Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 010670/001.

Names and composition

"ORINASE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of TOLBUTAMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010670/001 ORINASE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
010670/002 ORINASE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
010670/001 ORINASE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
010670/002 ORINASE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
012678/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086047/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086109/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086141/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086445/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086574/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
086926/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087093/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087121/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087318/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087541/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
087876/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
088893/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
088950/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG
089110/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 250MG
089111/001 TOLBUTAMIDE TOLBUTAMIDE TABLET/ORAL 500MG

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Answered questions

I need the names of several diabetic meds P.O that doesn't cost and arm?
Asked by Honey Seibert 1 year ago.

What Types of Oral Diabetes Medicine Are Available? Diabetes medications are grouped in categories based on medication type. There are several categories of oral diabetes medicine -- each works differently. Sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The first drugs of this type that were developed -- Dymelor, Diabinese, Orinase and Tolinase -- are not as widely used since they tend to be less potent and shorter acting drugs than the newer sulfonylureas. They include Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase PresTab and Amaryl. These drugs can cause a decrease in the hemoglobin A1c (/content/article/46/1667_50945?z=1667_5... [link] of up to 1%-2%. Biguanides. These drugs improve insulin's ability to move glucose into cells especially into the muscle cells. They also prevent the liver from releasing stored glucose. Biguanides should not be used in people who have kidney damage or heart failure because of the risk of precipitating a severe build up of acid (called lactic acidosis) in these patients. Biguanides can decrease the HbA1c 1%-2%. Examples include metformin (Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and Glumetza). Thiazolidinediones. These drugs improve insulin's effectiveness (improving insulin resistance) in muscle and in fat tissue. They lower the amount of glucose released by the liver and make fat cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Actos and Avandia are the two drugs of this class. A decrease in the HbA1c of 1%-2% can be seen with this class of medications. These drugs may take a few weeks before they have an effect in lowering blood glucose. They should be used with caution in people with heart failure. Your doctor will do periodic blood testing of your liver function when using this medication. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, including Precose and Glyset. These drugs block enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood glucose. These drugs may cause diarrhea or gas. These drugs can result in the reduction of the level of HbA1c of 0.5%-1%. Meglitinides, including Prandin and Starlix. These medicines lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The effects of these medications depend on the level of glucose. They are said to be glucose dependant. High sugars make this class of medications release insulin. This is unlike the sulfonylureas that cause an increase in insulin release, regardless of glucose levels, and can lead to hypoglycemia. Combination therapy. There are several combination pills that combine two medications into one tablet. One example of this is Glucovance, which combines glyburide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin. Others include Metaglip, which combines glipizide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin, and Avandamet which utilizes both metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) in one pill. Metformin and glipizide are generic products which would be less costly that the brand counterparts. Answered by Loni Steinbock 1 year ago.

There are pharmaceutical companies that have prescription drug assistance plans for people with limited income -- whether you have insurance, or not. You may be able to get the application from your pharmacist or online. Good luck! Answered by Stacia Asmus 1 year ago.

Why? Are you planning on prescribing them for yourself? Answered by Carmen Shulz 1 year ago.

whats that. Answered by Lachelle Mcclair 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Nobuko Karwowski 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Lavon Peirce 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Chasity Dannelly 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Candida Jardel 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Twanna Hursh 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Candance Takala 1 year ago.


I need the names of several diabetic meds P.O that doesn't cost and arm?
Asked by Shan Abatti 1 year ago.

