziness, sensory disturbances (including electric shock sensations and tinnitus), abnormal dreams, agitation, anxiety, nausea, sweating, mood fluctuations, headache, fatigue, nervousness and sleep disturbances. Answered by Elton Naro 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil CR for about a year at a slightly higher dose. I got off of it because of slight weight gain and severe sleepiness. Not at night, but during the day all I would do is lay around on the couch. Maybe it just did not help. After 5 years on an antidepressant- I tried alot of them and the best one was......... nothing. With my doctors help I weaned off them and I feel better than I can remember! Be careful when you start any new drug in that family, they can increase suicidal thoughts. Keep your chin up! Answered by Vito Maxi 1 year ago.


Help with paxil cr tapering!?
I'm on 12.5 mg of paxil cr and my doctor is tapering me off by going everyother day for 2 weeks, then every third day, then once a week, then done! It's been 2 weeks so far and I feel fine until it's the day to take the dose then I feel sleepy and nausea. My doctor said if I want I can stop now. I do... Asked by Sammy Finken 1 year ago.

I'm on 12.5 mg of paxil cr and my doctor is tapering me off by going everyother day for 2 weeks, then every third day, then once a week, then done! It's been 2 weeks so far and I feel fine until it's the day to take the dose then I feel sleepy and nausea. My doctor said if I want I can stop now. I do but I'm scared I may withdrawal. Thoughts? Answered by Joey Horimoto 1 year ago.

Hello, paxil withdrawal is real even tho some docs say it doesnt exist oh yes it does! but the reason your feeling sick on the day your too take the dose is because by that day your system has very minimal meds in it and your sick fr withdrawals. in other words, you dose and then days later your system has minimal meds in it and the withdrawal is there.... but like your doc said you can always slow down or stop the weaning off process. maybe if you simply call your doc and say hey im having these effects by the 3rd day? he will simply change up the milligrams you take or maybe go too every 2 days for a bit... til you adjust better. or you could simply add a half a tablet on the 2nd day too ease your process a bit. whats a half tab gonna hurt? but it sounds like the 3rd day is the issue 4u so why not just add a half tab or ask your doc or pharmacist for best advice free of charge w/a phone call. either way it sounds like things are fine and just need a fine tune up as the doctors say ie. med adjustments.... this would cure the nausea and sleepy issues.... regardless, all will work out in time.... good luck! Answered by Dalton Mccrossin 1 year ago.


Tapering paxil CR?
i am not breaking the 25 mg pill... i got a new prescription for 12.5. I just want to know is going from 25 to 12.5 a big drop.. even if plan on continue taking the 12.5 dose regularly. Asked by Cassondra Oblinski 1 year ago.

I have been taking paxil CR 25 mg for the past 4 months for PMS symtoms. However, i feel like that the dose is too much for my body to take, and for the past 3 days i have reduced it to 12.5 mg. Besides a mild headache, so far it has been ok. I want to know has anyone suffered from withdrawl symtoms from lowering the dose so abruptly. thanks. Answered by Colleen Wiechman 1 year ago.

there is no other way to taper off the Paxil other than going from 25 to 12.5 mg. Whenever you come off a psychotropic medication, like Paxil, you MUST wean slowly off of it. Your doctor will probably have you take 12.5 mg for a week or two and then come off completely. Unfortunately, there is no way to cut those CR pills in half because any time a medication is controlled release (CR) it shouldn't be broken, crushed chewed, etc. You will notice a bit of a headace with coming off the med, but going down to 12.5 is the correct thing. Like I said, after a week, you should go to like 12.5 every other day, and then off completely. Slow is the key... you have to give your body time to adjust. Good luck Answered by Macy Agan 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil for about a year when I wanted to get off it. I slowly went from 40 mg to 35, 30, 20, 15, 10, 5, and finally after about 6 months, 2.5. When I would try to stop taking it altogether I would get really dizzy and sick to my stomache. When I took 2.5 mg it would all stop. Finally I had to take my sister's Prozac for 2 days to get off Paxil. Don't ask me how that worked, but the doctor told me to do it. Don't taper off without telling your dr, and watch out for the side effects - they are totally present! Answered by Millard Ereth 1 year ago.

I was on paxil cr for PPD. I stopped taking it cold turkey and what a mistake. I'm now off it but I had to wean myself. Every other day for a few weeks then 1/2 doses every other day for a while until I could function without it. I've been off since April 30th and feel great! If you do it gradually you will feel great too! Good luck Answered by Tanja Ellermann 1 year ago.

Yes. You should not do this yourself, only the doctor can really lower a dosage. And it is usually a gradual increase or decrease. And on another note, I know from working in nursing homes that you can not cut a pill without it having a score mark because if you do the meds loose effectiveness. Be careful when cutting/breaking pills. Also some meds aren't made to be crushed, broken down ect. Answered by Ilse Macivor 1 year ago.

OH HONEY!!!!! i had very bad ones my eyes felt like when i would step ,the vibration would cause them to move, felling like electric shocks without the pain just the muscle action would hit me every so often, extreme anger, rage, head ache,but as long as i was on them, i felt great its the coming off that's so horrible, you could switch you prescription to generic and they want be as potent and you'll able to break them easier, you are probably getting to much to fast ,you're not suppose to break paxil cr they are time release, you should tell your doctor Answered by Ty Legros 1 year ago.


Is Paxil CR THAT different from regular release?
I am seriously considering a move from Paxil CR (12.5 mg) to regular release Paxil (not sure which mg...whichever is the least). My insurance (Aetna) covers so little of this drug that I pay a tremendous amount each month. And regular release can be purchased at Sam's Club via their $4 Prescription Drug plan.... Asked by Sharon Cajero 1 year ago.

I am seriously considering a move from Paxil CR (12.5 mg) to regular release Paxil (not sure which mg...whichever is the least). My insurance (Aetna) covers so little of this drug that I pay a tremendous amount each month. And regular release can be purchased at Sam's Club via their $4 Prescription Drug plan. That works. My question is for anyone who has taken both. Is there that much of a difference between the two drugs? I know HOW they are different...I just do not know how it manifests itself on a day-to-day basis. Does anyone have any experience with this? Thanks. Answered by Darron Brend 1 year ago.

The chemical make up of the lively element is comparable. With the CR it extremely is, as you in all probability comprehend, persisted launch. different ingredients are blended with the Paxil so because it is embarked on your bloodstream gradually over a volume of time, as adversarial to very virtually suddenly. i discovered the CR precise for me, yet Paxil is a extreme drug, and additionally you have a minimum of a telephone seek for advice from which comprise your time-honored care practioner. he or she will have the skill to make certain which attitude is extra effectual for you. i'm hoping this facilitates! stable good fortune and stable heatlh to you! Gerald Answered by Rhoda Furl 1 year ago.


Weaning off Paxil CR?
I haave been on Paxil CR for the past 3 yrs. to help mask my panic disorder. It has worked well, but I feel the need to wean off and see if I can learn to cope on my own. I know to wean slowly,and I have studied the websites with advice, but these sites only mention Paxil not Paxil CR,(controlled release) which... Asked by Dan Sessums 1 year ago.

I haave been on Paxil CR for the past 3 yrs. to help mask my panic disorder. It has worked well, but I feel the need to wean off and see if I can learn to cope on my own. I know to wean slowly,and I have studied the websites with advice, but these sites only mention Paxil not Paxil CR,(controlled release) which comes in different mg's. I did speak to my doctor, but she was not helpful in my attempt to wean slowly. She just wrote me a rx for half the dose I normally take. I do not have insurance so it is hard for me to save enough money to see another doctor for different advice. Can any one help me to wean slowly without cutting the pills,(they crumble)? Has anyone weaned from PaxilCR? How did it go? Answered by Jeanne Benwarc 1 year ago.

