Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017015/001.

Names and composition

"PAVULON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PANCURONIUM BROMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017015/001 PAVULON PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
017015/002 PAVULON PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017015/001 PAVULON PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
017015/002 PAVULON PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072058/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072059/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
072060/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
072208/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE Injectable/ Injection 2MG per ML
072209/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
072210/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072211/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
072212/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
072213/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
072320/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072321/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
072759/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072760/001 PANCURONIUM BROMIDE PANCURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML

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Answered questions

How much do pentothal (3-5grams), Pavulon (100milligrams), and Potassium chloride (100milliequivalents) cost?
Yes, I know that they are used for lethal injections in the U.S., but I need to know how much they would cost so that I could tell people how much their life is worth. No hater comments please! If you don't think it's funny, you can leave. All answers are appreciated. Thank you. Asked by Eloy Gonzaga 1 year ago.

That's a lot of Pentothal. It's about $5 for 500mg, so 6-10 times that would be $30-50. Pancuronium (generic for Pavlon) is cheap - maybe $2? Potassium is cheap, too. They usually come in 20 mEq vials, so I'd say about $5 total for that. When you take it to the checkout, you'll have to pay in the neighborhood of $40-60 for the lot. You know that the cost of the drugs does not have ANYTHING to do with the worth of anyone's life, even a murderer's. It's a ridiculous concept. Answered by Karey Follis 1 year ago.

Don't forget to add in the cost of the IV, the IV tubing, the saline flushes, and the pay for the person who's placing the IV and pushing the drugs (unless he or she is doing this pro bono). Alternatively, since a properly wielded razor blade to the throat would kill someone, you could argue that the value of a person's life is no more than the price of the razor blade... Answered by Aimee Jennelle 1 year ago.

They are not only used in lethal injection. They are used theraputically in smaller doses. I have an rx for micro k which is potassium in 20meqs for 200 pills that cost 3$ with my insurance. Answered by Lurlene Birckett 1 year ago.

Realistically, since you can't get these drugs, why does it matter what they cost? Why is it your job to tell other people what their lives are worth? If it was really your job to pass on this information, would you not have access to it? You could conceivably contact the manufacturers. Answered by Dorethea Jayme 1 year ago.


What changes in the body happen during a lethal injection that kills the person?
Asked by Thuy Thum 1 year ago.

There are actually more than one drug injected for a lethal injection. Here are the drugs and what each do to the prisoner: The drugs are administered, in this order: Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Within a minute or two after the last drug is administered, a physician or medical technician declares the inmate dead. The amount of time between when the prisoner leaves the holding cell and when he or she is declared dead may be just 30 minutes. Death usually occurs anywhere from five to 18 minutes after the execution order is given. After the execution, the body is placed in a body bag and taken to medical examiner, who may perform an autopsy. It is then either claimed by the inmate's family or interred by the state. Answered by Michael Dombeck 1 year ago.

There are 3 injections: a million) a barbiturate (sedative) to bring about coma. 2) a neuromuscular blockading agent to provide up respiratory and sluggish the middle. 3) potassium chloride to provide up the middle beating. dying follows shortly after. As you would be completely subconscious after the 1st injection, you will not experience something. Answered by Kerstin Shapard 1 year ago.

There are three chemicals that are injected: 1. Brevatol, which is a benzodiazapine (like Valium) which puts you to sleep. . (Unconscious) then 2. Pavulon, a paralytic, which paralyzes the diaphragm (Muscle responsible for breathing) then 3. Potassium chloride, in a high enough concentration to stop the heart. . Thats it! hope this helps. . . Oh, by the way, "Don't try this at home!" Answered by Jody Gavin 1 year ago.

Potassium chloride (KCl) is the "lethal" part of the injection. It causes the heart to stop beating. Answered by Cecilia Sarault 1 year ago.

The potassium chloride stops the heart by suppressing nerve impulses. Answered by Lakenya Dimond 1 year ago.

the potassium chloride alters the rhythm of the heart that would eventually lead to cardiac arrest :D Answered by Jesus Friemering 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Dacia Popkin 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Karine Salazar 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Genaro Righthouse 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Pamelia Bulluck 1 year ago.


How much do pentothal (3-5grams), Pavulon (100milligrams), and Potassium chloride (100milliequivalents) cost?
Yes, I know that they are used for lethal injections in the U.S., but I need to know how much they would cost so that I could tell people how much their life is worth. No hater comments please! If you don't think it's funny, you can leave. All answers are appreciated. Thank you. Asked by Dominique Toher 1 year ago.

