Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 014103/001.

Names and composition

"ONCOVIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VINCRISTINE SULFATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014103/001 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per VIAL
014103/002 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
014103/003 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014103/001 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per VIAL
014103/002 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
014103/003 ONCOVIN VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
070411/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
070777/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
070778/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
070867/001 VINCREX VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
070873/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071222/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per VIAL
071223/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 2MG per VIAL
071426/001 VINCASAR PFS VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071484/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE PFS VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071559/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per VIAL
071560/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 2MG per VIAL
071561/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per VIAL
071937/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE Injectable/ Injection 5MG per VIAL
075493/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE PFS VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
076296/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
076401/001 VINCRISTINE SULFATE VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
202497/001 MARQIBO KIT VINCRISTINE SULFATE INJECTABLE, LIPOSOMAL/INTRAVENOUS 5MG per 5ML (1MG per ML)

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Answered questions

Why would drug Vincristine (Oncovin) be fatal to a cell?
why would drug Vincristine (Oncovin) be fatal to a cell? Asked by Tara Thieklin 1 year ago.

It disrupts cell division, and works best on cells that divide very rapidly. Cancer cells fall into this category; unfortunately, so do the cells of the intestinal lining. Vincristine lets cell division progress to a certain stage, but then, all activity is halted. Because the cell is in an unstable state at that point, it is a target for destruction. The cell cannot survive at this disrupted state, since the nucleus (among other structures) is not present, and thus, the cell cannot regulate processes, and it will die soon after exposure. Answered by Estefana Mihok 1 year ago.

Vincristine inhibits microtubule formation. Among the roles of microtubules is separating chromosomes during mitosis. As a result, rapidly dividing cells are likely to be interrupted mid-division and lose ability to function. Answered by Lu Schoch 1 year ago.

More information needed Answered by Kandy Seymor 1 year ago.


My son is on the following chemo drugs: Oncovin,Doxorubicin,cytoxan,et... ifosfamide?
he wanted me to ask if anyone knows, when his hair will start falling out. He's 13 and had his 1st treatment, and is not looking forward to his hair loss, i tell him its only hair and will grow back. Asked by Moc 1 year ago.

I would expect his hair to start falling out within 2 weeks of the treatment. It probably will start getting thin then all ths sudden, fall out in big chunks. He will most likely lose his eye brows, eye lashes, and facial hair if he has any yet along with his pubic hair and hair on his arms and legs too. He most likely will develop sun sensitivity and his appetite may diminish greatly. I always tell my pts not to eat their favorite foods while recieving chemo treatments because it will never be there favorite again after they throw it up. Sounds like your sons oncologist is serious here about killing cancer cells. I am curious to know what kind of cancer your son has. This is very aggressive chemotherapy he is recieving. My prayers are with you and you child. Answered by Merideth Rickards 1 year ago.

Everyone is different. My sons hair took a few months to fall out. All his darker hair fell out first and left little blonde wisps for quite awhile. But eventually it all came out. He was on the high dose chemo for 9 months (HD-VAC and Ifosomide/Etoposide). He tolerated treatment very well and had good response from the chemotherapy. Answered by Ezra Wiechman 1 year ago.

Exactly, once the treatment has finished, it will all come back healthy and curly (which the chicks dig) within weeks. Although it seems harsh to have cancer at such a young age it can have it's positive ramifications. The chances of survival are that much greater and it does give a clarity of purpose. Answered by Abraham Sulc 1 year ago.

I' m so sorry to here about your son tell him his hair will grow back Answered by Lynda Rasanen 1 year ago.

It took my Mom a couple of months before hers fell out. Answered by Christina Syon 1 year ago.

Visit the American Cancer Society website. Answered by Marin Gadberry 1 year ago.


An adult weighs 165lb and is 5'8" tall. the physician orders oncovin 2mg/m square for treatment of a malinancy?
what is the dose for this patient? what is the volume of medication the patient should recieve as a dose Asked by Trang Mealing 1 year ago.

BSA ~ 1.9, so dose would be 2 mg X 1.9 = 3.8 mg, but this is moot since vincristine doses are often capped at 2 mg / week. Therefore the most appropriate dose (without more info in this hypothetical situation) is 2 mg. As far as the volume administered is concerned, the answer depends on your institution. Vincristine has historically been prepared in syringes. This preparation method has, however, resulted in numerous fatalities due to accidental intrathecal administration in patients receiving other medications via this route. To prevent this, many institutions at least dilute to 10-12 mL to help distinguish IV from IT (which is usually a smaller volume, around 3-5 mL commonly). The Joint Commission, ISMP, and WHO, however, have recommended for years that vincristine doses ideally be prepared in diluted IV minibags having total volumes of 25+ mL to prevent confusion with intrathecal syringes, so many institutions do this. If this hypothetical patient were seen at my hospital s/he'd most likely receive 2 mg vincristine in 25 mL normal saline, barring those rare circumstances in which the 2 mg cap would be exceeded. I'm also guessing that this question is related to a homework assignment designed to allow you to practice the calculations. If that is indeed the case, your professor might be better off selecting a medication that does not have unusual dosage and volume restrictions. Answered by Jamar Deets 1 year ago.

First you have to do a couple of conversions. lbs --> kg 165lbs * 1kg/2.2lbs = 75kg feet and inches --> cm 5'8" = 68inches * 2.54cm/1inch = 172.72cm Now you need to calculate the BSA BSA(m^2) = SQRT((wt(kg) * ht(cm)) / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT((75kg * 172.72cm) / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT(12954 / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT(3.598) BSA(m^2) = 1.9m^2 Now the dose 1.9m^2 * 2mg/m^2 = 3.8mg And finally, the volume (you really can't calculate it with the information given, but it's only available as a 1mg/1ml solution) The general formula is: What you have = What you want Have: 1mg/ml Want: 3.8mg/Xml Setup: 1mg/1ml = 3.8mg/Xml Solve for Xml Xml * 1mg = 1ml * 3.8mg Xml = (1ml * 3.8mg) / 1mg Xml = 3.8ml If you have any questions, just shoot me an email or IM EDIT: A T is correct regarding the 2mg/week cap and the diluting to a larger volume. We do the same where I work. Answered by Danille Peszynski 1 year ago.


Why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems?
Asked by Ayako Cowell 1 year ago.

