Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 008392/003.

Names and composition

"NYDRAZID" is the commercial name of a drug composed of ISONIAZID.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008392/003 NYDRAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
008662/001 NYDRAZID ISONIAZID INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
008392/003 NYDRAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
008420/001 RIMIFON ISONIAZID SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
008420/002 RIMIFON ISONIAZID INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
008420/003 RIMIFON ISONIAZID INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
008428/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 50MG
008428/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
008428/003 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
008499/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
008499/003 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
008662/001 NYDRAZID ISONIAZID INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
008678/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
008678/003 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
040090/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
040090/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
040648/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID INJECTABLE/INJECTION 100MG per ML
080120/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080126/001 STANOZIDE ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080126/002 STANOZIDE ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
080132/003 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080132/004 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080134/003 HYZYD ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080134/004 HYZYD ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
080136/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080140/001 LANIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080140/002 LANIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080153/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080212/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080270/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080330/002 DOW-ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
080368/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080368/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080401/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080521/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
080522/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080523/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080935/001 INH ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
080936/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080937/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
080941/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
081118/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
083060/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
083178/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
083610/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
083632/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 50MG
083633/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
084050/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085091/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085784/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
085790/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
087425/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
088119/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
088231/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
088235/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
089243/001 LANIAZID ISONIAZID SYRUP/ORAL 50MG per 5ML
089776/001 LANIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG
089816/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID Injectable/ Injection 100MG per ML
202610/001 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 100MG
202610/002 ISONIAZID ISONIAZID TABLET/ORAL 300MG

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Answered questions

How safe is the Change of medicine for a tb affected lady?
She is taking medicine remister 4fdc(4 daily), pyrovit(1 daily), multi vitamin and neoceptin r for last 15 days to prevent tb. Having lots of reaction- fever/vomiting/ stomach pain. Now another doctor told to stop med for 3 days and to start another med. How safe is this change of medicine for a tb affected lady. Asked by Kacy Aukes 1 year ago.

isoniazld(INH< Nydrazid) Rafampin(Rifadin Rimactance) Pyrazinamide Etharmbutol Rafapentine Streptomycine Ethionamide Cycloserine Capreomycin Levofloxacin Moxifloxacin These are the drugs used for Tb you sure this is what she has since the meds you gave have nothing to do with TB as far as I can tell. SORRY Answered by Eldon Falacco 1 year ago.


Side effects?
I am at the moment being treated for Tuberculosis and for the last few days I have bean suffering cramps in my hands and knees, very similar to arthritis, anything to do with the cocktail of drugs they have me on. UK citizen living and working in China Asked by Venus Sodergren 1 year ago.

Here are some drugs and their side effects: Drug Daily adult dose Side effects isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid), also called INH 5 mg/kg up to 300 mg Hepatitis (rare), excessive tiredness, weakness, loss of appetite, upset stomach, vomiting, dark yellow or brown urine, yellowing of the skin or eyes, diarrhea, vision problems, eye pain, numbness or tingling in the hands and feet, rash, fever, swollen glands, sore throat, stomach pains or tenderness rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), also called RIF 10 mg/kg up to 600 mg Hepatitis (rare), headache, muscle pain, bone pain, heartburn, upset stomach, vomiting, stomach cramps, chills, diarrhea, rash, sores on skin or in the mouth, fever, yellowing of the skin or eyes. Urine, stools, saliva, sputum, sweat, and tears may turn red-orange. pyrazinamide, also called PZA 1,000 mg for patients weighing 40 – 55 kg (88 – 121 lbs) 1,500 mg for patients weighing 56 – 75 kg (123 – 165 lbs) 2,000 mg for patients weighing 76 – 90 kg (167 – 198 lbs) Hepatitis (rare), upset stomach, fatigue, rash, fever, vomiting, loss of appetite, yellowing of the skin or eyes, darkened urine, pain and swelling in the joints, unusual bleeding or bruising, difficulty urinating ethambutol (Myambutol), also called EMB 800 mg for patients weighing 40 – 55 kg (88 – 121 lbs) 1,200 mg for patients weighing 56 – 75 kg (123 – 165 lbs) 1,600 mg for patients weighting 76 – 90 kg (167 – 198 lbs) Blurred vision, sudden changes in vision, inability to see the colors red and green, loss of appetite, upset stomach, vomiting, numbness and tingling in the hands. Pyrazinamide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: upset stomach fatigue If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: skin rash fever vomiting loss of appetite yellowing of the skin or eyes darkened urine pain and swelling in the joints * unusual bleeding or bruising difficult urination Answered by Alex Rebollar 1 year ago.