How to Stop Taking Paxil, Paxil CR: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your of the CR dosage by 12.5mg every four days. You should probably make it five days because Paxil's discontinuation syndrome is so harsh. That means putting up with the suck-*** side effects for longer, but trust me, it really sucks less this way. Based on the 15-20 hour half-life. If your doctor says something that's slower than that, go for it! I'm all for slower discontinuations. Four to five days is the fastest you can step down the dosage. How To Safely Stop Taking Psychiatric & Anti-Epileptic Medications Lots of people hit this site wanting to know how to stop taking their crazy meds. That's understandable. There are many good reasons to stop taking the meds. There are also many bad reasons to stop taking them. I'll try to help you sort out the good from the bad reasons. But if you do have good reasons, you have to stop taking the meds safely. Sudden or rapid discontinuation can lead to many problems. This guide is just to use to make sure that you and your doctor have worked out a good discontinuation schedule for a medication, presuming you have the luxury for such. You must work with your doctor! You are not qualified to make this decision on your own. Got that? What you and your doctor need to do is work out a discontinuation schedule for any medication. This is the reverse of the titration schedule (if any, which I'm actually against), which was the plan of how your dosage was increased. The discontinuation schedule is the plan of how you'll decrease the amount of a med you'll take. Ask your doctor what it is based on. There are three things a discontinuation schedule should be based on: the half-life of a drug looking for the return of any symptoms experience with taking someone off a med The last one is either other people going off the same med or you coming off of the same or other meds. Or both. If you're lucky enough to get an explanation from your doctor, the half-life of a psychiatric medication is often explained like this, "It's out of your body in that many hours, but it's still in your brain." That's a gross oversimplification, but it's close enough for government work. Here's a way to picture the half-life in action. Take a glass and fill it half full with some beverage. Now fill it the rest of the way with water. OK, now empty it half of the mixture out and top it off with water. Keep doing that until you have something you'd drink and that could pass as water. The number of times it took to do that is the half-life, expressed in a quantity of water, of a particular beverage. Try it with a different beverage and you'd get a different half-life. Half-life means how long it takes for half of the metabolites to get flushed out of your system. The half-lives of meds is expressed in time because the process of adding water to the glass is more-or-less constant in your body. And in the environment for the half-lives of radioactive materials. So using Effexor (venlafaxine), if you're down to your last 37.5mg dose after 20 hours you'll have 18.75mg left in your body. Twenty hours after that you'll have about 9.4mg left. And so forth until it's gone, about 80-100 hours after your final 37.5mg tablet. Please, don't get all Xeno's Paradoxical on me, after four or five passes, as it were, a med is so broken down that the effects shouldn't be noticeable. The only real variable is not if it's four or five times the length of the half-life, but if you metabolize the med quickly or slowly. These half-life numbers are the based on the arithmetic mean averages from clinical trials and studies. Read the pharmacokinetics section of the med's PI sheet carefully to see what the known range of a drug's half-life is. All right so where does this "In your brain but out of your body" come from? Well when they measure half-life in humans during the clinical trials it's by blood tests. With critters in earlier tests it's a different story. Anyway, the drugs do clear out of your blood a lot faster than they do from your brain. But they hang around other organs, usually your liver and kidneys, maybe others, for four to five times the period of the half-life. So while they do all their work in your brain and that's where they like to hang out, there are other parts of your body that the meds might be hanging around as well. It all depends on the med, your body and a host of other factors. So "Out of your body but still in your brain" is mostly true and covers much of the concept neatly in the time allowed in a typical doctor's appointment. Anyway, the metabolites that are in your liver, kidneys and digestive system are what might be causing a bunch of the side effects you're complaining about in the first place. So if you take the half-life of a med and multiply it by five that's the minimum number of hours between when you can next lower your dosage by whatever the lowest dosage the med comes in is. The problem, of course, is that some meds get metabolized more than once, they have active metabolites, or they have really short half-lives and you'd be coming off to fast to give yourself a good idea to know if it was a good idea or not to stop taking this particular med. However, I do note in most of the med's profiles what the minimum amount of time that I recommend is between stepping down each dosage. Monitor return of symptoms. Unless you're replacing one med with another you have to be on the lookout for symptoms coming back. In this case you'll want to reduce the dosages really slowly, taking a couple weeks at a time to get an idea of how you'll be doing with less and less of a med. You'll want to keep some kind of diary, a blog, something to keep track of how you feel every day. At some point if it starts to suck, then you know you've lowered your dosage too far. But, hey, maybe you can get along at a lower dosage! Nothing wrong with that. From what I've read on support fora and in e-mails I get I think a lot of people wind up on dosages that are too high. When it comes to affective mood disorders, panic/anxiety disorders and many other psychiatric disorders we can afford to experiment with lower dosages. Things may hurt us emotionally for a bit, but we can get back up to a dosage where we were OK and we'll be OK again. It's not that big a deal. For schizophrenia, for epilepsy and other disorders the decision to lower dosages isn't that simple. Again a doctor must always be involved with this decision. The most important thing to remember is this - your symptoms have gone away BECAUSE THE MEDS ARE WORKING! It's not necessarily because you've been cured. There are no cures for a lot of these disorders. It's not your fault that you're crazy, but it is your responsibility to stay as sane as possible. You're not the only person you hurt if you really flip out. If you've been taking anticonvulsants (also known as "mood stabilizers" in Bipolarland) for a few months or longer and need to stop, you can't stop cold turkey at all. Unlike stopping SSRIs the effects of sudden discontinuation aren't just viciously unpleasant, they are dangerous. You run the risk of having seizures on top of your bipolar getting worse. These run the gamut from partial complex or absence seizures to tonic-clonic grand mals. Maybe you'll have this problem, maybe you won't, there's no way to tell. If you never had a seizure before that doesn't mean you won't start flopping around like a fish out of water. The risk is worse if you're taking a lithium variant, and/or any antidepressant, especially Wellbutrin (bupropion hydrochloride). Anticonvulsants need to be gradually discontinued to prevent any seizure activity from happening. With gradual discontinuation the worst most people experience is slight dizziness, confusion and sensitivity to sound and/or light. If you're already taking another anticonvulsant and are in the therapeutic range already, then you can probably stop one cold turkey with little risk of seizures, presuming you have no past history of seizure activity. You'll feel other wacky effects, and those will vary from med to med, but you won't be risking seizures. Let me qualify that, it has to be an anticonvulsant that is known to be effective for you. If it's a new anticonvulsant, well, you just never know. The odds are in your favor at least. If you do have a history of seizure activity, stopping any anticonvulsant cold turkey is never a decision you should make based upon information gleaned from any stupid website on the goddamn Internet you jackass, you should be discussing that with at least two neurologists! Get off your computer and on the telephone and start making appointments! SSRI discontinuation syndrome. Read the article to learn more about it. SSRIs are some of the most physically addictive drugs in existence. Addictive isn't really the right word, you develop an intense physical and psychological dependency without a craving and urge to abuse them (unless you're bipolar, then you may abuse them), but addictive is close enough. To suddenly stop taking them is to feel so very much worse than you were feeling before you ever considered taking meds. There's a term, "brain shivers." You'll know it if you ever experience it. Mouse and I have kicked opiates and we have kicked SSRIs cold turkey. We'll take the opiate kick. If you're taking an atypical antipsychotic along with an SSRI, the discontinuation is often not nearly as bad, so if you have some Seroquel (quetiapine) on hand for insomnia, you'll want to take some for your SSRI discontinuation. Not everyone experiences SSRI discontinuation syndrome, and for those who do the effects range from mild to extreme. Not all doctors recognize this as an issue, so that sucks even more. Be sure to read the section about how long it takes for a med to clear out of your system and wait that long to taper down to the next stage in your dosage. And, as Paula writes in her article, invest in a pill splitter. Another option is to switch to the liquid form that many of the meds have available, that way you can reduce your dosage by as much as you damn well please and take as long as you can afford to discontinue to med. If it's really bad you may want to switch to liquid Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) for the final discontinuation. That can take a very long time, but because of Prozac's 9.3 day half-life it usually has the mildest discontinuation syndrome effects of all the SSRIs. The long half-life is a double-edged sword. If you're on a high dosage and especially sensitive to the discontinuation syndrome, it will take forever to get off of Prozac, but at least it won't be as bad as the other meds. If you're not as sensitive to the discontinuation syndrome, Prozac's long half-life makes it easier to discontinue than any of the other SSRIs. Abrupt discontinuation of high doses of benzodiazepines can lead to seizures in addition to dysphoria, insomnia, muscle cramps, vomiting and sweating. If you do wind up taking them daily for longer than four weeks and don't build up a tolerance and don't abuse them, be sure to refill your prescription a few days before running out, just in case something happens to prevent you from getting that refill when you do run out. Otherwise a normal discontinuation schedule is usually all it takes to safely and painlessly withdrawal from benzodiazepines. There's just one proviso - you can only discontinue from Xanax (alprazolam) using Xanax. All other benzos are interchangeable for purposes of discontinuation, but not Xanax. It figures that Xanax is the most addictive of them all. The withdrawal from atypical antipsychotics has been likened to taking small amounts of psychedelic drugs. Whether that is a good or bad thing is up to individual experience. Others get rebound symptoms for a day or two, sometimes longer and that's about it. The big problem is that the bipolar and the schizophrenic are the worst about stopping their meds. The good news is you can just start right back up on the atypicals and get back to where you were in controlling your symptoms. There isn't much in the way of good evidence if meds are effective if you stop them and start taking them again. So far I've found some studies that indicate you're screwed if you stop taking Paxil (paroxetine) and then want to start taking it again. I've come across some anecdotal evidence (i.e. people's experiences) that indicate the same for lithium, the valproates and Lamictal (lamotrigine). As mentioned above, the atypical antipsychotics seem to be OK with people who use them as required, as are the benzodiazepines. There are also people who rotate through SSRIs because of SSRI poop-out, with mixed results on Paxil's second use. The vaunted weight-loss effect of Topamax (topiramate) is a one-time offer. If you stop taking Topamax then take it again the odds are it won't affect your appetite. So you have to take into consideration that the med that is working well for you now may not work so well for you again if you stop taking it and want to take it again. Please read 12 Steps to Stay on Drugs to make sure you're not just addicted to some of your crazy behaviors. Strange as it may sound, some people are. There's also a physical condition known as anosognosia that prevents people from recognizing that they are ill. I think that it can be extended to where it prevents people from dealing with their illness in the proper way. It affects approximately 50% of the bipolar and schizophrenic communities. I'm pretty sure I have it. I went for years without getting the right meds to treat my bipolar and seizure disorders, and even now I have days when I want to throw away all of my meds and just go back to using my Soul of Iron to deal with all of my problems. It's just crazy so I don't do it. Just be damned sure you're stopping a med for the right reasons. For some disorders meds are temporary parts of an overall therapy strategy to get your brain working in a less messed-up way. For example - depression or panic/anxiety disorder the meds may be permanent or they may be temporary. But for epilepsy and bipolar disorder, for instance, the odds are that the meds, or some kind of treatment like VNS or TMS, is going to be a long-term, if not permanent part of your life. It's going to be many years of taking the right meds before you can even think of not taking any. Anticonvulsants ("Mood stabilizers") do, in theory, prevent the brain from getting into a state that causes seizures and/or mood swings. But it takes a long, long time to train your brain to stop acting that way. If it can happen at all. Epilepsy kills. Mood swings are dangerous. You are literally taking your life in your hands when you're considering a slow, steady discontinuation of anticonvulsants. Answered by Sabra Vanandel 1 year ago.

Weaning Off Paxil Answered by Telma Kabel 1 year ago.

Getting Off Paxil Answered by Juli Bisikirski 1 year ago.

Paxil CR is the same as Paxil. CR stands for controlled release meaning that it is released in a more regular way in your body. From what I have read, some people have a very difficult time getting off of the stuff even by "weaning". Good luck. Answered by Mathilda Fitzmorris 1 year ago.

