OXYCONTIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 022272/001.

Names and composition

"OXYCONTIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE.
It belongs to the class Opiates and is used in Pain, fever (Pain)

Answered questions

Oxycontin?
im doing a project for health on oxycontin...my powerpoint is really good except im missing a few slides. i need to know the treatment for oxycontin. i also need to know where it comes from!!! i cant find this information anywhere and i know it sounds easy to find but i still cant. if you could give me links to... Asked by Norbert Buffa 4 months ago.

im doing a project for health on oxycontin...my powerpoint is really good except im missing a few slides. i need to know the treatment for oxycontin. i also need to know where it comes from!!! i cant find this information anywhere and i know it sounds easy to find but i still cant. if you could give me links to websites or just the information thankyou so much! thanksss :)) Answered by Goldie Mafnas 4 months ago.

oxycontin is time released oxycodone an opiate derived from thebaine. it is the same opiate in percocet. here is some historical info. 1916 - Oxycodone was first synthesized in Germany as a semi-synthetic derivative of thebaine. 1917 - Oxycodone is first introduced into clinical practice in Germany under the brand name Eukodal. 1920s - Reports first surface of Oxycodone causing "euphoric highs" in patients. [More Info] 1950 - Percodan (oxycodone and aspirin combo) is first launched by Endo Pharmaceutical. 1960 - The United Nation Office on Drug and Crime includes oxycodone in the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Ordinance. 1971 - Percocet (oxycodone and acetaminophen combo) is first launched by Endo Pharmaceutical. [More Info] 1995 - The FDA approves a higher-dose time-release form of Oxycodone under the brand name OxyContin, owned by Purdue Pharma. 1996 - OxyContin becomes publicly available. Recreational use and abuse of oxycodone increases. 2001 - OxyContin faces significant national media attention in the U.S. because of increases in recreational use and abuse. ---all the info you need is at erowid.org or lycaceum.org---- Answered by Machelle Syrek 4 months ago.

what do u mean the treatment for oxycontin? what for detoxing off it or what its used for? Answered by Joi Whitledge 4 months ago.


What is OxyContin the medication?
I was wanting to know what the medication is used for Asked by Tony Szafraniec 4 months ago.

OxyContin is the brand name (trade name) for extended released (pill version) of oxycodone. The "Contin" in the brand name represents the "extended release" aspect. Oxycodone is a narcotic (opioid) analgesic (pain reliever) officially FDA-approved to treating chronic ("around the clock") moderate to severe pain in longer term cases (or for a period longer than say, two weeks, or even longer), in which an opioid medication would be appropriate (e.g. certain types of musculoskeletal pain; non-union, or "non-knit" bone-fracture pain; herniated disks; interstitial cystitis, fibromyalgia, and some types of neuropathic pain; as well as cancer-related pain). Rarely, OxyContin is prescribed--often in conjunction with other medication, to treat chronic daily headaches/migraines---especially occurring with intractable diarrhea (the opioid component helps with that); irritable bowel symptom; arthritis pain; dental pain (e.g. when multiple teeth are extracted at once; or severe pain associated with jaw surgery). OxyContin may also be prescribed for longer term pain in patients who are already opioid tolerant. The prescription-only medication in a Federally Controlled Schedule 2 controlled substance in the U.S.A. Due to its ability to be abused by being crushed--and thus bypassing the "extended release" coating mechanism--and then injected, chewed, smoked, snorted--this particular medication has even greater regulation by pharmacies and government agencies (since diversion among patients who wish to sell the drug, abuse the drug recreationally/non-medically, forge prescriptions, unscrupulous physicians; legitimate pain patients seeking multiple doctors to obtain multiple prescriptions to sell on the black market. This drug is very addictive. Patients who are not opioid-tolerant can risk death by taking too high of a dose--or even by consuming one crush pill of a high-dosage denomination--if timely emergency medical intervention (for the respiratory depression) is not sought. Oxycodone is found in lower concentrations in medications (trade names include: Percocet; Endocet; Percodan)---so-called "combination medications" ---in which each pill includes another non-opioid analgesic (pain reliever)---such as aspirin or acetaminophen in addition to the oxycodone. Such pills are addictive and Schedule 2 controlled substances. These medications, however, have an lower concentration of oxycodone per pill (usually 5 mg, 7.5 mg, or 10 mg)---compared with OxyContin---which has high concentration of oxycodone per pill (usually 10 mg, 20 mg, 30 mg, 40 mg, and up to 80 mg). The highest used to be 160 mg---which still exists in Germany but has been removed from the market in the U.S.A. _____________________________________' Furthermore, Oxycontin does not contain acetaminophen or aspirin. Recently, a version of OxyContin has been placed on the market that is less "abuse prone" and "crush resistant"---however, abusers still have gotten around that mechanism. ______________________________________... When taking properly for the right type of pain, as prescribed, in the correct dosage, and swallowed; OxyContin can be an extremely beneficial drug for chronic pain patients---not only as a pain reliever; but in some patients (depending on the illness/injury/situation), can even restore functioning. Answered by Rochell Fewell 4 months ago.