That's a lot of Pentothal. It's about $5 for 500mg, so 6-10 times that would be $30-50. Pancuronium (generic for Pavlon) is cheap - maybe $2? Potassium is cheap, too. They usually come in 20 mEq vials, so I'd say about $5 total for that. When you take it to the checkout, you'll have to pay in the neighborhood of $40-60 for the lot. You know that the cost of the drugs does not have ANYTHING to do with the worth of anyone's life, even a murderer's. It's a ridiculous concept. Answered by Arlen Paleo 1 year ago.

Don't forget to add in the cost of the IV, the IV tubing, the saline flushes, and the pay for the person who's placing the IV and pushing the drugs (unless he or she is doing this pro bono). Alternatively, since a properly wielded razor blade to the throat would kill someone, you could argue that the value of a person's life is no more than the price of the razor blade... Answered by Theresia Fitzgibbons 1 year ago.

They are not only used in lethal injection. They are used theraputically in smaller doses. I have an rx for micro k which is potassium in 20meqs for 200 pills that cost 3$ with my insurance. Answered by Lizette Stilgenbauer 1 year ago.

Realistically, since you can't get these drugs, why does it matter what they cost? Why is it your job to tell other people what their lives are worth? If it was really your job to pass on this information, would you not have access to it? You could conceivably contact the manufacturers. Answered by Kurt Spiroff 1 year ago.


What changes in the body happen during a lethal injection that kills the person?
Asked by Pamella Cuddihee 1 year ago.

There are actually more than one drug injected for a lethal injection. Here are the drugs and what each do to the prisoner: The drugs are administered, in this order: Anesthetic - Sodium thiopental, which has the trademark name Pentothal, puts the inmate into a deep sleep. This drug is a barbiturate that induces general anesthesia when administered intravenously. It can reach effective clinical concentrations in the brain within 30 seconds, according to an Amnesty International report. For surgical operations, patients are given a dose of 100 to 150 milligrams over a period of 10 to 15 seconds. For executions, as many as 5 grams (5,000 mg) of Pentothal may be administered. This in itself is a lethal dose. It's believed by some that after this anesthetic is delivered, the inmate doesn't feel anything. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Paralyzing agent - Pancuronium bromide, also known as Pavulon, is a muscle relaxant that is given in a dose that stops breathing by paralyzing the diaphragm and lungs. Conventionally, this drug takes effect in one to three minutes after being injected. In many states, this drug is given in doses of up to 100 milligrams, a much higher dose than is used in surgical operations -- usually 40 to 100 micrograms per one kilogram of body weight. Other chemicals that can be used as a paralyzing agent include tubocurarine chloride and succinylcholine chloride. Saline solution flushes the intravenous line. Toxic agent (not used by all states) - Potassium chloride is given at a lethal dose in order to interrupt the electrical signaling essential to heart functions. This induces cardiac arrest. Within a minute or two after the last drug is administered, a physician or medical technician declares the inmate dead. The amount of time between when the prisoner leaves the holding cell and when he or she is declared dead may be just 30 minutes. Death usually occurs anywhere from five to 18 minutes after the execution order is given. After the execution, the body is placed in a body bag and taken to medical examiner, who may perform an autopsy. It is then either claimed by the inmate's family or interred by the state. Answered by Mina Henken 1 year ago.

There are 3 injections: a million) a barbiturate (sedative) to bring about coma. 2) a neuromuscular blockading agent to provide up respiratory and sluggish the middle. 3) potassium chloride to provide up the middle beating. dying follows shortly after. As you would be completely subconscious after the 1st injection, you will not experience something. Answered by Pauline Eldridge 1 year ago.

There are three chemicals that are injected: 1. Brevatol, which is a benzodiazapine (like Valium) which puts you to sleep. . (Unconscious) then 2. Pavulon, a paralytic, which paralyzes the diaphragm (Muscle responsible for breathing) then 3. Potassium chloride, in a high enough concentration to stop the heart. . Thats it! hope this helps. . . Oh, by the way, "Don't try this at home!" Answered by Kami Schinnell 1 year ago.

Potassium chloride (KCl) is the "lethal" part of the injection. It causes the heart to stop beating. Answered by Marylouise Hugghis 1 year ago.

The potassium chloride stops the heart by suppressing nerve impulses. Answered by Margo Kreinbring 1 year ago.

the potassium chloride alters the rhythm of the heart that would eventually lead to cardiac arrest :D Answered by Harris Urie 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Garnet Bokor 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Porsha Garren 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Maxwell Rakowski 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Lupe Timenez 1 year ago.


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