Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017031/001.

Names and composition

"OVRETTE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NORGESTREL.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017031/001 OVRETTE NORGESTREL TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017031/001 OVRETTE NORGESTREL TABLET/ORAL 0.075MG

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Answered questions

Is ovrette pills have any side effect ?
Asked by Janetta Rosado 1 year ago.

Yes, it has some side effects... Answered by Emil Franklin 1 year ago.


Is ovrette pills have any side effect??? plz help?
Asked by Reinaldo Knoerzer 1 year ago.

Yes, they do have some side effects, like nausea, cramps, etc... Answered by Tommy Kill 1 year ago.


Contraceptive pill and antibiotics?
My doctor told me that taking Trimethoprim and the 21 day combined oral contraceptive, Ovranette, will not make the contraceptive any less effective. However, after looking on the internet, I have came across most answers saying antibiotics will affect it? Any ideas? Asked by Sherice Melchior 1 year ago.

Drug-Drug Interactions (None found) Ingredient Duplication (None found) Drug-ALLERGY Interactions (None found) Drug-FOOD Interactions (1) Drugs: Summary: NORGESTREL [Systemic] [Ovrette] Drug interaction is moderate Moderate Good Concurrent use of CAFFEINE and CONTRACEPTIVES, COMBINATION may result in enhanced CNS stimulation. Drug-ETHANOL Interactions (1) Drugs: Severity: Documentation: Summary: TRIMETHOPRIM [Systemic] Drug interaction is major Major Good Concurrent use of ETHANOL and COTRIMOXAZOLE may result in a disulfiram-like reaction (flushing, sweating, palpitations, drowsiness). Drug-LAB Interactions (2) Drugs: Severity: Documentation: Summary: TRIMETHOPRIM [Systemic] Drug interaction is moderate Moderate Good TRIMETHOPRIM may result in interference with serum methotrexate assay using the competitive binding protein technique due to assay interference. TRIMETHOPRIM [Systemic] Drug interaction is moderate Moderate Fair TRIMETHOPRIM may result in falsely elevated creatinine levels due to interference with the Jaffe alkaline picrate reaction. Drug-TOBACCO Interactions (1) Drugs: Severity: Documentation: Summary: NORGESTREL [Systemic] [Ovrette] Drug interaction is minor Minor Fair Concurrent use of TOBACCO and CONTRACEPTIVES, COMBINATION may result in an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Drug-PREGNANCY Interactions (2) Drugs: Severity: Documentation: Summary: NORGESTREL [Systemic] [Ovrette] Drug interaction is contraindicated Contraindicated Unknown Norgestrel is rated as US FDA Category X. Studies, adequate well-controlled or observational, in animals or pregnant women have demonstrated positive evidence of fetal abnormalities. The use of the product is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant. TRIMETHOPRIM [Systemic] Drug interaction is moderate Moderate Unknown Trimethoprim is rated as US FDA Category C. Animal studies have shown an adverse effect and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. (OR) No animal studies have been conducted and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Drug-LACTATION Interactions (2) Drugs: Severity: Documentation: Summary: NORGESTREL [Systemic] [Ovrette] Drug interaction is contraindicated Contraindicated Unknown Infant risk has been demonstrated: Evidence and/or expert consensus has demonstrated harmful infant effects when Norgestrel is used during breast-feeding. An alternative to Norgestrel should be prescribed or patients should be advised to discontinue breast-feeding. TRIMETHOPRIM [Systemic] Drug interaction is minor Minor Unknown According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, Trimethoprim is compatible with breast-feeding. No drug-drug interaction between these medications. Answered by Susie Janack 1 year ago.

most of the antibiotics will work together with delivery administration. that's ultimate to apply yet another variety of contraceptive. (ie condoms) The antibiotics will nevertheless be on your gadget for a speedy time when you end taking them. yet you will be sturdy to pass 10 days when you end the antibiotics. that's genuine that some antibiotics do not work together... the final thank you to be sure whether yours do or not is to touch your medical expert or pharmacy. in addition they could placed a sticky label on the bottle of antibiotics if that's going to work together. desire it facilitates! in case you ever become uninterested in the pill. attempt the Nuvaring. I even have used it for a year now and that's large. not greater freaking out, attempting to bear in mind if I took my pill that day or not. Antibiotics nevertheless work together however. Answered by Betty Klinski 1 year ago.

