Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020937/001.

Names and composition

"OPTIMARK" is the commercial name of a drug composed of GADOVERSETAMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020937/001 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1654.5MG per 5ML (330.9MG per ML)
020937/002 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3309MG per 10ML (330.9MG per ML)
020937/003 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4963.5MG per 15ML (330.9MG per ML)
020937/004 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 6618MG per 20ML (330.9MG per ML)
020975/001 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 16.545GM per 50ML (330.9MG per ML)

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020937/001 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1654.5MG per 5ML (330.9MG per ML)
020937/002 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3309MG per 10ML (330.9MG per ML)
020937/003 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4963.5MG per 15ML (330.9MG per ML)
020937/004 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 6618MG per 20ML (330.9MG per ML)
020975/001 OPTIMARK GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 16.545GM per 50ML (330.9MG per ML)
020976/001 OPTIMARK IN PLASTIC CONTAINER GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 9927MG per 30ML (330.9MG per ML)
020976/002 OPTIMARK IN PLASTIC CONTAINER GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 3309MG per 10ML (330.9MG per ML)
020976/003 OPTIMARK IN PLASTIC CONTAINER GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4963.5MG per 15ML (330.9MG per ML)
020976/004 OPTIMARK IN PLASTIC CONTAINER GADOVERSETAMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 6618MG per 20ML (330.9MG per ML)

Ask a doctor

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Answered questions

Gadolinium-based contrast agents?
Magnevist, ominiscan, optiMark, nultiHance,Prohance. I have an itemized list of Anaphylactic reactions. Which of the above would cause me the least amount of concern Asked by Mozelle Torress 1 year ago.

The incidence of anaphylactic reactions or true allergic reactions with gadolinium based agents is extremely low; even lower than CT contrast (which is also pretty low). There is no statistically significant difference among agents (the incidence of anaphylaxis is probably too low to even test this). In over 15 years of training + practice I have seen maybe one minor reaction to gadolinium, and no serious ones. Because you are obviously very worried about this, you may want to have your study done in a hospital MRI rather than a free-standing location. Most people find out-patient centers more pleasant, but in the event of a life-threatening reaction, proximity to the Emergency Department would be helpful. Thousands of CTs and MRIs are safely done each day. All free-standing imaging centers have basic crash kits. In states where I've worked, a physician (radiologist) must be on site if an injection is to be given, just in case. However, requirements vary according to state law, and you may want to check with the MRI to make sure a doctor will be there at the time. Statistically, you are far, far more likely to be injured in a traffic accident on the way to the MRI than to have a problem from the contrast. Drive safe! Answered by Marry Gama 1 year ago.

All would be of a concern if any of these cause anaphylaxis. This is quite serious and can be fatal. Some people confuse anaphylaxis with having a side effect of a medication. Side effects can be minor or serious. If you are truly anaphylactic from these medications, you should be carrying an Epi-Pen which is injected in the event that somehow, you ingest a medication that can cause this. Wear a Medical Alert bracelet as well. Talk to your Doc about these medications. He/she can advise you on what you should due in the event of such a reaction. I hope this helps. Answered by Augustus Valladolid 1 year ago.

If I remember properly, it Reduces the community Magnetic container, So clever as a assessment In MRI. not probably to Have Any severe area consequences, it does not many times pass the Blood-recommendations Barrier, yet Haptenization of the Molecule seems achievable, Making it Recognizable to performed IgE, allergic reaction. Answered by Jung Mitchell 1 year ago.

Please see the web pages for more details on Magnevist, Gadodiamide (generic name) Omniscan (brand name), Gadoversetamide (generic name) Optimark (brand name), Gadobenate dimeglumine (generic name) MultiHance (brand name) and Gadoteridol (generic name) Prohance (brand name). Please note that I am not a medical professional. Answered by Bee Lebroke 1 year ago.


What are the side effects of the dye they inject you with at the hospital?
Asked by Reba Yelle 1 year ago.

Well the other day my mom got dye injected in her, and she told me that her heart started racing uncontrollably, and she felt like she had to got to the rest room. Answered by Vance Sposito 1 year ago.


Gadolinium-based contrast agents?
Magnevist, ominiscan, optiMark, nultiHance,Prohance. I have an itemized list of Anaphylactic reactions. Which of the above would cause me the least amount of concern Asked by Erwin Bloes 1 year ago.

The incidence of anaphylactic reactions or true allergic reactions with gadolinium based agents is extremely low; even lower than CT contrast (which is also pretty low). There is no statistically significant difference among agents (the incidence of anaphylaxis is probably too low to even test this). In over 15 years of training + practice I have seen maybe one minor reaction to gadolinium, and no serious ones. Because you are obviously very worried about this, you may want to have your study done in a hospital MRI rather than a free-standing location. Most people find out-patient centers more pleasant, but in the event of a life-threatening reaction, proximity to the Emergency Department would be helpful. Thousands of CTs and MRIs are safely done each day. All free-standing imaging centers have basic crash kits. In states where I've worked, a physician (radiologist) must be on site if an injection is to be given, just in case. However, requirements vary according to state law, and you may want to check with the MRI to make sure a doctor will be there at the time. Statistically, you are far, far more likely to be injured in a traffic accident on the way to the MRI than to have a problem from the contrast. Drive safe! Answered by Corene Hamblen 1 year ago.

