PAROXETINE MESYLATE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 207139/001.

Names and composition

"PAROXETINE MESYLATE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of PAROXETINE MESYLATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
207139/001 PAROXETINE MESYLATE PAROXETINE MESYLATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 7.5MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
204516/001 BRISDELLE PAROXETINE MESYLATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 7.5MG BASE
207139/001 PAROXETINE MESYLATE PAROXETINE MESYLATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 7.5MG BASE
021299/001 PEXEVA PAROXETINE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 10MG BASE
021299/002 PEXEVA PAROXETINE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 20MG BASE
021299/003 PEXEVA PAROXETINE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 30MG BASE
021299/004 PEXEVA PAROXETINE MESYLATE TABLET/ORAL EQ 40MG BASE

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Answered questions

Paroxetine (Paxil) and (mesylate) same?
Doctor gave me this for depression on the bottle says pexeva paroxetine (as mesylate) not paxil.. Are they both same or different? He also gave it to me for nerve pain how long does the effect kick in? Right away or over a week? And how long it stays in your symptoms when stoping from taking them? Like a day or... Asked by Tanna Kava 1 month ago.

Doctor gave me this for depression on the bottle says pexeva paroxetine (as mesylate) not paxil.. Are they both same or different? He also gave it to me for nerve pain how long does the effect kick in? Right away or over a week? And how long it stays in your symptoms when stoping from taking them? Like a day or two.. Thank Answered by Junior Domino 1 month ago.

Paxil is paroxetine HCl. The two medications are bioequivalent, but they are not identical. The inactive salt (HCl or mesylate) is separated when your body metabolizes the medication, and it is the paroxetine that provides the effect. There might be some short term difference depending on if one is absorbed more easily (I don't know if that's the case), but since paroxetine has a half-life of 24 hours (meaning after 24 hours the concentration of the drug in your blood is halved) or more I would expect the long term effects to be just about identical. However, I'm not a doctor... This is what I would be more concerned about when it comes to the substitution: there is currently no generic form of Pexeva available, which means you may end up paying more for this form of paroxetine than you would if your prescription was for Paxil which DOES have a generic version! To combine the last two paragraphs: For your purposes the two drugs are going to do the same thing. For the pharmaceutical company's purposes the two drugs are different enough that the new one (Pexeva) qualifies for a new patent, meaning they can charge brand name money for it without worrying about a generic substitute yet. Tell your doctor you're on to this drug company trickery and get him to switch that script! Effects for depression can take up to a month to be noticeable, and at the point the dosage may need to be adjusted. Your doctor should be monitoring this closely. I don't know anything about the effects on nerve pain, since I have only ever taken it for depression. If you need to stop taking this or any other SSRI you should taper off. Paroxetine has a shorter half life than some other SSRIs and once the level of the medication in your body drops enough there can be a number of withdrawal symptoms. With Paxil I've had this happen by missing just one dose. You should look up SSRI discontinuation syndrome on Google. Answered by Leighann Rosol 1 month ago.

I've not been pregnant on Paxil but I would do as both your doctors suggest. The warnings on the label and on the internet are the same as the warnings for pregnant women and smoking. Yeah, it's probably best not to smoke while your pregnant, but you could. Anyway, your benefits really do outway the risk in this case. Stay happy and healthy. Get check ups often and talk with your doctors about the baby. Everything should be fine. Or if your still not satisfied and don't trust your doctors you could get a third opinion from another doctor. Good luck! Answered by Carline Ariail 1 month ago.


Paroxetine (Paxil) and (mesylate) same? ?
Doctor gave me this for depression on the bottle says pexeva paroxetine (as mesylate) not paxil.. Are they both same or different? He also gave it to me for nerve pain how long does the effect kick in? Right away or over a week? And how long it stays in your symptoms when stoping from taking them? Like a day or... Asked by Cherryl Washmuth 1 month ago.

