PARAGARD T 380A Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018680/001.

Names and composition

"PARAGARD T 380A" is the commercial name of a drug composed of COPPER.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018680/001 PARAGARD T 380A COPPER INTRAUTERINE DEVICE/INTRAUTERINE 309MG per COPPER

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017408/001 CU-7 COPPER INTRAUTERINE DEVICE/INTRAUTERINE 89MG
018680/001 PARAGARD T 380A COPPER INTRAUTERINE DEVICE/INTRAUTERINE 309MG per COPPER
018205/001 TATUM-T COPPER INTRAUTERINE DEVICE/INTRAUTERINE 120MG

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Answered questions

Paragard IUD and deep/rough sex?
I'm thinking about getting the Paragard IUD (nonhormonal IUD) and I've read a lot about it and it is ideally the right choice for me. I've had a baby 6months ago and I do not want another child. Since I'm young my doctor won't refer me to a surgeon to get a tubal ligation so an IUD makes sense... Asked by Catarina Kibbler 1 month ago.

I'm thinking about getting the Paragard IUD (nonhormonal IUD) and I've read a lot about it and it is ideally the right choice for me. I've had a baby 6months ago and I do not want another child. Since I'm young my doctor won't refer me to a surgeon to get a tubal ligation so an IUD makes sense for me because I forget to take the pill which got me my beautiful baby in the first place. The ONLY problem I have is I read that women who have deep penetration with an IUD are in pain during sex and eventually stop having deep sex. I also read that some women who have really hard/rough sex also "feel it". I know that your partner may feel the strings that is not of my concern. So if anyone has any experience with Paragard or Mireana and deep/rough sex please help me out. Answered by Martina Vallar 1 month ago.

Paragard IUD T-380A is an IUD with copper, currently approved for 10 years use, however the newest data show it actually remains effective for at least 12 years, and perhaps beyond, after which it should be removed and replaced if desired. The Para Gard can be used as a form of emergency contraception if inserted within three to five days after unprotected intercourse, and it can be inserted 8 weeks after childbirth. have had a Para Gard since July and we have had a few rough goes, well, commendable stature, we'll said. Honestly, the cervix will get a bit sore, but no more so than it would have pre-IUD. the first time you get into it, you will forgot about IUD and got REALLY excited when you could feel the strings very calmly tell him that the strings come out of my cervix, which he was sort of pounding in his ****The rest of my bits got tired and sore far faster from the epic marathon sex-in' than anything related to my IUD. I say: have at! Most people can continue having the same sexy fun after insertion--though waiting a few days might be a good idea. :) Cervix size only matters for the insertion,periods are only slightly heavier with Paragard,but they're mild.You will not displace the IUD by bumping the cervix during sex. Your partner will probably feel the strings, especially till they soften, but that's about it.Your health care provider will insert a speculum into your vagina and cleanse your vagina and cervix with an antiseptic solution. Then he or she will use a special instrument to gently align your cervical canal and uterine cavity, and another tool to measure the depth of your uterine cavity. Next your health care provider will fold down ParaGard's horizontal arms and place the device inside an applicator tube. He or she will insert the tube into your cervical canal and carefully place ParaGard in your uterus. When the applicator tube is removed, ParaGard will remain in place. Your health care provider will trim ParaGard's strings so that they don't protrude too far into the vagina and may record the length of the strings. During ParaGard insertion, you may experience dizziness, fainting, nausea, low blood pressure or a slower than normal heart rate (bradycardia). Rarely, it's also possible for the IUD to perforate the uterine wall or cervix. After every period, check to feel that ParaGard's strings are protruding from your cervix. Don't pull on the strings. Four to six weeks after ParaGard is inserted, your health care provider may re-examine you to make sure the device hasn't moved and check for signs and symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease, which can cause tubal damage or infertility. Answered by Yoshie Grosskreutz 1 month ago.


What is paragard....?
Asked by Gail Welborn 1 month ago.