I went off Paxil a few years ago. If I remember correctly. my doc lowered my dosage first for a month. Then I took one pill every other day for a week or two, then off completely. It was very difficult for me, but after a week or so, I was ok. Be sure that you want to do this, tho. I was on it for about 2 years, and thought the same as you, that I didn't need it, and I could manage on my own, and after about 6 months, I was back at the doc. She put me on Effexor. I am taking 225 mg a day and have been on it for a long time now, and I beleive I am a anti-depressant lifer. Sometimes I think I can go off, but then I remember that I am on them for a reason, and I feel normal BECAUSE I am taking them. I know they are very expensive, but if you can afford it, and are feeling better on them, maybe you should rethink going off. Just my opinion, tho. If you do wean, just remember, you will probably feel like crap for a week or so, but each day you will be a little better, and befor you know it, you'll be ok. Give it about 2 weeks after your last pill. Good Luck Answered by Shane Ellison 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil too for almost a year, and I hated the side effects of getting off. I would sit on the couch and it felt like the whole world was spinning. Paxil was the worst for side effects when getting off of it. I wouldn't worry, I think what your haveing is perfectly normal. If you are female, I didn't notice, it is now known that Paxil when pregnant causes congenital heart defects. I would let your doctor know of your symptoms and that will make you feel better. But I think you will be ok, I felt l ike crap comeing off of it too. Good luck Answered by Eunice Brinkhaus 1 year ago.

I really think you need to go to a Doctor. that is sympathetic to your case, dump the Doctor you're seeing they get a kickback from the drug company. See if you can find a Doctor into natural remedies. Its worth the extra money your health is at stake. Answered by Domitila Champany 1 year ago.


Paxil - CR Advise.?
I've been prescribed Paxil CR 12.5. Any advise would be wonderful. I have been on Anything and Everything. I plan to become pregnant in a couple of months (hopefully) and would not want this to effect me in anyway. Any advise would be greatly appreciated. God Bless!! Asked by Moses Boeson 1 year ago.

Paxil is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor which means that this drug keeps the neurotransmiters to stay in the synasis b/n 2 nerve cells longer. You mentioned that you've been on anything and everything. I wish you can be more specific about it. For antidepressants to work, you have to give it a long trial period before deciding whether it works or not. If you have recurring depressions, then you should stay on the medication for a much longer time period. Paxil is consider class-c when it comes to pregancy. The study is done on animal and it might but not an absolute answer that it might cause some problem. But human studies are inconclusive. Basically it boils down to the benefit vs risk ratio. In your situation I would think the benefit out weight the risk. Let's say if there is a 1000 women who are like you while not on any medication vs. 1000 women who are totally healthy, which group do you think will have a higher probability of having a totally health baby? So if a 1000 women who are like you while on paxil vs. 1000 women who are totally healthy, which group would have more totally health baby? Then can you credit the difference b/c of the medication or it is just the fact that your genetics is different. Do a Yahoo search for 'Paxil & pregnancy' and you will find more articles that you can read up on your own. Answered by Erik Solima 1 year ago.

Oh bless your heart~ First and foremost you need to consult an ob/gyn and discuss your current medications~you need to do this well ahead of considering a pregnancy~also consult your psychiatrist~ Discuss this with these doctors and get second opinions if you can~ You also are going to run a higher risk for postpartum depression~ Babies add more stress to your life as wonderful as they are~ First and foremost you need to take care of you as you are the most important person in the world~once you are on level ground then you will be more prepared for a baby~and a baby is not going to cure your disorders~ I know I sound some what cold~yet I thought it would help my "issues" and it did not~ It takes at the very least 12 weeks for most of the medications to build in your system to an advisable level~and never, never just stop taking them cold turkey~I have and I suffered! Sweetheart I hope that you can find the medication that helps you~I take a combination of things~every system is different~it takes time to find the right stuff~when you do you will feel much better~then you can take on the pregnancy issue~ Make sure you get plenty of exercise~just a good walk helps your system and mind feel much better~ I wish you the very best~you will be content I promise~just give it all the proper time and you will be a better person for your patients~ May the sparkles in life land upon you~!~ Paroxetine is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Paroxetine affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Paroxetine is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Paroxetine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Paroxetine may cause heart defects or serious, life-threatening lung problems in newborn babies whose mothers take the medication during pregnancy. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant during pregnancy. If you are planning a pregnancy, or if you become pregnant while taking paroxetine, do not stop taking the medication without first talking to your doctor. Answered by Nora Estler 1 year ago.


Does the paxil has any side effects??
Asked by Barbie Flecther 1 year ago.

Paxil CR is approved only for adults 18 years and over. There are benefits and risks when using antidepressants. Depression and other illnesses can lead to suicidal thoughts or behavior whether or not you are taking antidepressants. In some children and teens, antidepressants increase suicidal thoughts or actions. You and your family should watch closely and call the doctor right away, if you have worsening depression, thoughts of suicide, or sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior (for example feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or not being able to sleep), especially at the beginning of treatment or after any change in dose. The reason that there have been some suicides with any and all antidepressants is the fact that when people are severely depressed they don't have the energy, drive or interest in doing anything at all. Most of them only sleep or sit for hours staring at blank walls. When this same person(s) decide to make a change for the better and get their life back, they start taking antidepressants which start to lift their depression. Unfortunately, on the road to being completely undepressed, you have to pass through the level of being mildly depressed. At this stage of depression, a person is more energetic, driven and is thinking more about his depression and problems than he was when he was severely depressed. It is at this time, that many people make the move to do away with themselves. It has nothing to do with the drug itself - only the level of depression the person is experiencing. The depressed person still needs to get help, but if that person is severely depressed and is taking antidepressant drug therapy, then someone should be responsible enough to keep watch on them during the mildly depressed period. This takes love and committment but the outcome for the depressed person is a life worth living. I have added some additional info for you below. In most cases, you can take Paxil CR with other medications. However, medicines known as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), thioridazine or pimozide should not be taken while you are taking Paxil CR. There may be other medicines that don't react well with Paxil CR, so be sure to tell your healthcare provider about any prescription and over-the-counter medications that you are taking. As with any prescription medication, Paxil CR may cause some side effects, which are usually mild to moderate and may fade or disappear completely over time. A common side effect of Paxil CR is nausea, which may be lessened by taking it with food. Other side effects may include injury, infection, diarrhea, constipation, decreased appetite, sleepiness, weakness, dry mouth, insomnia, dizziness, tremor, yawning, sweating, abnormal vision and sexual side effects. If you should experience any side effects, be sure to report them to your healthcare provider as soon as possible and follow his/her advice. I took Paxil without any problems and found it was good for anxiety as well as depression. Answered by Mirtha Przybycien 1 year ago.

I agree you should look for another doctor. I went on Paxil over a year ago (now trying to go off). I had some side effects, but I went on the medication GRADUALLY, as I hope you are too. I started with a small dose of 5 or 10 mg, and then increased in increments of 5 mg. So it was 5 mg for one week, then 10 mg for a week or so, then 15 mg for a week or so, then 20 mg. which is the strength I've been at since then. If you went from zero to 20 that may explain the severity of side effects. Good luck. Answered by Piper Almanza 1 year ago.

I gained weight on paxil Answered by In Remlinger 1 year ago.

I went from around 175 to upper 180s, plus there were some sexual side affects. Though, given the benefit of taking it, it was a no-brainer - I'd do it again if I had to. Answered by Blanche Jovich 1 year ago.

It most certainly does, I was taking that drug briefly (about 3 weeks), and ended up in the ER due to the strenght of the side effects. Answered by Nolan Mccash 1 year ago.

If you have been prescribed a medication you need to speak to you doctor about it. Take it as it indicates on the label. My male friend had problems with ejaculation. He could not ejaculate as he once did, it took forever. I have a female friend that had a problem with orgasm, she couldn't but she would rather not be depressed. It was worth it to her to keep taking it. Answered by Rochelle Harrell 1 year ago.

read the label and the instructions Answered by Truman Larmore 1 year ago.

MAYBE DEPENDS Answered by Herschel Zotti 1 year ago.


Paxil CR...How do I go off of it?
I have been on Paxil CR for about a year. I recently missed a dose, it was the worst feeling that you could imagine. I felt like a drug addict. I couldn't stop throwing up, I was dizzy, sweating, shivering. HORRIBLE! After this happened I realized I can't live like this, completely dependent on Paxil. I... Asked by Judi Donnerberg 1 year ago.

I have been on Paxil CR for about a year. I recently missed a dose, it was the worst feeling that you could imagine. I felt like a drug addict. I couldn't stop throwing up, I was dizzy, sweating, shivering. HORRIBLE! After this happened I realized I can't live like this, completely dependent on Paxil. I can't be scared to miss a dose. I want to be off of it. My doctor isn't exactly the best doctor in the world and don't want to ask for her help, she is quite strange! haha. So I would like to know how I should take myself off of it? Help! Please! Answered by Susan Snook 1 year ago.

I wish I could tell everyone that not only is Paxil CR is biggest joke in psychiatry (regular Paxil works just as well) but putting a person on Paxil should be considered after many other drugs fail. It causes the most extreme "dependency," it has the highest chance of causing discontinuation syndrome (withdrawal) and the discontinuation is typically bad. The fact your doctor prescribed Paxil CR is reason enough to leave. However you CAN NOT just stop the medication. Normally what happens it you are switched the the drug Prozac because it has a very long half life so the blood concentration is more level where as Paxil has more up and downs. Although your reaction to missing one dose is completely bazaar, especially the CR version. If you are afraid of asking her for help then why bother going? It is a waste of time and money to see a doctor and not say what is really going on or not actually telling her what your concerns are. I also want to address one thing that is a serious problem. Antidepressants and what you went through have absolutely NOTHING to do with addiction. It is a simple fact, that is why antidepressant "withdrawal" is technically called discontinuation syndrome, to try to separate antidepressants from drugs of abuse like heroin and cocaine. Addiction is not psychical, addiction is psychological dependency it is caving and "needing" a drug. An addict would do anything to get more drugs. Does that sounds like you? I'm guessing no. What antidepressants can cause it physical dependency (also the term "physical addiction" is not real or correct). Many drugs from heroin to prednisone to Afrin nasal spray to laxatives can all cause physical dependency. Addiction is consequences, loss of friends, family, jobs, money, arrests, and so on yet still refusing to stop the drug. Is the person on 1,000 mg of IV morphine for terminal cancer an addict? I doubt it yet if the morphine would be turned off the pain and misery would horrific. So you are NOT an addict. Also you might consider using another drug like Lexapro or Zoloft because they have a low rate of discontinuation syndrome and if it happens it is mild yet Paxil is by far the worst. If antidepressants help you, there is not need to just stop. It is good to use a different one but don't let fear stop you from having a better life. And in reality a lot of people are "dependent" on drugs, a diabetic requires insulin, a person who has has a transplant requires immunosuppressants, a person with HIV can be in a lot of trouble if even a couple of doses are skipped. There is a difference between "needing" heroin and needing a medication that helps you. I have some medical problems and if I got stranded on an island I would have problems without the medications. Yet I need them to live a normal life and for most people it is worth it. Governments even have plans for emergency situations (like a disaster) for dealing with people dependent on drugs- be it morphine (either legally or illegally) or an antidepressant. If you really just want to stop antidepressants forever you need to come up with a plan with a doctor. Some people need a week or two and some need months, especially with what you take. But typically switching to Prozac is best if you want to stop it all but if antidepressants help you you don't need to throw that away, you just need to get on better medications and be confident that if you need to you can reduce the dose and stop the drug. Answered by Shavon Lions 1 year ago.