Doctor gave me this for depression on the bottle says pexeva paroxetine (as mesylate) not paxil.. Are they both same or different? He also gave it to me for nerve pain how long does the effect kick in? Right away or over a week? And how long it stays in your symptoms when stoping from taking them? Like a day or two.. Thank Answered by Randell Wash 1 month ago.

Both are the same, Paxil is the "trade" name. Takes a little while to kick in yes, anything up to 2 weeks. It will remain in your body for about a week depending on your metabolism and liver and kidney health. Don't stop taking this drug without your doctors advice. Answered by Allegra Leclare 1 month ago.


Drug interaction concerns?
My brother in law is taking400mg paroxetine300mg Lithium carb2mg Risperidone2mg Doxazosin-Mesylate75mg Amitriptyline HCL20mg Zyprexa20mg PropranololSince he's been taking all of these medications he's been sort of zombie like. He can't really speak and my mother in law has told me that... Asked by Ora Dabbraccio 1 month ago.

My brother in law is taking 400mg paroxetine 300mg Lithium carb 2mg Risperidone 2mg Doxazosin-Mesylate 75mg Amitriptyline HCL 20mg Zyprexa 20mg Propranolol Since he's been taking all of these medications he's been sort of zombie like. He can't really speak and my mother in law has told me that he's been having hallucinations. Can these medications themselves cause him to have these hallucinations? I'm really concerned about him, I mean is it responsible for the docs to keep him so drugged up to the point that he can't walk or talk, and hallucinate? My fiance has told me that he probably suspects that the only thing his brother suffered from was being bipolar, and perhaps a mild case of depression, but that's it. Answered by Carlo Speroni 1 month ago.

So the drugs are: paroxetine - anti depressant Lithium carb - mood stabilizer Risperidone - anti psychotic Doxazosin-Mesylate - for high blood pressure Amitriptyline HCL - anto depressant Zyprexa - anti psychotic Propranolol - for high blood pressure he is being treated for 2 different disorders.... Bipolar and High blood pressure. They do have him on 2 anti depreswsants and 2 anto psychotics but even that is not out of the ordinary..... I take; Lamictal, Saphris, Klonopin, and Lunesta (for Bipolar); Albuterol, Advair, Qvar, Singlair, Zyrtec, and Rhinocort (for Asthma and allergies); levothyroxine (for hypothyroidism); Naltrexone (for chronic fatigue). those are my everyday meds. I also occasionally take medication for migraines, inflamation, and pain (partially due to the chronic fatigue and partially due to a disorder that causes calcuim to build up in my ligaments. If it reallt cincerns you then take him for a second opinion but the doctor has a reason for having him on all of those.... It is standard practice to use t6 or 4 meds for Bipolar... one for the depression, one for the mania, and a mood stabilizer.... and sometimes somethign for anxiety and insomnia.. not so unusual. Answered by Zella Rockmore 1 month ago.

Mixing lithium with antipsychotic drugs might cause neurotoxicity. The feature was first noticed over 20 years ago, and some canadian psychiatrists "disproved" the interaction by a flawed retrospective statistics. The trouble with their study was that in order to prove an interaction occurred the person had to die. They could operate in a cloud and it would not have been noticed by the nurse enough to question a possible interaction. Since then there have been not trials done to find out how it works, not even in animals. Even if a study showed no change in blood levels that does not mean an interaction does not exist, as for example alcohol and narcotics added together can kill without changed blood levels. Duplicate therapy to promote serotonin syndrome exists with the amitriptyline and paroxetine (dose cannot be correct), also no reason for duplication of antipsychotic drugs risperidone and zyprexa. These atypical antipsychotics promote weight gain and diabetes. Commonly the prescriber does not check for hemoglobin A1c or glucose levels to monitor adverse blood sugar changes (not their departiment?). Answered by Golda Cissel 1 month ago.