Vincristine Trade Names: Oncovin ®, Vincasar Pfs ® Other Names: Vincristine Sulfate, LCR, VCR Drug Type: Vincristine is an anti-cancer ("antineoplastic" or "cytotoxic") chemotherapy drug. Vincristine is classified as a plant alkaloid. What Vincristine Is Used For: Cancers treated with Vincristine include: acute leukemia, Hodgkin's and non- Hodgkin's lymphoma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, Wilms' tumor, multiple myeloma, chronic leukemias, thyroid cancer, brain tumors. It is also used to treat some blood disorders. Side effects may include: Taste changes Peripheral neuropathy: Although uncommon, a serious side effect of decreased sensation and paresthesia (numbness and tingling of the hands and feet) may be noted. Sensory loss, numbness and tingling, and difficulty in walking may last for at least as long as therapy is continued How Vincristine Works: Cancerous tumors are characterized by cell division, which is no longer controlled as it is in normal tissue. "Normal" cells stop dividing when they come into contact with like cells, a mechanism known as contact inhibition. Cancerous cells lose this ability. Cancer cells no longer have the normal checks and balances in place that control and limit cell division. The process of cell division, whether normal or cancerous cells, is through the cell cycle. The cell cycle goes from the resting phase, through active growing phases, and then to mitosis (division). The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by damaging the RNA or DNA that tells the cell how to copy itself in division. If the cells are unable to divide, they die. The faster the cells are dividing, the more likely it is that chemotherapy will kill the cells, causing the tumor to shrink. They also induce cell suicide (self-death or apoptosis). Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells only when they are dividing are called cell-cycle specific. Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells when they are at rest are called cell-cycle non-specific. The scheduling of chemotherapy is set based on the type of cells, rate at which they divide, and the time at which a given drug is likely to be effective. This is why chemotherapy is typically given in cycles. Chemotherapy is most effective at killing cells that are rapidly dividing. Unfortunately, chemotherapy does not know the difference between the cancerous cells and the normal cells. The "normal" cells will grow back and be healthy but in the meantime, side effects occur. The "normal" cells most commonly affected by chemotherapy are the blood cells, the cells in the mouth, stomach and bowel, and the hair follicles; resulting in low blood counts, mouth sores, nausea, diarrhea, and/or hair loss. Different drugs may affect different parts of the body. Vincristine belongs to a class of chemotherapy drugs called plant alkaloids. Plant alkaloids are made from plants. The vinca alkaloids are made from the periwinkle plant (catharanthus rosea). The taxanes are made from the bark of the Pacific Yew tree (taxus). The vinca alkaloids and taxanes are also known as antimicrotubule agents. The podophyllotoxins are derived from the May Apple plant. Camptothecan analogs are derived from the Asian "Happy Tree" (Camptotheca acuminata). Podophyllotoxins and camptothecan analogs are also known as topoisomerase inhibitors. The plant alkaloids are cell-cycle specific. This means they attack the cells during various phases of division. Answered by Jeffery Emslander 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems? Answered by Katherine Mccafferty 1 year ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Lane Mcclarnon 1 year ago.


Which active ingredient blastine or vincristine is more used in chemotherapy now a days?
vincristine & vinblastine are most used vinca alkaloids in preparation of drugs used in cancer treatment but one is more popular among pharmacist than other which is that Asked by Enrique Zalenski 1 year ago.

vincristine oncovin Answered by Riva Grieger 1 year ago.


List the names of the companies producing vinblastine and vincristine from cathranthus roseus?
herbal pharmacuetical companies Asked by Sau Hollinshead 1 year ago.

Vincristine, which is marketed as Oncovin by Eli Lilly, has a serum half-life of about 85 hours. It's used mainly to treat acute leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, Hodgkin's disease and other lymphomas. Vinorelbine is currently in Phase II clinical trials as a treatment for ovarian cancer. It will be marketed as Navelbine by Glaxo Wellcome, Inc., if the trials are successful and the FDA approves the drug. Answered by Precious Zaldivar 1 year ago.


My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG.?
My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG they said its in 99% of her bones. She starts chemo (velcade) monday. what can she expect and what about the other meds. she needs.dexamethasone and Thalidomide and are very expensive she has no insurance any suggestions is greatly appreciated. Asked by Arminda Robinzine 1 year ago.

She should apply for emergency Medicaid to help with the costs. This is from Mayo Clinic literature: Standard treatments for myeloma Though there's no cure for multiple myeloma, with good treatment results you can usually return to near-normal activity. The appropriate multiple myeloma treatment depends on your needs, medical status and general health. You may also wish to consider approved clinical trials as an option. Standard treatment options include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine (Oncovin), doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids such as prednisone and dexamethasone (Decadron) have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given as pills. Some research suggests that high doses of steroids may not be needed, and that lower doses may be safer and more effective. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Thalidomide is currently FDA-approved in conjunction with the corticosteroid called dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed cases of multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Bortezomib (Velcade). Velcade was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It works by blocking the action of proteasomes, which causes cancer cells to die. One study showed that bortezomib had more than twice the response rate of a commonly used drug, dexamethasone. Bortezomib is approved by the FDA for use in a treatment for people with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects. It is given orally. Lenalidomide is FDA-approved for use in combination with dexamethasone as a treatment for people who have received at least one prior therapy for multiple myeloma. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to target myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, to more quickly shrink a tumor that's causing pain or destroying a bone. Initial therapy for myeloma The initial chemotherapy used to treat multiple myeloma depends on whether you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation. Factors such as the risk of your disease progressing, your age and your general health play a part in determining whether stem cell transplantation may be right for you. If you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy will likely exclude melphalan because this drug can have a toxic effect on stem cells, making it impossible to collect enough of them. You may begin treatment with the most common initial myeloma therapy in the United States, thalidomide plus dexamethasone. Or your doctor may instead recommend a newer regimen, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone. Your stem cells will likely be collected after you've undergone three to four months of treatment with these initial agents. Your doctor may recommend undergoing the stem cell transplant soon after your cells are collected or delaying the transplant until after a relapse, if it occurs. Your age and your personal preference are important factors that will help your doctor make his or her recommendation. If you're not considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy is likely to be a combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT). If the side effects are intolerable, melphalan plus prednisone is another option (MP). This type of therapy is typically given for about 12 to 18 months. Treatments for relapsed or treatment-resistant multiple myeloma Most people who are treated for multiple myeloma eventually experience a relapse of the disease. And in some cases, none of the currently available, first-line therapies slow the cancer cells from multiplying. If you experience a relapse of multiple myeloma, your doctor may recommend repeating another course of the treatment that initially helped you. Another option is trying one or more of the other treatments typically used as first-line therapy, either alone or in combination. Research on a number of promising new treatment options is ongoing, and these drugs offer important options for those with multiple myeloma. Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials may be available to you. Treating complications Because multiple myeloma can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions. For example: Back pain. Taking pain medication or wearing a back brace can help relieve the back pain you might experience with multiple myeloma. Kidney complications. People with severe kidney damage may need dialysis. Infections. Antibiotics may be necessary to help treat infections or to help reduce your risk of them. Bone loss. You may take medications called bisphosphonates, such as pamidronate (Aredia) or zoledronic acid (Zometa), which bind to the surface of your bones and help prevent bone loss. Treatment with these drugs is associated with the risk of harm to the jawbone. If you're taking these medications, don't have dental procedures done without consulting your doctor first. Anemia. If you have persistent anemia, your doctor may prescribe erythropoietin injections. Erythropoietin is a naturally occurring hormone made in the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Research suggests that the use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of blood clots in some people with myeloma. Answered by Fannie Cintra 1 year ago.