This sounds like a rather extreme reaction for missing one dose. If you have such little confidence in your doctor, you definitely need to get a new one right away! Stay on your prescribed dose until you meet with a doctor who will assist you in getting off the Paxil slowly. Keep in mind that you were prescribed this medication for a reason, and getting off of it might not be in your best interest, either. Answered by Malka Fett 1 year ago.

Paroxetine can be a ***** to come off. You didn't say how much your on, but I was on 40mg for over a year and had to reduce the dosage very slowly. Switch to immediate release then knock a few mg off over 4-5 days until you get down to 10mg, then it should be a lot easier. You will have to cut the tablets into half and quarters this is why you need to switch to IR. It just takes time and patience and will power as with any drug. Answered by Demetrius Pavolini 1 year ago.

I was on paxil for 10 years and I tried to go off the cold turkey but I kept cryying and I figured that I would be on it forever. but. I finally made a search on paxil and found out that the reason I was crying everytime I tried to go off the stuff was that crying was one of side effects of going off. /so I than knew that I could go off the crap. I did wean myself off the stuff, until I finally got off it. You may expiernce alot of miserable side affects but if you can do it good for you. Maybe you looked up the webb. on paxil, if you did you should know that there was a class action law suit for paxil there was alot of people commiting suicide on the poison. Well good luck and dont give up the idea of weaning off slowly.n April Answered by Brittany Samuelsen 1 year ago.

Simon is correct. To further elaborate, you should never try go off a long term drug suddenly. You need to taper the dose gradually, with a doctor monitoring. Another issue to note is that you must NEVER cut a sustained-release (SR) or controlled-released (CR) tablet. You can suffer an overdosage. Switch to plain tablets, but you 'll need to tailor the plain tablets to your needs first. Thats why you need the doctor to be working hand-in-hand with you to taper your medicine. Answered by Barney Lard 1 year ago.

Get a new doctor. You don't want your life in her hands from the way you make her sound. Find someone that cares and that you can trust. Both the answers before me were correct though. Answered by Angelena Foran 1 year ago.


Pregnacy and Paxil CR?
I found out I was pregnant a coulple of weeks ago and ran out of medication and couldn't afford to buy it about 4-5 days already but now I have it here. The problem is that I don't know if I should take it I know that they said it's a hazard for the baby but that stoping abruptly is also a hazard.... Asked by Evia Mcelhenney 1 year ago.

I found out I was pregnant a coulple of weeks ago and ran out of medication and couldn't afford to buy it about 4-5 days already but now I have it here. The problem is that I don't know if I should take it I know that they said it's a hazard for the baby but that stoping abruptly is also a hazard. Please don't post rude remarks on why im asking here. I just wanted to see if someone has possibly being in the same situation or close to it to give some kind of advise. I go see my doctor on the 24th of this month the prenatal doctor that is. Answered by Alexandra Monsees 1 year ago.

I was on paxil when I found out I was pregnant with my first. My doctor quickly weened me off it and kept me off while pregnant. My hormones evened out and I was fine. Talk to your doctor about what is best for you. Each situation is different. Even if your doc appointment isn't for a bit you can call and ask for advice on the paxil till then. They may reccomend a lower does or just take you off it. Answered by Lala Piacquadio 1 year ago.


Psychiatrist gave me 12.5 mg of paxil cr?
i asked him about this drug and he said it will get rid of my depression and give me more energy during the day because i wont be depressed as much. does anybody take this drug what are or were ur experiences with it? does it help with ur depression? any bad side effects? fyi, im an 18 year old male Asked by Marietta Fejes 1 year ago.

I dont take it. But I am a pharmacy technician and we fill this drug often this is my answer: How Paxil CR Helps Depression may be related to a chemical imbalance in the brain. Serotonin is one of these chemicals. One way to treat it is to adjust the levels of serotonin. Paxil CR can help reduce the symptoms of depression (including associated anxiety symptoms) by adjusting the balance of serotonin. In medical studies, Paxil CR effectively relieved depression and its associated anxiety symptoms. Treatment and older adults Older adults may be more sensitive to taking medicine. Therefore, the healthcare provider may start older adults on a lower dose of medicine. Older adults are more likely to be on other medications for other health problems, so the side effects of medicines and the results of combining medicines must be considered by the healthcare provider. Important Safety Information Prescription Paxil CR is not for everyone. Don't take with MAOIs, thioridazine or pimozide. Paxil CR is generally well tolerated. As with many medications, there can be side effects. Some of the side effects may include infection, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, constipation, decreased appetite, dizziness, sweating, tremor, sexual side effects, injury, yawning, weakness, insomnia, abnormal vision or sleepiness. Talk to your doctor if you are taking prescription medication known as triptans, which are used for migraine or cluster headaches. When used in combination with Paxil CR or other antidepressant treatments, these drugs may lead to potentially life-threatening complications. Paxil CR is approved only for adults 18 years and over. In some children and teens, antidepressants increase suicidal thoughts or actions. Young adults, especially those with depression, may be at increased risk for suicidal actions. Whether or not you are taking antidepressants, you or your family should call the doctor right away if you have worsening depression, thoughts of suicide, or sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior (for example feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or not being able to sleep), especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose. Don't stop taking Paxil CR before talking to your doctor since side effects may result from stopping the medicine, particularly when abrupt. Symptoms some patients have reported on stopping Paxil CR include: dizziness, sensory disturbances (including electric shock sensations and tinnitus), abnormal dreams, agitation, anxiety, nausea, sweating, mood fluctuations, headache, fatigue, nervousness and sleep disturbances. Answered by Lupe Jarchow 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil CR for about a year at a slightly higher dose. I got off of it because of slight weight gain and severe sleepiness. Not at night, but during the day all I would do is lay around on the couch. Maybe it just did not help. After 5 years on an antidepressant- I tried alot of them and the best one was......... nothing. With my doctors help I weaned off them and I feel better than I can remember! Be careful when you start any new drug in that family, they can increase suicidal thoughts. Keep your chin up! Answered by Magaly Bartman 1 year ago.


Help with paxil cr tapering!?
I'm on 12.5 mg of paxil cr and my doctor is tapering me off by going everyother day for 2 weeks, then every third day, then once a week, then done! It's been 2 weeks so far and I feel fine until it's the day to take the dose then I feel sleepy and nausea. My doctor said if I want I can stop now. I do... Asked by Hilda Leffert 1 year ago.

I'm on 12.5 mg of paxil cr and my doctor is tapering me off by going everyother day for 2 weeks, then every third day, then once a week, then done! It's been 2 weeks so far and I feel fine until it's the day to take the dose then I feel sleepy and nausea. My doctor said if I want I can stop now. I do but I'm scared I may withdrawal. Thoughts? Answered by Isela Hertz 1 year ago.

Hello, paxil withdrawal is real even tho some docs say it doesnt exist oh yes it does! but the reason your feeling sick on the day your too take the dose is because by that day your system has very minimal meds in it and your sick fr withdrawals. in other words, you dose and then days later your system has minimal meds in it and the withdrawal is there.... but like your doc said you can always slow down or stop the weaning off process. maybe if you simply call your doc and say hey im having these effects by the 3rd day? he will simply change up the milligrams you take or maybe go too every 2 days for a bit... til you adjust better. or you could simply add a half a tablet on the 2nd day too ease your process a bit. whats a half tab gonna hurt? but it sounds like the 3rd day is the issue 4u so why not just add a half tab or ask your doc or pharmacist for best advice free of charge w/a phone call. either way it sounds like things are fine and just need a fine tune up as the doctors say ie. med adjustments.... this would cure the nausea and sleepy issues.... regardless, all will work out in time.... good luck! Answered by Luisa Kobler 1 year ago.


Tapering paxil CR?
i am not breaking the 25 mg pill... i got a new prescription for 12.5. I just want to know is going from 25 to 12.5 a big drop.. even if plan on continue taking the 12.5 dose regularly. Asked by Juliane Plantenberg 1 year ago.

I have been taking paxil CR 25 mg for the past 4 months for PMS symtoms. However, i feel like that the dose is too much for my body to take, and for the past 3 days i have reduced it to 12.5 mg. Besides a mild headache, so far it has been ok. I want to know has anyone suffered from withdrawl symtoms from lowering the dose so abruptly. thanks. Answered by Lanell Wueste 1 year ago.

there is no other way to taper off the Paxil other than going from 25 to 12.5 mg. Whenever you come off a psychotropic medication, like Paxil, you MUST wean slowly off of it. Your doctor will probably have you take 12.5 mg for a week or two and then come off completely. Unfortunately, there is no way to cut those CR pills in half because any time a medication is controlled release (CR) it shouldn't be broken, crushed chewed, etc. You will notice a bit of a headace with coming off the med, but going down to 12.5 is the correct thing. Like I said, after a week, you should go to like 12.5 every other day, and then off completely. Slow is the key... you have to give your body time to adjust. Good luck Answered by Corey Abernathy 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil for about a year when I wanted to get off it. I slowly went from 40 mg to 35, 30, 20, 15, 10, 5, and finally after about 6 months, 2.5. When I would try to stop taking it altogether I would get really dizzy and sick to my stomache. When I took 2.5 mg it would all stop. Finally I had to take my sister's Prozac for 2 days to get off Paxil. Don't ask me how that worked, but the doctor told me to do it. Don't taper off without telling your dr, and watch out for the side effects - they are totally present! Answered by Shantay Lomanto 1 year ago.