Oxycontin is a time released morphine. Doctors kind of prescribe this when the patient has used and built up a tolerance to everything else. Percs are kind of like 2nd in the line up. They are only a step above vicoden. Oxycontin is strong stuff and really addictive and pretty much only given to people who are going to be in pain for a REALLY long time or for the rest of their lives. Answered by Arvilla Nevilles 4 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What is OxyContin the medication? I was wanting to know what the medication is used for Answered by Maryann Cashen 4 months ago.

it is used to treat moderate to severe pain. it is similar to morphine but not as strong. it is considered a narcotic because it is derived from opium, which means its like a safe and very small dose of heroin. it is available by prescription only from a doctor and used to treat pain, for example after surgery or other severe pain. not recommend for long term use because physical and mental addiction can occur. it is also sold a a street drug which is considered illegal. possible to overdose and die if you take way too many pills all at once. basically it a strong pain medication. Answered by Qiana Frisk 4 months ago.


Why would anyone take Oxycontin?
I heard that Rush Limbaugh takes Oxycontin, and I was somewhat surprised and confused. Why would someone like Rush Limbaugh take a drug like Oxycontin? Is it somehow related to his job as a talk radio host (i.e. performance enhancing drug?) Am I mistaken in thinking of Oxycontin as basically being a smoother and... Asked by Darryl Touart 4 months ago.

I heard that Rush Limbaugh takes Oxycontin, and I was somewhat surprised and confused. Why would someone like Rush Limbaugh take a drug like Oxycontin? Is it somehow related to his job as a talk radio host (i.e. performance enhancing drug?) Am I mistaken in thinking of Oxycontin as basically being a smoother and low-key version of ecstasy? Answered by Marco Arrington 4 months ago.