I know Thalidomide has a patient assistance program to help with the cost. Her doctor can give her all the information. But you can check out this website also. Thalomid.com. I don't think dex is that expensive. Answered by Hiram Vacanti 1 year ago.


What treatments are used for Stage 4 Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma?
Stage 4 only, please, maybe you know someone who had, has it or you are a medical professional? Do they usually do chemotherapy at this stage? Also, if they use chemo, how often is it required? This is for someone at high risk of death with many symptoms. Asked by Carmelo Yilma 1 year ago.

in terms of chemo, it may be CHOP plus Rituxan (CHOP-R or R-CHOP). CHOP stands for: Cytoxan (Cyclophosphamide); Hydroxydaunomycin (Adriamycin or Doxorubicin); Oncovin (Vincristine) and Prednisone. Rituxan is a monoclonal antibody that objectives purely CD20 cells. Now, there are various varieties of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL). The medical care I defined is for an aggressive Lymphoma. I had aggressive Diffuse great B-cellular NHL. The above grow to be my medical care. I did a great variety of study on it and that i understand that what I have been given grow to be present day. it rather is been a million a million/2 years when you consider that my medical care. in spite of the undeniable fact that, different varieties of NHL could require thoroughly diverse regimens. i'm hoping this facilitates. solid luck. Answered by Vanna Kamrowski 1 year ago.

stage 4....no matter what kinda cancer you should be thinking of HOW spending time which you got LEFT ,you might not wanna choose for chemo...its gonna make you probably even more sick.I would be doing something I have always wanted to do and if you still could do it then this is really your last chance you know,sorry.ITS TIME really for the only important stuff,spending time with family and friends instead puking out the rubbish chemo will put extra into your system Answered by Lajuana Setler 1 year ago.

GOD is the best cure, I have been in uncreable situations and he delivred me, go on your knees and pray and he did it for me he will do it for youu Answered by Morton Revell 1 year ago.


Does polynueropthy ever go away?
Asked by Nobuko Cowell 1 year ago.

The prognosis for people with acute or chronic polyneuropathy depends on the cause. Polyneuropathy is the simultaneous malfunction of many peripheral nerves throughout the body. Polyneuropathy may be acute (beginning suddenly) or chronic (developing gradually, often over months or years). Causes Acute polyneuropathy has many causes. It may be caused by an infection involving a toxin produced by bacteria (as in diphtheria) or by an autoimmune reaction (as in Guillain-Barré syndrome). Toxic substances, including heavy metals such as lead and mercury, carbon monoxide, and some drugs can also cause acute polyneuropathy. The drugs include the anticonvulsant phenytoinSome Trade Names DILANTIN, some antibiotics (such as chloramphenicol Some Trade Names CHLOROMYCETIN, nitrofurantoinSome Trade Names FURADANTIN MACRODANTIN, and sulfonamides), some chemotherapy drugs (such as vinblastineSome Trade Names VELBAN and vincristineSome Trade Names ONCOVIN), and some sedatives (such as barbital and hexobarbitalSome Trade Names SOMBULEX). Cancer, such as multiple myeloma, may cause acute polyneuropathy by directly invading or compressing the nerves or by producing toxic substances. The cause of chronic polyneuropathy is often unknown. The most common form of chronic polyneuropathy is most often due to diabetes but may be due to excessive use of alcohol. Nutritional deficiencies (such as vitamin B deficiency) are an uncommon cause of chronic polyneuropathy in the United States, except among alcoholics who are malnourished. Anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency (pernicious anemia) may also cause chronic polyneuropathy. Other causes include an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), liver failure, and kidney failure. Rare causes include certain cancers, such as lung cancer, and taking excessive amounts of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine). Poor control of blood sugar levels in diabetes (see Diabetes Mellitus (DM)) causes several forms of polyneuropathy, collectively referred to as diabetic neuropathy. (Diabetes can also cause mononeuropathy or mononeuritis multiplex that leads to weakness, typically of the eye or thigh muscles.) Answered by Cassi Leaver 1 year ago.


Why would drug Vincristine (Oncovin) be fatal to a cell?
why would drug Vincristine (Oncovin) be fatal to a cell? Asked by Nadene Deffibaugh 1 year ago.

It disrupts cell division, and works best on cells that divide very rapidly. Cancer cells fall into this category; unfortunately, so do the cells of the intestinal lining. Vincristine lets cell division progress to a certain stage, but then, all activity is halted. Because the cell is in an unstable state at that point, it is a target for destruction. The cell cannot survive at this disrupted state, since the nucleus (among other structures) is not present, and thus, the cell cannot regulate processes, and it will die soon after exposure. Answered by Jimmie Pen 1 year ago.

Vincristine inhibits microtubule formation. Among the roles of microtubules is separating chromosomes during mitosis. As a result, rapidly dividing cells are likely to be interrupted mid-division and lose ability to function. Answered by Chana Fauver 1 year ago.

More information needed Answered by Kittie Hiers 1 year ago.


My son is on the following chemo drugs: Oncovin,Doxorubicin,cytoxan,et... ifosfamide?
he wanted me to ask if anyone knows, when his hair will start falling out. He's 13 and had his 1st treatment, and is not looking forward to his hair loss, i tell him its only hair and will grow back. Asked by Loreta Borski 1 year ago.

I would expect his hair to start falling out within 2 weeks of the treatment. It probably will start getting thin then all ths sudden, fall out in big chunks. He will most likely lose his eye brows, eye lashes, and facial hair if he has any yet along with his pubic hair and hair on his arms and legs too. He most likely will develop sun sensitivity and his appetite may diminish greatly. I always tell my pts not to eat their favorite foods while recieving chemo treatments because it will never be there favorite again after they throw it up. Sounds like your sons oncologist is serious here about killing cancer cells. I am curious to know what kind of cancer your son has. This is very aggressive chemotherapy he is recieving. My prayers are with you and you child. Answered by Kylee Dekorne 1 year ago.

Everyone is different. My sons hair took a few months to fall out. All his darker hair fell out first and left little blonde wisps for quite awhile. But eventually it all came out. He was on the high dose chemo for 9 months (HD-VAC and Ifosomide/Etoposide). He tolerated treatment very well and had good response from the chemotherapy. Answered by Kristel Weber 1 year ago.

Exactly, once the treatment has finished, it will all come back healthy and curly (which the chicks dig) within weeks. Although it seems harsh to have cancer at such a young age it can have it's positive ramifications. The chances of survival are that much greater and it does give a clarity of purpose. Answered by Louis Pownell 1 year ago.

