Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019977/001.

Names and composition

"ORAMORPH SR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of MORPHINE SULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019977/001 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
019977/002 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
019977/003 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
019977/004 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018565/001 DURAMORPH PF MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
018565/002 DURAMORPH PF MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
018565/003 INFUMORPH MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
018565/004 INFUMORPH MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
019516/001 MS CONTIN MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
019516/002 MS CONTIN MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
019516/003 MS CONTIN MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
019516/004 MS CONTIN MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
019516/005 MS CONTIN MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
019916/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
019916/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
019917/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
019977/001 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
019977/002 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
019977/003 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
019977/004 ORAMORPH SR MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
019999/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15MG per ML
020616/001 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 20MG
020616/002 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG
020616/003 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
020616/004 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
020616/005 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
020616/006 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 80MG
020616/007 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
020616/008 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
020616/009 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
020616/010 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 70MG
020616/011 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 130MG
020616/012 KADIAN MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 150MG
020631/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
020631/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
021260/001 AVINZA MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
021260/002 AVINZA MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
021260/003 AVINZA MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
021260/004 AVINZA MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
021260/005 AVINZA MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 45MG
021260/006 AVINZA MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
021671/001 DEPODUR MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE, LIPOSOMAL/EPIDURAL 10MG per ML (10MG per ML)
021671/002 DEPODUR MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE, LIPOSOMAL/EPIDURAL 15MG per 1.5ML (10MG per ML)
021671/003 DEPODUR MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE, LIPOSOMAL/EPIDURAL 20MG per 2ML (10MG per ML)
022195/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
022195/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 20MG per 5ML
022195/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
022207/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 15MG
022207/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET/ORAL 30MG
071050/001 ASTRAMORPH PF MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
071051/001 ASTRAMORPH PF MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
071052/001 ASTRAMORPH PF MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071053/001 ASTRAMORPH PF MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071849/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
071850/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
073373/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
073374/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
073375/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
073376/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
073509/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
073510/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
074769/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
074769/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
074862/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
074862/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
074862/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075295/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
075295/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075295/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075295/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
075295/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
075407/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
075656/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
076412/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
076412/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
076412/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
076438/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
076438/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
076720/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
076720/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
076733/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
077855/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
077855/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
078761/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
078761/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
078761/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
078761/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
078761/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
079040/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
079040/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 45MG
079040/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
079040/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 75MG
079040/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
079040/006 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 120MG
091357/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
091357/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
091357/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
091357/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
091357/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
200411/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 20MG
200411/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
200411/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG
200411/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
200411/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 80MG
200411/006 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
200812/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 20MG
200812/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
200812/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG
200812/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
200812/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 80MG
200812/006 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
200824/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
200824/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
200824/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
200824/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
200824/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
201011/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
201011/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 20MG per 5ML
201517/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
201574/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
201947/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
201947/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 20MG per 5ML
202104/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 10MG
202104/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 20MG
202104/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
202104/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG
202104/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
202104/006 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 80MG
202104/007 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
202309/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
202310/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 20MG per 5ML
202348/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
202515/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per ML
202515/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4MG per ML
202515/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 8MG per ML
202515/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
202515/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 15MG per ML
202718/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 20MG
202718/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
202718/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 50MG
202718/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
202718/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 80MG
202718/006 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
202718/007 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 40MG
202718/008 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 70MG
203518/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
203518/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
203519/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 20MG per 5ML
203602/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
203602/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
203602/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
203602/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
203602/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
203849/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
203849/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
203849/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
203849/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
203849/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
204053/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
204223/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 2MG per ML (2MG per ML)
204223/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 4MG per ML (4MG per ML)
204223/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 5MG per ML (5MG per ML)
204223/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 8MG per ML (8MG per ML)
204223/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, INTRAVENOUS 10MG per ML (10MG per ML)
205386/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
205386/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
205386/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
205386/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
205634/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
205634/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
205634/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
205634/004 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
205634/005 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 200MG
205758/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4MG per ML
205758/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 8MG per ML
205758/003 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
206308/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 10MG per 5ML
206308/002 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
206420/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 20MG per 5ML
206544/001 MORPHABOND ER MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
206544/002 MORPHABOND ER MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
206544/003 MORPHABOND ER MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
206544/004 MORPHABOND ER MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 100MG
206573/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML
208603/001 ARYMO ER MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 15MG
208603/002 ARYMO ER MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
208603/003 ARYMO ER MORPHINE SULFATE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
208809/001 MORPHINE SULFATE MORPHINE SULFATE SOLUTION/ORAL 100MG per 5ML

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Answered questions

Is abusing prescription opiates just as bad as doing heroin?
My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd... Asked by Lindsey Alquisira 1 year ago.

My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd frequently fall asleep while eating and while having a conversation. I suspected him of being on heroin before I realized that the pills could be having the same effect. So do these pills have almost the same effect on your body as heroin? What is different? BTW, he doesn't take these pills anymore... that I am aware of anyway. Answered by Oliva Piserchio 1 year ago.

In reality Heroin (diacetylmorphine) has an undeserved reputation. Heroin is no better or worse than the other full opioid agonists legally used for pain namely hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo), morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, Oramorph SR), oxycodone (OxyContin, Oxy IR, Percocet), fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq), oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER) and methadone (Dolophine). All of these drugs produce (more/less) the same effects as Heroin namely that they all bind to the μ-opioid receptor which is what causes analgesia (pain relief), euphoria, and other opioid effects. A number of studies have been done in IV Heroin addicts to determine if they could tell the difference between Heroin and another opioid given in an equivalent amount. The studies found that addicts could NOT distinguish IV Heroin from equivalent doses of other opioids. Not to mention that a number of prescription opioids- hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and fentanyl- are more potent than Heroin. So a smaller amount of these drugs is required to achieve the same effects as Heroin. Heroin is (just to give you an idea) about twice as potent as morphine. What is really interesting is that the effects of Heroin are from morphine. When a person uses Heroin, especially by IV, it rapidly enters the brain. Heroin then undergoes rapid deacetylation (an acetyl chemical group is removed from Heroin aka diacetylmorphine). If you just look at the name diacetylmorphine you can imagine what remains if the acetyl is removed. What remains is morphine along with other metabolites- primarily 6-MAM. All Heroin does is it more efficiently enters the brain but once it is there it breaks down into morphine and it is the morphine that produces all of its effects. Heroin only lasts a few minutes once taken. Heroin became the preferred drug among addicts since it "hits" the brain faster than morphine thus it gives a greater "rush." However if an equivalent amount of morphine is given the effects are the same. Heroin also have fewer side effects than morphine. Heroin is actually widely used legally in The United Kingdom and a number of countries like Canada have a special limited access programme to provide Heroin to people with severe intractable pain (mostly due to cancer or AIDS) that does not respond well to other medication. So yes the effects of prescription opioids like oxycodone are almost exactly the same as Heroin. Oxycodone is 1.5 times more potent than morphine so it is nearly as potent as Heroin. Even methadone maintenance programmes treat people who are addicted and physically dependent to opioids aside from Heroin. But do keep in mind that there is NOTHING inherently wrong with Heroin or any of the other opioids. The problem comes when they are misused but many hundreds of thousands of people a year take opioids and benefit greatly from them and don't misuse them. Res non per se at per usum, bona aut mala est. Nothing of itself is good or evil; only the manner of its use makes it so. Answered by Pamella Herriott 1 year ago.

Hydrocodone makes me feel speedy too. Your question is difficult to answer. I agree that opiate abuse is bad, but Tramadol is also addictive. I have been on Tramadol for years, and if I try to skip a day, I feel like death. This is my opinion on drug addiction. If you are taking pain medication that has been prescribed by a doctor, and you become addicted AT the doses prescribed, not more than the prescribed doses, then you are clinically dependent on your medication, but your not abusing your drugs. I take several different addictive drugs everyday. I know, and my doctor knows that if I ever have to stop, it will be a process of tapering down, and possibly even going to the hospital to detox. Back to your medication. My doctor has me on Tramadol(which I love by the way, it completes me, lol) and also 10 Vicoden a month for break threw pain, or in other words bad days. My whole family except my Dad is junkies. They have been over my house playing X-BOX and stole my pills before. I agree that you should never share pills. I have to hide my pills when they come over. I left a bottle of Klonopin out, and substituted the pills with laxatives and my brother and law took about 20 out of the bottle, idiot. Opiate addiction is not that bad if you and your doctor are aware of your condition and you take your prescribed doses. Answered by Collin Cora 1 year ago.

Yes, they act in more or less identical ways once inside your body. Their are differences about how fast the different drugs start acting (heroin acts much faster as its injected right into the veins) and how much of each drug is needed to get a similar high, but pretty much, yes it is every bit as 'bad.' That being said doing heroin is generally more dangerous as addicts often inject with dirty needles leading to the spread of hepatitis, HIV, or contraction of endocarditis (infection of the heart). Answered by Dayle Sacarello 1 year ago.

Being addicted to prescription pills still makes you a fiend. So yeah, its just as bad. Answered by Erma Boldrin 1 year ago.

Drugs are drugs alcohol & tobacco included... if it is creating an issue in life, addiction is possible.... however u can! not force an addict to get help...or you might end up needing therapy of your own. RECOVERY IS A CHOICE. U can lead a horse to water but u can't make him drink... if you believe, prayer helps... Answered by Jeff Welde 1 year ago.


Does morphine come in a pill or only in a shot? and can it be prescribed to take at home?
Asked by Aracely Maixner 1 year ago.

Morphine sulfate also is administered orally or rectally. The manufacturers state that certain morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., Avinza® extended-release capsules, Kadian® extended-release capsules, Oramorph® SR extended-release tablets) can be administered without regard to food; the effect of food on the GI absorption of other morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., MS-Contin® extended-release tablets) has not been fully evaluated to date. Extended-release tablets of the drug should be swallowed intact and should not be broken, crushed, or chewed; intake of a broken, crushed, or chewed tablet may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. The manufacturers of morphine sulfate extended-release capsules state that the capsules may be swallowed whole or the entire contents of the capsules may be sprinkled on a small amount of applesauce, at room temperature or cooler, immediately prior to administration; subdividing the contents of a capsule is not recommended. The patient should swallow the entire mixture. The beads or pellets should not be crushed, chewed, or dissolved; intake of crushed, chewed, or dissolved beads or pellets may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially fatal dose of morphine sulfate. Following administration, the patient should drink a glass of water to rinse the mouth and ensure that the beads or pellets are swallowed. The mixture of applesauce and beads or pellets should not be stored for future use. Patients receiving morphine sulfate extended-release capsules (Avinza®, Kadian®) must not consume alcoholic beverages or prescription or nonprescription preparations containing alcohol; intake of alcohol may result in rapid release of the drug from the capsules and intake of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. Additionally, one manufacturer states that the contents of the extended-release capsules (Kadian®) should not be administered through a nasogastric tube Serious adverse events and deaths have occurred as a result of inadvertent overdosage of concentrated morphine sulfate Answered by Carrie Sandau 1 year ago.


Medical marijuana...?
I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications... Asked by Dennis Doyle 1 year ago.

I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications for medical marijuana and I meet these requirements. Does marijuana have any bad long term side affects? Please do not judge. I am not going to blindly ask my parents or doctors for this, because it is not my place to get something like this. I just want to get answers to my question. Answered by Roxane Beard 1 year ago.