I was on paxil cr for PPD. I stopped taking it cold turkey and what a mistake. I'm now off it but I had to wean myself. Every other day for a few weeks then 1/2 doses every other day for a while until I could function without it. I've been off since April 30th and feel great! If you do it gradually you will feel great too! Good luck Answered by Ricki Spake 1 year ago.

Yes. You should not do this yourself, only the doctor can really lower a dosage. And it is usually a gradual increase or decrease. And on another note, I know from working in nursing homes that you can not cut a pill without it having a score mark because if you do the meds loose effectiveness. Be careful when cutting/breaking pills. Also some meds aren't made to be crushed, broken down ect. Answered by Letitia Kassouf 1 year ago.

OH HONEY!!!!! i had very bad ones my eyes felt like when i would step ,the vibration would cause them to move, felling like electric shocks without the pain just the muscle action would hit me every so often, extreme anger, rage, head ache,but as long as i was on them, i felt great its the coming off that's so horrible, you could switch you prescription to generic and they want be as potent and you'll able to break them easier, you are probably getting to much to fast ,you're not suppose to break paxil cr they are time release, you should tell your doctor Answered by Stanley Bellingtier 1 year ago.


Is Paxil CR THAT different from regular release?
I am seriously considering a move from Paxil CR (12.5 mg) to regular release Paxil (not sure which mg...whichever is the least). My insurance (Aetna) covers so little of this drug that I pay a tremendous amount each month. And regular release can be purchased at Sam's Club via their $4 Prescription Drug plan.... Asked by Gilbert Boedecker 1 year ago.

I am seriously considering a move from Paxil CR (12.5 mg) to regular release Paxil (not sure which mg...whichever is the least). My insurance (Aetna) covers so little of this drug that I pay a tremendous amount each month. And regular release can be purchased at Sam's Club via their $4 Prescription Drug plan. That works. My question is for anyone who has taken both. Is there that much of a difference between the two drugs? I know HOW they are different...I just do not know how it manifests itself on a day-to-day basis. Does anyone have any experience with this? Thanks. Answered by Pat Brandy 1 year ago.

The chemical make up of the lively element is comparable. With the CR it extremely is, as you in all probability comprehend, persisted launch. different ingredients are blended with the Paxil so because it is embarked on your bloodstream gradually over a volume of time, as adversarial to very virtually suddenly. i discovered the CR precise for me, yet Paxil is a extreme drug, and additionally you have a minimum of a telephone seek for advice from which comprise your time-honored care practioner. he or she will have the skill to make certain which attitude is extra effectual for you. i'm hoping this facilitates! stable good fortune and stable heatlh to you! Gerald Answered by Romelia Polster 1 year ago.


Weaning off Paxil CR?
I haave been on Paxil CR for the past 3 yrs. to help mask my panic disorder. It has worked well, but I feel the need to wean off and see if I can learn to cope on my own. I know to wean slowly,and I have studied the websites with advice, but these sites only mention Paxil not Paxil CR,(controlled release) which... Asked by Brittni Tocco 1 year ago.

I haave been on Paxil CR for the past 3 yrs. to help mask my panic disorder. It has worked well, but I feel the need to wean off and see if I can learn to cope on my own. I know to wean slowly,and I have studied the websites with advice, but these sites only mention Paxil not Paxil CR,(controlled release) which comes in different mg's. I did speak to my doctor, but she was not helpful in my attempt to wean slowly. She just wrote me a rx for half the dose I normally take. I do not have insurance so it is hard for me to save enough money to see another doctor for different advice. Can any one help me to wean slowly without cutting the pills,(they crumble)? Has anyone weaned from PaxilCR? How did it go? Answered by Damian Morley 1 year ago.

How to Stop Taking Paxil, Paxil CR: Your doctor should be recommending that you reduce your of the CR dosage by 12.5mg every four days. You should probably make it five days because Paxil's discontinuation syndrome is so harsh. That means putting up with the suck-*** side effects for longer, but trust me, it really sucks less this way. Based on the 15-20 hour half-life. If your doctor says something that's slower than that, go for it! I'm all for slower discontinuations. Four to five days is the fastest you can step down the dosage. How To Safely Stop Taking Psychiatric & Anti-Epileptic Medications Lots of people hit this site wanting to know how to stop taking their crazy meds. That's understandable. There are many good reasons to stop taking the meds. There are also many bad reasons to stop taking them. I'll try to help you sort out the good from the bad reasons. But if you do have good reasons, you have to stop taking the meds safely. Sudden or rapid discontinuation can lead to many problems. This guide is just to use to make sure that you and your doctor have worked out a good discontinuation schedule for a medication, presuming you have the luxury for such. You must work with your doctor! You are not qualified to make this decision on your own. Got that? What you and your doctor need to do is work out a discontinuation schedule for any medication. This is the reverse of the titration schedule (if any, which I'm actually against), which was the plan of how your dosage was increased. The discontinuation schedule is the plan of how you'll decrease the amount of a med you'll take. Ask your doctor what it is based on. There are three things a discontinuation schedule should be based on: the half-life of a drug looking for the return of any symptoms experience with taking someone off a med The last one is either other people going off the same med or you coming off of the same or other meds. Or both. If you're lucky enough to get an explanation from your doctor, the half-life of a psychiatric medication is often explained like this, "It's out of your body in that many hours, but it's still in your brain." That's a gross oversimplification, but it's close enough for government work. Here's a way to picture the half-life in action. Take a glass and fill it half full with some beverage. Now fill it the rest of the way with water. OK, now empty it half of the mixture out and top it off with water. Keep doing that until you have something you'd drink and that could pass as water. The number of times it took to do that is the half-life, expressed in a quantity of water, of a particular beverage. Try it with a different beverage and you'd get a different half-life. Half-life means how long it takes for half of the metabolites to get flushed out of your system. The half-lives of meds is expressed in time because the process of adding water to the glass is more-or-less constant in your body. And in the environment for the half-lives of radioactive materials. So using Effexor (venlafaxine), if you're down to your last 37.5mg dose after 20 hours you'll have 18.75mg left in your body. Twenty hours after that you'll have about 9.4mg left. And so forth until it's gone, about 80-100 hours after your final 37.5mg tablet. Please, don't get all Xeno's Paradoxical on me, after four or five passes, as it were, a med is so broken down that the effects shouldn't be noticeable. The only real variable is not if it's four or five times the length of the half-life, but if you metabolize the med quickly or slowly. These half-life numbers are the based on the arithmetic mean averages from clinical trials and studies. Read the pharmacokinetics section of the med's PI sheet carefully to see what the known range of a drug's half-life is. All right so where does this "In your brain but out of your body" come from? Well when they measure half-life in humans during the clinical trials it's by blood tests. With critters in earlier tests it's a different story. Anyway, the drugs do clear out of your blood a lot faster than they do from your brain. But they hang around other organs, usually your liver and kidneys, maybe others, for four to five times the period of the half-life. So while they do all their work in your brain and that's where they like to hang out, there are other parts of your body that the meds might be hanging around as well. It all depends on the med, your body and a host of other factors. So "Out of your body but still in your brain" is mostly true and covers much of the concept neatly in the time allowed in a typical doctor's appointment. Anyway, the metabolites that are in your liver, kidneys and digestive system are what might be causing a bunch of the side effects you're complaining about in the first place. So if you take the half-life of a med and multiply it by five that's the minimum number of hours between when you can next lower your dosage by whatever the lowest dosage the med comes in is. The problem, of course, is that some meds get metabolized more than once, they have active metabolites, or they have really short half-lives and you'd be coming off to fast to give yourself a good idea to know if it was a good idea or not to stop taking this particular med. However, I do note in most of the med's profiles what the minimum amount of time that I recommend is between stepping down each dosage. Monitor return of symptoms. Unless you're replacing one med with another you have to be on the lookout for symptoms coming back. In this case you'll want to reduce the dosages really slowly, taking a couple weeks at a time to get an idea of how you'll be doing with less and less of a med. You'll want to keep some kind of diary, a blog, something to keep track of how you feel every day. At some point if it starts to suck, then you know you've lowered your dosage too far. But, hey, maybe you can get along at a lower dosage! Nothing wrong with that. From what I've read on support fora and in e-mails I get I think a lot of people wind up on dosages that are too high. When it comes to affective mood disorders, panic/anxiety disorders and many other psychiatric disorders we can afford to experiment with lower dosages. Things may hurt us emotionally for a bit, but we can get back up to a dosage where we were OK and we'll be OK again. It's not that big a deal. For schizophrenia, for epilepsy and other disorders the decision to lower dosages isn't that simple. Again a doctor must always be involved with this decision. The most important thing to remember is this - your symptoms have gone away BECAUSE THE MEDS ARE WORKING! It's not necessarily because you've been cured. There are no cures for a lot of these disorders. It's not your fault that you're crazy, but it is your responsibility to stay as sane as possible. You're not the only person you hurt if you really flip out. If you've been taking anticonvulsants (also known as "mood stabilizers" in Bipolarland) for a few months or longer and need to stop, you can't stop cold turkey at all. Unlike stopping SSRIs the effects of sudden discontinuation aren't just viciously unpleasant, they are dangerous. You run the risk of having seizures on top of your bipolar getting worse. These run the gamut from partial complex or absence seizures to tonic-clonic grand mals. Maybe you'll have this problem, maybe you won't, there's no way to tell. If you never had a seizure before that doesn't mean you won't start flopping around like a fish out of water. The risk is worse if you're taking a lithium variant, and/or any antidepressant, especially Wellbutrin (bupropion hydrochloride). Anticonvulsants need to be gradually discontinued to prevent any seizure activity from happening. With gradual discontinuation the worst most people experience is slight dizziness, confusion and sensitivity to sound and/or light. If you're already taking another anticonvulsant and are in the therapeutic range already, then you can probably stop one cold turkey with little risk of seizures, presuming you have no past history of seizure activity. You'll feel other wacky effects, and those will vary from med to med, but you won't be risking seizures. Let me qualify that, it has to be an anticonvulsant that is known to be effective for you. If it's a new anticonvulsant, well, you just never know. The odds are in your favor at least. If you do have a history of seizure activity, stopping any anticonvulsant cold turkey is never a decision you should make based upon information gleaned from any stupid website on the goddamn Internet you jackass, you should be discussing that with at least two neurologists! Get off your computer and on the telephone and start making appointments! SSRI discontinuation syndrome. Read the article to learn more about it. SSRIs are some of the most physically addictive drugs in existence. Addictive isn't really the right word, you develop an intense physical and psychological dependency without a craving and urge to abuse them (unless you're bipolar, then you may abuse them), but addictive is close enough. To suddenly stop taking them is to feel so very much worse than you were feeling before you ever considered taking meds. There's a term, "brain shivers." You'll know it if you ever experience it. Mouse and I have kicked opiates and we have kicked SSRIs cold turkey. We'll take the opiate kick. If you're taking an atypical antipsychotic along with an SSRI, the discontinuation is often not nearly as bad, so if you have some Seroquel (quetiapine) on hand for insomnia, you'll want to take some for your SSRI discontinuation. Not everyone experiences SSRI discontinuation syndrome, and for those who do the effects range from mild to extreme. Not all doctors recognize this as an issue, so that sucks even more. Be sure to read the section about how long it takes for a med to clear out of your system and wait that long to taper down to the next stage in your dosage. And, as Paula writes in her article, invest in a pill splitter. Another option is to switch to the liquid form that many of the meds have available, that way you can reduce your dosage by as much as you damn well please and take as long as you can afford to discontinue to med. If it's really bad you may want to switch to liquid Prozac (fluoxetine hydrochloride) for the final discontinuation. That can take a very long time, but because of Prozac's 9.3 day half-life it usually has the mildest discontinuation syndrome effects of all the SSRIs. The long half-life is a double-edged sword. If you're on a high dosage and especially sensitive to the discontinuation syndrome, it will take forever to get off of Prozac, but at least it won't be as bad as the other meds. If you're not as sensitive to the discontinuation syndrome, Prozac's long half-life makes it easier to discontinue than any of the other SSRIs. Abrupt discontinuation of high doses of benzodiazepines can lead to seizures in addition to dysphoria, insomnia, muscle cramps, vomiting and sweating. If you do wind up taking them daily for longer than four weeks and don't build up a tolerance and don't abuse them, be sure to refill your prescription a few days before running out, just in case something happens to prevent you from getting that refill when you do run out. Otherwise a normal discontinuation schedule is usually all it takes to safely and painlessly withdrawal from benzodiazepines. There's just one proviso - you can only discontinue from Xanax (alprazolam) using Xanax. All other benzos are interchangeable for purposes of discontinuation, but not Xanax. It figures that Xanax is the most addictive of them all. The withdrawal from atypical antipsychotics has been likened to taking small amounts of psychedelic drugs. Whether that is a good or bad thing is up to individual experience. Others get rebound symptoms for a day or two, sometimes longer and that's about it. The big problem is that the bipolar and the schizophrenic are the worst about stopping their meds. The good news is you can just start right back up on the atypicals and get back to where you were in controlling your symptoms. There isn't much in the way of good evidence if meds are effective if you stop them and start taking them again. So far I've found some studies that indicate you're screwed if you stop taking Paxil (paroxetine) and then want to start taking it again. I've come across some anecdotal evidence (i.e. people's experiences) that indicate the same for lithium, the valproates and Lamictal (lamotrigine). As mentioned above, the atypical antipsychotics seem to be OK with people who use them as required, as are the benzodiazepines. There are also people who rotate through SSRIs because of SSRI poop-out, with mixed results on Paxil's second use. The vaunted weight-loss effect of Topamax (topiramate) is a one-time offer. If you stop taking Topamax then take it again the odds are it won't affect your appetite. So you have to take into consideration that the med that is working well for you now may not work so well for you again if you stop taking it and want to take it again. Please read 12 Steps to Stay on Drugs to make sure you're not just addicted to some of your crazy behaviors. Strange as it may sound, some people are. There's also a physical condition known as anosognosia that prevents people from recognizing that they are ill. I think that it can be extended to where it prevents people from dealing with their illness in the proper way. It affects approximately 50% of the bipolar and schizophrenic communities. I'm pretty sure I have it. I went for years without getting the right meds to treat my bipolar and seizure disorders, and even now I have days when I want to throw away all of my meds and just go back to using my Soul of Iron to deal with all of my problems. It's just crazy so I don't do it. Just be damned sure you're stopping a med for the right reasons. For some disorders meds are temporary parts of an overall therapy strategy to get your brain working in a less messed-up way. For example - depression or panic/anxiety disorder the meds may be permanent or they may be temporary. But for epilepsy and bipolar disorder, for instance, the odds are that the meds, or some kind of treatment like VNS or TMS, is going to be a long-term, if not permanent part of your life. It's going to be many years of taking the right meds before you can even think of not taking any. Anticonvulsants ("Mood stabilizers") do, in theory, prevent the brain from getting into a state that causes seizures and/or mood swings. But it takes a long, long time to train your brain to stop acting that way. If it can happen at all. Epilepsy kills. Mood swings are dangerous. You are literally taking your life in your hands when you're considering a slow, steady discontinuation of anticonvulsants. Answered by Emelda Sermania 1 year ago.