All would be of a concern if any of these cause anaphylaxis. This is quite serious and can be fatal. Some people confuse anaphylaxis with having a side effect of a medication. Side effects can be minor or serious. If you are truly anaphylactic from these medications, you should be carrying an Epi-Pen which is injected in the event that somehow, you ingest a medication that can cause this. Wear a Medical Alert bracelet as well. Talk to your Doc about these medications. He/she can advise you on what you should due in the event of such a reaction. I hope this helps. Answered by Jesenia Sarault 1 year ago.

If I remember properly, it Reduces the community Magnetic container, So clever as a assessment In MRI. not probably to Have Any severe area consequences, it does not many times pass the Blood-recommendations Barrier, yet Haptenization of the Molecule seems achievable, Making it Recognizable to performed IgE, allergic reaction. Answered by Henry Bessick 1 year ago.

Please see the web pages for more details on Magnevist, Gadodiamide (generic name) Omniscan (brand name), Gadoversetamide (generic name) Optimark (brand name), Gadobenate dimeglumine (generic name) MultiHance (brand name) and Gadoteridol (generic name) Prohance (brand name). Please note that I am not a medical professional. Answered by Scott Fixari 1 year ago.


What are the side effects of the dye they inject you with at the hospital?
Asked by Elizbeth Kerman 1 year ago.

Well the other day my mom got dye injected in her, and she told me that her heart started racing uncontrollably, and she felt like she had to got to the rest room. Answered by Jeanette Schneiders 1 year ago.


Gadolinium-based contrast agents?
Magnevist, ominiscan, optiMark, nultiHance,Prohance. I have an itemized list of Anaphylactic reactions. Which of the above would cause me the least amount of concern Asked by Audry Hargett 1 year ago.

The incidence of anaphylactic reactions or true allergic reactions with gadolinium based agents is extremely low; even lower than CT contrast (which is also pretty low). There is no statistically significant difference among agents (the incidence of anaphylaxis is probably too low to even test this). In over 15 years of training + practice I have seen maybe one minor reaction to gadolinium, and no serious ones. Because you are obviously very worried about this, you may want to have your study done in a hospital MRI rather than a free-standing location. Most people find out-patient centers more pleasant, but in the event of a life-threatening reaction, proximity to the Emergency Department would be helpful. Thousands of CTs and MRIs are safely done each day. All free-standing imaging centers have basic crash kits. In states where I've worked, a physician (radiologist) must be on site if an injection is to be given, just in case. However, requirements vary according to state law, and you may want to check with the MRI to make sure a doctor will be there at the time. Statistically, you are far, far more likely to be injured in a traffic accident on the way to the MRI than to have a problem from the contrast. Drive safe! Answered by Sang Caster 1 year ago.

All would be of a concern if any of these cause anaphylaxis. This is quite serious and can be fatal. Some people confuse anaphylaxis with having a side effect of a medication. Side effects can be minor or serious. If you are truly anaphylactic from these medications, you should be carrying an Epi-Pen which is injected in the event that somehow, you ingest a medication that can cause this. Wear a Medical Alert bracelet as well. Talk to your Doc about these medications. He/she can advise you on what you should due in the event of such a reaction. I hope this helps. Answered by Jessenia Johnstonbaugh 1 year ago.

If I remember properly, it Reduces the community Magnetic container, So clever as a assessment In MRI. not probably to Have Any severe area consequences, it does not many times pass the Blood-recommendations Barrier, yet Haptenization of the Molecule seems achievable, Making it Recognizable to performed IgE, allergic reaction. Answered by Kenda Revels 1 year ago.

Please see the web pages for more details on Magnevist, Gadodiamide (generic name) Omniscan (brand name), Gadoversetamide (generic name) Optimark (brand name), Gadobenate dimeglumine (generic name) MultiHance (brand name) and Gadoteridol (generic name) Prohance (brand name). Please note that I am not a medical professional. Answered by Mervin Vanoven 1 year ago.


What are the side effects of the dye they inject you with at the hospital?
Asked by Matthew Mccullogh 1 year ago.

Well the other day my mom got dye injected in her, and she told me that her heart started racing uncontrollably, and she felt like she had to got to the rest room. Answered by Federico Risse 1 year ago.


Gadolinium-based contrast agents?
Magnevist, ominiscan, optiMark, nultiHance,Prohance. I have an itemized list of Anaphylactic reactions. Which of the above would cause me the least amount of concern Asked by Opal Stieb 1 year ago.