A couple of things- Firstly if marijuana is illegal where you live then you can't legally use, buy, or posses it regardless of why you are using it. Also nearly all doctors will not officially condone or recommend medical marijuana use by a patient and doctors do have some legal liability if they do. Also over-the-counter pain medication is only for MILD pain, if you have a legitimate medical problem causing moderate to severe pain then only prescription medication will be able to alleviate it (OTC drugs did not work because they are useless against severe pain). If your problem is so severe why aren't you getting treatment or at least symptomatic control? With any type of pain, even in places where medical marijuana is available, it is not going to be used especially if you have only taken drugs like Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Advil, Motrin (ibuprofen) that is like going from the most minimal to very extreme without stopping in the middle. The cornerstone of pain management is opioid use particularly the full opioid agonists including: morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MST Continus, Oramorph SR) oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, Oxy-IR, Roxicet, Roxicodone, Tylox, Endocet) oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER, Numorphan) hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin) fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq, Fentora, Onsolis) methadone (Dolophine, Metadol, Methadose) Typically something like marijuana is used to treat pain WITH opioids, for extreme conditions, in patients refractory to opioid therapy, and especially in patients with terminal conditions (typically AIDS or cancer), cachexia, and chemotherapy induced vomiting refractory to first-line treatment. It is not really your age that is a problem, people at any age with severe pain are treated with the proper medications to control the pain. Just to give you an idea of the guidelines and conditions that medical marijuana is typically accepted these are the Health Canada regulations (this is just for generalized information) There are two categories of people who can apply to possess marihuana for medical purposes: Category 1: This category is comprised of any symptoms treated within the context of providing compassionate end-of-life care; or the symptoms associated with the specified medical conditions, namely: Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from multiple sclerosis; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from a spinal cord injury; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from spinal cord disease; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from cancer; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from HIV/AIDS infection; Severe pain from severe forms of arthritis; or Seizures from epilepsy. Category 2: This category is for applicants who have debilitating symptom (s) of medical condition (s), other than those described in Category 1. Under Category 2, persons with debilitating symptoms can apply to obtain an Authorization to Possess dried marihuana for medical purposes, if a specialist confirms the diagnosis and that conventional treatments have failed or judged inappropriate to relieve symptoms of the medical condition. You really need to talk to your doctor and your parents. If you are in significant pain or are having any medical problems is it important to tell your doctor and get appropriate treatment. Also the best course of action is saying "doctor I'm in severe pain, how can we get it controlled?" And then let him do his job to consider, inform, and recommend options for pain control. But in the end, at least for now, you simply can't get medical marijuana and with respect if you have not taken anything except OTC medication then use of medical marijuana is not really considered appropriate. Lastly do not believe people who on are the extremes on the issue of marijuana. It is not the terrible drug some would have you believe nor is it a risk-free and perfectly benign substance. ALL drugs no matter if it is smoked, taken as a pill, injected, or is natural, semi-synthetic, or synthetic have risk. Marijuana may not have killed anyone but death is not the only risk- other things can happen. UPDATE: Just to respond to sauve4te I am hardly a "very narrow minded individual." I have not said marijuana is bad or that it should not be used however responsible doctors don't take 16 year old patients who have only taken OTC medications and then put them on marijuana. That goes against every medical guideline and common sense. Also most of the conditions marijuana may be prescribed in certain states or countries have NEVER been been proven to be effectively treated with marijuana. The states just put the few conditions proven to be treatable and then add a bunch more that typically is only supported by very little evidence. Notice how each state has different "approved" uses ranging from the proven (cachexia) and in some states, especially California and Colorado it is being prescribed for things like ADHD. Your information said "Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses" to me that sounds like there is no consensus. The only things marijuana is currently PROVEN to treat are for 1) AIDS-related anorexia and cachexia 2) severe nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. 3) As an adjunctive analgesic treatment in adult patients with advanced cancer who experience moderate to severe pain during the highest tolerated dose of strong opioid therapy for persistent background pain. 4) As an adjunctive treatment for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults. For the record I have had severe chronic pain for about half my life, I tried marijuana when I was in university and it did help my pain. I did not use more because I did not like the feeling but I assure you that I understand pain- from patients, studies, and myself. I know what being desperate for relief is like. The problem is that treatments need facts, just because many people (including myself) say marijuana helps pain is not proof. And anywhere you do the proper protocol- to use full opioid agonists as the central medication then add adjunctive treatments (hydroxyzine, orphenadrine, diazepam, clonazepam, methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, gabapentin, amitriptyline, phenobarbital, promethazine, marijuana). M.D., C.M. psychiatry, internal medicine (Québec) Hons. BSc in pharmacology Answered by Ima Schille 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Medical marijuana...? I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I... Answered by Cristopher Lookadoo 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, I don't believe you would be able to obtain medical marj because you said in your state it is not legal yet. Also you are only 16 they would probably want you to wait until your 18 since than you are considered a "legal" age. You may only have the option now to buy illegally which of course I cannot recommend lol .lol. Marijuana does NOT have any bad long term side effects contrary to what many people think. A lot of people have been taught and brainwashed to think badly about marij. but any research would more than likely change people's ideas.. I would suggest checking out the website: medicalmarijuana.procon.org TOTAL DEATHS FROM MARIJUANA = 0 TOTAL DEATHS FROM 17 FDA APPROVED DRUGS = 10, 008 I believe this info is from 2005 so I'm sure the deaths from FDA approved meds is a lot higher now. Good luck, I know how you feel Have to disagree with a so called answer you got. Obviously a very narrow minded idividual. Anyway wanted to share with you the conditions that medical marijuana is now approved for in DC. Approved Conditions: HIV, AIDS, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, cancer, other conditions that are chronic, long-lasting, debilitating, or that interfere with the basic functions of life, serious medical conditions for which the use of medical marijuana is beneficial, patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy/ In Michigan: Approved Conditions: Approved for treatment of debilitating medical conditions, defined as cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn's disease, agitation of Alzheimer's disease, nail patella, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, epilepsy, muscle spasms, and multiple sclerosis HIV, AIDS, Cancer are approved med uses in all states that are medically approved marj states. Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses. You can find more information on what each state considers approved med marij usage at procon.org Answered by Tamatha Puff 1 year ago.

A great documentary came out called "Super High Me" watch it and all questions should be answered. On a personal note, Marijuana is a naturally occurring plant and I think it should be legal, medical or recreational. Answered by Sid Veeser 1 year ago.

Cannabis is a wonderful painkiller. If medical marijuana is illegal in your state, as you said above, you cannot get it in that state. With your medical history and your parents signature, you would be able to get MMJ in the states that it is legal. The long term side effects are a toll on your lungs if you smoke cannabis, but its not nearly as bad as cigarettes. It can also mess up your short term memory. I use medical marijuana. Answered by Shirlee Dittrick 1 year ago.

Get the best marijane, 420 and mmj here. If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Http://medicalmarijuana4you.blogspot.com/ Answered by Sunshine Osterberg 1 year ago.

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If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Sorry I can't tell you where to access some, but my webpage should give you all the education (ammunition?) you ever wanted about marijuana, including the lack of long term side effects, and you can write any of us anytime with your questions. www.letstalkaboutpot.com Answered by Halley Hartory 1 year ago.

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Should I ask my Doctor to switch...?
My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.Asked by Rodrigo Medsker 1 year ago.

My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.< Also I thought about asking my doctor if she can switch my two pain med for one powerful pain med, the two pain med I got is Hydrocodone 7.5/323 (for constant Kidney stones) and Tramadol (Nerve pain in knee). I was told Oxycontin er would be it.. But I'm afraid of it due to negative side affect like withdrawal (I heard Oxy withdrawal are worse than Heroin withdrawal) =0 Won't Mophine Pills AVINza, Kadian, Morphine IR, MS Contin, MSIR, Oramorph SR, Roxanol will do? Answered by Brigette Naumes 1 year ago.

Your doctor presumably thought Clonazepam would be a better choice for you than Xanax. Without reviewing the specific details of your case, I can't offer you any insight as to whether or not her reasoning was correct, but presumably at least she thought it was. If you're concerned about your current medication, you should definitely discuss this with your doctor- you should ask why that particular drug was prescribed, if there are alternatives, and why she thought this one was the best. Answered by Mila Skar 1 year ago.

Clonazepam lasts longer but Xanax packs a more powerful punch initially. As for pain meds, its kinda hard to get Oxycontin prescribed, but you never know. I take Clonazepam by the way, and it works very well. Answered by Martine Rahaman 1 year ago.


What pill is this?
I found these pills in my friends room. They have PA on one side and 933 on the other I've looked online but cannot find an answer? Asked by Nicholle Gorri 1 year ago.

so is uploading pictures on yahoo answers work now?? Answered by Neil Kernagis 1 year ago.


How does opana compare to oxycontin?
Asked by Birgit Critton 1 year ago.

In what way? Are you comparing Opana ER (oxymorphone extended-release) to OxyContin (oxycodone extended-release) or are you talking about the instant release for of Opana vs. instant release oxycodone? Both drugs are full opioid agonists indicated for moderate to severe pain when the use of an opioid is indicated. Oxymorphone, the opioid in Opana, is twice as potent as oxycodone. Some oxycodone is metabolized into oxymorphone so a very small amount of the effects of oxycodone is from oxymorphone. Opana ER has a better reputation for lasting the full 12hrs compared to OxyContin which some people need to take a bit more frequently. Contrary to what one person wrote oxycodone is NOT more addictive than oxymorphone. Full opioid agonists have the same potential for abuse and dependence. Since Opana is fairly new and not as widely prescribed as OxyContin it has not been abused as often but they do have the same abuse potential. However when taken for a legitimate problem the risk of abuse or dependence to any opioid is very small. Both drugs are still only available as brand name drugs so they are both expensive. However two extended release opioids- MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release) and Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal) are available as generics. Basically everyone does differently with opioids- some people respond well the Opana and have few side effects, some don't do well with Opana at all but may do well with OxyContin. In general both drugs are well tolerated and highly effective. I have personally taken both but my experience is really irrelevant and won't really help. Some guidelines recommend that a morphine drug be first used and if it is not well tolerated a drug like OxyContin should be used. Other long acting opioids available in The United States include MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release), Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal), BuTrans (buprenorphine transdermal), Kadian (morphine sulfate extended-release), Avinza (morphine sulfate extended-release), Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate extended-release), Exalgo (hydromorphone extended-release), and Embeda (morphine sulfate/naltrexone). Dolophine (methadone) is also used, it does not come in an extended-release form but it works longer than other opioids and is typically taken every 8-12hrs. There is also Ultram ER (tramadol extended-release) however tramadol is NOT a full opioid agonist and it is approved for moderate to moderately severe pain. Answered by Mike Alva 1 year ago.

Oxycontin is a form of time released OXYCODONE, not morphine. You probably already know that, by looking at the medicine bottle, but others may think it's actually morpine based on the above poster's response. If you're hurt enough to get a prescription for 20 mg's of oxycodone, you should probably be on the couch resting, anyways. There's a lot of factors, most likely you will feel a little buzz for the first few days. I'd avoid operating a vehicle for the first day to make sure you know how the medication affects you. Take it easy and recuperate. Answered by Maybell Hefel 1 year ago.

They're two different drugs and hard to compare. Oxycontin is mode addicting. Answered by Janell Sprenkle 1 year ago.

whats all the yeehaw about opana? took 2 and it just doesnt have the lift of o.c. and it may last a few minutesmore but i can feel when my oxy hits, the opana is more of a maybe i feel it kind of things Answered by Numbers Blacknall 1 year ago.


Since Darvocet has been pulled off of the market, what will doctors replace it with?
I was previously prescribed Darvocet for my back pain, but now that it has been pulled off of the market, I was wondering what my doctors might replace it with. I am also prescribed Ultram (Tramadol). Asked by Sammie Mcmillion 1 year ago.