The ParaGard Intrauterine Device (IUD) Copper T 380A is a small, "T-shaped" contraceptive device, about 1-1/4 inches wide by 1-3/8 inches long, made of flexible plastic and wrapped in copper. The ParaGard IUD must be inserted by a qualified healthcare professional (such as an ob/gyn or nurse practitioner). It is hormone-free, so it does not alter a woman’s natural menstrual cycle. The ParaGard IUD releases a tiny amount of copper continuously over a 10-year period as a way to prevent pregnancy. Discover more below Answered by Sofia Tondre 1 month ago.


Wondering how long an IUD is effective?
I have a Paragard T 380A IUD right now. When I got in put it in May 2001 my Doctor told me it would be effective untill May 2011 which is great but now I keep hearing that the same brand name can now be left in for up to 12 years which would make it effective untill May 2013 (numerous websites with medical expert... Asked by Brain Hagelgans 1 month ago.

I have a Paragard T 380A IUD right now. When I got in put it in May 2001 my Doctor told me it would be effective untill May 2011 which is great but now I keep hearing that the same brand name can now be left in for up to 12 years which would make it effective untill May 2013 (numerous websites with medical expert advice and also contrception.com says the same thing) anyone else heard about this? Thanks Answered by Deb Woldridge 1 month ago.

I have that IUD and I was always told 7-10 years. so far, my doctor hasn't changed that number on me. i'm in my 6th year and I'm not really sure how long it'll be before I have to get it changed. but I'll do what my doctor tells me. Answered by Birdie Eldredge 1 month ago.

I've always heard they're effective for 10 years. I have the mirena IUD and it's effective for 5 years. Your doctor would know best. Answered by Yelena Sonza 1 month ago.

i am pregnant right now and me and my obgyn talked about the IUD and i am getting it put in right after the baby comes out. She told me that it last for 5 years that is it. i would talk to your doctor. Answered by Rocio Large 1 month ago.

You should go off of what your doctor said. They may have changed how it is made since you had your IUD placed. Answered by Dyan Prezzia 1 month ago.

times changes rapidly n so r the resherches so may be now new version has come up. go according to doct Answered by Hans Hadler 1 month ago.

Don't you have something urgent to worry about? Answered by Lori Grotts 1 month ago.

pills can always fail and so can everything else on the market Answered by Annetta Lacount 1 month ago.


2 periods 1 week apart.. PARAGARD?
I have had the Paragard for 1 year now. Periods have been normal. I recently finished my period... my partner and I had intercourse, and one week after intercourse I was bleeding for a day, and 1 day only. I was wondering if it was caused due to an egg being fertilized and the paraguard doing it's job... Asked by Denise Alphin 1 month ago.

I have had the Paragard for 1 year now. Periods have been normal. I recently finished my period... my partner and I had intercourse, and one week after intercourse I was bleeding for a day, and 1 day only. I was wondering if it was caused due to an egg being fertilized and the paraguard doing it's job getting rid of it? Contraceptive.org : 'According to the manufacturers, how the ParaGard T 380A prevents pregnancy is not completely understood. Several theories have been suggested, as multiple birth control mechanisms may affect the ovum, sperm, and fertilized egg. Clinical studies with copper-bearing IUDs suggest that fertilization is prevented by killing sperm. However, it is also known that the ParaGard IUD does not prevent ovulation. Some sperm may in fact reach the egg, resulting in fertilization. When fertilization does occur, ParaGard is thought to act as birth control by preventing the embryo from implanting in the uterus.' I am just trying to make sense of it all. Any help would be greatly appreciated... thank you! Answered by Seymour Pisha 1 month ago.

The 2 periods are a side effect of the Paragard, its due to excess of endometrial shedding. Answered by Shaunda Ubiles 1 month ago.


Is this birth control a possible method for me?
I'm considering getting a ParaGard Copper T 380A but have skin that is sensitive to copper. Hormonal birth control is not an option and barrier control is a last resort. The sensiiveity has been getting lessened as I get older so that now I just turn a bright green for a few days if copper sits on my skin for... Asked by Anita Isbister 1 month ago.