Weaning Off Paxil Answered by Yuk Nuon 1 year ago.

Getting Off Paxil Answered by Hunter Jozwiak 1 year ago.

Paxil CR is the same as Paxil. CR stands for controlled release meaning that it is released in a more regular way in your body. From what I have read, some people have a very difficult time getting off of the stuff even by "weaning". Good luck. Answered by Halley Ahlman 1 year ago.

I went off Paxil a few years ago. If I remember correctly. my doc lowered my dosage first for a month. Then I took one pill every other day for a week or two, then off completely. It was very difficult for me, but after a week or so, I was ok. Be sure that you want to do this, tho. I was on it for about 2 years, and thought the same as you, that I didn't need it, and I could manage on my own, and after about 6 months, I was back at the doc. She put me on Effexor. I am taking 225 mg a day and have been on it for a long time now, and I beleive I am a anti-depressant lifer. Sometimes I think I can go off, but then I remember that I am on them for a reason, and I feel normal BECAUSE I am taking them. I know they are very expensive, but if you can afford it, and are feeling better on them, maybe you should rethink going off. Just my opinion, tho. If you do wean, just remember, you will probably feel like crap for a week or so, but each day you will be a little better, and befor you know it, you'll be ok. Give it about 2 weeks after your last pill. Good Luck Answered by Regena Tarman 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil too for almost a year, and I hated the side effects of getting off. I would sit on the couch and it felt like the whole world was spinning. Paxil was the worst for side effects when getting off of it. I wouldn't worry, I think what your haveing is perfectly normal. If you are female, I didn't notice, it is now known that Paxil when pregnant causes congenital heart defects. I would let your doctor know of your symptoms and that will make you feel better. But I think you will be ok, I felt l ike crap comeing off of it too. Good luck Answered by Detra Gueretta 1 year ago.

I really think you need to go to a Doctor. that is sympathetic to your case, dump the Doctor you're seeing they get a kickback from the drug company. See if you can find a Doctor into natural remedies. Its worth the extra money your health is at stake. Answered by Willard Branagan 1 year ago.


Paxil - CR Advise.?
I've been prescribed Paxil CR 12.5. Any advise would be wonderful. I have been on Anything and Everything. I plan to become pregnant in a couple of months (hopefully) and would not want this to effect me in anyway. Any advise would be greatly appreciated. God Bless!! Asked by Tonya Revel 1 year ago.

Paxil is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor which means that this drug keeps the neurotransmiters to stay in the synasis b/n 2 nerve cells longer. You mentioned that you've been on anything and everything. I wish you can be more specific about it. For antidepressants to work, you have to give it a long trial period before deciding whether it works or not. If you have recurring depressions, then you should stay on the medication for a much longer time period. Paxil is consider class-c when it comes to pregancy. The study is done on animal and it might but not an absolute answer that it might cause some problem. But human studies are inconclusive. Basically it boils down to the benefit vs risk ratio. In your situation I would think the benefit out weight the risk. Let's say if there is a 1000 women who are like you while not on any medication vs. 1000 women who are totally healthy, which group do you think will have a higher probability of having a totally health baby? So if a 1000 women who are like you while on paxil vs. 1000 women who are totally healthy, which group would have more totally health baby? Then can you credit the difference b/c of the medication or it is just the fact that your genetics is different. Do a Yahoo search for 'Paxil & pregnancy' and you will find more articles that you can read up on your own. Answered by Ngan Dziadek 1 year ago.

Oh bless your heart~ First and foremost you need to consult an ob/gyn and discuss your current medications~you need to do this well ahead of considering a pregnancy~also consult your psychiatrist~ Discuss this with these doctors and get second opinions if you can~ You also are going to run a higher risk for postpartum depression~ Babies add more stress to your life as wonderful as they are~ First and foremost you need to take care of you as you are the most important person in the world~once you are on level ground then you will be more prepared for a baby~and a baby is not going to cure your disorders~ I know I sound some what cold~yet I thought it would help my "issues" and it did not~ It takes at the very least 12 weeks for most of the medications to build in your system to an advisable level~and never, never just stop taking them cold turkey~I have and I suffered! Sweetheart I hope that you can find the medication that helps you~I take a combination of things~every system is different~it takes time to find the right stuff~when you do you will feel much better~then you can take on the pregnancy issue~ Make sure you get plenty of exercise~just a good walk helps your system and mind feel much better~ I wish you the very best~you will be content I promise~just give it all the proper time and you will be a better person for your patients~ May the sparkles in life land upon you~!~ Paroxetine is an antidepressant in a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Paroxetine affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Paroxetine is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Paroxetine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. Paroxetine may cause heart defects or serious, life-threatening lung problems in newborn babies whose mothers take the medication during pregnancy. However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant during pregnancy. If you are planning a pregnancy, or if you become pregnant while taking paroxetine, do not stop taking the medication without first talking to your doctor. Answered by Selina Kempon 1 year ago.