Darvocet is indicated for the relief of mild to moderate pain and I don't think any other opioids have the same indication, for example Tylenol with Codeine is indicated for the relief of mild to moderately severe pain. I would imagine tramadol, codeine, and hydrocodone (perhaps even pentazocine to some extent) will become the preferred drugs. The other issues is that propoxyphene is a federally controlled schedule IV substance, the same as Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), phenobarbital, and Adipex-P (phentermine). Most other opioids are at a higher level of control, due to a higher addictive potential, and from all the American doctors I have spoken with they prefer using schedule III or IV opioids when possible. Hydrocodone and codeine are both schedule III and tramadol is not a controlled substance. Even now hydrocodone is the most prescribed drug in The United States and codeine has fallen somewhat out of favour. There is also the possibility that many of the drugs with hydrocodone like Vicodin may be removed from the market, which a FDA committee did recommend due to the high levels of acetaminophen. There are a lot of opioids in the US so I am sure you and your doctor can find a something good List of opioids: Weak to intermediate opioids: Codeine (Tylenol #3, Tylenol #4, Panadeine, Panadeine Forte, Prontalgine Codeine Contin) Tramadol (Ultram, Ultram ER, Zydol, Tramacet, Contramal, Tramal, Tridural, Zytram XL) Pentazocine (Talacen, Talwin NX) Dihydrocodeine (Codhydrine, Panlor DC, Panlor SS, Synalgos-DC) Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet, Vicoprofen, Ibudone, Zydone, Xodol, Maxidone) Full opioid agonists: Morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MOS-SR, M.O.S., MXL Capsules, MST Continuous, Oramorph SR, Embeda) Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR, Supeudol, OxyNorm, Magnacet, Roxicet, Tylox, Combunox, Endocet) Oxymorphone (Opana) Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo) Fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq) Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol) Methadone (Dolophine) Levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran, Dromoran) Tapentadol (Nucynta) Answered by Tyree Liebherr 1 year ago.

Is Darvocet Off The Market Answered by Gilma Gartley 1 year ago.

my husband and i took hydrocodone for many years and did not get addicted, as we used it when laying down didn't help. i supply of 30 of them lasted me four months. but then i got allergic to codeine. my doctor switched me to darvocet a few months ago. now that it has been pulled off the market our doctor switched me to talwin. my husband can still take hydrocodone. does anyone know how talwin com,pares in pain relief to hydrocodone? by the way, i had been taking hydrocodone for so long that the darvocet worked better than it. Answered by Mona Arriano 1 year ago.

Probably nothing. Tramadol is a NSAID pain reliever. Depending on your problem, they may just leave you with that. Darvocet is in the same class with Codeine (synthetic), so they might give you Vicoden. Many times when people come into the ER for back pain, they go home with Motrin & Vicoden, if they send them home with a Rx at all. Answered by Ela Rients 1 year ago.

Darvocet was pretty much worthless for pain relief anyway. It had a LOT of hidden dangers, including patient deaths, without much to recommend it for relieving pain. There are much better/safer/effective alternatives today, including Vicodin. Answered by Kesha Jamin 1 year ago.

It's no great loss. Propoxyphene isn't as strong as acetaminophen, anyway, and most people would have been better served by taking a couple of Tylenol along with a couple of Advil. There's still plenty of codeine and hydrocodone, et. al.. Answered by Yolanda Bomkamp 1 year ago.

Oxycodone or hydrocodone, most likely. There's no shortage of pain relievers. Yet. Answered by Sharilyn Lebaron 1 year ago.

Call your doctor. Answered by Carole Doub 1 year ago.

Percocet, or some other form of oxycondone, something like that. Answered by Mauricio Gliues 1 year ago.


Is abusing prescription opiates just as bad as doing heroin?
My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd... Asked by Wonda Rimes 1 year ago.

My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd frequently fall asleep while eating and while having a conversation. I suspected him of being on heroin before I realized that the pills could be having the same effect. So do these pills have almost the same effect on your body as heroin? What is different? BTW, he doesn't take these pills anymore... that I am aware of anyway. Answered by Latoyia Nichol 1 year ago.

In reality Heroin (diacetylmorphine) has an undeserved reputation. Heroin is no better or worse than the other full opioid agonists legally used for pain namely hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo), morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, Oramorph SR), oxycodone (OxyContin, Oxy IR, Percocet), fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq), oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER) and methadone (Dolophine). All of these drugs produce (more/less) the same effects as Heroin namely that they all bind to the μ-opioid receptor which is what causes analgesia (pain relief), euphoria, and other opioid effects. A number of studies have been done in IV Heroin addicts to determine if they could tell the difference between Heroin and another opioid given in an equivalent amount. The studies found that addicts could NOT distinguish IV Heroin from equivalent doses of other opioids. Not to mention that a number of prescription opioids- hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and fentanyl- are more potent than Heroin. So a smaller amount of these drugs is required to achieve the same effects as Heroin. Heroin is (just to give you an idea) about twice as potent as morphine. What is really interesting is that the effects of Heroin are from morphine. When a person uses Heroin, especially by IV, it rapidly enters the brain. Heroin then undergoes rapid deacetylation (an acetyl chemical group is removed from Heroin aka diacetylmorphine). If you just look at the name diacetylmorphine you can imagine what remains if the acetyl is removed. What remains is morphine along with other metabolites- primarily 6-MAM. All Heroin does is it more efficiently enters the brain but once it is there it breaks down into morphine and it is the morphine that produces all of its effects. Heroin only lasts a few minutes once taken. Heroin became the preferred drug among addicts since it "hits" the brain faster than morphine thus it gives a greater "rush." However if an equivalent amount of morphine is given the effects are the same. Heroin also have fewer side effects than morphine. Heroin is actually widely used legally in The United Kingdom and a number of countries like Canada have a special limited access programme to provide Heroin to people with severe intractable pain (mostly due to cancer or AIDS) that does not respond well to other medication. So yes the effects of prescription opioids like oxycodone are almost exactly the same as Heroin. Oxycodone is 1.5 times more potent than morphine so it is nearly as potent as Heroin. Even methadone maintenance programmes treat people who are addicted and physically dependent to opioids aside from Heroin. But do keep in mind that there is NOTHING inherently wrong with Heroin or any of the other opioids. The problem comes when they are misused but many hundreds of thousands of people a year take opioids and benefit greatly from them and don't misuse them. Res non per se at per usum, bona aut mala est. Nothing of itself is good or evil; only the manner of its use makes it so. Answered by Leonida Lavander 1 year ago.

Hydrocodone makes me feel speedy too. Your question is difficult to answer. I agree that opiate abuse is bad, but Tramadol is also addictive. I have been on Tramadol for years, and if I try to skip a day, I feel like death. This is my opinion on drug addiction. If you are taking pain medication that has been prescribed by a doctor, and you become addicted AT the doses prescribed, not more than the prescribed doses, then you are clinically dependent on your medication, but your not abusing your drugs. I take several different addictive drugs everyday. I know, and my doctor knows that if I ever have to stop, it will be a process of tapering down, and possibly even going to the hospital to detox. Back to your medication. My doctor has me on Tramadol(which I love by the way, it completes me, lol) and also 10 Vicoden a month for break threw pain, or in other words bad days. My whole family except my Dad is junkies. They have been over my house playing X-BOX and stole my pills before. I agree that you should never share pills. I have to hide my pills when they come over. I left a bottle of Klonopin out, and substituted the pills with laxatives and my brother and law took about 20 out of the bottle, idiot. Opiate addiction is not that bad if you and your doctor are aware of your condition and you take your prescribed doses. Answered by Brendan Vanderkam 1 year ago.

Yes, they act in more or less identical ways once inside your body. Their are differences about how fast the different drugs start acting (heroin acts much faster as its injected right into the veins) and how much of each drug is needed to get a similar high, but pretty much, yes it is every bit as 'bad.' That being said doing heroin is generally more dangerous as addicts often inject with dirty needles leading to the spread of hepatitis, HIV, or contraction of endocarditis (infection of the heart). Answered by Marlo Greubel 1 year ago.

Being addicted to prescription pills still makes you a fiend. So yeah, its just as bad. Answered by Harriett Yarrell 1 year ago.

Drugs are drugs alcohol & tobacco included... if it is creating an issue in life, addiction is possible.... however u can! not force an addict to get help...or you might end up needing therapy of your own. RECOVERY IS A CHOICE. U can lead a horse to water but u can't make him drink... if you believe, prayer helps... Answered by Kenda Beliveau 1 year ago.


Does morphine come in a pill or only in a shot? and can it be prescribed to take at home?
Asked by Jessie Blake 1 year ago.

Morphine sulfate also is administered orally or rectally. The manufacturers state that certain morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., Avinza® extended-release capsules, Kadian® extended-release capsules, Oramorph® SR extended-release tablets) can be administered without regard to food; the effect of food on the GI absorption of other morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., MS-Contin® extended-release tablets) has not been fully evaluated to date. Extended-release tablets of the drug should be swallowed intact and should not be broken, crushed, or chewed; intake of a broken, crushed, or chewed tablet may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. The manufacturers of morphine sulfate extended-release capsules state that the capsules may be swallowed whole or the entire contents of the capsules may be sprinkled on a small amount of applesauce, at room temperature or cooler, immediately prior to administration; subdividing the contents of a capsule is not recommended. The patient should swallow the entire mixture. The beads or pellets should not be crushed, chewed, or dissolved; intake of crushed, chewed, or dissolved beads or pellets may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially fatal dose of morphine sulfate. Following administration, the patient should drink a glass of water to rinse the mouth and ensure that the beads or pellets are swallowed. The mixture of applesauce and beads or pellets should not be stored for future use. Patients receiving morphine sulfate extended-release capsules (Avinza®, Kadian®) must not consume alcoholic beverages or prescription or nonprescription preparations containing alcohol; intake of alcohol may result in rapid release of the drug from the capsules and intake of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. Additionally, one manufacturer states that the contents of the extended-release capsules (Kadian®) should not be administered through a nasogastric tube Serious adverse events and deaths have occurred as a result of inadvertent overdosage of concentrated morphine sulfate Answered by Estelle Hilker 1 year ago.


Medical marijuana...?
I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications... Asked by Dora Munuz 1 year ago.

I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications for medical marijuana and I meet these requirements. Does marijuana have any bad long term side affects? Please do not judge. I am not going to blindly ask my parents or doctors for this, because it is not my place to get something like this. I just want to get answers to my question. Answered by Ebonie Tomasko 1 year ago.