I'm considering getting a ParaGard Copper T 380A but have skin that is sensitive to copper. Hormonal birth control is not an option and barrier control is a last resort. The sensiiveity has been getting lessened as I get older so that now I just turn a bright green for a few days if copper sits on my skin for more than 6 hours or if it gets wet while on me. But it used to blister asd turn my skin black. That hasn't happed in almost 10 years though. Any help is appreciated, Answered by Jaqueline Abnet 1 month ago.

I am a CCMA If your allergic to it do not use it you can have a reaction and actually die.. I do not mean to pry but why isn't the pill the patch or the depo injection a option for you?? It sounds like it would be safer in your situation Answered by Dion Schorder 1 month ago.

You might wanna speak to your doctor about this. They have different sorts of birth control, and so far I haven't heard of any of them changing anyones skin color. Answered by Elisha Beaber 1 month ago.


Once your period regulates on paraguard does it stay that way?
i have been on paraguard for 14 months and my periods have been regular, unitl now. I'm 2 weeks late and have taken 2 pregnancy tests that have come out negitive. i need a piece of mind Asked by Reynaldo Bencivenga 1 month ago.

(intrauterine copper contraceptive) Get Answers To Common Questions www.paragard.com Form of Contraceptive Compare Forms Of Contraception And Find An Option Not Taken Daily. www.not-the-pill.com More Sponsors: paraguard, side effects Search results ParaGard® (intrauterine copper contraceptive) Learn more about ParaGard®. Visit ParaGard.com to see if it can fit your lifestyle. paragard.com - Cached How It Works Ways to Pay Healthcare Providers What Is ParaGard Quiz Is It Right for Me Patient Brochures FAQs More results from paragard.com » Paragard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The ParaGard T-380A is an IUD with copper, manufactured and marketed in the United States by Duramed Pharmaceuticals. It is the only copper-containing intrauterine ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paragard - Cached More results from en.wikipedia.org » What Is ParaGard®? | ParaGard® (copper intrauterine ... ParaGard® is an IUC that can fit your lifestyle. Learn more about ParaGard®. hcp.paragard.com/about-paragard - Cached ParaGard Official FDA information, side effects and uses. Accurate, FDA approved ParaGard information for healthcare professionals and patients - brought to you by Drugs.com. www.drugs.com/pro/paragard.html - Cached More results from drugs.com » ParaGard (copper IUD) - MayoClinic.com - Mayo Clinic ParaGard (copper IUD) — Overview covers definition, risks, instructions for using this type of contraception. www.mayoclinic.com/health/paragard/MY009... - Cached More results from mayoclinic.com » Paraguard reviews - Mirena vs. Paragard IUD I have a Paragard (non-homonal IUD), which I used to be quite happy with. However, I have been bleeding off and on for going on two weeks now, no cramping. My new doc... www.mothering.com/community/t/200926/par... - Cached Answered by Orval Altermatt 1 month ago.


Ladies Pls help!?
How many of you ladies are wearing a loop or the coil to prevent unwanted pregnancies? How many of you got pregnent after wearing the loop? What are the side effects? Also mentioned any other detials one should be aware of the loop method. Asked by Mohammed Abdulkarim 1 month ago.