I dont think you have tuberculosis. hand and knees cramps have nothing to do with it symptoms include a productive, prolonged cough of more than three weeks duration, chest pain, and coughing up blood. Systemic symptoms include fever, chills, night sweats, appetite loss, weight loss, paling, and easy fatigability. Answered by Latoya Bertorelli 1 year ago.


What could be the cause of this sudden increase in ALT level?
I got tested and i got 91.7 and that's really high.I dont drink,i dont do drugs,and ive never had sex or used someones razors and stuff and i dont have hepatitis i got tested for that before so im sure i dont have it.i am going to c a doctor tomorrow anyways but i just need to calm my nerves down a bit. Asked by Jenna Ferrante 1 year ago.

Your liver is a vital organ that produces bile to aid digestion, removes chemicals from the blood and produces proteins necessary for well-being. Certain prescribed medications as well as over-the-counter medications, herbs and vitamins can cause liver damage. Acetaminophen An acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose can cause liver damage. The amount of liver damage depends on the dosage ingested. In the U.S. and the United Kingdom, the leading cause of rapid onset liver failure is acetaminophen overdose. People who are at an increased risk for liver damage resulting from high levels of acetaminophen ingestion are those who drink alcohol regularly, malnourished individuals and people who take acetaminophen along with phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital or isoniazid (Nydrazid, Laniazid). Cholesterol Medications Statin medications are used to lower "bad" cholesterol to prevent strokes and heart attacks. Liver injury is rare, but statins can cause mild elevations of liver enzymes such as ALT and AST. Examples of statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor), simvastatin (Zocor), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol) and rosuvastatin (Crestor). Due to the small risk of severe liver damage, the FDA recommends patients have liver enzyme blood tests performed before beginning statin medications, again 12 weeks after beginning treatment and then periodically. Niacin is another medication used to treat high cholesterol and can cause increased liver enzymes, yellowing of the skin and, rarely, liver failure. The generic name for Niacin is nicotinic acid. People who drink regularly and those with pre-existing liver disease are at a greater risk for liver damage. The extended-release form of Niacin is more likely to cause liver damage than the immediate-release form. Cordarone Cordarone is a medication prescribed for irregular heart rhythms. The generic name of Cordarone is amiodarone. Cordarone can cause elevated liver enzymes, rapid liver failure and irreversible cirrhosis. Less than 1 percent of patients are at risk for serious liver damage. Liver damage can occur even after the medication is discontinued because Coradarone is stored in the liver. Serious liver damage can result in the need for a liver transplant. Methotrexate Methotrexate is prescribed for people with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease. The brand names of methotrexate are Rheumatrex and Trexall. This medication can cause liver cirrhosis, depending on the dose prescribed. People who drink alcohol regularly, who are obese and those with a pre-existing liver conditions are at an increased risk for cirrhosis while taking methotrexate. Antibiotics Certain antibiotics such as isoniazid, nitrofurantoin and augmentin can cause liver problems. Other antibiotics that can cause liver damage are minocycline and Cotrimoxazole. Isoniazid is a medication used to treat tuberculosis. This medication can cause mild liver enzyme elevation and can cause isoniazid-induced hepatitis in 1 to 2 percent of patients. The risk of liver damage increases when isoniazid is taken with Tylenol and rifampin. Nitrofurantoin is an antibiotic used to treat urinary tract infections. This medication can cause elevated liver enzymes and sudden onset and chronic liver disease. In rare cases, nitrofurantoin can cause nitrofurantoin hepatitis. Augmentin is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections. This medication can rarely cause Augmentin-induced cholestasis that can result in cirrhosis, liver failure and liver transplant. NSAIDs NSAIDs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are used for joint and bone related inflammations. Examples of NSAIDs are ibuprofen (Motrin), diclofenac (Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Naprosyn), nabumetone (Relafen) and piroxicam (Feldene). These medications are generally safe when properly used, but can worsen liver function in people with advanced liver disease and cirrhosis. Liver disease from NSAID use is rare, but diclofenac carries a slightly higher risk for producing hepatitis. Other Medications Tacrine (Cognex) is prescribed for treating Alzheimer's disease. This medication can cause elevated liver enzymes and, rarely, hepatitis and serious liver damage. Disulfiram (Antabuse) is used to treat alcoholism and can cause a sudden onset of hepatitis which can lead to acute liver failure and liver transplant.... Answered by Willy Schabes 1 year ago.