A couple of things- Firstly if marijuana is illegal where you live then you can't legally use, buy, or posses it regardless of why you are using it. Also nearly all doctors will not officially condone or recommend medical marijuana use by a patient and doctors do have some legal liability if they do. Also over-the-counter pain medication is only for MILD pain, if you have a legitimate medical problem causing moderate to severe pain then only prescription medication will be able to alleviate it (OTC drugs did not work because they are useless against severe pain). If your problem is so severe why aren't you getting treatment or at least symptomatic control? With any type of pain, even in places where medical marijuana is available, it is not going to be used especially if you have only taken drugs like Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Advil, Motrin (ibuprofen) that is like going from the most minimal to very extreme without stopping in the middle. The cornerstone of pain management is opioid use particularly the full opioid agonists including: morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MST Continus, Oramorph SR) oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, Oxy-IR, Roxicet, Roxicodone, Tylox, Endocet) oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER, Numorphan) hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin) fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq, Fentora, Onsolis) methadone (Dolophine, Metadol, Methadose) Typically something like marijuana is used to treat pain WITH opioids, for extreme conditions, in patients refractory to opioid therapy, and especially in patients with terminal conditions (typically AIDS or cancer), cachexia, and chemotherapy induced vomiting refractory to first-line treatment. It is not really your age that is a problem, people at any age with severe pain are treated with the proper medications to control the pain. Just to give you an idea of the guidelines and conditions that medical marijuana is typically accepted these are the Health Canada regulations (this is just for generalized information) There are two categories of people who can apply to possess marihuana for medical purposes: Category 1: This category is comprised of any symptoms treated within the context of providing compassionate end-of-life care; or the symptoms associated with the specified medical conditions, namely: Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from multiple sclerosis; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from a spinal cord injury; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from spinal cord disease; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from cancer; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from HIV/AIDS infection; Severe pain from severe forms of arthritis; or Seizures from epilepsy. Category 2: This category is for applicants who have debilitating symptom (s) of medical condition (s), other than those described in Category 1. Under Category 2, persons with debilitating symptoms can apply to obtain an Authorization to Possess dried marihuana for medical purposes, if a specialist confirms the diagnosis and that conventional treatments have failed or judged inappropriate to relieve symptoms of the medical condition. You really need to talk to your doctor and your parents. If you are in significant pain or are having any medical problems is it important to tell your doctor and get appropriate treatment. Also the best course of action is saying "doctor I'm in severe pain, how can we get it controlled?" And then let him do his job to consider, inform, and recommend options for pain control. But in the end, at least for now, you simply can't get medical marijuana and with respect if you have not taken anything except OTC medication then use of medical marijuana is not really considered appropriate. Lastly do not believe people who on are the extremes on the issue of marijuana. It is not the terrible drug some would have you believe nor is it a risk-free and perfectly benign substance. ALL drugs no matter if it is smoked, taken as a pill, injected, or is natural, semi-synthetic, or synthetic have risk. Marijuana may not have killed anyone but death is not the only risk- other things can happen. UPDATE: Just to respond to sauve4te I am hardly a "very narrow minded individual." I have not said marijuana is bad or that it should not be used however responsible doctors don't take 16 year old patients who have only taken OTC medications and then put them on marijuana. That goes against every medical guideline and common sense. Also most of the conditions marijuana may be prescribed in certain states or countries have NEVER been been proven to be effectively treated with marijuana. The states just put the few conditions proven to be treatable and then add a bunch more that typically is only supported by very little evidence. Notice how each state has different "approved" uses ranging from the proven (cachexia) and in some states, especially California and Colorado it is being prescribed for things like ADHD. Your information said "Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses" to me that sounds like there is no consensus. The only things marijuana is currently PROVEN to treat are for 1) AIDS-related anorexia and cachexia 2) severe nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. 3) As an adjunctive analgesic treatment in adult patients with advanced cancer who experience moderate to severe pain during the highest tolerated dose of strong opioid therapy for persistent background pain. 4) As an adjunctive treatment for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults. For the record I have had severe chronic pain for about half my life, I tried marijuana when I was in university and it did help my pain. I did not use more because I did not like the feeling but I assure you that I understand pain- from patients, studies, and myself. I know what being desperate for relief is like. The problem is that treatments need facts, just because many people (including myself) say marijuana helps pain is not proof. And anywhere you do the proper protocol- to use full opioid agonists as the central medication then add adjunctive treatments (hydroxyzine, orphenadrine, diazepam, clonazepam, methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, gabapentin, amitriptyline, phenobarbital, promethazine, marijuana). M.D., C.M. psychiatry, internal medicine (Québec) Hons. BSc in pharmacology Answered by Karri Kania 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Medical marijuana...? I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I... Answered by Lavada Akin 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, I don't believe you would be able to obtain medical marj because you said in your state it is not legal yet. Also you are only 16 they would probably want you to wait until your 18 since than you are considered a "legal" age. You may only have the option now to buy illegally which of course I cannot recommend lol .lol. Marijuana does NOT have any bad long term side effects contrary to what many people think. A lot of people have been taught and brainwashed to think badly about marij. but any research would more than likely change people's ideas.. I would suggest checking out the website: medicalmarijuana.procon.org TOTAL DEATHS FROM MARIJUANA = 0 TOTAL DEATHS FROM 17 FDA APPROVED DRUGS = 10, 008 I believe this info is from 2005 so I'm sure the deaths from FDA approved meds is a lot higher now. Good luck, I know how you feel Have to disagree with a so called answer you got. Obviously a very narrow minded idividual. Anyway wanted to share with you the conditions that medical marijuana is now approved for in DC. Approved Conditions: HIV, AIDS, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, cancer, other conditions that are chronic, long-lasting, debilitating, or that interfere with the basic functions of life, serious medical conditions for which the use of medical marijuana is beneficial, patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy/ In Michigan: Approved Conditions: Approved for treatment of debilitating medical conditions, defined as cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn's disease, agitation of Alzheimer's disease, nail patella, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, epilepsy, muscle spasms, and multiple sclerosis HIV, AIDS, Cancer are approved med uses in all states that are medically approved marj states. Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses. You can find more information on what each state considers approved med marij usage at procon.org Answered by Leeanna Brought 1 year ago.

A great documentary came out called "Super High Me" watch it and all questions should be answered. On a personal note, Marijuana is a naturally occurring plant and I think it should be legal, medical or recreational. Answered by Margeret Rosenthal 1 year ago.

Cannabis is a wonderful painkiller. If medical marijuana is illegal in your state, as you said above, you cannot get it in that state. With your medical history and your parents signature, you would be able to get MMJ in the states that it is legal. The long term side effects are a toll on your lungs if you smoke cannabis, but its not nearly as bad as cigarettes. It can also mess up your short term memory. I use medical marijuana. Answered by Karine Caimi 1 year ago.

Get the best marijane, 420 and mmj here. If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Http://medicalmarijuana4you.blogspot.com/ Answered by Hans Natal 1 year ago.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA & MARIJUANA CONCENTRATES FOR SALE Text (509) 255-7518,email: rebecca.monic@gmail.com Answered by Roxane Mooney 1 year ago.

If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Sorry I can't tell you where to access some, but my webpage should give you all the education (ammunition?) you ever wanted about marijuana, including the lack of long term side effects, and you can write any of us anytime with your questions. www.letstalkaboutpot.com Answered by Leone Ulrich 1 year ago.

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Should I ask my Doctor to switch...?
My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.Asked by Mac Stagers 1 year ago.

My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.< Also I thought about asking my doctor if she can switch my two pain med for one powerful pain med, the two pain med I got is Hydrocodone 7.5/323 (for constant Kidney stones) and Tramadol (Nerve pain in knee). I was told Oxycontin er would be it.. But I'm afraid of it due to negative side affect like withdrawal (I heard Oxy withdrawal are worse than Heroin withdrawal) =0 Won't Mophine Pills AVINza, Kadian, Morphine IR, MS Contin, MSIR, Oramorph SR, Roxanol will do? Answered by Carin Brucz 1 year ago.

Your doctor presumably thought Clonazepam would be a better choice for you than Xanax. Without reviewing the specific details of your case, I can't offer you any insight as to whether or not her reasoning was correct, but presumably at least she thought it was. If you're concerned about your current medication, you should definitely discuss this with your doctor- you should ask why that particular drug was prescribed, if there are alternatives, and why she thought this one was the best. Answered by Mariette Orndorf 1 year ago.

Clonazepam lasts longer but Xanax packs a more powerful punch initially. As for pain meds, its kinda hard to get Oxycontin prescribed, but you never know. I take Clonazepam by the way, and it works very well. Answered by Maximina Depa 1 year ago.


What pill is this?
I found these pills in my friends room. They have PA on one side and 933 on the other I've looked online but cannot find an answer? Asked by Cristin Pluviose 1 year ago.

so is uploading pictures on yahoo answers work now?? Answered by Terese Glasbrenner 1 year ago.


How does opana compare to oxycontin?
Asked by Cicely Shawnee 1 year ago.

In what way? Are you comparing Opana ER (oxymorphone extended-release) to OxyContin (oxycodone extended-release) or are you talking about the instant release for of Opana vs. instant release oxycodone? Both drugs are full opioid agonists indicated for moderate to severe pain when the use of an opioid is indicated. Oxymorphone, the opioid in Opana, is twice as potent as oxycodone. Some oxycodone is metabolized into oxymorphone so a very small amount of the effects of oxycodone is from oxymorphone. Opana ER has a better reputation for lasting the full 12hrs compared to OxyContin which some people need to take a bit more frequently. Contrary to what one person wrote oxycodone is NOT more addictive than oxymorphone. Full opioid agonists have the same potential for abuse and dependence. Since Opana is fairly new and not as widely prescribed as OxyContin it has not been abused as often but they do have the same abuse potential. However when taken for a legitimate problem the risk of abuse or dependence to any opioid is very small. Both drugs are still only available as brand name drugs so they are both expensive. However two extended release opioids- MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release) and Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal) are available as generics. Basically everyone does differently with opioids- some people respond well the Opana and have few side effects, some don't do well with Opana at all but may do well with OxyContin. In general both drugs are well tolerated and highly effective. I have personally taken both but my experience is really irrelevant and won't really help. Some guidelines recommend that a morphine drug be first used and if it is not well tolerated a drug like OxyContin should be used. Other long acting opioids available in The United States include MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release), Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal), BuTrans (buprenorphine transdermal), Kadian (morphine sulfate extended-release), Avinza (morphine sulfate extended-release), Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate extended-release), Exalgo (hydromorphone extended-release), and Embeda (morphine sulfate/naltrexone). Dolophine (methadone) is also used, it does not come in an extended-release form but it works longer than other opioids and is typically taken every 8-12hrs. There is also Ultram ER (tramadol extended-release) however tramadol is NOT a full opioid agonist and it is approved for moderate to moderately severe pain. Answered by Latarsha Legore 1 year ago.

Oxycontin is a form of time released OXYCODONE, not morphine. You probably already know that, by looking at the medicine bottle, but others may think it's actually morpine based on the above poster's response. If you're hurt enough to get a prescription for 20 mg's of oxycodone, you should probably be on the couch resting, anyways. There's a lot of factors, most likely you will feel a little buzz for the first few days. I'd avoid operating a vehicle for the first day to make sure you know how the medication affects you. Take it easy and recuperate. Answered by Marhta Bilich 1 year ago.

They're two different drugs and hard to compare. Oxycontin is mode addicting. Answered by Carita Junkins 1 year ago.

whats all the yeehaw about opana? took 2 and it just doesnt have the lift of o.c. and it may last a few minutesmore but i can feel when my oxy hits, the opana is more of a maybe i feel it kind of things Answered by Monique Petkoff 1 year ago.


Since Darvocet has been pulled off of the market, what will doctors replace it with?
I was previously prescribed Darvocet for my back pain, but now that it has been pulled off of the market, I was wondering what my doctors might replace it with. I am also prescribed Ultram (Tramadol). Asked by Isabelle Bisom 1 year ago.

Darvocet is indicated for the relief of mild to moderate pain and I don't think any other opioids have the same indication, for example Tylenol with Codeine is indicated for the relief of mild to moderately severe pain. I would imagine tramadol, codeine, and hydrocodone (perhaps even pentazocine to some extent) will become the preferred drugs. The other issues is that propoxyphene is a federally controlled schedule IV substance, the same as Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), phenobarbital, and Adipex-P (phentermine). Most other opioids are at a higher level of control, due to a higher addictive potential, and from all the American doctors I have spoken with they prefer using schedule III or IV opioids when possible. Hydrocodone and codeine are both schedule III and tramadol is not a controlled substance. Even now hydrocodone is the most prescribed drug in The United States and codeine has fallen somewhat out of favour. There is also the possibility that many of the drugs with hydrocodone like Vicodin may be removed from the market, which a FDA committee did recommend due to the high levels of acetaminophen. There are a lot of opioids in the US so I am sure you and your doctor can find a something good List of opioids: Weak to intermediate opioids: Codeine (Tylenol #3, Tylenol #4, Panadeine, Panadeine Forte, Prontalgine Codeine Contin) Tramadol (Ultram, Ultram ER, Zydol, Tramacet, Contramal, Tramal, Tridural, Zytram XL) Pentazocine (Talacen, Talwin NX) Dihydrocodeine (Codhydrine, Panlor DC, Panlor SS, Synalgos-DC) Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet, Vicoprofen, Ibudone, Zydone, Xodol, Maxidone) Full opioid agonists: Morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MOS-SR, M.O.S., MXL Capsules, MST Continuous, Oramorph SR, Embeda) Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR, Supeudol, OxyNorm, Magnacet, Roxicet, Tylox, Combunox, Endocet) Oxymorphone (Opana) Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo) Fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq) Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol) Methadone (Dolophine) Levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran, Dromoran) Tapentadol (Nucynta) Answered by Alan Brougham 1 year ago.

Is Darvocet Off The Market Answered by Anton Radell 1 year ago.

my husband and i took hydrocodone for many years and did not get addicted, as we used it when laying down didn't help. i supply of 30 of them lasted me four months. but then i got allergic to codeine. my doctor switched me to darvocet a few months ago. now that it has been pulled off the market our doctor switched me to talwin. my husband can still take hydrocodone. does anyone know how talwin com,pares in pain relief to hydrocodone? by the way, i had been taking hydrocodone for so long that the darvocet worked better than it. Answered by Shay Nase 1 year ago.

