PACERONE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 075135/001.

Names and composition

"PACERONE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
075135/001 PACERONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075135/002 PACERONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018972/001 CORDARONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
020377/001 CORDARONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
021594/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
075761/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
075955/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
076018/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
076088/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
076108/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
076163/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
076217/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
022325/001 NEXTERONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
076232/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
022325/002 NEXTERONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 150MG per 100ML (1.5MG per ML)
075135/001 PACERONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
076299/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
022325/003 NEXTERONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 360MG per 200ML (1.8MG per ML)
075135/002 PACERONE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076394/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
077161/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
077234/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
077610/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
077834/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
203884/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
203885/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per ML
074739/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
074895/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075188/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075315/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075315/002 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
075389/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075424/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075424/002 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
076362/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
076362/002 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
077069/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
077069/002 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG
077069/003 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
078578/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
079029/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
204742/001 AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE AMIODARONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG

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A licensed doctor will try to answer your question as quickly as possible.

Answered questions

Dog swallowed 200 mg of paceroneWhat would you like to ask?dogses?
Dog swallowed 200 mg of pacerone Asked by Delora Menon 1 month ago.

pacerone is amiodarone that is an anti arrhythmic drug. I don't think it will cause any toxicity other than slight hypotension. dogses I couldn't understand. was it some joke? Answered by Vergie Neibert 1 month ago.


Does anyone know if you have to be weened off pacerone?
amadroine/ pacerone I was diagnosed with afib and give this med oral at 400mg then down to 200mg once a day for 2 months today the doc told me to stop. I could swear I was told I would have to be weened off. does anyone know? Asked by Myong Chowning 1 month ago.

how you could do it truly is to cut backpedal the quantities gradually. start up ingesting purely a 12 oz..can, then one among those small 8 oz., ect. really, although, i found chilly turkey to be really useful. i replaced into ingesting a lo-carb capacity drink each morning and a can of eating routine coke at nighttime before I were given pregnant, and scaling down would provide me complications, too. yet, when I were given pregnant, i did not really have a favor to drink caffeine and that i did not get complications even as i finished all of it mutually. if you're like me, early being pregnant will convey an brilliant favor to drink water (and far of it!), so that you crave that and under no circumstances the caffeine Answered by Karan Mauck 1 month ago.


Can anyone comment on the drug pacerone 200mg?
i had open heart 4 bypass in march ,only had a frib once in hospitol, never before, never again. this is a bad drug the surgeon only prescribed it for 2 months, but my reg doctor wants me on it??? also i went thru a 36 visit cardiac rehab with a monitor and didnt have not one hint of a frib. iwant to stop this... Asked by Philip Weaver 1 month ago.

i had open heart 4 bypass in march ,only had a frib once in hospitol, never before, never again. this is a bad drug the surgeon only prescribed it for 2 months, but my reg doctor wants me on it??? also i went thru a 36 visit cardiac rehab with a monitor and didnt have not one hint of a frib. iwant to stop this drug....advice?? Answered by Britta Presiado 1 month ago.

Talk to a cardiologist. Ask about your risk to go back into AF. The problem is that IF you go back into AF and aren't on a blood thinner such as warfarin or Pradaxa, BIG time stroke risk. Also, ask your family doc why he/she still wants you on it. Answered by Sanjuanita Rink 1 month ago.

still i suggest you may do so strictly on medical advice Answered by Eugenio Schmeckpeper 1 month ago.


Has any one taken Amiodarone, Pacerone or Cardarone?
I was given Cardarone (Amiodarone) for 45 days in December of 2006. As a result of taking it my thyroid numbers, triglyceride, HDL and LDL numbers are horrible. It is a half life medication. I am just wondering if anyone has taken it and had similiar problems, and if so how long it took to get it out of their... Asked by Nam Menson 1 month ago.