The ALT and AST are liver enzymes. It is true that these will give the doctor an idea if there is liver cell damage. However, different things can cause these enzymes to rise: exercising before the test was done, taking certain kinds of medications, having a muscle injury or intramuscular injection, consuming alcohol, and so much more. The liver enzymes (ALTAnswered by Janetta Gilbreath 1 year ago.


Ms. Bates presents the pharmacy with a list of medications that she takes on a regular basis?
Atenolol 50 mg PO daily, HCTZ 25 mg PO daily, INH 300 mg PO daily What is the third drug on the list? Based on the dose of the third drug, which disease and phase is being treated? Asked by Shella Ambrosini 1 year ago.

INH is isoniazid. Other brand names of this drug include: Isotamine, Nydrazid, or Laniazid. It is a first-line therapy for active tuberculosis when used in combination with other drugs. Alone, it is used to prevent tuberculosis in patients who have been exposed to the disease. Answered by Marylou Rahmes 1 year ago.

isoniazid. he's being treated for latent tb. Answered by Marnie Blackston 1 year ago.


What does the term MAIO inhibiting drugs mean?
I was asked about drug interactions and this term came up. My question is what drugs are considered maio inhibitors. Asked by Lynwood Desmond 1 year ago.

I think you mean MAOI?? Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOI) drugs and trade names: • Furazolidone: Furoxone • Isocarboxazid: Marplan® • Isoniazid: Laniazid®, Nydrazid® • Isoniazid rifampin: Rifamate®, Rimactane®/INH • Moclobemide • Pargyline: Eutonyl® • Phenelzine: Nardil® • Procarbazine: Matulane® • Selegiline: Atapryl®, Deprenyl®, Eldepryl® • Tranylcypromine: Parnate® type of drug: Two groups: • Hydrazine derivatives: phenelzine, isocarboxazid • Non-hydrazine derivatives: tranylcypromine, pargyline mechanism: Agents that inhibit monoamine oxidase and alter catecholamine metabolism (down-regulating noradrenergic synpases and upregulating serotogenic synapses); includes other agents with secondary MAOI action, e.g., phenelzine. used to treat: Depression (refractory to tricyclic antidepressants); antineoplastic (procarbazine), antibiotic (furoxone); adjunctive treatment in Parkinson's (selegine) and hypertension (pargyline). Answered by Yasuko Rincon 1 year ago.

Mono Amine Oxidase Inhibitors - MAOI See the wiki page about it They are old fashioned antidepressants and associated with the necessity to stick to a particular diet and avoid certain foods. There is a new class of MAOI's now, the RIMA's Reversible Inhibitors of Monoamine oxidase A: moclobemide This is a better drug as it is safer and does not require the diet. It is considered a mild antidepressant as it's efficacy is not quite up to par with the hard core tricyclics and SSRI's The wiki page has a list of the names of these: # Isocarboxazid (Marplan) # Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix, Moclodura®) # Phenelzine (Nardil) # Tranylcypromine (Parnate) # Selegiline (Selegiline, Eldepryl), and Emsam # Nialamide # Iproniazid (Marsilid, Iprozid, Ipronid, Rivivol, Propilniazida) # Iproclozide # Toloxatone Answered by Delta Shanahan 1 year ago.

I asked my doctor recently. It is a group of drugs that used to be used for treating depression. They are still used but not very often. I don't have the names of the drugs but if you aren't being treated for depression, you should be ok. If in doubt, call a 24 hr. pharmacy and ask to speak to the pharmacist. Answered by Janay Apo 1 year ago.

Certain types of antideppressants. (BTW, it's MAOI) Look this up on the internet and it will give you the names of them. Most health care professionals are steering away from these now because of the many interactions with other meds and even foods, such as cheese and wine. Answered by Stephanie Shrigley 1 year ago.

Maoi Drug Names Answered by Hermina Scrogham 1 year ago.


Treatment and prevention of Tuberculosis?
Im doing a project Asked by Annika Galvis 1 year ago.