I' m so sorry to here about your son tell him his hair will grow back Answered by Omega Eugley 1 year ago.

It took my Mom a couple of months before hers fell out. Answered by Denita Blanchet 1 year ago.

Visit the American Cancer Society website. Answered by Ryan Norfolk 1 year ago.


An adult weighs 165lb and is 5'8" tall. the physician orders oncovin 2mg/m square for treatment of a malinancy?
what is the dose for this patient? what is the volume of medication the patient should recieve as a dose Asked by Deetta Kirchmann 1 year ago.

BSA ~ 1.9, so dose would be 2 mg X 1.9 = 3.8 mg, but this is moot since vincristine doses are often capped at 2 mg / week. Therefore the most appropriate dose (without more info in this hypothetical situation) is 2 mg. As far as the volume administered is concerned, the answer depends on your institution. Vincristine has historically been prepared in syringes. This preparation method has, however, resulted in numerous fatalities due to accidental intrathecal administration in patients receiving other medications via this route. To prevent this, many institutions at least dilute to 10-12 mL to help distinguish IV from IT (which is usually a smaller volume, around 3-5 mL commonly). The Joint Commission, ISMP, and WHO, however, have recommended for years that vincristine doses ideally be prepared in diluted IV minibags having total volumes of 25+ mL to prevent confusion with intrathecal syringes, so many institutions do this. If this hypothetical patient were seen at my hospital s/he'd most likely receive 2 mg vincristine in 25 mL normal saline, barring those rare circumstances in which the 2 mg cap would be exceeded. I'm also guessing that this question is related to a homework assignment designed to allow you to practice the calculations. If that is indeed the case, your professor might be better off selecting a medication that does not have unusual dosage and volume restrictions. Answered by Ismael Drinnon 1 year ago.

First you have to do a couple of conversions. lbs --> kg 165lbs * 1kg/2.2lbs = 75kg feet and inches --> cm 5'8" = 68inches * 2.54cm/1inch = 172.72cm Now you need to calculate the BSA BSA(m^2) = SQRT((wt(kg) * ht(cm)) / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT((75kg * 172.72cm) / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT(12954 / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT(3.598) BSA(m^2) = 1.9m^2 Now the dose 1.9m^2 * 2mg/m^2 = 3.8mg And finally, the volume (you really can't calculate it with the information given, but it's only available as a 1mg/1ml solution) The general formula is: What you have = What you want Have: 1mg/ml Want: 3.8mg/Xml Setup: 1mg/1ml = 3.8mg/Xml Solve for Xml Xml * 1mg = 1ml * 3.8mg Xml = (1ml * 3.8mg) / 1mg Xml = 3.8ml If you have any questions, just shoot me an email or IM EDIT: A T is correct regarding the 2mg/week cap and the diluting to a larger volume. We do the same where I work. Answered by Darcey Rosenblatt 1 year ago.


Why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems?
Asked by Cherryl Sojka 1 year ago.

Vincristine Trade Names: Oncovin ®, Vincasar Pfs ® Other Names: Vincristine Sulfate, LCR, VCR Drug Type: Vincristine is an anti-cancer ("antineoplastic" or "cytotoxic") chemotherapy drug. Vincristine is classified as a plant alkaloid. What Vincristine Is Used For: Cancers treated with Vincristine include: acute leukemia, Hodgkin's and non- Hodgkin's lymphoma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, Wilms' tumor, multiple myeloma, chronic leukemias, thyroid cancer, brain tumors. It is also used to treat some blood disorders. Side effects may include: Taste changes Peripheral neuropathy: Although uncommon, a serious side effect of decreased sensation and paresthesia (numbness and tingling of the hands and feet) may be noted. Sensory loss, numbness and tingling, and difficulty in walking may last for at least as long as therapy is continued How Vincristine Works: Cancerous tumors are characterized by cell division, which is no longer controlled as it is in normal tissue. "Normal" cells stop dividing when they come into contact with like cells, a mechanism known as contact inhibition. Cancerous cells lose this ability. Cancer cells no longer have the normal checks and balances in place that control and limit cell division. The process of cell division, whether normal or cancerous cells, is through the cell cycle. The cell cycle goes from the resting phase, through active growing phases, and then to mitosis (division). The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by damaging the RNA or DNA that tells the cell how to copy itself in division. If the cells are unable to divide, they die. The faster the cells are dividing, the more likely it is that chemotherapy will kill the cells, causing the tumor to shrink. They also induce cell suicide (self-death or apoptosis). Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells only when they are dividing are called cell-cycle specific. Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells when they are at rest are called cell-cycle non-specific. The scheduling of chemotherapy is set based on the type of cells, rate at which they divide, and the time at which a given drug is likely to be effective. This is why chemotherapy is typically given in cycles. Chemotherapy is most effective at killing cells that are rapidly dividing. Unfortunately, chemotherapy does not know the difference between the cancerous cells and the normal cells. The "normal" cells will grow back and be healthy but in the meantime, side effects occur. The "normal" cells most commonly affected by chemotherapy are the blood cells, the cells in the mouth, stomach and bowel, and the hair follicles; resulting in low blood counts, mouth sores, nausea, diarrhea, and/or hair loss. Different drugs may affect different parts of the body. Vincristine belongs to a class of chemotherapy drugs called plant alkaloids. Plant alkaloids are made from plants. The vinca alkaloids are made from the periwinkle plant (catharanthus rosea). The taxanes are made from the bark of the Pacific Yew tree (taxus). The vinca alkaloids and taxanes are also known as antimicrotubule agents. The podophyllotoxins are derived from the May Apple plant. Camptothecan analogs are derived from the Asian "Happy Tree" (Camptotheca acuminata). Podophyllotoxins and camptothecan analogs are also known as topoisomerase inhibitors. The plant alkaloids are cell-cycle specific. This means they attack the cells during various phases of division. Answered by Despina Youkers 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems? Answered by Vasiliki Lawes 1 year ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Linh Brancaccio 1 year ago.


Which active ingredient blastine or vincristine is more used in chemotherapy now a days?
vincristine & vinblastine are most used vinca alkaloids in preparation of drugs used in cancer treatment but one is more popular among pharmacist than other which is that Asked by Hermina Teehee 1 year ago.

vincristine oncovin Answered by Bari Bertorelli 1 year ago.


List the names of the companies producing vinblastine and vincristine from cathranthus roseus?
herbal pharmacuetical companies Asked by Vinnie Szaflarski 1 year ago.

Vincristine, which is marketed as Oncovin by Eli Lilly, has a serum half-life of about 85 hours. It's used mainly to treat acute leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, Hodgkin's disease and other lymphomas. Vinorelbine is currently in Phase II clinical trials as a treatment for ovarian cancer. It will be marketed as Navelbine by Glaxo Wellcome, Inc., if the trials are successful and the FDA approves the drug. Answered by Saul Kordsmeier 1 year ago.