Not a single one of these drugs can but fused together it may have a different reactions try to get him off them Answered by Marine Nethken 1 month ago.


Paxil is Pexeva?
wtg medic i agree totally, so basically, they gave paxil to me wrapped in a package made to look like it had a nice little bow on it, huh? from what i gathered, its paxil, seeing as the only ingredient in it that makes it "differnet" from paxil is essentially flushed out of your body leaving you with... Asked by Adrianne Coressel 1 month ago.

after deciding to go off my anxiety meds with my docs permission, he told me pexeva was NOT paxil, well i remembered quite vividly him telling me when i was given the meds that i was being given a generic brand of PAXIL, so i researched it and it seems that all i can find is what i thought he told me and then later denied giving me, was PAXIL, im i wrong or is PEXEVA not generic PAXIL? b/c everytime i look it up there it is-paxil, paxil cr and pexeva! all peroxitine, all the same same medicine, just under different names, by the way it should be called PAX-HELL, this drug was the worst thing ever, the withdrawl is worse than the condition i was given the drug for!!!!!!!! Answered by Jerlene Genre 1 month ago.

wtg medic i agree totally, so basically, they gave paxil to me wrapped in a package made to look like it had a nice little bow on it, huh? from what i gathered, its paxil, seeing as the only ingredient in it that makes it "differnet" from paxil is essentially flushed out of your body leaving you with ,basically, the exact same paxil ingredient and the exact same pill make up as paxil, correct? Answered by Katerine Dewitte 1 month ago.

PEXEVA is a brand product composed of paroxetine mesylate. PEXEVA is bioequivalent to GlaxoSmithKline's Paxil, which is composed of paroxetine hydrochloride. The chemical difference between the two products is the inactive salt portion of the active ingredient (PEXEVA's mesylate vs. PAXIL's hydrochloride). The inactive salt is separated from the active paroxetine molecule in the gastrointestinal tract, leaving only the active paroxetine molecule to be absorbed into the bloodstream and provide the intended therapeutic effect. I personally don't think SSRI's do anyting for depression. No one has been able to successfully explain to me how exactly seratonin plays a role in depressive disorder. Even in the drug commercials they carefully state that serotonin "is believed" to play a role in depression. Basically they are selling you something that changes brain chemistry when they have no idea if that is the problem. A doctor does no medical examination nor do they "measure" quantitative values of seratonin so why on earth would they start fudging with it. So many people I have encountered have had nightmares with SSRI's. I'm no doctor, chemist or expert, but I've seen the results of bad medicine up close and personal. I agree, they are BAD NEWS! Edit: EXACTLY! But don't blame your doctor, most of them have no idea what it even is. Whichever drug company whore that gives them the box seats wins the "prescription of the month" prize. I have rarely met an MD who has any idea the pathophysiology of the drugs they prescribe. Answered by Maria Zeinert 1 month ago.

what was the withdrawl like. I have just started taking it a week ago, and it seems to be helping my anxiety ok BUT i do get a nervously shaky feeling, followed by a bit of nausea that goes away after about a half hour(not too severe)... Fill me in Im actually taking what says PEROXITINE on the bottle, what is supposed to be generic.... Im sorry I dont know what to say as far as your question goes, i wanted to help, but if you wouldnt mind writing me back and filling me in about it more, id really appreciate it. THANK YOU! Answered by Shandra Andrae 1 month ago.


Can a patient take St Johns wort while in treatment with the following medications?
thanks everyone. I'd better get in touch with the doc to go on the safe side. Asked by Judith Bacik 1 month ago.