TUBERCULOSIS:: Tuberculosis (TB),has been around for many many yrs.it has declined in the past century, but there has been an increase with the homeless folks living in the inner cities and people infected with HIV also from other country's., TB is a long lasting (chronic) bacterial infection. You can breath this in from someone elses sneezes or coughs since its an air boren disease. TB varies directly with the frequency and intensity of your contacts with people who are infected .TB results from the bacterium mycobacterium tuberculosis. If a person is expsoed to TB this organism may gain entry to the lungs Can be infected but have no symptoms initially, or you may develope a light fever or cough. The TB organism can spread through the lymph nodes and blood to almost any part of the body. Areas most commonly effected are the lungs and the membranes that cover the lungs (pleural membranes), the spine ,large joints, and the kidneys, if the kidneys are effected the feeling is like a bad bladder infection. A simple skin test can let a person know if they have been infected. this test is a small needle with the tuberculin purified protein derivative into the skin . If infected this will cause a reaction at injection site within 48-72 hours if this is very active infection or the immune system is suppressed the TB test reaction may be falsely negative. A preliminary diagnosis of TB is often based on a chest X ray where changes may appear within 2-3 months after the initial infection.Your doctor may want a person to collect sputum for staining and examination under a microscope. A diagnosis is confirmed by growing the organism (culturing) in a laboratory. The sputum is usually the easiest sample to obtain for a culture,another way is urine and stomach secretions.Stomach secretions are collected by passing a small tube through the nose,down the back of the throatthrough the esophagus and into the stomach.the doctor may get preliminary results fr4om a staining test much faster than a culture the staining is up in 24 hours as to the culture takes at least 3-8 weeks because the TB bacterium grows very slow. Some strains of the TB organism require different or more intensive treatments than other strains.Sometimes the TB develops within week after initial exposure.however the TB organism may lie dormant for years before the disease becomes apparent. The disease may be reactivated under a weak immune system with age,alcoholism. and malnutrition or the use of immunosuppressant medications or the present of certain illnesses like HIV / Aids or Cancers. Drugs have been the main treatment for this disease but as time goes on the drugs offered have become resistant (the organisms) that have been commonly usedActive Tb strats with 4 type drugs isoniazid (Laniazid,Nydrazid), Rifampin (Rifadin). Pyrazinamidecan be combined into one pill (rifater)and Ethambutol(myambutol).. To determine the bactera's sensitivity or resistance to each drug cultures of either stutum or other body secetions or tissues are evaluated in a laboratory when theses results are complete some drugs may need to be replaced with either stronger or a new drug all together. Once a drug regimen is started improvement is seen in the symptoms in 3-4 weeks.with a follow up chest X ray this treatment may last for 1 year this is to be sure the TB is destroyed for good. If you have a positive TB skin test especially if you or some one you know has been in close contact with any one with the TB diseasethe doc may consider giving you isoniazid to decrease the risk of developing active TB this must be taken for 9 months in addition the rest of the family may have to take this or another similar one to keep all from getting the TB disease. Answered by Terina Oliviera 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Kitty Shellgren 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Chieko Wenthold 1 year ago.


Can anyone tell me what cladidimine and acetametaphin are and what they are used for?
Asked by Annette Asp 1 year ago.