My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG.?
My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG they said its in 99% of her bones. She starts chemo (velcade) monday. what can she expect and what about the other meds. she needs.dexamethasone and Thalidomide and are very expensive she has no insurance any suggestions is greatly appreciated. Asked by Rosina Kugler 1 year ago.

She should apply for emergency Medicaid to help with the costs. This is from Mayo Clinic literature: Standard treatments for myeloma Though there's no cure for multiple myeloma, with good treatment results you can usually return to near-normal activity. The appropriate multiple myeloma treatment depends on your needs, medical status and general health. You may also wish to consider approved clinical trials as an option. Standard treatment options include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine (Oncovin), doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids such as prednisone and dexamethasone (Decadron) have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given as pills. Some research suggests that high doses of steroids may not be needed, and that lower doses may be safer and more effective. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Thalidomide is currently FDA-approved in conjunction with the corticosteroid called dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed cases of multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Bortezomib (Velcade). Velcade was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It works by blocking the action of proteasomes, which causes cancer cells to die. One study showed that bortezomib had more than twice the response rate of a commonly used drug, dexamethasone. Bortezomib is approved by the FDA for use in a treatment for people with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects. It is given orally. Lenalidomide is FDA-approved for use in combination with dexamethasone as a treatment for people who have received at least one prior therapy for multiple myeloma. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to target myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, to more quickly shrink a tumor that's causing pain or destroying a bone. Initial therapy for myeloma The initial chemotherapy used to treat multiple myeloma depends on whether you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation. Factors such as the risk of your disease progressing, your age and your general health play a part in determining whether stem cell transplantation may be right for you. If you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy will likely exclude melphalan because this drug can have a toxic effect on stem cells, making it impossible to collect enough of them. You may begin treatment with the most common initial myeloma therapy in the United States, thalidomide plus dexamethasone. Or your doctor may instead recommend a newer regimen, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone. Your stem cells will likely be collected after you've undergone three to four months of treatment with these initial agents. Your doctor may recommend undergoing the stem cell transplant soon after your cells are collected or delaying the transplant until after a relapse, if it occurs. Your age and your personal preference are important factors that will help your doctor make his or her recommendation. If you're not considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy is likely to be a combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT). If the side effects are intolerable, melphalan plus prednisone is another option (MP). This type of therapy is typically given for about 12 to 18 months. Treatments for relapsed or treatment-resistant multiple myeloma Most people who are treated for multiple myeloma eventually experience a relapse of the disease. And in some cases, none of the currently available, first-line therapies slow the cancer cells from multiplying. If you experience a relapse of multiple myeloma, your doctor may recommend repeating another course of the treatment that initially helped you. Another option is trying one or more of the other treatments typically used as first-line therapy, either alone or in combination. Research on a number of promising new treatment options is ongoing, and these drugs offer important options for those with multiple myeloma. Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials may be available to you. Treating complications Because multiple myeloma can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions. For example: Back pain. Taking pain medication or wearing a back brace can help relieve the back pain you might experience with multiple myeloma. Kidney complications. People with severe kidney damage may need dialysis. Infections. Antibiotics may be necessary to help treat infections or to help reduce your risk of them. Bone loss. You may take medications called bisphosphonates, such as pamidronate (Aredia) or zoledronic acid (Zometa), which bind to the surface of your bones and help prevent bone loss. Treatment with these drugs is associated with the risk of harm to the jawbone. If you're taking these medications, don't have dental procedures done without consulting your doctor first. Anemia. If you have persistent anemia, your doctor may prescribe erythropoietin injections. Erythropoietin is a naturally occurring hormone made in the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Research suggests that the use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of blood clots in some people with myeloma. Answered by Tina Phuma 1 year ago.

I know Thalidomide has a patient assistance program to help with the cost. Her doctor can give her all the information. But you can check out this website also. Thalomid.com. I don't think dex is that expensive. Answered by Sachiko Liepins 1 year ago.


What treatments are used for Stage 4 Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma?
Stage 4 only, please, maybe you know someone who had, has it or you are a medical professional? Do they usually do chemotherapy at this stage? Also, if they use chemo, how often is it required? This is for someone at high risk of death with many symptoms. Asked by Tonie Persch 1 year ago.

in terms of chemo, it may be CHOP plus Rituxan (CHOP-R or R-CHOP). CHOP stands for: Cytoxan (Cyclophosphamide); Hydroxydaunomycin (Adriamycin or Doxorubicin); Oncovin (Vincristine) and Prednisone. Rituxan is a monoclonal antibody that objectives purely CD20 cells. Now, there are various varieties of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL). The medical care I defined is for an aggressive Lymphoma. I had aggressive Diffuse great B-cellular NHL. The above grow to be my medical care. I did a great variety of study on it and that i understand that what I have been given grow to be present day. it rather is been a million a million/2 years when you consider that my medical care. in spite of the undeniable fact that, different varieties of NHL could require thoroughly diverse regimens. i'm hoping this facilitates. solid luck. Answered by Angel Strasburg 1 year ago.

stage 4....no matter what kinda cancer you should be thinking of HOW spending time which you got LEFT ,you might not wanna choose for chemo...its gonna make you probably even more sick.I would be doing something I have always wanted to do and if you still could do it then this is really your last chance you know,sorry.ITS TIME really for the only important stuff,spending time with family and friends instead puking out the rubbish chemo will put extra into your system Answered by Alyssa Bascombe 1 year ago.

GOD is the best cure, I have been in uncreable situations and he delivred me, go on your knees and pray and he did it for me he will do it for youu Answered by Karry Edrington 1 year ago.


Does polynueropthy ever go away?
Asked by Tracie Shiba 1 year ago.