Short answer: Do NOT take the wort along with paroxetine without telling your doctor! Longer answer: The number one drug on that list that will interact with St. John's wort is paroxetine. They both have anti-depressant effect and I believe that they even have a common mechanism of action (SSRI). This essentially means that by taking them both you're double-dosing and are potentially exposing yourself to a reaction known as serotonin syndrome in which your central nervous system becomes overloaded with serotonin and stops responding to it appropriately. This can cause clonic seizures, altered mentation, hyperthermia, and more and can be life-threatening. The initial stages of SS can be difficult to detect unless you know exactly what to look for. Basically you need to talk with your doctor and probably make a decision with them either to take the St. John's wort or to take the paroxetine but not both. Or, if he or she does agree to your taking both, then they'll probably want to know your exact dosage of wort and want you to carefully monitor your response to the combined drugs. Also, you have to consider that if paroxetine isn't working for you then you may just need to report that to your doctor and try either a different drug (there are a few kinds besides SSRIs and one may work better for you), light therapy, cognitive therapy, lifestyle changes (exercise?, hobbies?, social events?), or something else altogether. I think that none of the other medications you list really interact with St. John's wort appreciably, however there's a chance that the wort might increase the amount of amlodipine you need to be taking (by increasing how fast your body metabolizes it). Also the wort can interact to some degree with a wide range of drugs which your doctor might want to put you on at some future time. So, again, it's an absolute must that your doctor know about the wort. Answered by Naomi Frymoyer 1 month ago.

No. The paroxetine alone you cannot take St. John's Wort with - also that is a mountain of medications, looks like for managing diabetes. St John's Wort's effect on the liver could be catastrophic with some of these medications. Answered by Sheridan Freier 1 month ago.

St. John's Wort is well known for changing how your liver enzymes break down drugs, which then affects how much drug there is in your blood. This then effects how much is free to actually have an effect on you - whether it be too much and causing overdose, or too little and thus not doing what it's supposed to. I would not reccomend taking SJW with all those things, but the best answer is to go through it with your doctor. Answered by Augusta Orahood 1 month ago.

Call the Dr. or even call your local pharmacy, preferably where these other prescriptions are filled. St. John's Wort is for depression and even though it is a herb, I would still make that call. Answered by Maryalice Frease 1 month ago.


Right type of Antidepressant for this fictional character?
So, I have this one fictional Character that has some pretty bad problems. Here's what I'm looking for. An antidepressant that;- Works very well with depression and severe anxiety- Can be mixed with another medication called Clozapine, used for his Schizophrenia- Doesn't cause side effects such as... Asked by Nelida Kalkbrenner 1 month ago.

So, I have this one fictional Character that has some pretty bad problems. Here's what I'm looking for. An antidepressant that; - Works very well with depression and severe anxiety - Can be mixed with another medication called Clozapine, used for his Schizophrenia - Doesn't cause side effects such as hallucinations, delusions, or suicidal thoughts (If any of these are side effects the character will be doomed in chaos forever!) If you can find something like that I would be very happy! Now I know, this question might sound weird but please note that I do not intend any disrespect and am certainly not trying to ask a real life question. This is completely Hypothetical! Also, I reserve the rights to create my own characters and add anything I want to them so no judging please! I have my reasons Answered by Annabelle Kotyk 1 month ago.

Xanax isn't an antidepressant, though it can improve mood if someone is agitated and anxious. It really all depends on how important it is that the audience understands the specifics of the medication. Celexa (citalopram) might be one that is well enough known, and might fit your criteria. Other drugs in same class: Other drugs in same class: Escitalopram, Sertraline, Fluoxetine, Paroxetine, Fluvoxamine, Nefazodone, Olanzapine/fluoxetine, Citalopram Hydrobromide, Sertraline Hydrochloride, Trazodone hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Fluvoxamine Maleate, Paroxetine hydrochloride, Paroxetine mesylate, Paroxetine hydrochloride hemihydrate, Nefazodone hydrochloride, Fluoxetine hydrochloride Answered by Marvis Wilburn 1 month ago.

I'm not a doctor but I'm guessing that Xanax would be a good one. Certainly almost anyone reading your story will know what it is and what it does. Answered by Nana Miklos 1 month ago.


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