Every doctor and person I've asked says that antibiotics weaken birth control. But maybe that one works different, call a local pharmacist and get another opinion. Or you can tough it out and use a condom too until you are through with your round of antibiotics. Answered by Nenita Dang 1 year ago.

You doctor is right, it's not necessary. Guidance changed on this recently, and many websites are out of date. I've linked the Family Planning Association website below. Answered by Theodore Mchaffie 1 year ago.

I'd trust the doctor over random internet people with no knowledge of your specific situation why would he lie to you about that? Answered by Antoinette Gauch 1 year ago.

Ask your pharmacist. Likely the doctor is correct, but, if it would make you feel better, get an opinion of someone educated (i.e. not random internet people). Answered by Ina Fridman 1 year ago.


Birth Control while Breastfeeding?
Does anyone know of a birth control pill that is safe during breastfeeding? Asked by Floy Walema 1 year ago.

as far as i know the mini pill is the best Progestin-only contraceptives are the preferred choice for breastfeeding mothers when something hormonal is desired or necessary. Progestin-only contraceptives come in several different forms: * the progestin-only pill (POP) also called the "mini-pill" (Micronor, Errin, Nor-QD, Ovrette, Microval, etc) * the birth control injection (Depo Provera) * the progesterone-releasing IUD (Mirena, Progestasert) * the birth control implant (Norplant, Implanon). Milk supply: For most mothers, progestin-only forms of contraception do not cause problems with milk supply if started after the 6th-8th week postpartum and if given at normal doses. However, there are many reports (most anecdotal but nevertheless worth paying attention to) that some women do experience supply problems with these pills, so if you choose this method you still need to proceed with some caution. If you're interested in one of the longer lasting progestin-only forms of birth control (the Depo-Provera shot lasts at least 12 weeks, but effects may be seen up to a year; the Mirena/Progestasert IUD and the Norplant implant can last up to 5 years), it may be a good idea to do a trial of progestin-only pills (mini-pill) for a month or more before deciding on the longer-term form of birth control. If you find that you are among the women whose supply drops significantly due to progestin-only birth control, you can simply discontinue the pills - rather than struggling with low milk supply for several months until the shot wears off or you get the implant or IUD removed. Do note that the Mirena/Progestasert IUD delivers its hormone directly to the lining of the uterus, which only leads to a slight increase in progesterone levels in the blood stream (much lower than that found with the progesterone-only pill). As a result, there is much less chance of side effects from the progesterone than from the Depo-Provera shot or mini-pill. Milk composition: At higher doses than normal this type of pill can affect the content of breastmilk. At these higher doses it has been shown to decrease the protein/nitrogen and lactose content of the milk. At regular doses, this does not seem to be as likely. it really recommends you dont take any pill on till you are at least 6 weeks postpartum im breast feeding and my son is nearly 18 months we have been ttc for about 5 months to no avail which is unusual for us Answered by Fairy Altice 1 year ago.

I too am breastfeeding and the only type of pill you can take is a progesterone only pill and even those can decrease your milk supply. An IUD is probably your best bet. Just research all your options. With me, I couldn't have an IUD so we are taking our chances with no birth control. Answered by Jared Voccia 1 year ago.

Most doctors prefer the mini pill Micron. That's what I was prescribed but I haven't taken it because I'm afraid it will lessen my milk supply. I've heard from some moms that it has done that so I'm just staying away from it! Answered by Tandra Quinerly 1 year ago.

You should ask your doctor about it... but I asked a few weeks ago (I am due and plan to breast feed) and my doctor told me they do have birth control that is very low dose and I believe it is only estrogen... no progesterone... or its the other way around... im not sure.:) but there is definitely something out there for you! Answered by Rachell Mittelsteadt 1 year ago.

you can take birth control that does not contain estrogen. the "mini pill" contains only progesterone, and is safe. IUD's are safe, as well as the depo shot. Answered by Mark Plomma 1 year ago.