Probably nothing. Tramadol is a NSAID pain reliever. Depending on your problem, they may just leave you with that. Darvocet is in the same class with Codeine (synthetic), so they might give you Vicoden. Many times when people come into the ER for back pain, they go home with Motrin & Vicoden, if they send them home with a Rx at all. Answered by Renetta Sis 1 year ago.

Darvocet was pretty much worthless for pain relief anyway. It had a LOT of hidden dangers, including patient deaths, without much to recommend it for relieving pain. There are much better/safer/effective alternatives today, including Vicodin. Answered by Georgianna Hamrick 1 year ago.

It's no great loss. Propoxyphene isn't as strong as acetaminophen, anyway, and most people would have been better served by taking a couple of Tylenol along with a couple of Advil. There's still plenty of codeine and hydrocodone, et. al.. Answered by Lael Acock 1 year ago.

Oxycodone or hydrocodone, most likely. There's no shortage of pain relievers. Yet. Answered by Margarite Byers 1 year ago.

Call your doctor. Answered by Blossom Sigala 1 year ago.

Percocet, or some other form of oxycondone, something like that. Answered by Cory Zbierski 1 year ago.


Is abusing prescription opiates just as bad as doing heroin?
My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd... Asked by Eugena Matrisciano 1 year ago.

My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd frequently fall asleep while eating and while having a conversation. I suspected him of being on heroin before I realized that the pills could be having the same effect. So do these pills have almost the same effect on your body as heroin? What is different? BTW, he doesn't take these pills anymore... that I am aware of anyway. Answered by Esta Zephier 1 year ago.

In reality Heroin (diacetylmorphine) has an undeserved reputation. Heroin is no better or worse than the other full opioid agonists legally used for pain namely hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo), morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, Oramorph SR), oxycodone (OxyContin, Oxy IR, Percocet), fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq), oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER) and methadone (Dolophine). All of these drugs produce (more/less) the same effects as Heroin namely that they all bind to the μ-opioid receptor which is what causes analgesia (pain relief), euphoria, and other opioid effects. A number of studies have been done in IV Heroin addicts to determine if they could tell the difference between Heroin and another opioid given in an equivalent amount. The studies found that addicts could NOT distinguish IV Heroin from equivalent doses of other opioids. Not to mention that a number of prescription opioids- hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and fentanyl- are more potent than Heroin. So a smaller amount of these drugs is required to achieve the same effects as Heroin. Heroin is (just to give you an idea) about twice as potent as morphine. What is really interesting is that the effects of Heroin are from morphine. When a person uses Heroin, especially by IV, it rapidly enters the brain. Heroin then undergoes rapid deacetylation (an acetyl chemical group is removed from Heroin aka diacetylmorphine). If you just look at the name diacetylmorphine you can imagine what remains if the acetyl is removed. What remains is morphine along with other metabolites- primarily 6-MAM. All Heroin does is it more efficiently enters the brain but once it is there it breaks down into morphine and it is the morphine that produces all of its effects. Heroin only lasts a few minutes once taken. Heroin became the preferred drug among addicts since it "hits" the brain faster than morphine thus it gives a greater "rush." However if an equivalent amount of morphine is given the effects are the same. Heroin also have fewer side effects than morphine. Heroin is actually widely used legally in The United Kingdom and a number of countries like Canada have a special limited access programme to provide Heroin to people with severe intractable pain (mostly due to cancer or AIDS) that does not respond well to other medication. So yes the effects of prescription opioids like oxycodone are almost exactly the same as Heroin. Oxycodone is 1.5 times more potent than morphine so it is nearly as potent as Heroin. Even methadone maintenance programmes treat people who are addicted and physically dependent to opioids aside from Heroin. But do keep in mind that there is NOTHING inherently wrong with Heroin or any of the other opioids. The problem comes when they are misused but many hundreds of thousands of people a year take opioids and benefit greatly from them and don't misuse them. Res non per se at per usum, bona aut mala est. Nothing of itself is good or evil; only the manner of its use makes it so. Answered by Lilla Salvitti 1 year ago.

Hydrocodone makes me feel speedy too. Your question is difficult to answer. I agree that opiate abuse is bad, but Tramadol is also addictive. I have been on Tramadol for years, and if I try to skip a day, I feel like death. This is my opinion on drug addiction. If you are taking pain medication that has been prescribed by a doctor, and you become addicted AT the doses prescribed, not more than the prescribed doses, then you are clinically dependent on your medication, but your not abusing your drugs. I take several different addictive drugs everyday. I know, and my doctor knows that if I ever have to stop, it will be a process of tapering down, and possibly even going to the hospital to detox. Back to your medication. My doctor has me on Tramadol(which I love by the way, it completes me, lol) and also 10 Vicoden a month for break threw pain, or in other words bad days. My whole family except my Dad is junkies. They have been over my house playing X-BOX and stole my pills before. I agree that you should never share pills. I have to hide my pills when they come over. I left a bottle of Klonopin out, and substituted the pills with laxatives and my brother and law took about 20 out of the bottle, idiot. Opiate addiction is not that bad if you and your doctor are aware of your condition and you take your prescribed doses. Answered by Lavonda Burba 1 year ago.

Yes, they act in more or less identical ways once inside your body. Their are differences about how fast the different drugs start acting (heroin acts much faster as its injected right into the veins) and how much of each drug is needed to get a similar high, but pretty much, yes it is every bit as 'bad.' That being said doing heroin is generally more dangerous as addicts often inject with dirty needles leading to the spread of hepatitis, HIV, or contraction of endocarditis (infection of the heart). Answered by Andrew Nuno 1 year ago.

Being addicted to prescription pills still makes you a fiend. So yeah, its just as bad. Answered by Luther Feinberg 1 year ago.

Drugs are drugs alcohol & tobacco included... if it is creating an issue in life, addiction is possible.... however u can! not force an addict to get help...or you might end up needing therapy of your own. RECOVERY IS A CHOICE. U can lead a horse to water but u can't make him drink... if you believe, prayer helps... Answered by Mabel Havel 1 year ago.


Does morphine come in a pill or only in a shot? and can it be prescribed to take at home?
Asked by Rebbeca Drybread 1 year ago.

Morphine sulfate also is administered orally or rectally. The manufacturers state that certain morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., Avinza® extended-release capsules, Kadian® extended-release capsules, Oramorph® SR extended-release tablets) can be administered without regard to food; the effect of food on the GI absorption of other morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., MS-Contin® extended-release tablets) has not been fully evaluated to date. Extended-release tablets of the drug should be swallowed intact and should not be broken, crushed, or chewed; intake of a broken, crushed, or chewed tablet may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. The manufacturers of morphine sulfate extended-release capsules state that the capsules may be swallowed whole or the entire contents of the capsules may be sprinkled on a small amount of applesauce, at room temperature or cooler, immediately prior to administration; subdividing the contents of a capsule is not recommended. The patient should swallow the entire mixture. The beads or pellets should not be crushed, chewed, or dissolved; intake of crushed, chewed, or dissolved beads or pellets may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially fatal dose of morphine sulfate. Following administration, the patient should drink a glass of water to rinse the mouth and ensure that the beads or pellets are swallowed. The mixture of applesauce and beads or pellets should not be stored for future use. Patients receiving morphine sulfate extended-release capsules (Avinza®, Kadian®) must not consume alcoholic beverages or prescription or nonprescription preparations containing alcohol; intake of alcohol may result in rapid release of the drug from the capsules and intake of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. Additionally, one manufacturer states that the contents of the extended-release capsules (Kadian®) should not be administered through a nasogastric tube Serious adverse events and deaths have occurred as a result of inadvertent overdosage of concentrated morphine sulfate Answered by Rubye Wiltfong 1 year ago.


Medical marijuana...?
I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications... Asked by Treva Aristide 1 year ago.

I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications for medical marijuana and I meet these requirements. Does marijuana have any bad long term side affects? Please do not judge. I am not going to blindly ask my parents or doctors for this, because it is not my place to get something like this. I just want to get answers to my question. Answered by Shavon Milles 1 year ago.

A couple of things- Firstly if marijuana is illegal where you live then you can't legally use, buy, or posses it regardless of why you are using it. Also nearly all doctors will not officially condone or recommend medical marijuana use by a patient and doctors do have some legal liability if they do. Also over-the-counter pain medication is only for MILD pain, if you have a legitimate medical problem causing moderate to severe pain then only prescription medication will be able to alleviate it (OTC drugs did not work because they are useless against severe pain). If your problem is so severe why aren't you getting treatment or at least symptomatic control? With any type of pain, even in places where medical marijuana is available, it is not going to be used especially if you have only taken drugs like Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Advil, Motrin (ibuprofen) that is like going from the most minimal to very extreme without stopping in the middle. The cornerstone of pain management is opioid use particularly the full opioid agonists including: morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MST Continus, Oramorph SR) oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, Oxy-IR, Roxicet, Roxicodone, Tylox, Endocet) oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER, Numorphan) hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin) fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq, Fentora, Onsolis) methadone (Dolophine, Metadol, Methadose) Typically something like marijuana is used to treat pain WITH opioids, for extreme conditions, in patients refractory to opioid therapy, and especially in patients with terminal conditions (typically AIDS or cancer), cachexia, and chemotherapy induced vomiting refractory to first-line treatment. It is not really your age that is a problem, people at any age with severe pain are treated with the proper medications to control the pain. Just to give you an idea of the guidelines and conditions that medical marijuana is typically accepted these are the Health Canada regulations (this is just for generalized information) There are two categories of people who can apply to possess marihuana for medical purposes: Category 1: This category is comprised of any symptoms treated within the context of providing compassionate end-of-life care; or the symptoms associated with the specified medical conditions, namely: Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from multiple sclerosis; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from a spinal cord injury; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from spinal cord disease; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from cancer; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from HIV/AIDS infection; Severe pain from severe forms of arthritis; or Seizures from epilepsy. Category 2: This category is for applicants who have debilitating symptom (s) of medical condition (s), other than those described in Category 1. Under Category 2, persons with debilitating symptoms can apply to obtain an Authorization to Possess dried marihuana for medical purposes, if a specialist confirms the diagnosis and that conventional treatments have failed or judged inappropriate to relieve symptoms of the medical condition. You really need to talk to your doctor and your parents. If you are in significant pain or are having any medical problems is it important to tell your doctor and get appropriate treatment. Also the best course of action is saying "doctor I'm in severe pain, how can we get it controlled?" And then let him do his job to consider, inform, and recommend options for pain control. But in the end, at least for now, you simply can't get medical marijuana and with respect if you have not taken anything except OTC medication then use of medical marijuana is not really considered appropriate. Lastly do not believe people who on are the extremes on the issue of marijuana. It is not the terrible drug some would have you believe nor is it a risk-free and perfectly benign substance. ALL drugs no matter if it is smoked, taken as a pill, injected, or is natural, semi-synthetic, or synthetic have risk. Marijuana may not have killed anyone but death is not the only risk- other things can happen. UPDATE: Just to respond to sauve4te I am hardly a "very narrow minded individual." I have not said marijuana is bad or that it should not be used however responsible doctors don't take 16 year old patients who have only taken OTC medications and then put them on marijuana. That goes against every medical guideline and common sense. Also most of the conditions marijuana may be prescribed in certain states or countries have NEVER been been proven to be effectively treated with marijuana. The states just put the few conditions proven to be treatable and then add a bunch more that typically is only supported by very little evidence. Notice how each state has different "approved" uses ranging from the proven (cachexia) and in some states, especially California and Colorado it is being prescribed for things like ADHD. Your information said "Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses" to me that sounds like there is no consensus. The only things marijuana is currently PROVEN to treat are for 1) AIDS-related anorexia and cachexia 2) severe nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. 3) As an adjunctive analgesic treatment in adult patients with advanced cancer who experience moderate to severe pain during the highest tolerated dose of strong opioid therapy for persistent background pain. 4) As an adjunctive treatment for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults. For the record I have had severe chronic pain for about half my life, I tried marijuana when I was in university and it did help my pain. I did not use more because I did not like the feeling but I assure you that I understand pain- from patients, studies, and myself. I know what being desperate for relief is like. The problem is that treatments need facts, just because many people (including myself) say marijuana helps pain is not proof. And anywhere you do the proper protocol- to use full opioid agonists as the central medication then add adjunctive treatments (hydroxyzine, orphenadrine, diazepam, clonazepam, methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, gabapentin, amitriptyline, phenobarbital, promethazine, marijuana). M.D., C.M. psychiatry, internal medicine (Québec) Hons. BSc in pharmacology Answered by Marquis Traeger 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Medical marijuana...? I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I... Answered by Beatris Kraner 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, I don't believe you would be able to obtain medical marj because you said in your state it is not legal yet. Also you are only 16 they would probably want you to wait until your 18 since than you are considered a "legal" age. You may only have the option now to buy illegally which of course I cannot recommend lol .lol. Marijuana does NOT have any bad long term side effects contrary to what many people think. A lot of people have been taught and brainwashed to think badly about marij. but any research would more than likely change people's ideas.. I would suggest checking out the website: medicalmarijuana.procon.org TOTAL DEATHS FROM MARIJUANA = 0 TOTAL DEATHS FROM 17 FDA APPROVED DRUGS = 10, 008 I believe this info is from 2005 so I'm sure the deaths from FDA approved meds is a lot higher now. Good luck, I know how you feel Have to disagree with a so called answer you got. Obviously a very narrow minded idividual. Anyway wanted to share with you the conditions that medical marijuana is now approved for in DC. Approved Conditions: HIV, AIDS, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, cancer, other conditions that are chronic, long-lasting, debilitating, or that interfere with the basic functions of life, serious medical conditions for which the use of medical marijuana is beneficial, patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy/ In Michigan: Approved Conditions: Approved for treatment of debilitating medical conditions, defined as cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn's disease, agitation of Alzheimer's disease, nail patella, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, epilepsy, muscle spasms, and multiple sclerosis HIV, AIDS, Cancer are approved med uses in all states that are medically approved marj states. Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses. You can find more information on what each state considers approved med marij usage at procon.org Answered by Genesis Ashcraft 1 year ago.