The prognosis for people with acute or chronic polyneuropathy depends on the cause. Polyneuropathy is the simultaneous malfunction of many peripheral nerves throughout the body. Polyneuropathy may be acute (beginning suddenly) or chronic (developing gradually, often over months or years). Causes Acute polyneuropathy has many causes. It may be caused by an infection involving a toxin produced by bacteria (as in diphtheria) or by an autoimmune reaction (as in Guillain-Barré syndrome). Toxic substances, including heavy metals such as lead and mercury, carbon monoxide, and some drugs can also cause acute polyneuropathy. The drugs include the anticonvulsant phenytoinSome Trade Names DILANTIN, some antibiotics (such as chloramphenicol Some Trade Names CHLOROMYCETIN, nitrofurantoinSome Trade Names FURADANTIN MACRODANTIN, and sulfonamides), some chemotherapy drugs (such as vinblastineSome Trade Names VELBAN and vincristineSome Trade Names ONCOVIN), and some sedatives (such as barbital and hexobarbitalSome Trade Names SOMBULEX). Cancer, such as multiple myeloma, may cause acute polyneuropathy by directly invading or compressing the nerves or by producing toxic substances. The cause of chronic polyneuropathy is often unknown. The most common form of chronic polyneuropathy is most often due to diabetes but may be due to excessive use of alcohol. Nutritional deficiencies (such as vitamin B deficiency) are an uncommon cause of chronic polyneuropathy in the United States, except among alcoholics who are malnourished. Anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency (pernicious anemia) may also cause chronic polyneuropathy. Other causes include an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), liver failure, and kidney failure. Rare causes include certain cancers, such as lung cancer, and taking excessive amounts of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine). Poor control of blood sugar levels in diabetes (see Diabetes Mellitus (DM)) causes several forms of polyneuropathy, collectively referred to as diabetic neuropathy. (Diabetes can also cause mononeuropathy or mononeuritis multiplex that leads to weakness, typically of the eye or thigh muscles.) Answered by Stephania Frohlich 1 year ago.


Why would drug Vincristine (Oncovin) be fatal to a cell?
why would drug Vincristine (Oncovin) be fatal to a cell? Asked by Vilma Baltzley 1 year ago.

It disrupts cell division, and works best on cells that divide very rapidly. Cancer cells fall into this category; unfortunately, so do the cells of the intestinal lining. Vincristine lets cell division progress to a certain stage, but then, all activity is halted. Because the cell is in an unstable state at that point, it is a target for destruction. The cell cannot survive at this disrupted state, since the nucleus (among other structures) is not present, and thus, the cell cannot regulate processes, and it will die soon after exposure. Answered by Santana Laferriere 1 year ago.

Vincristine inhibits microtubule formation. Among the roles of microtubules is separating chromosomes during mitosis. As a result, rapidly dividing cells are likely to be interrupted mid-division and lose ability to function. Answered by Rico Hurban 1 year ago.

More information needed Answered by Maricela Don 1 year ago.


My son is on the following chemo drugs: Oncovin,Doxorubicin,cytoxan,et... ifosfamide?
he wanted me to ask if anyone knows, when his hair will start falling out. He's 13 and had his 1st treatment, and is not looking forward to his hair loss, i tell him its only hair and will grow back. Asked by Lesley Coogan 1 year ago.

I would expect his hair to start falling out within 2 weeks of the treatment. It probably will start getting thin then all ths sudden, fall out in big chunks. He will most likely lose his eye brows, eye lashes, and facial hair if he has any yet along with his pubic hair and hair on his arms and legs too. He most likely will develop sun sensitivity and his appetite may diminish greatly. I always tell my pts not to eat their favorite foods while recieving chemo treatments because it will never be there favorite again after they throw it up. Sounds like your sons oncologist is serious here about killing cancer cells. I am curious to know what kind of cancer your son has. This is very aggressive chemotherapy he is recieving. My prayers are with you and you child. Answered by Christy Blumenkranz 1 year ago.

Everyone is different. My sons hair took a few months to fall out. All his darker hair fell out first and left little blonde wisps for quite awhile. But eventually it all came out. He was on the high dose chemo for 9 months (HD-VAC and Ifosomide/Etoposide). He tolerated treatment very well and had good response from the chemotherapy. Answered by Jonathan Buchannan 1 year ago.

Exactly, once the treatment has finished, it will all come back healthy and curly (which the chicks dig) within weeks. Although it seems harsh to have cancer at such a young age it can have it's positive ramifications. The chances of survival are that much greater and it does give a clarity of purpose. Answered by Arvilla Milford 1 year ago.

I' m so sorry to here about your son tell him his hair will grow back Answered by Deandre Loreto 1 year ago.

It took my Mom a couple of months before hers fell out. Answered by Skye Hulse 1 year ago.

Visit the American Cancer Society website. Answered by Lucina Grieme 1 year ago.


An adult weighs 165lb and is 5'8" tall. the physician orders oncovin 2mg/m square for treatment of a malinancy?
what is the dose for this patient? what is the volume of medication the patient should recieve as a dose Asked by Forrest Marrietta 1 year ago.

BSA ~ 1.9, so dose would be 2 mg X 1.9 = 3.8 mg, but this is moot since vincristine doses are often capped at 2 mg / week. Therefore the most appropriate dose (without more info in this hypothetical situation) is 2 mg. As far as the volume administered is concerned, the answer depends on your institution. Vincristine has historically been prepared in syringes. This preparation method has, however, resulted in numerous fatalities due to accidental intrathecal administration in patients receiving other medications via this route. To prevent this, many institutions at least dilute to 10-12 mL to help distinguish IV from IT (which is usually a smaller volume, around 3-5 mL commonly). The Joint Commission, ISMP, and WHO, however, have recommended for years that vincristine doses ideally be prepared in diluted IV minibags having total volumes of 25+ mL to prevent confusion with intrathecal syringes, so many institutions do this. If this hypothetical patient were seen at my hospital s/he'd most likely receive 2 mg vincristine in 25 mL normal saline, barring those rare circumstances in which the 2 mg cap would be exceeded. I'm also guessing that this question is related to a homework assignment designed to allow you to practice the calculations. If that is indeed the case, your professor might be better off selecting a medication that does not have unusual dosage and volume restrictions. Answered by Shawanda Whitebear 1 year ago.

First you have to do a couple of conversions. lbs --> kg 165lbs * 1kg/2.2lbs = 75kg feet and inches --> cm 5'8" = 68inches * 2.54cm/1inch = 172.72cm Now you need to calculate the BSA BSA(m^2) = SQRT((wt(kg) * ht(cm)) / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT((75kg * 172.72cm) / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT(12954 / 3600) BSA(m^2) = SQRT(3.598) BSA(m^2) = 1.9m^2 Now the dose 1.9m^2 * 2mg/m^2 = 3.8mg And finally, the volume (you really can't calculate it with the information given, but it's only available as a 1mg/1ml solution) The general formula is: What you have = What you want Have: 1mg/ml Want: 3.8mg/Xml Setup: 1mg/1ml = 3.8mg/Xml Solve for Xml Xml * 1mg = 1ml * 3.8mg Xml = (1ml * 3.8mg) / 1mg Xml = 3.8ml If you have any questions, just shoot me an email or IM EDIT: A T is correct regarding the 2mg/week cap and the diluting to a larger volume. We do the same where I work. Answered by Santiago Michelle 1 year ago.


Why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems?
Asked by Delilah Koprowski 1 year ago.