Yes, the "mini Pill" is a progesterone only pill and is compatible with nursing. It is not as effective, however. Your ob/gyn can prescribe it Answered by Nicolette Hulan 1 year ago.

I forget the name of the pill I was on but it began with a M. It is low estrogen ask you ob just to be sure!! Answered by Kimber Giroir 1 year ago.

Progesterone only pills are usually presribed. Answered by Maragaret Heiler 1 year ago.

i wouldn't risk taking any bc while breastfeeding Answered by Shila Sanker 1 year ago.

im taking the nor-q-d tab Answered by Tyler Needels 1 year ago.


Which birth control methods are safe while breast feeding?
I want to get on BC as soon as I give birth to avoid having babies back to back at such a young age but I also want to breastfeed.....My ideal BC would be the shot or the implant (arm), I WILL NOT put anything in my uterus so absolutely NO iud's....which methods are safe while breastfeeding...thanks ladies... Asked by Marisela Bastic 1 year ago.

Progestin-only contraceptives are the preferred choice for breastfeeding mothers when something hormonal is desired or necessary. Progestin-only contraceptives come in several different forms: * the progestin-only pill (POP) also called the "mini-pill" (Micronor, Errin, Nor-QD, Ovrette, Microval, etc) * the birth control injection (Depo Provera) * the progesterone-releasing IUD (Mirena, Progestasert) * the birth control implant (Norplant, Implanon). Milk supply: For most mothers, progestin-only forms of contraception do not cause problems with milk supply if started after the 6th-8th week postpartum and if given at normal doses. However, there are many reports (most anecdotal but nevertheless worth paying attention to) that some women do experience supply problems with these pills, so if you choose this method you still need to proceed with some caution. If you're interested in one of the longer lasting progestin-only forms of birth control (the Depo-Provera shot lasts at least 12 weeks, but effects may be seen up to a year; the Mirena/Progestasert IUD and the Norplant implant can last up to 5 years), it may be a good idea to do a trial of progestin-only pills (mini-pill) for a month or more before deciding on the longer-term form of birth control. If you find that you are among the women whose supply drops significantly due to progestin-only birth control, you can simply discontinue the pills - rather than struggling with low milk supply for several months until the shot wears off or you get the implant or IUD removed. Do note that the Mirena/Progestasert IUD delivers its hormone directly to the lining of the uterus, which only leads to a slight increase in progesterone levels in the blood stream (much lower than that found with the progesterone-only pill). As a result, there is much less chance of side effects from the progesterone than from the Depo-Provera shot or mini-pill. Milk composition: At higher doses than normal this type of pill can affect the content of breastmilk. At these higher doses it has been shown to decrease the protein/nitrogen and lactose content of the milk. At regular doses, this does not seem to be as likely. Safety: Progestin (progesterone) is approved by the AAP for use in breastfeeding mothers. See below for additional information on side effects related to lactation. **I was one of those women that had supply issues with Depo-Provera, though I did not have the same issue with the mini-pill.** Answered by Olin Eggers 1 year ago.

Not all men are that bad. They all suck, in my opinion (my husband included), but some are a lot better than others. I want to get my tubes tied and I want my husband to get a vasectomy someday, but he's only (almost) 21 and I just turned 19. I didn't want kids, but my bc pills didn't work so great, I guess. I love my daughter but I don't want anymore. Anyway, I'm on Camila bc pills right now, just until my Mirena gets to my OB/GYN office. That'll be about 3 weeks. Camila is a progestin only pill, or "mini pill." The Mirena is an IUC that you can leave in for up to 5 years or have it removed whenever if you decide to have more children. Answered by Lesa Bovia 1 year ago.

Ask your doctor, most BC is safe for nursing moms however the ones you are willing to do have hormones and will drop your milk production quiet abit. Answered by Meredith Mcwethy 1 year ago.

you should ask your doctor what forms are safest. I know that your doctor won't let you have any birth control until after your post-natal bleeding stops. Answered by Ruthann Goodheart 1 year ago.


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