An IUD is a small, t-shaped device that is inserted into your uterus by your doctor. It is made out of flexible plastic and contains either copper or hormones. At the end of the IUD are two transparent strings that hang down into the vagina, which women can feel for to check that their IUD is still in place. Depending on the type you use, your IUD can provide you with continuous protection from pregnancy anywhere from five to 12 years. In the United States, there are two types of IUDs available: the Mirena which continuously releases hormones for up to five years, and the ParaGard Copper T 380A IUD which contains copper and can be worn for up to 12 years. IUD’s are effective as soon as they are inserted. Both types of IUDs primarily work in the same fashion: by preventing the fertilization of an egg. While experts aren’t exactly sure how, it is suspected that the IUD alters the movement of an egg or sperm making conception difficult. However, ovulation still occurs when you use an IUD. IUDs that contain hormones also work by thicken a woman’s cervical mucus thereby creating a natural barrier to sperm. As well, the hormones help to alter the uterine lining in order to inhibit implantation of a fertilized egg. Although copper IUDs also alter the endometrial lining and prevent implantation from occurring, the copper contained within the IUD works to increase the production of prostaglandins, hormones that help support a pregnancy. While the IUD is very effective at preventing pregnancy, it offers no protection against sexually transmitted diseases. The IUD is generally not recommended for women who have multiple sexual partners. Because of the long lasting protection against pregnancy an IUD provides, the IUD is one of the most popular types of birth control throughout the world. Many women like the fact that they do not need to worry about their contraceptive on a regular basis. Additionally, the IUD gives a woman birth control options – if she prefers non-hormonal forms of contraceptives, she can use the copper IUD which in no way interferes with her hormonal levels. Women who use the Mirena IUD may find that their menstrual periods are lighter and that their cramps are not as severe. About 30% of women using this type of IUD will stop menstruating although their periods should return fairly soon after the IUD is removed. The copper IUD can also be used as a form of emergency contraceptive. It has been shown to be as much as 99% effective in preventing pregnancy from occurring when it is inserted within five days of having unprotected vaginal intercourse. The most common side effects associated with the IUD include menstrual irregularities and spotting. Women who use the ParaGard IUD may have anywhere from a 50 to 75% increase in their menstrual flow. This heavy flow may lead to anemia in some women. Additionally, women using this type of IUD may have more menstrual cramps. Women using the Mirena IUD are likely to experience similar side affects as those associated with the birth control pill. Moreover, some women have found the insertion and removal of an IUD to be painful. The IUD has been associated with a number of health risks that, although rare, can occur. IUD problems include: Uterine puncture: Occurs in one to three out of every 1,000 insertions. Usually realized right away. If not, the IUD may migrate to other parts of the body necessitating a surgical removal of the IUD. Expulsion: As much as 7% of all IUDs will be expelled by a woman’s body within the first year, mainly within the first few months. Women who fail to realize that their IUD has been expelled are likely to become pregnant. An expelled IUD accounts for 1/3 of all pregnancies that occur to women using an IUD. Tubal infection: Not common, but the process of inserting an IUD may cause naturally occurring vaginal bacteria or an STD to be pushed up into the uterus leading to infection. Mild cases can be cleared up with antibiotics. In some, more serious cases, the IUD may need to be removed. In very rare, but serious instances, the infection may require surgery and possibly leave a woman sterile. Infections that are left untreated may be fatal. Pregnancy: If you think you are pregnant, you should have your IUD removed. A pregnancy that results while a woman is wearing an IUD increases her risk of en ectopic pregnancy, serious pelvic infection, preterm labor and miscarriage. During the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, a woman who has an IUD in place has a 15 to 50% chance of miscarrying. After this time, the risk goes up to 50%. Because of past problems with IUDs, many women are concerned about just how safe an IUD is to use. The main culprit behind the tarnished reputation is the Dalkon Shield. This IUD was first put on the market in 1970 but recalled in 1975 because 12 of the IUD’s 2.8 million users had died. The IUD was pulled off the market and, despite the fact that no other IUDs had been found unsafe, many other IUD manufacturers decided to follow suit for fear of lawsuits. In order to avoid problems in the future, IUD manufacturers have worked to improve the safety of IUDs currently on the market. The IUD may not be suitable for women who have never been pregnant before due to increased risk of expulsion. This is because of a smaller uterus and difficulty with insertion. Women with multiple sex partners are at a higher risk for STDs. The IUD has been found to be as much as 99% effective when inserted properly. However, not all women are suited to using an IUD. Women who are at an increased risk of STDs; may be pregnant or are trying to conceive; have HIV or AIDS; a history of certain medical conditions and infections; have a deformed uterus or one that sits too far forward or back in the pelvis; or women that have severe anemia may need to consider using a different birth control method. Discuss the issue with your health care provider. Women who have not had children can safely use the IUD although some doctors may prefer to not prescribe it as these women’s uteri tend to be smaller and may be more likely to get irritated by an IUD. Answered by Elyse Clemence 1 month ago.