Vincristine Trade Names: Oncovin ®, Vincasar Pfs ® Other Names: Vincristine Sulfate, LCR, VCR Drug Type: Vincristine is an anti-cancer ("antineoplastic" or "cytotoxic") chemotherapy drug. Vincristine is classified as a plant alkaloid. What Vincristine Is Used For: Cancers treated with Vincristine include: acute leukemia, Hodgkin's and non- Hodgkin's lymphoma, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, Wilms' tumor, multiple myeloma, chronic leukemias, thyroid cancer, brain tumors. It is also used to treat some blood disorders. Side effects may include: Taste changes Peripheral neuropathy: Although uncommon, a serious side effect of decreased sensation and paresthesia (numbness and tingling of the hands and feet) may be noted. Sensory loss, numbness and tingling, and difficulty in walking may last for at least as long as therapy is continued How Vincristine Works: Cancerous tumors are characterized by cell division, which is no longer controlled as it is in normal tissue. "Normal" cells stop dividing when they come into contact with like cells, a mechanism known as contact inhibition. Cancerous cells lose this ability. Cancer cells no longer have the normal checks and balances in place that control and limit cell division. The process of cell division, whether normal or cancerous cells, is through the cell cycle. The cell cycle goes from the resting phase, through active growing phases, and then to mitosis (division). The ability of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells depends on its ability to halt cell division. Usually, the drugs work by damaging the RNA or DNA that tells the cell how to copy itself in division. If the cells are unable to divide, they die. The faster the cells are dividing, the more likely it is that chemotherapy will kill the cells, causing the tumor to shrink. They also induce cell suicide (self-death or apoptosis). Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells only when they are dividing are called cell-cycle specific. Chemotherapy drugs that affect cells when they are at rest are called cell-cycle non-specific. The scheduling of chemotherapy is set based on the type of cells, rate at which they divide, and the time at which a given drug is likely to be effective. This is why chemotherapy is typically given in cycles. Chemotherapy is most effective at killing cells that are rapidly dividing. Unfortunately, chemotherapy does not know the difference between the cancerous cells and the normal cells. The "normal" cells will grow back and be healthy but in the meantime, side effects occur. The "normal" cells most commonly affected by chemotherapy are the blood cells, the cells in the mouth, stomach and bowel, and the hair follicles; resulting in low blood counts, mouth sores, nausea, diarrhea, and/or hair loss. Different drugs may affect different parts of the body. Vincristine belongs to a class of chemotherapy drugs called plant alkaloids. Plant alkaloids are made from plants. The vinca alkaloids are made from the periwinkle plant (catharanthus rosea). The taxanes are made from the bark of the Pacific Yew tree (taxus). The vinca alkaloids and taxanes are also known as antimicrotubule agents. The podophyllotoxins are derived from the May Apple plant. Camptothecan analogs are derived from the Asian "Happy Tree" (Camptotheca acuminata). Podophyllotoxins and camptothecan analogs are also known as topoisomerase inhibitors. The plant alkaloids are cell-cycle specific. This means they attack the cells during various phases of division. Answered by Ezequiel Rawling 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: why does the drug vincristine have side effects such as loss of dividing cells an nerve problems? Answered by Christa Cukaj 1 year ago.

Monitor your blood glucose levels. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose levels will help keep your blood glucose under control and may help improve your neuropathy. Answered by Ashleigh Eidson 1 year ago.


Which active ingredient blastine or vincristine is more used in chemotherapy now a days?
vincristine & vinblastine are most used vinca alkaloids in preparation of drugs used in cancer treatment but one is more popular among pharmacist than other which is that Asked by Delilah Vugteveen 1 year ago.

vincristine oncovin Answered by Aurore Granade 1 year ago.


List the names of the companies producing vinblastine and vincristine from cathranthus roseus?
herbal pharmacuetical companies Asked by Mattie Haeck 1 year ago.

Vincristine, which is marketed as Oncovin by Eli Lilly, has a serum half-life of about 85 hours. It's used mainly to treat acute leukemia, rhabdomyosarcoma, neuroblastoma, Hodgkin's disease and other lymphomas. Vinorelbine is currently in Phase II clinical trials as a treatment for ovarian cancer. It will be marketed as Navelbine by Glaxo Wellcome, Inc., if the trials are successful and the FDA approves the drug. Answered by Cristobal Leib 1 year ago.


My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG.?
My sister was diagnosed with multiple myeloma IdG they said its in 99% of her bones. She starts chemo (velcade) monday. what can she expect and what about the other meds. she needs.dexamethasone and Thalidomide and are very expensive she has no insurance any suggestions is greatly appreciated. Asked by Lakisha Jodha 1 year ago.