I was given Cardarone (Amiodarone) for 45 days in December of 2006. As a result of taking it my thyroid numbers, triglyceride, HDL and LDL numbers are horrible. It is a half life medication. I am just wondering if anyone has taken it and had similiar problems, and if so how long it took to get it out of their system. I would also be interested to know if their triglycerides, HDL, LDL and thyroid numbers ever returned back to normal. Answered by Artie Schug 1 month ago.

Sadly amiodarone is a very "dirty" drug with a high incidence of serious side effect that range from liver dysfunction to thyroid problems to lung fibrosis. The most common are thyroid problems, either underactive or over active and liver problems which can range from mild elevation of liver enzymes in blood tests(common) which resolve with no damage on withdrawl of the drug to full blown cirrhosis(rare). The reason why amiodarone is used despite the problems associated with it is that it is by far the most effective heart rhythm controlling drug and will often work where all else fails. Its half life is extremely long, and may take up to 9 months or more to wash out of the system. Even then sometimes the thyroid does not return to normal though it often does. Hope this helps Answered by Fern Hruska 1 month ago.

Take It Easy On Me by The Little River Band Take A Bow by Madonna Answered by Seth Handin 1 month ago.


Please help me out!! What is this pill?
I've been searching to find out what this pill that i found is and i can't find it! its reddish-orange with 0145 in white print on it. it's a clear capsule and is round and very small. Please help! Asked by Kirsten Sanpaolo 1 month ago.

Pacerone Generic Name amiodarone Strength(s) 400 mg Imprint(s) P400 0145 Manufacturer / Distributor Upsher-Smith Laboratories Inc Answered by Dante Bishoff 1 month ago.


My husbands defribullator/pacemaker went off 43 times in January. Anyone have anything like that happen?
Will look into having shocks lessened in intensity, that would certainly help, as a prick would have me calling 911. But then another answer seems to indicate he might need full blown shock. He just seems so well physically now, hard to believe he has such a bad heart. Of course, he's in the care of his... Asked by Marguerite Christi 1 month ago.

Defribullator/pacemaker has gone off three times in 13 months. First time it was 15 times. He doesn't hasn't had a heart attack, stays lucid during shocks. We are living with an time bomb that could go off at any time. He comes back physically but mentally, he's a wreck. He is 72 yrs. old and had a triple bypass in '92. Has anyone ever had one removed? Generic name, Pacerone, is working on the arrhythmia. He never had chest pains nor a heart attack during any one of the three times it has gone off. He doesn't have the defrib that is associated with faulty lead wires but don't have a cause for the huge number of times it goes off. We are wondering if quality of life wouldn't be far greater if it was possible to have it removed. He still has occassional nightmares and wakes wondering if it's gone off again. This is 6 months after January and the 43 shocks. Would like a second opinion from a doctor whose living is not dependent upon installing defribullators. Any advice? Answered by Callie Tepezano 1 month ago.

Will look into having shocks lessened in intensity, that would certainly help, as a prick would have me calling 911. But then another answer seems to indicate he might need full blown shock. He just seems so well physically now, hard to believe he has such a bad heart. Of course, he's in the care of his Cardiologist who installed the defrib. and it is checked regularly and has been adjusted twice as to heart rate. Guess we'll just pray drugs keep working. As I said Pacerone is the drug that seems to have made a big difference, he was taking the beta blockers before the Jan. episode. Again, thanks for the comments. No one we know has ever heard of a defrib going off more than a few times at the most. Answered by Jamar Prohaska 1 month ago.

It sound to me that the ICD is doing it job. The problem maybe that his heart keeps trying to go into V-tach., which of course means sudden cardiac death, and the ICD is preventing that. The company of the ICD can on a MD order intrograte the ICD very easily to determine if it is a bad ICD or his heart (I beat it is his heart). And if it is his heart the Cardiologist will probaly increase his Pacerone or place him on other anti-dysrhythmics. Sound like you father probaly has a bad heart (EF of <20% or ICM). Sorry but your father options are limited at this point. Answered by Angila Angermeier 1 month ago.