Oxycontin is continuous (time released) Oxycodone. Oxycodone is an opioid pain reliever, analgesic. So it's only use is for pain,.. and in this formulation most commonly for chronic pain (or post surgical pain for X weeks, or months). It is designed to be 'safe' on the body to take for as long as one needs it.. as opposed to say Lortab (Hydrocodone/Acetaminophen) -- which is a similar pain killer that is for moderate to severe pain but lasts just several hours and the Tylenol/apap is harmful to the body if taken on a chronic basis. So the Oxycontin (Contin, is short for continuous release) - is merely a "similar" class of medication to eliminate the Tylenol (and danger to the hepatic system/GI ) -- and provide an 'all day' pain control mechanism. It wouldn't be uncommon for someone with chronic pain (pain that exists all the time) to be prescribed 40mg of Oxycontin to take twice per day.. every 8-12 hours, for example. The reason Rush Limbaugh took it is because Opioid pain medications (the only type that are really effective) also have a side effect in many people of euphoria -- basically it boosts your mood, makes you feel better mentally. You can call this a 'high' I suppose -- but it isn't a Heroin type of high that most people would think of.. most people who take something like this are highly functional and simply fall into the tolerance, dependence, and ultimate addiction if they don't need it for actual pain. The brain adapts, over time, to the presence of these Opiate/Opioid pain killers and what was once effective becomes ineffective.. and the person needs to take a higher dose to achieve a similar feeling/result. Further, these medications while we MUST have them in medical use (as again there are no other pain medications that are even remotely as effective) ,-- have an unfortunate side effect if one uses them daily for lengthy periods of time. IE: Months to years. They will always cause a dependence in the body regardless of if the person is 'addicted' to the medication. What this means is that the person taking this medication daily will experience a very severe withdrawal process when they don't have the drug in their system -- which causes intense pain (even if you didn't have it prior to taking the medication), nausea with vomiting, diarrhea, bone pain, very unpleasant mental and emotional state, weakness, fatigue, inability to control body temperature, sneezing, coughing, tearing eyes, and the list goes on. This withdrawal (if one doesn't take any more of the medication to stop it) will last anywhere from 5days to several weeks. Typically the withdrawal will begin within 8-24 hours after the last dose of the medication and continue to build in intensity for several days before it begins to start to level off and wear down. IE: Rush stops the Oxycontin Monday Morning... goes to bed, wakes up Tuesday -- he will be feeling sick. By Wednesday Morning he will be feeling two to four times as bad as he did Tuesday -- and then it would peak by Friday (72-96 hours after last dose) where he would have all the symptoms listed above and feel like death, literally. There is no illness that compares with acute opiate withdrawal. From there he would still feel awful by the following Monday (7 days or so later).. but a little better than he did at the peak (the previous Friday or so). The feelings of physical sickness/pain/fatigue/weakness will linger for several weeks.. and the mental withdrawal feelings of apathy, despair, depression, anxiety, inability to concentrate, etc generally linger for quite a bit longer -- Usually in direct proportion the how long the person used the medication. So, all those who are so adamantly and vehemently mean spirited towards people who get hooked on prescription pain killers can rest assured these people get punished by the very drug they are/were taking -- there is no way around not going through this process -- which is why many people will switch to methadone or suboxone (both which are STILL opioids/opiate medications.. but designed to help people take one does of said medication per day and not be constantly hunting to find more 'pills' etc and often breaking the law (if they aren't being prescribed). This is how hard it is to deal with the withdrawal effects of opioids/opiates. I've seen many people in opioid withdrawal, and I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. Answered by Susan Bork 4 months ago.

Oxycodone (Oxycontin) Prescription drug Consult a doctor if you have a medical concern. Treats moderate to severe pain. Rapid-release oxycodone is a narcotic that is used for immediate pain relief. Side effects - Warnings - How to use National Library of Medicine Brand names: Oxycontin, Roxicodone, Oxecta Legal status: Schedule II controlled substance Pregnancy risk: Category B (No evidence of risk in humans) May treat: Post-Operative Pain Drug classes: Analgesic, Opioid Other drugs in same class: Oxycodone/Acetaminophen, More Answered by Raleigh Rigoni 4 months ago.

Oxycontin is a painkiller. You usually use it after a severe injury or operation. My mom used Oxycodone (similar to oxycontin, same active ingredient) for nerve pain from a back condition combined with a slipped rib. It wasn't strong enough though... Answered by Ruthe Leachman 4 months ago.

you recognize, in case you weigh down an Oxycontin then you definately could have powder, so yeah i assume you probably can get it in powder form. did you recognize that Oxycontin is actual considered one of those heroine? you won't have faith me, yet look up the chemical factors of heroine and for oxy and notice what you come across! Please do no longer take Oxycontin except you're already dying of maximum cancers or another undesirable ailment! I actual have considered a number of my acquaintances die that way! because of the fact of this i could never touch the stuff. Answered by Sofia Kabina 4 months ago.

well i for example take it for pain. i have whats called an anal fissure (generally to be more painful than child birth!). to sum it up... it feels like passing razor blades when i go number 2. the pain meds allow me to live life normally and sit like a normal person without constantly having to get up and walk around. oxycontin (which is just oxycodone without tylonol) is the same thing as percocet. Answered by Joshua Valderrama 4 months ago.

Ever have a fractured bone, especially ribs or a shoulder. you'll be on oxycontin for a few days. it is a very effective painkiller, but dangerously addictive. Answered by Hunter Kiefert 4 months ago.

Jared's answer sums it up, and no it is not like ecstasy at all. (Although both cause euphoria at recreational doses, they are really nothing like eachother) Answered by Shila Pratts 4 months ago.


OxyContin, Vicodin, and Morphine?
I know that all three of the above medications need to be prescribed by a medical docter, but I also know that there three medications are abused by drug users everyday.What is some information about the abuse of prescription drugs, primarily there three types?What are severe side effects?How do most... Asked by Cheri Fawson 4 months ago.