She should apply for emergency Medicaid to help with the costs. This is from Mayo Clinic literature: Standard treatments for myeloma Though there's no cure for multiple myeloma, with good treatment results you can usually return to near-normal activity. The appropriate multiple myeloma treatment depends on your needs, medical status and general health. You may also wish to consider approved clinical trials as an option. Standard treatment options include: Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy involves using medicines — taken orally as a pill or given through an intravenous (IV) injection — to kill myeloma cells. Chemotherapy is often given in cycles over a period of months, followed by a rest period. Often chemotherapy is discontinued during what is called a plateau phase or remission, during which your M protein level remains stable. You may need chemotherapy again if your M protein level begins to rise. Common chemotherapy drugs used to treat myeloma are melphalan (Alkeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), vincristine (Oncovin), doxorubicin (Adriamycin) and liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil). Corticosteroids. Corticosteroids such as prednisone and dexamethasone (Decadron) have been used for decades to treat multiple myeloma. They are typically given as pills. Some research suggests that high doses of steroids may not be needed, and that lower doses may be safer and more effective. Stem cell transplantation. This treatment involves using high-dose chemotherapy — usually high doses of melphalan — along with transfusion of previously collected immature blood cells (stem cells) to replace diseased or damaged marrow. The stem cells can come from you or from a donor, and they may be from either blood or bone marrow. Thalidomide (Thalomid). Thalidomide, a drug originally used as a sedative and to treat morning sickness in the 1950s, was removed from the market after it was found to cause severe birth defects. However, the drug received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) again in 1998, first as a treatment for skin lesions caused by leprosy. Thalidomide is currently FDA-approved in conjunction with the corticosteroid called dexamethasone for the treatment of newly diagnosed cases of multiple myeloma. This drug is given orally. Bortezomib (Velcade). Velcade was the first approved drug in a new class of medications called proteasome inhibitors. It is administered intravenously. It works by blocking the action of proteasomes, which causes cancer cells to die. One study showed that bortezomib had more than twice the response rate of a commonly used drug, dexamethasone. Bortezomib is approved by the FDA for use in a treatment for people with multiple myeloma who have received at least one prior therapy. Lenalidomide (Revlimid). Lenalidomide is chemically similar to thalidomide, but appears to be more potent and cause fewer side effects. It is given orally. Lenalidomide is FDA-approved for use in combination with dexamethasone as a treatment for people who have received at least one prior therapy for multiple myeloma. Radiation therapy. This treatment uses high-energy penetrating waves to damage myeloma cells and stop their growth. Radiation therapy may be used to target myeloma cells in a specific area — for instance, to more quickly shrink a tumor that's causing pain or destroying a bone. Initial therapy for myeloma The initial chemotherapy used to treat multiple myeloma depends on whether you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation. Factors such as the risk of your disease progressing, your age and your general health play a part in determining whether stem cell transplantation may be right for you. If you're considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy will likely exclude melphalan because this drug can have a toxic effect on stem cells, making it impossible to collect enough of them. You may begin treatment with the most common initial myeloma therapy in the United States, thalidomide plus dexamethasone. Or your doctor may instead recommend a newer regimen, lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone. Your stem cells will likely be collected after you've undergone three to four months of treatment with these initial agents. Your doctor may recommend undergoing the stem cell transplant soon after your cells are collected or delaying the transplant until after a relapse, if it occurs. Your age and your personal preference are important factors that will help your doctor make his or her recommendation. If you're not considered a candidate for stem cell transplantation: Your initial therapy is likely to be a combination of melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide (MPT). If the side effects are intolerable, melphalan plus prednisone is another option (MP). This type of therapy is typically given for about 12 to 18 months. Treatments for relapsed or treatment-resistant multiple myeloma Most people who are treated for multiple myeloma eventually experience a relapse of the disease. And in some cases, none of the currently available, first-line therapies slow the cancer cells from multiplying. If you experience a relapse of multiple myeloma, your doctor may recommend repeating another course of the treatment that initially helped you. Another option is trying one or more of the other treatments typically used as first-line therapy, either alone or in combination. Research on a number of promising new treatment options is ongoing, and these drugs offer important options for those with multiple myeloma. Talk to your doctor about what clinical trials may be available to you. Treating complications Because multiple myeloma can cause a number of complications, you may also need treatment for those specific conditions. For example: Back pain. Taking pain medication or wearing a back brace can help relieve the back pain you might experience with multiple myeloma. Kidney complications. People with severe kidney damage may need dialysis. Infections. Antibiotics may be necessary to help treat infections or to help reduce your risk of them. Bone loss. You may take medications called bisphosphonates, such as pamidronate (Aredia) or zoledronic acid (Zometa), which bind to the surface of your bones and help prevent bone loss. Treatment with these drugs is associated with the risk of harm to the jawbone. If you're taking these medications, don't have dental procedures done without consulting your doctor first. Anemia. If you have persistent anemia, your doctor may prescribe erythropoietin injections. Erythropoietin is a naturally occurring hormone made in the kidneys that stimulates the production of red blood cells. Research suggests that the use of erythropoietin may increase the risk of blood clots in some people with myeloma. Answered by Russ Mcgarrah 1 year ago.

I know Thalidomide has a patient assistance program to help with the cost. Her doctor can give her all the information. But you can check out this website also. Thalomid.com. I don't think dex is that expensive. Answered by Benjamin Sancedo 1 year ago.


What treatments are used for Stage 4 Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma?
Stage 4 only, please, maybe you know someone who had, has it or you are a medical professional? Do they usually do chemotherapy at this stage? Also, if they use chemo, how often is it required? This is for someone at high risk of death with many symptoms. Asked by Shaquita Lawery 1 year ago.

in terms of chemo, it may be CHOP plus Rituxan (CHOP-R or R-CHOP). CHOP stands for: Cytoxan (Cyclophosphamide); Hydroxydaunomycin (Adriamycin or Doxorubicin); Oncovin (Vincristine) and Prednisone. Rituxan is a monoclonal antibody that objectives purely CD20 cells. Now, there are various varieties of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL). The medical care I defined is for an aggressive Lymphoma. I had aggressive Diffuse great B-cellular NHL. The above grow to be my medical care. I did a great variety of study on it and that i understand that what I have been given grow to be present day. it rather is been a million a million/2 years when you consider that my medical care. in spite of the undeniable fact that, different varieties of NHL could require thoroughly diverse regimens. i'm hoping this facilitates. solid luck. Answered by Twanda Wischmeier 1 year ago.

stage 4....no matter what kinda cancer you should be thinking of HOW spending time which you got LEFT ,you might not wanna choose for chemo...its gonna make you probably even more sick.I would be doing something I have always wanted to do and if you still could do it then this is really your last chance you know,sorry.ITS TIME really for the only important stuff,spending time with family and friends instead puking out the rubbish chemo will put extra into your system Answered by Vera Mutherspaw 1 year ago.

GOD is the best cure, I have been in uncreable situations and he delivred me, go on your knees and pray and he did it for me he will do it for youu Answered by Lanell Karlstad 1 year ago.


Does polynueropthy ever go away?
Asked by Brian Gerundo 1 year ago.

The prognosis for people with acute or chronic polyneuropathy depends on the cause. Polyneuropathy is the simultaneous malfunction of many peripheral nerves throughout the body. Polyneuropathy may be acute (beginning suddenly) or chronic (developing gradually, often over months or years). Causes Acute polyneuropathy has many causes. It may be caused by an infection involving a toxin produced by bacteria (as in diphtheria) or by an autoimmune reaction (as in Guillain-Barré syndrome). Toxic substances, including heavy metals such as lead and mercury, carbon monoxide, and some drugs can also cause acute polyneuropathy. The drugs include the anticonvulsant phenytoinSome Trade Names DILANTIN, some antibiotics (such as chloramphenicol Some Trade Names CHLOROMYCETIN, nitrofurantoinSome Trade Names FURADANTIN MACRODANTIN, and sulfonamides), some chemotherapy drugs (such as vinblastineSome Trade Names VELBAN and vincristineSome Trade Names ONCOVIN), and some sedatives (such as barbital and hexobarbitalSome Trade Names SOMBULEX). Cancer, such as multiple myeloma, may cause acute polyneuropathy by directly invading or compressing the nerves or by producing toxic substances. The cause of chronic polyneuropathy is often unknown. The most common form of chronic polyneuropathy is most often due to diabetes but may be due to excessive use of alcohol. Nutritional deficiencies (such as vitamin B deficiency) are an uncommon cause of chronic polyneuropathy in the United States, except among alcoholics who are malnourished. Anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency (pernicious anemia) may also cause chronic polyneuropathy. Other causes include an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), liver failure, and kidney failure. Rare causes include certain cancers, such as lung cancer, and taking excessive amounts of vitamin B6 (pyridoxine). Poor control of blood sugar levels in diabetes (see Diabetes Mellitus (DM)) causes several forms of polyneuropathy, collectively referred to as diabetic neuropathy. (Diabetes can also cause mononeuropathy or mononeuritis multiplex that leads to weakness, typically of the eye or thigh muscles.) Answered by Georgianna Vathroder 1 year ago.


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