What Types of Oral Diabetes Medicine Are Available? Diabetes medications are grouped in categories based on medication type. There are several categories of oral diabetes medicine -- each works differently. Sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The first drugs of this type that were developed -- Dymelor, Diabinese, Orinase and Tolinase -- are not as widely used since they tend to be less potent and shorter acting drugs than the newer sulfonylureas. They include Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, DiaBeta, Micronase, Glynase PresTab and Amaryl. These drugs can cause a decrease in the hemoglobin A1c (/content/article/46/1667_50945?z=1667_5... [link] of up to 1%-2%. Biguanides. These drugs improve insulin's ability to move glucose into cells especially into the muscle cells. They also prevent the liver from releasing stored glucose. Biguanides should not be used in people who have kidney damage or heart failure because of the risk of precipitating a severe build up of acid (called lactic acidosis) in these patients. Biguanides can decrease the HbA1c 1%-2%. Examples include metformin (Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet and Glumetza). Thiazolidinediones. These drugs improve insulin's effectiveness (improving insulin resistance) in muscle and in fat tissue. They lower the amount of glucose released by the liver and make fat cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin. Actos and Avandia are the two drugs of this class. A decrease in the HbA1c of 1%-2% can be seen with this class of medications. These drugs may take a few weeks before they have an effect in lowering blood glucose. They should be used with caution in people with heart failure. Your doctor will do periodic blood testing of your liver function when using this medication. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, including Precose and Glyset. These drugs block enzymes that help digest starches, slowing the rise in blood glucose. These drugs may cause diarrhea or gas. These drugs can result in the reduction of the level of HbA1c of 0.5%-1%. Meglitinides, including Prandin and Starlix. These medicines lower blood glucose by stimulating the pancreas to release more insulin. The effects of these medications depend on the level of glucose. They are said to be glucose dependant. High sugars make this class of medications release insulin. This is unlike the sulfonylureas that cause an increase in insulin release, regardless of glucose levels, and can lead to hypoglycemia. Combination therapy. There are several combination pills that combine two medications into one tablet. One example of this is Glucovance, which combines glyburide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin. Others include Metaglip, which combines glipizide (a sulfonylurea) and metformin, and Avandamet which utilizes both metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia) in one pill. Metformin and glipizide are generic products which would be less costly that the brand counterparts. Answered by Nigel Rath 1 year ago.

There are pharmaceutical companies that have prescription drug assistance plans for people with limited income -- whether you have insurance, or not. You may be able to get the application from your pharmacist or online. Good luck! Answered by Scottie Cobble 1 year ago.

Why? Are you planning on prescribing them for yourself? Answered by Emmitt Notter 1 year ago.

whats that. Answered by Trent Boughman 1 year ago.


How many oral hypoglycemics are there?
Asked by Maegan Milson 1 year ago.

Acetohexamide (Dymelor) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) Glipizide (Glucotrol) Glyburide (DiaBeta, Micronase) Glimepiride (Amaryl) Tolbutamide (Orinase) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Answered by Doris Getsinger 1 year ago.


Can I mix these prescription medications?
I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know... Asked by Gale Flot 1 year ago.

I take seroquel and lamictal, bipolar medications. I have a really bad sinus infection. Does mucinex mix with these medications? I know there's only certian over the counter meds that mix with mine. If anyone who knows about these prescriptions could help me out that would be great. Please only answer if you know for sure if you don't move on to the next question don't make a stupid comment about nothing you know. Answered by Meghann Conales 1 year ago.