Does the paxil has any side effects??
Asked by Mitchell Antinore 1 year ago.

Paxil CR is approved only for adults 18 years and over. There are benefits and risks when using antidepressants. Depression and other illnesses can lead to suicidal thoughts or behavior whether or not you are taking antidepressants. In some children and teens, antidepressants increase suicidal thoughts or actions. You and your family should watch closely and call the doctor right away, if you have worsening depression, thoughts of suicide, or sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior (for example feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or not being able to sleep), especially at the beginning of treatment or after any change in dose. The reason that there have been some suicides with any and all antidepressants is the fact that when people are severely depressed they don't have the energy, drive or interest in doing anything at all. Most of them only sleep or sit for hours staring at blank walls. When this same person(s) decide to make a change for the better and get their life back, they start taking antidepressants which start to lift their depression. Unfortunately, on the road to being completely undepressed, you have to pass through the level of being mildly depressed. At this stage of depression, a person is more energetic, driven and is thinking more about his depression and problems than he was when he was severely depressed. It is at this time, that many people make the move to do away with themselves. It has nothing to do with the drug itself - only the level of depression the person is experiencing. The depressed person still needs to get help, but if that person is severely depressed and is taking antidepressant drug therapy, then someone should be responsible enough to keep watch on them during the mildly depressed period. This takes love and committment but the outcome for the depressed person is a life worth living. I have added some additional info for you below. In most cases, you can take Paxil CR with other medications. However, medicines known as monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), thioridazine or pimozide should not be taken while you are taking Paxil CR. There may be other medicines that don't react well with Paxil CR, so be sure to tell your healthcare provider about any prescription and over-the-counter medications that you are taking. As with any prescription medication, Paxil CR may cause some side effects, which are usually mild to moderate and may fade or disappear completely over time. A common side effect of Paxil CR is nausea, which may be lessened by taking it with food. Other side effects may include injury, infection, diarrhea, constipation, decreased appetite, sleepiness, weakness, dry mouth, insomnia, dizziness, tremor, yawning, sweating, abnormal vision and sexual side effects. If you should experience any side effects, be sure to report them to your healthcare provider as soon as possible and follow his/her advice. I took Paxil without any problems and found it was good for anxiety as well as depression. Answered by Lahoma Meginnes 1 year ago.

I agree you should look for another doctor. I went on Paxil over a year ago (now trying to go off). I had some side effects, but I went on the medication GRADUALLY, as I hope you are too. I started with a small dose of 5 or 10 mg, and then increased in increments of 5 mg. So it was 5 mg for one week, then 10 mg for a week or so, then 15 mg for a week or so, then 20 mg. which is the strength I've been at since then. If you went from zero to 20 that may explain the severity of side effects. Good luck. Answered by Allan Furtado 1 year ago.

I gained weight on paxil Answered by Lynsey Caron 1 year ago.

I went from around 175 to upper 180s, plus there were some sexual side affects. Though, given the benefit of taking it, it was a no-brainer - I'd do it again if I had to. Answered by Rudolph Bevilaqua 1 year ago.

It most certainly does, I was taking that drug briefly (about 3 weeks), and ended up in the ER due to the strenght of the side effects. Answered by Santiago Brashier 1 year ago.

If you have been prescribed a medication you need to speak to you doctor about it. Take it as it indicates on the label. My male friend had problems with ejaculation. He could not ejaculate as he once did, it took forever. I have a female friend that had a problem with orgasm, she couldn't but she would rather not be depressed. It was worth it to her to keep taking it. Answered by Kate Rushman 1 year ago.

read the label and the instructions Answered by Lorita Trecroci 1 year ago.

MAYBE DEPENDS Answered by Mozelle Winberry 1 year ago.


Paxil CR...How do I go off of it?
I have been on Paxil CR for about a year. I recently missed a dose, it was the worst feeling that you could imagine. I felt like a drug addict. I couldn't stop throwing up, I was dizzy, sweating, shivering. HORRIBLE! After this happened I realized I can't live like this, completely dependent on Paxil. I... Asked by Kayce Nilsby 1 year ago.

I have been on Paxil CR for about a year. I recently missed a dose, it was the worst feeling that you could imagine. I felt like a drug addict. I couldn't stop throwing up, I was dizzy, sweating, shivering. HORRIBLE! After this happened I realized I can't live like this, completely dependent on Paxil. I can't be scared to miss a dose. I want to be off of it. My doctor isn't exactly the best doctor in the world and don't want to ask for her help, she is quite strange! haha. So I would like to know how I should take myself off of it? Help! Please! Answered by Angelia Roshia 1 year ago.

I wish I could tell everyone that not only is Paxil CR is biggest joke in psychiatry (regular Paxil works just as well) but putting a person on Paxil should be considered after many other drugs fail. It causes the most extreme "dependency," it has the highest chance of causing discontinuation syndrome (withdrawal) and the discontinuation is typically bad. The fact your doctor prescribed Paxil CR is reason enough to leave. However you CAN NOT just stop the medication. Normally what happens it you are switched the the drug Prozac because it has a very long half life so the blood concentration is more level where as Paxil has more up and downs. Although your reaction to missing one dose is completely bazaar, especially the CR version. If you are afraid of asking her for help then why bother going? It is a waste of time and money to see a doctor and not say what is really going on or not actually telling her what your concerns are. I also want to address one thing that is a serious problem. Antidepressants and what you went through have absolutely NOTHING to do with addiction. It is a simple fact, that is why antidepressant "withdrawal" is technically called discontinuation syndrome, to try to separate antidepressants from drugs of abuse like heroin and cocaine. Addiction is not psychical, addiction is psychological dependency it is caving and "needing" a drug. An addict would do anything to get more drugs. Does that sounds like you? I'm guessing no. What antidepressants can cause it physical dependency (also the term "physical addiction" is not real or correct). Many drugs from heroin to prednisone to Afrin nasal spray to laxatives can all cause physical dependency. Addiction is consequences, loss of friends, family, jobs, money, arrests, and so on yet still refusing to stop the drug. Is the person on 1,000 mg of IV morphine for terminal cancer an addict? I doubt it yet if the morphine would be turned off the pain and misery would horrific. So you are NOT an addict. Also you might consider using another drug like Lexapro or Zoloft because they have a low rate of discontinuation syndrome and if it happens it is mild yet Paxil is by far the worst. If antidepressants help you, there is not need to just stop. It is good to use a different one but don't let fear stop you from having a better life. And in reality a lot of people are "dependent" on drugs, a diabetic requires insulin, a person who has has a transplant requires immunosuppressants, a person with HIV can be in a lot of trouble if even a couple of doses are skipped. There is a difference between "needing" heroin and needing a medication that helps you. I have some medical problems and if I got stranded on an island I would have problems without the medications. Yet I need them to live a normal life and for most people it is worth it. Governments even have plans for emergency situations (like a disaster) for dealing with people dependent on drugs- be it morphine (either legally or illegally) or an antidepressant. If you really just want to stop antidepressants forever you need to come up with a plan with a doctor. Some people need a week or two and some need months, especially with what you take. But typically switching to Prozac is best if you want to stop it all but if antidepressants help you you don't need to throw that away, you just need to get on better medications and be confident that if you need to you can reduce the dose and stop the drug. Answered by Kathlyn Finkelson 1 year ago.

This sounds like a rather extreme reaction for missing one dose. If you have such little confidence in your doctor, you definitely need to get a new one right away! Stay on your prescribed dose until you meet with a doctor who will assist you in getting off the Paxil slowly. Keep in mind that you were prescribed this medication for a reason, and getting off of it might not be in your best interest, either. Answered by Sharleen Gamotan 1 year ago.

Paroxetine can be a ***** to come off. You didn't say how much your on, but I was on 40mg for over a year and had to reduce the dosage very slowly. Switch to immediate release then knock a few mg off over 4-5 days until you get down to 10mg, then it should be a lot easier. You will have to cut the tablets into half and quarters this is why you need to switch to IR. It just takes time and patience and will power as with any drug. Answered by Joane Vaeza 1 year ago.

I was on paxil for 10 years and I tried to go off the cold turkey but I kept cryying and I figured that I would be on it forever. but. I finally made a search on paxil and found out that the reason I was crying everytime I tried to go off the stuff was that crying was one of side effects of going off. /so I than knew that I could go off the crap. I did wean myself off the stuff, until I finally got off it. You may expiernce alot of miserable side affects but if you can do it good for you. Maybe you looked up the webb. on paxil, if you did you should know that there was a class action law suit for paxil there was alot of people commiting suicide on the poison. Well good luck and dont give up the idea of weaning off slowly.n April Answered by Kenyatta Reierson 1 year ago.

Simon is correct. To further elaborate, you should never try go off a long term drug suddenly. You need to taper the dose gradually, with a doctor monitoring. Another issue to note is that you must NEVER cut a sustained-release (SR) or controlled-released (CR) tablet. You can suffer an overdosage. Switch to plain tablets, but you 'll need to tailor the plain tablets to your needs first. Thats why you need the doctor to be working hand-in-hand with you to taper your medicine. Answered by Eun Market 1 year ago.

Get a new doctor. You don't want your life in her hands from the way you make her sound. Find someone that cares and that you can trust. Both the answers before me were correct though. Answered by Shanika Batchelder 1 year ago.


Pregnacy and Paxil CR?
I found out I was pregnant a coulple of weeks ago and ran out of medication and couldn't afford to buy it about 4-5 days already but now I have it here. The problem is that I don't know if I should take it I know that they said it's a hazard for the baby but that stoping abruptly is also a hazard.... Asked by Wilhelmina Billotti 1 year ago.