I know that all three of the above medications need to be prescribed by a medical docter, but I also know that there three medications are abused by drug users everyday. What is some information about the abuse of prescription drugs, primarily there three types? What are severe side effects? How do most druggies take them? BTW: I'm trying to learn more for a school project, I'm not a drug addict and never will be. I happy to say I'm drug free. Answered by Harriett Machacek 4 months ago.

Oxycontin and Morphine are classified as schedule 2 narcotics by the D.E.A., and Vicodin is a schedule 3 drug. Schedule 2 are the strongest pain medications available in the U.S. Oxycontin is available in 10mg, 20 mg, 40mg, and 80 mg tablets. People who abuse this drug crush it and snort it like cocaine, or meth amphetamine, or the dilute the drug in water and inject and get a "high much like heroin. These drugs can cause respiratory depression, tolerance, and physical and psychological dependence. Addiction can occur very rapidly and detoxification can be a horrible experience. Vicodin is available in 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 7.5 mg, and 10 mg. It is also highly addictive although not as addictive as Oxycontin which the main ingredient is oxycodone which is also in Percodan, Percocet, and Tylox. All of these drugs are very dangerous and should never be taken unless given to you by a trained pain management doctor. Also, Oxycontin should not be taken if the tablet is broken as this may release a lethal amount of the drug in a short period instead of over 12 hours the way it is supposed to be released into your bloodstream. Answered by Arlie Algier 4 months ago.

Morphine Vicodin Answered by Serena Hochhalter 4 months ago.

The most severe side effect is physical addiction - withdrawal symptoms - when the drug is unavailable - which is severe nauseous and whole body pain and twitching. Also the loss of all other interest and mental inability to maintain life functions. They can be ground up and snorted or taken whole by mouth. They could be ground and combined with water and injected also. It is much more common for people to become addicted to these drugs now and then go to the street drug version - heroin - since it is much less expensive. It is a widespread national problem especially since the street drug is so readily available. It is grown in Afganistan and due to pressure from the new Afghani government the US is able to suppress the abundance and the illegal importation of the drug cheaply here in our country. Our kids are falling for these drugs. It is an epidemic. Answered by Annalisa Emhoff 4 months ago.

All these medications are in the class called narcotics. They act on the opiate receptors in the central nervous system, that is how they produce a 'high'. They also cause depression of the respiratory system, and if abused can result in complete respiratory arrest and death. They are abused in multiple ways, by snorting, injection, soaking in ethanol and drinking the concoction, etc. Narcotics are a class of drugs used for pain control. Narcos means 'sleep' so they tend to make most people sleepy. So they depress the function of the central nervous system, including the respiratory centers in the brain stem, that is how they kill. Answered by Faith Korynta 4 months ago.

Oxycontin is not actually synthetic heroin, heroin is a different drug all together and is far more dangerous, it's off the street. However oxys are stronger than Vicodin to answer your question. The high is a lot stronger, especially when snorted. Answered by Berry Akawanzie 4 months ago.

Most of these drugs are used in the hospital after surguries, They are often injected thru IV's in the vein in the hospital. Alot of dentist may prescribe some of these for surguries. SIde effects are extreme drowsiness, knock ya out. They are prescribed in a pill form. OxyContin is nothing but Tylenol with codeine. Morphine is stronger. I have no idea about druggies, but someone in deep pain, u lucky any of these meds even work. Answered by Bonnie Wloch 4 months ago.

The Oxycontin and Vicodin are by mouth in pill form. The morphine can be in pill form and IV, injected into a vein. Mainly all of these medications will give you a high, somnolence. Answered by Catheryn Overmann 4 months ago.

type the names on google it'll be able to tell you more. they all ease pain so it makes you get "high" you can overdose on all of them and you could inject them by needle into your arm but vicodin & i think oxycotin are pills so just take a whole bunch or crush them and snort them. Answered by Elfriede Pyburn 4 months ago.


Whats the difference between oxycodone and oxycontin?
ive been snortin both and i want to know whats the difference..is it the high? is it the side effects? what is it Asked by Elise Toya 4 months ago.