I'm not a doctor nor ICD dependant. I attended a forum with many of them have ICD. You need to discuss it with your doctor. He/she can reset it and giving a shock that your husband can tolerateable. Most of the ICD have many types of setting and the cardiologist will adjust one which is suitable for your husband. Sometime the shocks are misfired and it can be avoid or minimised. Answered by Alline Salvio 1 month ago.

lotsa people -contact your cardiologist. Answered by Shanon Sorman 1 month ago.


What are the pulmonary side effects of amioderone?
Long term effect on lungs when used to treat atrial fib. Asked by Wilma Pitel 1 month ago.

Acupuncture, which involves inserting thin needles into various points on your body, may reduce peripheral neuropathy symptoms. Answered by Kasi Zhao 1 month ago.


Already on 5 mgm Lisinopril daily, my blood pressure still shoots to 200/110 or higher an it lasts for hours.?
Can't take more lisinopril, baseline blood pressure goes to low. Also on pacerone. Asked by Jerrie Arlotta 1 month ago.

Lisinopril is a very effective antihypertensive. So when you say your BP goes too low, the first question I would ask is: "are you symptomatic?" By that, I mean are you getting dizzy, light-headed, dim vision, or fainting? If not, then I would increase the dose. If you ARE getting symptoms, then I would add Hydrchlorothiazide (HCTZ) in combination. That simple additions can sometimes have dramatic improvements in BP control. An alternative, is to use an ACE receptor blocker (ARB) like Atacand, Diovan, Avapro, Cozaar or Tevetan. Or you could switch to a Calcium Channel Blocker, an Alpha receptor blocker, etc. There are a lot of choices out there. And finally, I would ask if there are associated events that could be triggering these episoeds, and how those events. Some of the others have suggested caffeine and a Pheo, I would add, stress, excessive salt intake, "energy drinks" and many weight-loss pills. Answered by Audie Trayer 1 month ago.

lisinopril is a very effective antihypertensive. however u may need to add a diuretic prefferably a thiazide diuretic to your drug regimen. also avoid smoking, caffeine, and fatty foods. try mild exercises daily and relaxation techniques. Answered by Odelia Ingvolostad 1 month ago.

How often does your BP shoot up like that? Phaeochromocytoma is a (rare!) condition where the adrenal gland releases too much catecholamine (adrenaline) and it causes episodes of very high BP, high pulse, nausea, anxiety, sweating. Answered by Lawerence Lumukanda 1 month ago.

5 mg of this drug is the very lowest drug---your doctor should be advised so that either this drug, or another stronger med can be prescribed. Obviously you need further consultation to switch to another drug. Answered by Bennie Wedner 1 month ago.

Don't drink caffeine! Answered by Hal Abaloz 1 month ago.


What is Amiodarone a generic for?
Asked by Latashia Zank 1 month ago.

Amiodarone IT is available under the trade names Pacerone,Cordarone, Aratac, Atlansil Amiodarone belongs to the family of medications known as antiarrhythmics. It is used to treat potentially life-threatening types of abnormal heart rhythms. It works by making the heart beat more regularly. The effects of this medication may be noted as early as three days after starting treatment, but it is usually one to three weeks before beneficial effects are seen. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than the ones listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Take care always Answered by Julianna Stuckey 1 month ago.

Amiodarone is the generic name. Pacerone is one of the brand names it's sold under. Answered by Errol Lardone 1 month ago.


Heart drugs and green veggies interaction?
Someone I know is taking Plavix and Pacerone. They were told by a couple friends that green vegetables should be eaten in moderation with these drugs. Is this true? Asked by Marleen Sagehorn 1 month ago.

it wouldn't hurt probably a good idea . Answered by Charita Windle 1 month ago.

it is not a must, but it is good, the drugs have no relation to it. Answered by Golden Baldasaro 1 month ago.


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