A great documentary came out called "Super High Me" watch it and all questions should be answered. On a personal note, Marijuana is a naturally occurring plant and I think it should be legal, medical or recreational. Answered by Wayne Bertschy 1 year ago.

Cannabis is a wonderful painkiller. If medical marijuana is illegal in your state, as you said above, you cannot get it in that state. With your medical history and your parents signature, you would be able to get MMJ in the states that it is legal. The long term side effects are a toll on your lungs if you smoke cannabis, but its not nearly as bad as cigarettes. It can also mess up your short term memory. I use medical marijuana. Answered by Luz Parody 1 year ago.

Get the best marijane, 420 and mmj here. If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Http://medicalmarijuana4you.blogspot.com/ Answered by Haley Feutz 1 year ago.

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If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Sorry I can't tell you where to access some, but my webpage should give you all the education (ammunition?) you ever wanted about marijuana, including the lack of long term side effects, and you can write any of us anytime with your questions. www.letstalkaboutpot.com Answered by Lakisha Hokett 1 year ago.

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Should I ask my Doctor to switch...?
My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.Asked by Christeen Bernucho 1 year ago.

My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.< Also I thought about asking my doctor if she can switch my two pain med for one powerful pain med, the two pain med I got is Hydrocodone 7.5/323 (for constant Kidney stones) and Tramadol (Nerve pain in knee). I was told Oxycontin er would be it.. But I'm afraid of it due to negative side affect like withdrawal (I heard Oxy withdrawal are worse than Heroin withdrawal) =0 Won't Mophine Pills AVINza, Kadian, Morphine IR, MS Contin, MSIR, Oramorph SR, Roxanol will do? Answered by Savanna Parent 1 year ago.

Your doctor presumably thought Clonazepam would be a better choice for you than Xanax. Without reviewing the specific details of your case, I can't offer you any insight as to whether or not her reasoning was correct, but presumably at least she thought it was. If you're concerned about your current medication, you should definitely discuss this with your doctor- you should ask why that particular drug was prescribed, if there are alternatives, and why she thought this one was the best. Answered by Ngoc Rogol 1 year ago.

Clonazepam lasts longer but Xanax packs a more powerful punch initially. As for pain meds, its kinda hard to get Oxycontin prescribed, but you never know. I take Clonazepam by the way, and it works very well. Answered by Herschel Boucaud 1 year ago.


What pill is this?
I found these pills in my friends room. They have PA on one side and 933 on the other I've looked online but cannot find an answer? Asked by Federico Balderrama 1 year ago.

so is uploading pictures on yahoo answers work now?? Answered by Lucienne Parise 1 year ago.


How does opana compare to oxycontin?
Asked by Bennie Krapf 1 year ago.

In what way? Are you comparing Opana ER (oxymorphone extended-release) to OxyContin (oxycodone extended-release) or are you talking about the instant release for of Opana vs. instant release oxycodone? Both drugs are full opioid agonists indicated for moderate to severe pain when the use of an opioid is indicated. Oxymorphone, the opioid in Opana, is twice as potent as oxycodone. Some oxycodone is metabolized into oxymorphone so a very small amount of the effects of oxycodone is from oxymorphone. Opana ER has a better reputation for lasting the full 12hrs compared to OxyContin which some people need to take a bit more frequently. Contrary to what one person wrote oxycodone is NOT more addictive than oxymorphone. Full opioid agonists have the same potential for abuse and dependence. Since Opana is fairly new and not as widely prescribed as OxyContin it has not been abused as often but they do have the same abuse potential. However when taken for a legitimate problem the risk of abuse or dependence to any opioid is very small. Both drugs are still only available as brand name drugs so they are both expensive. However two extended release opioids- MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release) and Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal) are available as generics. Basically everyone does differently with opioids- some people respond well the Opana and have few side effects, some don't do well with Opana at all but may do well with OxyContin. In general both drugs are well tolerated and highly effective. I have personally taken both but my experience is really irrelevant and won't really help. Some guidelines recommend that a morphine drug be first used and if it is not well tolerated a drug like OxyContin should be used. Other long acting opioids available in The United States include MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release), Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal), BuTrans (buprenorphine transdermal), Kadian (morphine sulfate extended-release), Avinza (morphine sulfate extended-release), Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate extended-release), Exalgo (hydromorphone extended-release), and Embeda (morphine sulfate/naltrexone). Dolophine (methadone) is also used, it does not come in an extended-release form but it works longer than other opioids and is typically taken every 8-12hrs. There is also Ultram ER (tramadol extended-release) however tramadol is NOT a full opioid agonist and it is approved for moderate to moderately severe pain. Answered by Jada Zerkle 1 year ago.

Oxycontin is a form of time released OXYCODONE, not morphine. You probably already know that, by looking at the medicine bottle, but others may think it's actually morpine based on the above poster's response. If you're hurt enough to get a prescription for 20 mg's of oxycodone, you should probably be on the couch resting, anyways. There's a lot of factors, most likely you will feel a little buzz for the first few days. I'd avoid operating a vehicle for the first day to make sure you know how the medication affects you. Take it easy and recuperate. Answered by Barbie Lingafelt 1 year ago.

They're two different drugs and hard to compare. Oxycontin is mode addicting. Answered by Ngoc Prinzi 1 year ago.

whats all the yeehaw about opana? took 2 and it just doesnt have the lift of o.c. and it may last a few minutesmore but i can feel when my oxy hits, the opana is more of a maybe i feel it kind of things Answered by Luanne Nyswonger 1 year ago.


Since Darvocet has been pulled off of the market, what will doctors replace it with?
I was previously prescribed Darvocet for my back pain, but now that it has been pulled off of the market, I was wondering what my doctors might replace it with. I am also prescribed Ultram (Tramadol). Asked by Garry Anthes 1 year ago.

Darvocet is indicated for the relief of mild to moderate pain and I don't think any other opioids have the same indication, for example Tylenol with Codeine is indicated for the relief of mild to moderately severe pain. I would imagine tramadol, codeine, and hydrocodone (perhaps even pentazocine to some extent) will become the preferred drugs. The other issues is that propoxyphene is a federally controlled schedule IV substance, the same as Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), phenobarbital, and Adipex-P (phentermine). Most other opioids are at a higher level of control, due to a higher addictive potential, and from all the American doctors I have spoken with they prefer using schedule III or IV opioids when possible. Hydrocodone and codeine are both schedule III and tramadol is not a controlled substance. Even now hydrocodone is the most prescribed drug in The United States and codeine has fallen somewhat out of favour. There is also the possibility that many of the drugs with hydrocodone like Vicodin may be removed from the market, which a FDA committee did recommend due to the high levels of acetaminophen. There are a lot of opioids in the US so I am sure you and your doctor can find a something good List of opioids: Weak to intermediate opioids: Codeine (Tylenol #3, Tylenol #4, Panadeine, Panadeine Forte, Prontalgine Codeine Contin) Tramadol (Ultram, Ultram ER, Zydol, Tramacet, Contramal, Tramal, Tridural, Zytram XL) Pentazocine (Talacen, Talwin NX) Dihydrocodeine (Codhydrine, Panlor DC, Panlor SS, Synalgos-DC) Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet, Vicoprofen, Ibudone, Zydone, Xodol, Maxidone) Full opioid agonists: Morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MOS-SR, M.O.S., MXL Capsules, MST Continuous, Oramorph SR, Embeda) Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR, Supeudol, OxyNorm, Magnacet, Roxicet, Tylox, Combunox, Endocet) Oxymorphone (Opana) Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo) Fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq) Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol) Methadone (Dolophine) Levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran, Dromoran) Tapentadol (Nucynta) Answered by Ginette Mcburrows 1 year ago.

Is Darvocet Off The Market Answered by Dudley Renart 1 year ago.

my husband and i took hydrocodone for many years and did not get addicted, as we used it when laying down didn't help. i supply of 30 of them lasted me four months. but then i got allergic to codeine. my doctor switched me to darvocet a few months ago. now that it has been pulled off the market our doctor switched me to talwin. my husband can still take hydrocodone. does anyone know how talwin com,pares in pain relief to hydrocodone? by the way, i had been taking hydrocodone for so long that the darvocet worked better than it. Answered by Deon Golia 1 year ago.

Probably nothing. Tramadol is a NSAID pain reliever. Depending on your problem, they may just leave you with that. Darvocet is in the same class with Codeine (synthetic), so they might give you Vicoden. Many times when people come into the ER for back pain, they go home with Motrin & Vicoden, if they send them home with a Rx at all. Answered by Summer Ogram 1 year ago.

Darvocet was pretty much worthless for pain relief anyway. It had a LOT of hidden dangers, including patient deaths, without much to recommend it for relieving pain. There are much better/safer/effective alternatives today, including Vicodin. Answered by Samuel Beres 1 year ago.

It's no great loss. Propoxyphene isn't as strong as acetaminophen, anyway, and most people would have been better served by taking a couple of Tylenol along with a couple of Advil. There's still plenty of codeine and hydrocodone, et. al.. Answered by Gia Cassella 1 year ago.

Oxycodone or hydrocodone, most likely. There's no shortage of pain relievers. Yet. Answered by Ellis Stober 1 year ago.

Call your doctor. Answered by Idell Kievit 1 year ago.

Percocet, or some other form of oxycondone, something like that. Answered by Lacie Luvene 1 year ago.


Is abusing prescription opiates just as bad as doing heroin?
My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd... Asked by Louis Buttner 1 year ago.

My boyfriend used to take opiate pills (I think it was oxycontin but I can't remember). He used them so much that he would constantly have trouble getting the pharmacist to refill his prescriptions. He used to show the same signs of someone who used heroin... the typical "on the nod" sign. He'd frequently fall asleep while eating and while having a conversation. I suspected him of being on heroin before I realized that the pills could be having the same effect. So do these pills have almost the same effect on your body as heroin? What is different? BTW, he doesn't take these pills anymore... that I am aware of anyway. Answered by Erwin Strose 1 year ago.