The incidence of anaphylactic reactions or true allergic reactions with gadolinium based agents is extremely low; even lower than CT contrast (which is also pretty low). There is no statistically significant difference among agents (the incidence of anaphylaxis is probably too low to even test this). In over 15 years of training + practice I have seen maybe one minor reaction to gadolinium, and no serious ones. Because you are obviously very worried about this, you may want to have your study done in a hospital MRI rather than a free-standing location. Most people find out-patient centers more pleasant, but in the event of a life-threatening reaction, proximity to the Emergency Department would be helpful. Thousands of CTs and MRIs are safely done each day. All free-standing imaging centers have basic crash kits. In states where I've worked, a physician (radiologist) must be on site if an injection is to be given, just in case. However, requirements vary according to state law, and you may want to check with the MRI to make sure a doctor will be there at the time. Statistically, you are far, far more likely to be injured in a traffic accident on the way to the MRI than to have a problem from the contrast. Drive safe! Answered by Novella Tacata 1 year ago.

All would be of a concern if any of these cause anaphylaxis. This is quite serious and can be fatal. Some people confuse anaphylaxis with having a side effect of a medication. Side effects can be minor or serious. If you are truly anaphylactic from these medications, you should be carrying an Epi-Pen which is injected in the event that somehow, you ingest a medication that can cause this. Wear a Medical Alert bracelet as well. Talk to your Doc about these medications. He/she can advise you on what you should due in the event of such a reaction. I hope this helps. Answered by Johnathon Gahr 1 year ago.

If I remember properly, it Reduces the community Magnetic container, So clever as a assessment In MRI. not probably to Have Any severe area consequences, it does not many times pass the Blood-recommendations Barrier, yet Haptenization of the Molecule seems achievable, Making it Recognizable to performed IgE, allergic reaction. Answered by Amiee Mcwhirt 1 year ago.

Please see the web pages for more details on Magnevist, Gadodiamide (generic name) Omniscan (brand name), Gadoversetamide (generic name) Optimark (brand name), Gadobenate dimeglumine (generic name) MultiHance (brand name) and Gadoteridol (generic name) Prohance (brand name). Please note that I am not a medical professional. Answered by Vanetta Huit 1 year ago.


What are the side effects of the dye they inject you with at the hospital?
Asked by Arlena Bacy 1 year ago.

Well the other day my mom got dye injected in her, and she told me that her heart started racing uncontrollably, and she felt like she had to got to the rest room. Answered by Edelmira Haddix 1 year ago.


Gadolinium-based contrast agents?
Magnevist, ominiscan, optiMark, nultiHance,Prohance. I have an itemized list of Anaphylactic reactions. Which of the above would cause me the least amount of concern Asked by Lajuana Rollinson 1 year ago.

The incidence of anaphylactic reactions or true allergic reactions with gadolinium based agents is extremely low; even lower than CT contrast (which is also pretty low). There is no statistically significant difference among agents (the incidence of anaphylaxis is probably too low to even test this). In over 15 years of training + practice I have seen maybe one minor reaction to gadolinium, and no serious ones. Because you are obviously very worried about this, you may want to have your study done in a hospital MRI rather than a free-standing location. Most people find out-patient centers more pleasant, but in the event of a life-threatening reaction, proximity to the Emergency Department would be helpful. Thousands of CTs and MRIs are safely done each day. All free-standing imaging centers have basic crash kits. In states where I've worked, a physician (radiologist) must be on site if an injection is to be given, just in case. However, requirements vary according to state law, and you may want to check with the MRI to make sure a doctor will be there at the time. Statistically, you are far, far more likely to be injured in a traffic accident on the way to the MRI than to have a problem from the contrast. Drive safe! Answered by Faviola Shilo 1 year ago.

All would be of a concern if any of these cause anaphylaxis. This is quite serious and can be fatal. Some people confuse anaphylaxis with having a side effect of a medication. Side effects can be minor or serious. If you are truly anaphylactic from these medications, you should be carrying an Epi-Pen which is injected in the event that somehow, you ingest a medication that can cause this. Wear a Medical Alert bracelet as well. Talk to your Doc about these medications. He/she can advise you on what you should due in the event of such a reaction. I hope this helps. Answered by Vivienne Corgiat 1 year ago.

If I remember properly, it Reduces the community Magnetic container, So clever as a assessment In MRI. not probably to Have Any severe area consequences, it does not many times pass the Blood-recommendations Barrier, yet Haptenization of the Molecule seems achievable, Making it Recognizable to performed IgE, allergic reaction. Answered by Gabriela Vig 1 year ago.

Please see the web pages for more details on Magnevist, Gadodiamide (generic name) Omniscan (brand name), Gadoversetamide (generic name) Optimark (brand name), Gadobenate dimeglumine (generic name) MultiHance (brand name) and Gadoteridol (generic name) Prohance (brand name). Please note that I am not a medical professional. Answered by Mackenzie Albrittain 1 year ago.


What are the side effects of the dye they inject you with at the hospital?
Asked by Doyle Chisom 1 year ago.

Well the other day my mom got dye injected in her, and she told me that her heart started racing uncontrollably, and she felt like she had to got to the rest room. Answered by Araceli Danials 1 year ago.


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