Mucinex is a multi-ingredient drug consisting of pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin. If you'd like to know more about how either one interacts with other medication, Google "pseudoephedrine drug interactions" and "guaifenesin drug interactions," although I don't believe you should be having any problems while on seroquel and lamictal. Here's a list of medication that WILL, however, interact with Mucinex, which I have looked into to double-check myself. I didn't see either of the two medications that you are on on any of the three lists, but here they are anyway, in case you'd like to see so for yourself: Major Interactions Atapryl, Azilect, Carbex, Eldepryl, Emsam, furazolidone, Furoxone, isocarboxazid, Jumex, linezolid, Marplan, Matulane, Nardil, Parnate, phenelzine, procarbazine, rasagiline, selegiline, Selgene, tranylcypromine, Zelapar, Zyvox Moderate Interactions acarbose, acetoHEXAMIDE, Aldomet, Amaryl, Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, bromocriptine, chlorproPAMIDE, Citra pH, Citrate-Phos-Dex, D.H.E. 45, deserpidine, DiaBeta, Diabinese, dihydroergotamine, Dymelor, epoprostenol, ergoloid mesylates, Ergomar, ergonovine, ergotamine, Ergotrate Maleate, EXUBERA, EXUBERA Combination Pack 12, EXUBERA Combination Pack 15, EXUBERA Kit, Flolan, Fortamet, glimepiride, glipiZIDE, glipiZIDE extended release, GlipiZIDE XL, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, Glumetza, glyBURIDE, glyBURIDE micronized, Glynase PresTab, Glyset, guanadrel, guanethidine, Harmonyl, Humalog, Humalog Cartridge, Humalog KwikPen, Humalog Pen, Humulin L, Humulin N, Humulin N Pen, Humulin R, Humulin R (Concentrated), Humulin U, Hydergine, Hydergine LC, Hylorel, Iletin II Lente Pork, Iletin II NPH Pork, Iletin II Regular Pork, Iletin Lente, Iletin NPH, Iletin Regular, iloprost, insulin, insulin analog, insulin aspart, insulin aspart protamine, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, insulin inhalation, rapid acting, insulin isophane, Insulin Lente Pork, insulin lispro, insulin lispro protamine, Insulin Purified NPH Pork, Insulin Purified Regular Pork, insulin regular, insulin zinc, insulin zinc extended, insulin, lente, insulin, NPH, insulin, ultralente, Inversine, Ismelin, Januvia, Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen, Lente insulin, Levemir, Levemir FlexPen, Levemir InnoLet, Levemir PenFill, mecamylamine, Meridia, metformin, metformin extended release, Methergine, methyldopa, methylergonovine, methysergide maleate, Micronase, midodrine, miglitol, Migranal, nateglinide, Neut, Novolin L, Novolin N, Novolin N Innolet, Novolin N PenFill, Novolin R, Novolin R Innolet, Novolin R PenFill, NovoLog, NovoLog FlexPen, NovoLog PenFill, NPH insulin, Orinase, Orvaten, oxytocin, Parlodel, Pitocin, potassium citrate, Prandin, Precose, ProAmatine, prostacyclin, protamine zinc insulin, Rauwolfemms, Rauwolfia 1X, rauwolfia serpentina, regular insulin, Relion Novolin N, ReliOn/Novolin R, Remodulin, repaglinide, reserpine, Riomet, Sansert, sibutramine, sitagliptin, sodium acetate, sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, sodium lactate, Starlix, Syntocinon, Tham, Tol-Tab, TOLAZamide, TOLBUTamide, Tolinase, treprostinil, Tricitrasol, tromethamine, Twin-K, Ultralente insulin, Urocit-K, Velosulin BR, Ventavis Minor Interactions Acerola, ammonium chloride, Ascor L 500, ascorbic acid, Ascorbic Acid Quick Melts, Ascot, atomoxetine, C-Time, C/Rose Hips, Cardoxin, Cecon, Cee-500, Cemill 1000, Cemill 500, Cenolate, Centrum Singles-Vitamin C, Cevi-Bid, Cotameth, Digitek, digitoxin, digoxin, digoxin capsule, Ester-C, K-Phos Original, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin, M-Caps, Mega-C/A Plus, methionine, N Ice with Vitamin C, Pedameth, potassium acid phosphate, sodium acid phosphate, sodium ascorbate, Strattera, Sunkist Vitamin C, Vicks Vitamin C Drops, Vitamin C, Vitamin C TR, Vitamin C with Rose Hips Answered by Isaias Wolever 1 year ago.

No interactions were reported. I also checked Mucinex D and Mucinex DM too, just in case. (I am a pharmacist, BTW) Answered by Kena Peat 1 year ago.


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