In reality Heroin (diacetylmorphine) has an undeserved reputation. Heroin is no better or worse than the other full opioid agonists legally used for pain namely hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo), morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, Oramorph SR), oxycodone (OxyContin, Oxy IR, Percocet), fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq), oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER) and methadone (Dolophine). All of these drugs produce (more/less) the same effects as Heroin namely that they all bind to the μ-opioid receptor which is what causes analgesia (pain relief), euphoria, and other opioid effects. A number of studies have been done in IV Heroin addicts to determine if they could tell the difference between Heroin and another opioid given in an equivalent amount. The studies found that addicts could NOT distinguish IV Heroin from equivalent doses of other opioids. Not to mention that a number of prescription opioids- hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and fentanyl- are more potent than Heroin. So a smaller amount of these drugs is required to achieve the same effects as Heroin. Heroin is (just to give you an idea) about twice as potent as morphine. What is really interesting is that the effects of Heroin are from morphine. When a person uses Heroin, especially by IV, it rapidly enters the brain. Heroin then undergoes rapid deacetylation (an acetyl chemical group is removed from Heroin aka diacetylmorphine). If you just look at the name diacetylmorphine you can imagine what remains if the acetyl is removed. What remains is morphine along with other metabolites- primarily 6-MAM. All Heroin does is it more efficiently enters the brain but once it is there it breaks down into morphine and it is the morphine that produces all of its effects. Heroin only lasts a few minutes once taken. Heroin became the preferred drug among addicts since it "hits" the brain faster than morphine thus it gives a greater "rush." However if an equivalent amount of morphine is given the effects are the same. Heroin also have fewer side effects than morphine. Heroin is actually widely used legally in The United Kingdom and a number of countries like Canada have a special limited access programme to provide Heroin to people with severe intractable pain (mostly due to cancer or AIDS) that does not respond well to other medication. So yes the effects of prescription opioids like oxycodone are almost exactly the same as Heroin. Oxycodone is 1.5 times more potent than morphine so it is nearly as potent as Heroin. Even methadone maintenance programmes treat people who are addicted and physically dependent to opioids aside from Heroin. But do keep in mind that there is NOTHING inherently wrong with Heroin or any of the other opioids. The problem comes when they are misused but many hundreds of thousands of people a year take opioids and benefit greatly from them and don't misuse them. Res non per se at per usum, bona aut mala est. Nothing of itself is good or evil; only the manner of its use makes it so. Answered by Natalya Rode 1 year ago.

Hydrocodone makes me feel speedy too. Your question is difficult to answer. I agree that opiate abuse is bad, but Tramadol is also addictive. I have been on Tramadol for years, and if I try to skip a day, I feel like death. This is my opinion on drug addiction. If you are taking pain medication that has been prescribed by a doctor, and you become addicted AT the doses prescribed, not more than the prescribed doses, then you are clinically dependent on your medication, but your not abusing your drugs. I take several different addictive drugs everyday. I know, and my doctor knows that if I ever have to stop, it will be a process of tapering down, and possibly even going to the hospital to detox. Back to your medication. My doctor has me on Tramadol(which I love by the way, it completes me, lol) and also 10 Vicoden a month for break threw pain, or in other words bad days. My whole family except my Dad is junkies. They have been over my house playing X-BOX and stole my pills before. I agree that you should never share pills. I have to hide my pills when they come over. I left a bottle of Klonopin out, and substituted the pills with laxatives and my brother and law took about 20 out of the bottle, idiot. Opiate addiction is not that bad if you and your doctor are aware of your condition and you take your prescribed doses. Answered by Cherilyn Mccane 1 year ago.

Yes, they act in more or less identical ways once inside your body. Their are differences about how fast the different drugs start acting (heroin acts much faster as its injected right into the veins) and how much of each drug is needed to get a similar high, but pretty much, yes it is every bit as 'bad.' That being said doing heroin is generally more dangerous as addicts often inject with dirty needles leading to the spread of hepatitis, HIV, or contraction of endocarditis (infection of the heart). Answered by Luis Vanderlee 1 year ago.

Being addicted to prescription pills still makes you a fiend. So yeah, its just as bad. Answered by Lili Degenhart 1 year ago.

Drugs are drugs alcohol & tobacco included... if it is creating an issue in life, addiction is possible.... however u can! not force an addict to get help...or you might end up needing therapy of your own. RECOVERY IS A CHOICE. U can lead a horse to water but u can't make him drink... if you believe, prayer helps... Answered by Duane Methe 1 year ago.


Does morphine come in a pill or only in a shot? and can it be prescribed to take at home?
Asked by Jarrod Hanauer 1 year ago.

Morphine sulfate also is administered orally or rectally. The manufacturers state that certain morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., Avinza® extended-release capsules, Kadian® extended-release capsules, Oramorph® SR extended-release tablets) can be administered without regard to food; the effect of food on the GI absorption of other morphine sulfate extended-release preparations (i.e., MS-Contin® extended-release tablets) has not been fully evaluated to date. Extended-release tablets of the drug should be swallowed intact and should not be broken, crushed, or chewed; intake of a broken, crushed, or chewed tablet may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. The manufacturers of morphine sulfate extended-release capsules state that the capsules may be swallowed whole or the entire contents of the capsules may be sprinkled on a small amount of applesauce, at room temperature or cooler, immediately prior to administration; subdividing the contents of a capsule is not recommended. The patient should swallow the entire mixture. The beads or pellets should not be crushed, chewed, or dissolved; intake of crushed, chewed, or dissolved beads or pellets may result in too rapid a release of the drug from the preparation and absorption of a potentially fatal dose of morphine sulfate. Following administration, the patient should drink a glass of water to rinse the mouth and ensure that the beads or pellets are swallowed. The mixture of applesauce and beads or pellets should not be stored for future use. Patients receiving morphine sulfate extended-release capsules (Avinza®, Kadian®) must not consume alcoholic beverages or prescription or nonprescription preparations containing alcohol; intake of alcohol may result in rapid release of the drug from the capsules and intake of a potentially toxic dose of morphine sulfate. Additionally, one manufacturer states that the contents of the extended-release capsules (Kadian®) should not be administered through a nasogastric tube Serious adverse events and deaths have occurred as a result of inadvertent overdosage of concentrated morphine sulfate Answered by Jacquline Klapec 1 year ago.


Medical marijuana...?
I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications... Asked by Carmina Ximines 1 year ago.

I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I read qualifications for medical marijuana and I meet these requirements. Does marijuana have any bad long term side affects? Please do not judge. I am not going to blindly ask my parents or doctors for this, because it is not my place to get something like this. I just want to get answers to my question. Answered by Albina Verhagen 1 year ago.

A couple of things- Firstly if marijuana is illegal where you live then you can't legally use, buy, or posses it regardless of why you are using it. Also nearly all doctors will not officially condone or recommend medical marijuana use by a patient and doctors do have some legal liability if they do. Also over-the-counter pain medication is only for MILD pain, if you have a legitimate medical problem causing moderate to severe pain then only prescription medication will be able to alleviate it (OTC drugs did not work because they are useless against severe pain). If your problem is so severe why aren't you getting treatment or at least symptomatic control? With any type of pain, even in places where medical marijuana is available, it is not going to be used especially if you have only taken drugs like Tylenol (acetaminophen) and Advil, Motrin (ibuprofen) that is like going from the most minimal to very extreme without stopping in the middle. The cornerstone of pain management is opioid use particularly the full opioid agonists including: morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MST Continus, Oramorph SR) oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, Oxy-IR, Roxicet, Roxicodone, Tylox, Endocet) oxymorphone (Opana, Opana ER, Numorphan) hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo, Hydromorph Contin) fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq, Fentora, Onsolis) methadone (Dolophine, Metadol, Methadose) Typically something like marijuana is used to treat pain WITH opioids, for extreme conditions, in patients refractory to opioid therapy, and especially in patients with terminal conditions (typically AIDS or cancer), cachexia, and chemotherapy induced vomiting refractory to first-line treatment. It is not really your age that is a problem, people at any age with severe pain are treated with the proper medications to control the pain. Just to give you an idea of the guidelines and conditions that medical marijuana is typically accepted these are the Health Canada regulations (this is just for generalized information) There are two categories of people who can apply to possess marihuana for medical purposes: Category 1: This category is comprised of any symptoms treated within the context of providing compassionate end-of-life care; or the symptoms associated with the specified medical conditions, namely: Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from multiple sclerosis; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from a spinal cord injury; Severe pain and/or persistent muscle spasms from spinal cord disease; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from cancer; Severe pain, cachexia, anorexia, weight loss, and/or severe nausea from HIV/AIDS infection; Severe pain from severe forms of arthritis; or Seizures from epilepsy. Category 2: This category is for applicants who have debilitating symptom (s) of medical condition (s), other than those described in Category 1. Under Category 2, persons with debilitating symptoms can apply to obtain an Authorization to Possess dried marihuana for medical purposes, if a specialist confirms the diagnosis and that conventional treatments have failed or judged inappropriate to relieve symptoms of the medical condition. You really need to talk to your doctor and your parents. If you are in significant pain or are having any medical problems is it important to tell your doctor and get appropriate treatment. Also the best course of action is saying "doctor I'm in severe pain, how can we get it controlled?" And then let him do his job to consider, inform, and recommend options for pain control. But in the end, at least for now, you simply can't get medical marijuana and with respect if you have not taken anything except OTC medication then use of medical marijuana is not really considered appropriate. Lastly do not believe people who on are the extremes on the issue of marijuana. It is not the terrible drug some would have you believe nor is it a risk-free and perfectly benign substance. ALL drugs no matter if it is smoked, taken as a pill, injected, or is natural, semi-synthetic, or synthetic have risk. Marijuana may not have killed anyone but death is not the only risk- other things can happen. UPDATE: Just to respond to sauve4te I am hardly a "very narrow minded individual." I have not said marijuana is bad or that it should not be used however responsible doctors don't take 16 year old patients who have only taken OTC medications and then put them on marijuana. That goes against every medical guideline and common sense. Also most of the conditions marijuana may be prescribed in certain states or countries have NEVER been been proven to be effectively treated with marijuana. The states just put the few conditions proven to be treatable and then add a bunch more that typically is only supported by very little evidence. Notice how each state has different "approved" uses ranging from the proven (cachexia) and in some states, especially California and Colorado it is being prescribed for things like ADHD. Your information said "Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses" to me that sounds like there is no consensus. The only things marijuana is currently PROVEN to treat are for 1) AIDS-related anorexia and cachexia 2) severe nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. 3) As an adjunctive analgesic treatment in adult patients with advanced cancer who experience moderate to severe pain during the highest tolerated dose of strong opioid therapy for persistent background pain. 4) As an adjunctive treatment for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) in adults. For the record I have had severe chronic pain for about half my life, I tried marijuana when I was in university and it did help my pain. I did not use more because I did not like the feeling but I assure you that I understand pain- from patients, studies, and myself. I know what being desperate for relief is like. The problem is that treatments need facts, just because many people (including myself) say marijuana helps pain is not proof. And anywhere you do the proper protocol- to use full opioid agonists as the central medication then add adjunctive treatments (hydroxyzine, orphenadrine, diazepam, clonazepam, methylphenidate, dextroamphetamine, gabapentin, amitriptyline, phenobarbital, promethazine, marijuana). M.D., C.M. psychiatry, internal medicine (Québec) Hons. BSc in pharmacology Answered by Geoffrey Doniel 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Medical marijuana...? I am chronically ill and the symptoms and pain I have is severe. Over the counter medications do not work at all. I am 16. I have a hypothetical question, because I have been considering medical marijuana. I Iive in a state where medical marijuana is illegal, how would I go about getting some? I... Answered by Alaine Volpert 1 year ago.