I found out I was pregnant a coulple of weeks ago and ran out of medication and couldn't afford to buy it about 4-5 days already but now I have it here. The problem is that I don't know if I should take it I know that they said it's a hazard for the baby but that stoping abruptly is also a hazard. Please don't post rude remarks on why im asking here. I just wanted to see if someone has possibly being in the same situation or close to it to give some kind of advise. I go see my doctor on the 24th of this month the prenatal doctor that is. Answered by Markita Gosvener 1 year ago.

I was on paxil when I found out I was pregnant with my first. My doctor quickly weened me off it and kept me off while pregnant. My hormones evened out and I was fine. Talk to your doctor about what is best for you. Each situation is different. Even if your doc appointment isn't for a bit you can call and ask for advice on the paxil till then. They may reccomend a lower does or just take you off it. Answered by Arie Aveline 1 year ago.


Psychiatrist gave me 12.5 mg of paxil cr?
i asked him about this drug and he said it will get rid of my depression and give me more energy during the day because i wont be depressed as much. does anybody take this drug what are or were ur experiences with it? does it help with ur depression? any bad side effects? fyi, im an 18 year old male Asked by Melodie Streib 1 year ago.

I dont take it. But I am a pharmacy technician and we fill this drug often this is my answer: How Paxil CR Helps Depression may be related to a chemical imbalance in the brain. Serotonin is one of these chemicals. One way to treat it is to adjust the levels of serotonin. Paxil CR can help reduce the symptoms of depression (including associated anxiety symptoms) by adjusting the balance of serotonin. In medical studies, Paxil CR effectively relieved depression and its associated anxiety symptoms. Treatment and older adults Older adults may be more sensitive to taking medicine. Therefore, the healthcare provider may start older adults on a lower dose of medicine. Older adults are more likely to be on other medications for other health problems, so the side effects of medicines and the results of combining medicines must be considered by the healthcare provider. Important Safety Information Prescription Paxil CR is not for everyone. Don't take with MAOIs, thioridazine or pimozide. Paxil CR is generally well tolerated. As with many medications, there can be side effects. Some of the side effects may include infection, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, constipation, decreased appetite, dizziness, sweating, tremor, sexual side effects, injury, yawning, weakness, insomnia, abnormal vision or sleepiness. Talk to your doctor if you are taking prescription medication known as triptans, which are used for migraine or cluster headaches. When used in combination with Paxil CR or other antidepressant treatments, these drugs may lead to potentially life-threatening complications. Paxil CR is approved only for adults 18 years and over. In some children and teens, antidepressants increase suicidal thoughts or actions. Young adults, especially those with depression, may be at increased risk for suicidal actions. Whether or not you are taking antidepressants, you or your family should call the doctor right away if you have worsening depression, thoughts of suicide, or sudden or severe changes in mood or behavior (for example feeling anxious, agitated, panicky, irritable, hostile, aggressive, impulsive, severely restless, hyperactive, overly excited, or not being able to sleep), especially at the beginning of treatment or after a change in dose. Don't stop taking Paxil CR before talking to your doctor since side effects may result from stopping the medicine, particularly when abrupt. Symptoms some patients have reported on stopping Paxil CR include: dizziness, sensory disturbances (including electric shock sensations and tinnitus), abnormal dreams, agitation, anxiety, nausea, sweating, mood fluctuations, headache, fatigue, nervousness and sleep disturbances. Answered by Henry Mato 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil CR for about a year at a slightly higher dose. I got off of it because of slight weight gain and severe sleepiness. Not at night, but during the day all I would do is lay around on the couch. Maybe it just did not help. After 5 years on an antidepressant- I tried alot of them and the best one was......... nothing. With my doctors help I weaned off them and I feel better than I can remember! Be careful when you start any new drug in that family, they can increase suicidal thoughts. Keep your chin up! Answered by Hannah Humason 1 year ago.


Help with paxil cr tapering!?
I'm on 12.5 mg of paxil cr and my doctor is tapering me off by going everyother day for 2 weeks, then every third day, then once a week, then done! It's been 2 weeks so far and I feel fine until it's the day to take the dose then I feel sleepy and nausea. My doctor said if I want I can stop now. I do... Asked by Dominick Leuters 1 year ago.

I'm on 12.5 mg of paxil cr and my doctor is tapering me off by going everyother day for 2 weeks, then every third day, then once a week, then done! It's been 2 weeks so far and I feel fine until it's the day to take the dose then I feel sleepy and nausea. My doctor said if I want I can stop now. I do but I'm scared I may withdrawal. Thoughts? Answered by Bronwyn Hargitt 1 year ago.

Hello, paxil withdrawal is real even tho some docs say it doesnt exist oh yes it does! but the reason your feeling sick on the day your too take the dose is because by that day your system has very minimal meds in it and your sick fr withdrawals. in other words, you dose and then days later your system has minimal meds in it and the withdrawal is there.... but like your doc said you can always slow down or stop the weaning off process. maybe if you simply call your doc and say hey im having these effects by the 3rd day? he will simply change up the milligrams you take or maybe go too every 2 days for a bit... til you adjust better. or you could simply add a half a tablet on the 2nd day too ease your process a bit. whats a half tab gonna hurt? but it sounds like the 3rd day is the issue 4u so why not just add a half tab or ask your doc or pharmacist for best advice free of charge w/a phone call. either way it sounds like things are fine and just need a fine tune up as the doctors say ie. med adjustments.... this would cure the nausea and sleepy issues.... regardless, all will work out in time.... good luck! Answered by Marcellus Paulic 1 year ago.


Tapering paxil CR?
i am not breaking the 25 mg pill... i got a new prescription for 12.5. I just want to know is going from 25 to 12.5 a big drop.. even if plan on continue taking the 12.5 dose regularly. Asked by Kyla Brockmann 1 year ago.

I have been taking paxil CR 25 mg for the past 4 months for PMS symtoms. However, i feel like that the dose is too much for my body to take, and for the past 3 days i have reduced it to 12.5 mg. Besides a mild headache, so far it has been ok. I want to know has anyone suffered from withdrawl symtoms from lowering the dose so abruptly. thanks. Answered by Margo Amante 1 year ago.

there is no other way to taper off the Paxil other than going from 25 to 12.5 mg. Whenever you come off a psychotropic medication, like Paxil, you MUST wean slowly off of it. Your doctor will probably have you take 12.5 mg for a week or two and then come off completely. Unfortunately, there is no way to cut those CR pills in half because any time a medication is controlled release (CR) it shouldn't be broken, crushed chewed, etc. You will notice a bit of a headace with coming off the med, but going down to 12.5 is the correct thing. Like I said, after a week, you should go to like 12.5 every other day, and then off completely. Slow is the key... you have to give your body time to adjust. Good luck Answered by Tomiko Opoien 1 year ago.

I was on Paxil for about a year when I wanted to get off it. I slowly went from 40 mg to 35, 30, 20, 15, 10, 5, and finally after about 6 months, 2.5. When I would try to stop taking it altogether I would get really dizzy and sick to my stomache. When I took 2.5 mg it would all stop. Finally I had to take my sister's Prozac for 2 days to get off Paxil. Don't ask me how that worked, but the doctor told me to do it. Don't taper off without telling your dr, and watch out for the side effects - they are totally present! Answered by Cristobal Purviance 1 year ago.

I was on paxil cr for PPD. I stopped taking it cold turkey and what a mistake. I'm now off it but I had to wean myself. Every other day for a few weeks then 1/2 doses every other day for a while until I could function without it. I've been off since April 30th and feel great! If you do it gradually you will feel great too! Good luck Answered by Karl Pietropaolo 1 year ago.

Yes. You should not do this yourself, only the doctor can really lower a dosage. And it is usually a gradual increase or decrease. And on another note, I know from working in nursing homes that you can not cut a pill without it having a score mark because if you do the meds loose effectiveness. Be careful when cutting/breaking pills. Also some meds aren't made to be crushed, broken down ect. Answered by Lanie Bey 1 year ago.

OH HONEY!!!!! i had very bad ones my eyes felt like when i would step ,the vibration would cause them to move, felling like electric shocks without the pain just the muscle action would hit me every so often, extreme anger, rage, head ache,but as long as i was on them, i felt great its the coming off that's so horrible, you could switch you prescription to generic and they want be as potent and you'll able to break them easier, you are probably getting to much to fast ,you're not suppose to break paxil cr they are time release, you should tell your doctor Answered by Solomon Kakacek 1 year ago.


Is Paxil CR THAT different from regular release?
I am seriously considering a move from Paxil CR (12.5 mg) to regular release Paxil (not sure which mg...whichever is the least). My insurance (Aetna) covers so little of this drug that I pay a tremendous amount each month. And regular release can be purchased at Sam's Club via their $4 Prescription Drug plan.... Asked by Emerson Boso 1 year ago.

I am seriously considering a move from Paxil CR (12.5 mg) to regular release Paxil (not sure which mg...whichever is the least). My insurance (Aetna) covers so little of this drug that I pay a tremendous amount each month. And regular release can be purchased at Sam's Club via their $4 Prescription Drug plan. That works. My question is for anyone who has taken both. Is there that much of a difference between the two drugs? I know HOW they are different...I just do not know how it manifests itself on a day-to-day basis. Does anyone have any experience with this? Thanks. Answered by Boris Devenecia 1 year ago.

The chemical make up of the lively element is comparable. With the CR it extremely is, as you in all probability comprehend, persisted launch. different ingredients are blended with the Paxil so because it is embarked on your bloodstream gradually over a volume of time, as adversarial to very virtually suddenly. i discovered the CR precise for me, yet Paxil is a extreme drug, and additionally you have a minimum of a telephone seek for advice from which comprise your time-honored care practioner. he or she will have the skill to make certain which attitude is extra effectual for you. i'm hoping this facilitates! stable good fortune and stable heatlh to you! Gerald Answered by Jaleesa Stains 1 year ago.


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