Women.. What Is..?
A IUD. Asked by Isidro Blan 1 month ago.

An Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a small object that is inserted through the cervix and placed in the uterus to prevent pregnancy. A small string hangs down from the IUD into the upper part of the vagina. The IUD is not noticeable during intercourse. IUDs can last 1-10 years. They work by changing the the the lining of the uterus and fallopian tubes affecting the movements of eggs and sperm and so that fertilization does not occur. IUDs are 99.2-99.9% effective as birth control. They do not protect against sexually transmitted infections, including HIV/AIDS. Answered by Arla Stachowiak 1 month ago.


New IUD...?
The new plastic IUD that is coming out on the market that lasts up to 5 years....what's it called? Who makes it? Does anyone know? Asked by Antionette Bettendorf 1 month ago.

Most non-hormonal IUDs have a plastic T-shaped frame that is wrapped with copper and/or has copper bands. Some IUDs, such as the Nova T 380, also contain a small amount of silver. The arms of the frame hold the IUD in place near the top of the uterus. The GyneFix does not have a T-shape, but rather is a loop that holds several copper tubes. The GyneFix is held in place by a suture to the fundus of the uterus. All copper-containing IUDs have a number as part of their name. This is the surface area of copper (in square millimeters) the IUD provides. Availability of IUDs varies widely by country. Only one brand of copper-containing IUD (ParaGard T 380A) is available in the United States, while seven brands (Flexi-T 300, Multi-Safe 375, Multi-Load Cu 375, Neo-Safe T380, Nova T 380, T-Safe 380A, and GyneFix - also called FlexiGard 330 or CuFix PP330) are available in Great Britain.[6] One hormonal intrauterine contraceptive (Mirena) is approved for use in the U.K. and the U.S. The LNG-20 IUS - marketed as Mirena by Schering Health - is the only IntraUterine System available. First introduced in 1990, it releases levonorgestrel (a progestagen) and may be used for five years. A lower-dose T-shaped IntraUterine System named Femilis is being developed by Contrel, a Belgian company. Contrel also manufactures the FibroPlant-LNG, a frameless IUS. FibroPlant is anchored to the fundus of the uterus as the GyneFix IUD is. Although a number of trials have shown positive results, FibroPlant is not yet commercially available. I hope this helps. Let me know if you have any further questions. Answered by Adeline Latourrette 1 month ago.

A new one?? I have one that has been out for a few years called Mirena.........it is hormonal and last 5 years. I love it. Answered by Jim Rijos 1 month ago.

Nuvaring This is the only one that i think is new. Here is the web site for it and mirena. I hope this helps. Answered by Ileana Arenos 1 month ago.


What is the name of the birth control that starts with P & had no hormones, typically used for breastfeeding?
I figured it out Para gard. Does anyone use this? Is The ParaGard® T 380A intrauterine copper contraceptive non-hormonal? I want the one you can use during breastfeeding. Asked by Lavonne Mccament 1 month ago.

I am trying to find a reasonable priced birth control that i can use while i breastfeed. I have considered Mirena but I will have to wait on whether i get job , to be able to afford it. Until then I am looking for an alternative. I heard about this one from a televised commercial in my gyn/obj's waiting room at my doc's office. & it starts with a P but i can't remember what it was called. Anyone know? Answered by Austin Seufer 1 month ago.

Provera? Progestin? Whatever it is the hormone involved is progesterone, which is safe to use while breastfeeding - it is also called the mini-pill. Is that what you heard about? Answered by Joan Melbourne 1 month ago.

Doubt its copper. Copper can leave toxins into the blood. Its plastic. ;) Answered by Felisa Talboti 1 month ago.


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