Unfortunately, I don't believe you would be able to obtain medical marj because you said in your state it is not legal yet. Also you are only 16 they would probably want you to wait until your 18 since than you are considered a "legal" age. You may only have the option now to buy illegally which of course I cannot recommend lol .lol. Marijuana does NOT have any bad long term side effects contrary to what many people think. A lot of people have been taught and brainwashed to think badly about marij. but any research would more than likely change people's ideas.. I would suggest checking out the website: medicalmarijuana.procon.org TOTAL DEATHS FROM MARIJUANA = 0 TOTAL DEATHS FROM 17 FDA APPROVED DRUGS = 10, 008 I believe this info is from 2005 so I'm sure the deaths from FDA approved meds is a lot higher now. Good luck, I know how you feel Have to disagree with a so called answer you got. Obviously a very narrow minded idividual. Anyway wanted to share with you the conditions that medical marijuana is now approved for in DC. Approved Conditions: HIV, AIDS, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, cancer, other conditions that are chronic, long-lasting, debilitating, or that interfere with the basic functions of life, serious medical conditions for which the use of medical marijuana is beneficial, patients undergoing treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy/ In Michigan: Approved Conditions: Approved for treatment of debilitating medical conditions, defined as cancer, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Crohn's disease, agitation of Alzheimer's disease, nail patella, cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe and chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, epilepsy, muscle spasms, and multiple sclerosis HIV, AIDS, Cancer are approved med uses in all states that are medically approved marj states. Each state has their own conditions which are medically approved uses. You can find more information on what each state considers approved med marij usage at procon.org Answered by Gail Brand 1 year ago.

A great documentary came out called "Super High Me" watch it and all questions should be answered. On a personal note, Marijuana is a naturally occurring plant and I think it should be legal, medical or recreational. Answered by Norah Polizzi 1 year ago.

Cannabis is a wonderful painkiller. If medical marijuana is illegal in your state, as you said above, you cannot get it in that state. With your medical history and your parents signature, you would be able to get MMJ in the states that it is legal. The long term side effects are a toll on your lungs if you smoke cannabis, but its not nearly as bad as cigarettes. It can also mess up your short term memory. I use medical marijuana. Answered by Earlene Favolise 1 year ago.

Get the best marijane, 420 and mmj here. If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Http://medicalmarijuana4you.blogspot.com/ Answered by Maude Louvier 1 year ago.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA & MARIJUANA CONCENTRATES FOR SALE Text (509) 255-7518,email: rebecca.monic@gmail.com Answered by Kimi Calero 1 year ago.

If you are in pain, then you deserve the amazing painkilling effects of cannabis. Sorry I can't tell you where to access some, but my webpage should give you all the education (ammunition?) you ever wanted about marijuana, including the lack of long term side effects, and you can write any of us anytime with your questions. www.letstalkaboutpot.com Answered by Terry Luse 1 year ago.

I HAVE TOP QUALITY LEAN AKA SYZURP,OIL,PILLS AN KUSH IN STOCK FOR SALE TEXT (774)776-3301 OR EMAIL; henryboy987@gmail.com SKYPE NAME; Actavis.syrup Add us alternatively if you wish no bullshit please only add if you need any of the above products #legit #quick #save #discreet hit me and order now Answered by Gabriel Wiest 1 year ago.


Should I ask my Doctor to switch...?
My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.Asked by Laraine Hochman 1 year ago.

My medication on Clonazepam 0.5 for Xanax? I read that Xanax is shorter duration and weaker version of Clonazepam. I thought about asking my doctor on Valium to help me face my fear in public places.. so I can function on my job and going outside of the house! >.< Also I thought about asking my doctor if she can switch my two pain med for one powerful pain med, the two pain med I got is Hydrocodone 7.5/323 (for constant Kidney stones) and Tramadol (Nerve pain in knee). I was told Oxycontin er would be it.. But I'm afraid of it due to negative side affect like withdrawal (I heard Oxy withdrawal are worse than Heroin withdrawal) =0 Won't Mophine Pills AVINza, Kadian, Morphine IR, MS Contin, MSIR, Oramorph SR, Roxanol will do? Answered by Lenna Gfeller 1 year ago.

Your doctor presumably thought Clonazepam would be a better choice for you than Xanax. Without reviewing the specific details of your case, I can't offer you any insight as to whether or not her reasoning was correct, but presumably at least she thought it was. If you're concerned about your current medication, you should definitely discuss this with your doctor- you should ask why that particular drug was prescribed, if there are alternatives, and why she thought this one was the best. Answered by Sherill Goleman 1 year ago.

Clonazepam lasts longer but Xanax packs a more powerful punch initially. As for pain meds, its kinda hard to get Oxycontin prescribed, but you never know. I take Clonazepam by the way, and it works very well. Answered by Teodora Pardi 1 year ago.


What pill is this?
I found these pills in my friends room. They have PA on one side and 933 on the other I've looked online but cannot find an answer? Asked by Shelba Gbur 1 year ago.

so is uploading pictures on yahoo answers work now?? Answered by Bess Orofino 1 year ago.


How does opana compare to oxycontin?
Asked by Doretha Salamon 1 year ago.

In what way? Are you comparing Opana ER (oxymorphone extended-release) to OxyContin (oxycodone extended-release) or are you talking about the instant release for of Opana vs. instant release oxycodone? Both drugs are full opioid agonists indicated for moderate to severe pain when the use of an opioid is indicated. Oxymorphone, the opioid in Opana, is twice as potent as oxycodone. Some oxycodone is metabolized into oxymorphone so a very small amount of the effects of oxycodone is from oxymorphone. Opana ER has a better reputation for lasting the full 12hrs compared to OxyContin which some people need to take a bit more frequently. Contrary to what one person wrote oxycodone is NOT more addictive than oxymorphone. Full opioid agonists have the same potential for abuse and dependence. Since Opana is fairly new and not as widely prescribed as OxyContin it has not been abused as often but they do have the same abuse potential. However when taken for a legitimate problem the risk of abuse or dependence to any opioid is very small. Both drugs are still only available as brand name drugs so they are both expensive. However two extended release opioids- MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release) and Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal) are available as generics. Basically everyone does differently with opioids- some people respond well the Opana and have few side effects, some don't do well with Opana at all but may do well with OxyContin. In general both drugs are well tolerated and highly effective. I have personally taken both but my experience is really irrelevant and won't really help. Some guidelines recommend that a morphine drug be first used and if it is not well tolerated a drug like OxyContin should be used. Other long acting opioids available in The United States include MS Contin (morphine sulfate extended-release), Duragesic (fentanyl transdermal), BuTrans (buprenorphine transdermal), Kadian (morphine sulfate extended-release), Avinza (morphine sulfate extended-release), Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate extended-release), Exalgo (hydromorphone extended-release), and Embeda (morphine sulfate/naltrexone). Dolophine (methadone) is also used, it does not come in an extended-release form but it works longer than other opioids and is typically taken every 8-12hrs. There is also Ultram ER (tramadol extended-release) however tramadol is NOT a full opioid agonist and it is approved for moderate to moderately severe pain. Answered by Dean Smink 1 year ago.

Oxycontin is a form of time released OXYCODONE, not morphine. You probably already know that, by looking at the medicine bottle, but others may think it's actually morpine based on the above poster's response. If you're hurt enough to get a prescription for 20 mg's of oxycodone, you should probably be on the couch resting, anyways. There's a lot of factors, most likely you will feel a little buzz for the first few days. I'd avoid operating a vehicle for the first day to make sure you know how the medication affects you. Take it easy and recuperate. Answered by Natasha Rinderle 1 year ago.

They're two different drugs and hard to compare. Oxycontin is mode addicting. Answered by Meda Bleakley 1 year ago.

whats all the yeehaw about opana? took 2 and it just doesnt have the lift of o.c. and it may last a few minutesmore but i can feel when my oxy hits, the opana is more of a maybe i feel it kind of things Answered by Yolonda Deller 1 year ago.


Since Darvocet has been pulled off of the market, what will doctors replace it with?
I was previously prescribed Darvocet for my back pain, but now that it has been pulled off of the market, I was wondering what my doctors might replace it with. I am also prescribed Ultram (Tramadol). Asked by Verdell Mhoon 1 year ago.

Darvocet is indicated for the relief of mild to moderate pain and I don't think any other opioids have the same indication, for example Tylenol with Codeine is indicated for the relief of mild to moderately severe pain. I would imagine tramadol, codeine, and hydrocodone (perhaps even pentazocine to some extent) will become the preferred drugs. The other issues is that propoxyphene is a federally controlled schedule IV substance, the same as Valium (diazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), phenobarbital, and Adipex-P (phentermine). Most other opioids are at a higher level of control, due to a higher addictive potential, and from all the American doctors I have spoken with they prefer using schedule III or IV opioids when possible. Hydrocodone and codeine are both schedule III and tramadol is not a controlled substance. Even now hydrocodone is the most prescribed drug in The United States and codeine has fallen somewhat out of favour. There is also the possibility that many of the drugs with hydrocodone like Vicodin may be removed from the market, which a FDA committee did recommend due to the high levels of acetaminophen. There are a lot of opioids in the US so I am sure you and your doctor can find a something good List of opioids: Weak to intermediate opioids: Codeine (Tylenol #3, Tylenol #4, Panadeine, Panadeine Forte, Prontalgine Codeine Contin) Tramadol (Ultram, Ultram ER, Zydol, Tramacet, Contramal, Tramal, Tridural, Zytram XL) Pentazocine (Talacen, Talwin NX) Dihydrocodeine (Codhydrine, Panlor DC, Panlor SS, Synalgos-DC) Hydrocodone (Vicodin, Norco, Lortab, Lorcet, Vicoprofen, Ibudone, Zydone, Xodol, Maxidone) Full opioid agonists: Morphine (MS Contin, Avinza, Kadian, M-Eslon, MS-IR, MOS-SR, M.O.S., MXL Capsules, MST Continuous, Oramorph SR, Embeda) Oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Oxy-IR, Supeudol, OxyNorm, Magnacet, Roxicet, Tylox, Combunox, Endocet) Oxymorphone (Opana) Hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Exalgo) Fentanyl (Duragesic, Actiq) Pethidine/meperidine (Demerol) Methadone (Dolophine) Levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran, Dromoran) Tapentadol (Nucynta) Answered by Crissy Luedi 1 year ago.

Is Darvocet Off The Market Answered by Oswaldo Bilder 1 year ago.

my husband and i took hydrocodone for many years and did not get addicted, as we used it when laying down didn't help. i supply of 30 of them lasted me four months. but then i got allergic to codeine. my doctor switched me to darvocet a few months ago. now that it has been pulled off the market our doctor switched me to talwin. my husband can still take hydrocodone. does anyone know how talwin com,pares in pain relief to hydrocodone? by the way, i had been taking hydrocodone for so long that the darvocet worked better than it. Answered by Yoshiko Clemon 1 year ago.

Probably nothing. Tramadol is a NSAID pain reliever. Depending on your problem, they may just leave you with that. Darvocet is in the same class with Codeine (synthetic), so they might give you Vicoden. Many times when people come into the ER for back pain, they go home with Motrin & Vicoden, if they send them home with a Rx at all. Answered by Kristin Andrew 1 year ago.

Darvocet was pretty much worthless for pain relief anyway. It had a LOT of hidden dangers, including patient deaths, without much to recommend it for relieving pain. There are much better/safer/effective alternatives today, including Vicodin. Answered by Loretta Donmoyer 1 year ago.

It's no great loss. Propoxyphene isn't as strong as acetaminophen, anyway, and most people would have been better served by taking a couple of Tylenol along with a couple of Advil. There's still plenty of codeine and hydrocodone, et. al.. Answered by Rikki Vongkhamphanh 1 year ago.

Oxycodone or hydrocodone, most likely. There's no shortage of pain relievers. Yet. Answered by Lakisha Misove 1 year ago.

Call your doctor. Answered by Dina Mesko 1 year ago.

Percocet, or some other form of oxycondone, something like that. Answered by Tran Stanchfield 1 year ago.


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