OxyContin is oxycodone continuous-release (ie Oxy for oxycodone and Contin for continuous-release). OxyContin is used for people with chronic pain since it only needs to be taken twice daily for continuous pain control. Oxycodone is just oxycodone, it is an immediate release medication. OxyIR is one of the brand names for oxycodone. Many drugs with oxycodone are combination products meaning they also have acetaminophen (Tylenol) or Aspirin like Percocet and Percodan. If you have used either of these drugs you would have taken the oxycodone and the non-opioid acetaminophen or Aspirin. However oxycodone is oxycodone, it is the same drug just in different forms. The "high" depends only on the dose and route of administration (orally, insufflation (snorting), IV). The side effects include sedation, constipation, euphoria, abdominal pain, excessive sweating, pruritus (itching), nausea/vomiting, dizziness, somnolence. More severe side effects, often caused by abuse, include respiratory depression, respiratory arrest, cardiovascular collapse, coma, physical dependency (alone this is not addiction), and addiction. Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid narcotic and a federally controlled schedule II substance in The United States, schedule I in Canada, Schedule 8 (S8) in Australia, Class A in The United Kingdom, and it is a controlled substance under international law and convention. Oxycodone has a high potential to cause substance abuse/dependency in the same manner as morphine and heroin. OxyContin abuse has a particularly high rate of hospitalization and death due to the large dose, which should be released over 12hrs rather than all at once/ Answered by Lavina Nudelman 4 months ago.

Technically, there's no such thing as oxycontin. It's a name brand, and therefore should have a couple of capital letters: OxyContin. That's a sustained-release tablet with oxycodone as the active ingredient. Once you've broken the integrity of the tablet, it's no longer OxyContin, anyway. Answered by Hildegarde Pratcher 4 months ago.

Oxycodone is the immediate release version. Oxycontin is the time release version. Snorting Oxycontin is even MORE dangerous (and more stupid) than snorting oxycodone. See you in my ER. Answered by Cassaundra Mabie 4 months ago.

Oxycodone is the generic name, Oxycontin is the brand name. There's also Oxy-IR, OxyNorm, Percocet, Depalgos, Percodan, Proladone, Roxicodone and Targin. Answered by Gilda Mehdi 4 months ago.


Does oxycontin affect one's short time memory?
Well, I just had my wisdom teeth pulled yesterday and this stuff really helps with the pain (yes it was prescribed!), but i really need to study for my AP world exam. Should i just deal with it or take the medicine? Asked by September Leblanc 4 months ago.

Yes, Oxycontin will affect your retention and recall of facts. Any opioid pain-killer causes central nervous system depression and this particular one lasts a lot longer than almost any, if not all, others. Oxycontin is time-released oxycodone. I would recommend calling your doctor and having them call in a prescription for Ultram (tramadol) as this blocks pain but also has a mild stimulatory effect (good for retaining information while blocking pain). Combined with a little coffee, you'll be flying through the book and not be drooling on yourself in a euphoric state. It is also not a controlled substance, so you do not need to visit your doctor again to obtain a prescription especially since you were already cleared to take Oxycontin. I think prescribing Oxycontin to a high-school student is entirely irresponsible. It's among the most addictive substances available; legal or illegal. Since he already made the poor decision to give it to you, just ask for the Ultram for your exam and take the Oxycontin when you're done trying to study. Another thing, don't think that taking Oxycontin the night before the test won't affect your performance. It releases oxycodone in two phases: 1st absorbed after about 36 minutes; 2nd absorbed after 6.9 hours. With the half-life of oxycodone contained within Oxycontin at 4.5 hours, you're looking at oxycodone being at a high level in your system for (6.9 + 4.5 = 11.4) 11.4 hours. It still takes longer for the oxycodone to clear your system and the residual effects could impair your short-term memory / recall for the entire next day. Look at the Clinical Pharmacology section of the source I posted. Answered by Britney Zeschke 4 months ago.

Oxycodone Memory Loss Answered by Kitty Bornstein 4 months ago.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, vomiting, constipation, mild itching, drowsiness, dry mouth, lightheadedness, loss of appetite, or weakness may occur. Some of these side effects may decrease after continued use of the medication. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly. THOUGH Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: slow/irregular/shallow breathing, dizziness upon standing, slow/fast/irregular heartbeat, mental/mood changes, uncontrolled muscle movements (tremors), vision changes. Answered by Carmela Dolven 4 months ago.


Has anyone done oxycontin?
like how long does it last, and do ur eyes dilate? whats it like? Asked by Roseanne Kormann 4 months ago.

Oxycontin is a slow release form of the drug oxycodone, which is also the major ingredient in Percodan or Percocet (other ingredients are aspirin or tylenol) . It is usually effective for 12 hours. Whereas a Percocet has 5mg of oxycodone that lasts about 4 hours, Oxycontin may be 10, 20 or 40 mg and has no other added ingredients. It is used most often for people with intractable pain such as that caused by terminal cancer. It is highly addictive. A lot of people abuse it by crushing it or biting the pill open before they swallow it so that they get a big dose of oxycodone all at once. If you've never taken it before it will probably make you very sick with nausea/vomiting, and the effect won't wear off for several hours. It causes your pupils to be pinpoint, not dilated. This is one of those serious drugs that is highly addictive. If you have any sense at all, you will not take it recreationally. Answered by Inge Pacho 4 months ago.

Percocet tablets (oxycodone with acetaminophen) are routinely prescribed for post-operative pain control. Oxycodone is also used in treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain. Both immediate-release and sustained-release oxycodone are now available (OxyContin and OxyNorm in the UK). There is no evidence that oxycodone is more effective than any other opioid, and, in palliative care, morphine remains the gold standard. However, it can be useful as an alternative opioid if a patient has troublesome adverse effects with morphine. The potency ratio between oxycodone and morphine is still uncertain. The manufacturers claim oxycodone is twice as potent as morphine, but most studies show a much lower potency of between 1.3 to 1.7 times more potent, with an approximate mean of 1.5 times greater potency. Nausea, drowsiness, constipation, lightheadedness, rash or itchiness, dizziness, and emotional mood disorders are the most frequently reported side effects. Other side effects can also include dry mouth and slightly decreased testosterone levels in men. Oxycodone accumulates in patients with renal or liver impairment, and dose reductions may be needed. As with all other opioids, tolerance and dependence are rarely problems when these drugs are taken by patients in pain and given with the support of specialist in pain or palliative care. Answered by Margurite Dennis 4 months ago.

I was prescribed Oxycontin for postoperative pain relief, and it gave me insomnia. No pain, but also no sleep. I would make a lousy drug addict. If you take it recreationally, you risk death from respiratory arrest. It's a real risk that happens frequently with this drug. Your eyes won't dilate. Opiates constrict your pupils. They also constipate you, make you itch, cause urinary retention and nausea. Sounds like a good time. Stay away from it. Answered by Jane Merzig 4 months ago.

I have. It really didn't affect my It somewhat affected my speech.It really affected my balance.The high is the most euphoric felling I've ever experienced.The downfall is the nausea that comes after(the comedown!).It lasted for me about an hour or 2, you may be different.I never once got either physically or mentally addicted to it.Just don't let it become you and use wisely. Answered by Darron Reichmann 4 months ago.

ya, i've tried it and i really liked it except for the itchy part i took it during school,... ya school im 16 and i did bit it. i had a lot of fun but, it's really stupid because it can be adicting and you can die,. your puples get small. and It last for a while. but i would do it again.. but thats just me. and if your thinking of trying it and you made your mind up that you are going to, no ones going to change your mind. just dont take to many, beleave me even a half a pill could mess you up if you dont have a stong something for pills... i do some pills dont do anything for me. just becareful Answered by Jacquelyne Bohrman 4 months ago.

this drug is probably the most dangerous out there, if fallen into the wrong hands, ive heard more deaths occuring from this drug then any other out there, especially when combined with alcohol ive heard that people pretty much just go to sleep and not wake up, and it does'nt take much of the drug or the alcohol to kill you, if your thinking about taking this for fun, which i think your profile said your 19 please dont, as a mother it would be heart breaking to see you accidently die, especially out of curiousty, be good! Answered by Sina Halsted 4 months ago.


How is the pill oxycontin designed 2 work?
well i need 2 explain how oxycontin is suppose 2 work 4 my health class and i need 2 explain things about the time capsule pill i think something like that. i looked everywhere on yahoo and google and i cant find it @ all so please help me this packet is worth 157 points!!! Asked by Drema Wedge 4 months ago.

Oxycontin is the sustained release form of the drug Oxycodone. Oxycontin contains an analgesic that is released around the clock, this method of delivery is known as time release or sustained release. Because the base drug oxycodone is a habit forming narcotic, it is also known as a controlled substance. Oxycontin contains a synthetic Opioid derivative, putting it in a class of drugs called opiates. It has a substance abuse warning similar to Morphine, and can be fatal if the tablets are crushed or altered in any way. Time released tablets are designed to release small doses of the drug in regular intervals, thereby keeping pain at a lower and more controlled level. Crushing or altering any time release tablet would allow the full effect of the drug to be delivered at one time, however, in a drug this powerful this would be considered an overdose and likely be fatal. Time release drugs come in two forms, tablets and patches. Fentanyl is a time release pain relieving drug that is delivered in patch form, allowing the skin to absorb metered doses over 24 hours. By delivering small doses of the medication over a prolonged period of time, less medication is required to relieve pain. In theory a single dose of Oxycontin can control pain for prolonged periods of time. This is useful when working with severe chronic pain or cancer related pain. Use the link to find more detail on Oxycontin that you might find useful for your class. This is a source used by physicians and healthcare professionals when they need information. It should prove helpful to you. Good luck! Answered by Pauletta Zehnpfennig 4 months ago.

I feel for you I went through the same thing its tough to get rid of th addiction. You think you have control of it but when you want to wean yourself its hard cause it is easier to just grab some pills and feel better. I had no choice I had to have a clean drug free bill of health for my profession. Now I am clean as can be but I suffer the aftermath. Your liver is screwed up right now, you also have put all your arteries at risk you probably have blockages starting or getting real bad. You need help to deal with this if you can't control this on your own, its Called will power.Take 2 motrin and drink a tea and go to bed. Don't do this to often though because naproxen and motrin and all those things will make your stomach bleed, also all the pills you have taken will cause diarrhoea and inflam your bowels. Its tough but you can do it if you really want to. Seriously get some professional help, you don't want to OD trying to self medicate. Answered by Melodie Burdon 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
022272/001 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
022272/002 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
022272/003 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 20MG
022272/004 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
022272/005 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
022272/006 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
022272/007 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 80MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020932/001 ROXICODONE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
020932/002 ROXICODONE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
021011/001 ROXICODONE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
021011/002 ROXICODONE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
021011/003 ROXICODONE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
022272/001 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
022272/002 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
022272/003 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 20MG
022272/004 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
022272/005 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
022272/006 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
022272/007 OXYCONTIN OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 80MG
076168/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 80MG
076318/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 80MG
076446/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 10MG
076446/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 20MG
076446/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 40MG
076610/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 10MG
076610/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 20MG
076610/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 40MG
076636/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076636/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076636/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
076758/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
076758/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
076758/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077290/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077290/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077290/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
077290/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
077290/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
077712/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
077712/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
077712/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
077712/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
077712/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
077822/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 10MG
077822/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 20MG
077822/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 40MG
077822/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 80MG
090659/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090659/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
090659/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
090659/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
090659/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
090895/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
090895/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
090895/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
091313/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
091313/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
091313/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
091313/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
091313/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091393/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
091393/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
091393/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
091393/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091393/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
091490/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
091490/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
091490/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
091490/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
091490/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
200534/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
200535/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
200535/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
201194/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
202080/001 OXAYDO OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202080/002 OXAYDO OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 7.5MG
202116/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202116/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
202116/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
202160/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202160/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
202160/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
202537/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
202662/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
202662/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
202662/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
202662/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
202773/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
203107/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
203208/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
203638/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
203638/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
203638/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
203638/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
203638/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
203823/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
204021/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
204021/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
204021/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
204021/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
204021/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
204037/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
204085/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
204092/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
204603/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
204752/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
204979/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
205177/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 5MG
206456/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
207119/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
207119/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
207119/003 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
207119/004 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 20MG
207119/005 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
207511/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
208593/001 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 5MG per 5ML
208593/002 OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
209777/001 ROXYBOND OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 5MG
209777/002 ROXYBOND OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
209777/003 ROXYBOND OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 30MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Napp Pharmaceuticals Ltd

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