Brand name: Tylenol Pronounced: TIE-len-all Generic name: Acetaminophen Other brand name: Aspirin Free Anacin --------------------------------------... Why is this drug prescribed? Tylenol is a fever- and pain-reducing medication that is widely used to relieve simple headaches and muscle aches; the minor aches and pains associated with the common cold; backache; toothache; minor pain of arthritis; and menstrual cramps. --------------------------------------... Most important fact about this drug Do not use Tylenol to relieve pain for more than 10 days, or to reduce fever for more than 3 days unless your doctor has specifically told you to do so. --------------------------------------... How should you take this medication? Follow the dosing instructions on the label. Do not take more Tylenol than is recommended. --If you miss a dose... Take this medication only as needed. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. Protect extra strength gelcaps and geltabs from high humidity and excessive heat. Keep the extended relief caplets away from high heat. --------------------------------------... What side effects may occur? Tylenol is relatively free of side effects. Rarely, an allergic reaction may occur. If you develop any allergic symptoms such as rash, hives, swelling, or difficulty breathing, stop taking Tylenol immediately and notify your doctor. --------------------------------------... Special warnings about this medication Stop taking Tylenol and check with your doctor if you develop new symptoms, if redness or swelling are present, if pain gets worse or lasts more than 10 days, or if fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days. Children's and Junior Strength Tylenol should not be used for more than 5 days for pain, or 3 days for fever. If you generally drink 3 or more alcoholic beverages per day, check with your doctor about using Tylenol and other acetaminophen-containing products, and never take more than the recommended dosage. There is a possibility of damage to the liver when large amounts of alcohol and acetaminophen are combined. --------------------------------------... Possible food and drug interactions when taking this medication If Tylenol is taken with certain other drugs the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Tylenol with the following: Alcohol Cholestyramine (Questran) Isoniazid (Nydrazid) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Dolobid and Motrin Oral Contraceptives Phenytoin (Dilantin) Warfarin (Coumadin) Zidovudine (Retrovir) Tylenol should not be used with other products containing acetaminophen. --------------------------------------... Special information if you are pregnant or breastfeeding Return to top As with all medications, ask your doctor or health care professional whether it is safe for you to use Tylenol while you are pregnant or breastfeeding. --------------------------------------... Recommended dosage ADULTS AND CHILDREN 12 YEARS AND OLDER --------------------------------------... Tylenol Regular Strength The usual dose is 2 tablets every 4 to 6 hours. Do not take more than 12 caplets or tablets in 24 hours. Tylenol Extra Strength The usual dose is 2 pills or tablespoonfuls every 4 to 6 hours. Do not take more than 8 pills or tablespoonfuls in 24 hours. Tylenol Extended Relief The usual dose is 2 caplets every 8 hours, not to exceed 6 caplets in any 24 hour period. Swallow each caplet whole. Do not crush, chew, or dissolve the caplets. CHILDREN 6 TO 12 YEARS OLD --------------------------------------... Tylenol Regular Strength One-half to 1 tablet every 4 to 6 hours. Children in this age group should not be given more than 5 doses in 24 hours. Junior Strength Tylenol All doses of Junior Strength Tylenol chewable tablets may be repeated every 4 hours, up to 5 times a day. The usual dose for children 6 to 8 years of age is 2 tablets; 9 to 10 years, 2-1/2 tablets; 11 years, 3 tablets; 12 years, 4 tablets Children's Tylenol All doses of Children's Tylenol may be repeated every 4 hours, but not more than 5 times daily. Chewable tablets: The usual dose for children 6 to 8 years of age is 4 tablets; 9 to 10 years, 5 tablets; 11 to 12 years, 6 tablets. Suspension liquid: (A special cup for measuring dosage is provided.) The usual dose for children 6 to 8 years of age is 2 teaspoons; 9 to 10 years, 2-1/2 teaspoons; 11 to 12 years, 3 teaspoons. CHILDREN UNDER 6 YEARS OLD --------------------------------------... Children's Tylenol All doses of Children's Tylenol may be repeated every 4 hours, but not more than 5 times daily. Children under 2 years old should be given Children's Tylenol only on the advice of a physician. Chewable tablets: The usual dose for children 2 to 3 years of age is 2 tablets; 4 to 5 years, 3 tablets. Suspension liquid: (A special cup for measuring dosage is provided.) The usual dose for children 4 to 11 months of age is 1/2 teaspoon; 12 to 23 months, 3/4 teaspoon; 2 to 3 years, 1 teaspoon; 4 to 5 years, 1-1/2 teaspoons. Infants' Tylenol Concentrated Drops The usual dose for children 0 to 3 months of age is 0.4 milliliter; 4 to 11 months, 0.8 milliliter; 12 to 23 months, 1.2 milliliters; 2 to 3 years, 1.6 milliliters. --------------------------------------... Overdosage Any medication taken in excess can have serious consequences. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately. Massive doses of Tylenol may cause liver damage. Symptoms of Tylenol overdose may include: Excessive perspiration, exhaustion, general discomfort, nausea, vomiting Answered by Martin Searls 1 year ago.


How safe is the Change of medicine for a tb affected lady?
She is taking medicine remister 4fdc(4 daily), pyrovit(1 daily), multi vitamin and neoceptin r for last 15 days to prevent tb. Having lots of reaction- fever/vomiting/ stomach pain. Now another doctor told to stop med for 3 days and to start another med. How safe is this change of medicine for a tb affected lady. Asked by Sharri Zais 1 year ago.

isoniazld(INH< Nydrazid) Rafampin(Rifadin Rimactance) Pyrazinamide Etharmbutol Rafapentine Streptomycine Ethionamide Cycloserine Capreomycin Levofloxacin Moxifloxacin These are the drugs used for Tb you sure this is what she has since the meds you gave have nothing to do with TB as far as I can tell. SORRY Answered by Brande Guaman 1 year ago.


Side effects?
I am at the moment being treated for Tuberculosis and for the last few days I have bean suffering cramps in my hands and knees, very similar to arthritis, anything to do with the cocktail of drugs they have me on. UK citizen living and working in China Asked by Mercedes Hara 1 year ago.

Here are some drugs and their side effects: Drug Daily adult dose Side effects isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid), also called INH 5 mg/kg up to 300 mg Hepatitis (rare), excessive tiredness, weakness, loss of appetite, upset stomach, vomiting, dark yellow or brown urine, yellowing of the skin or eyes, diarrhea, vision problems, eye pain, numbness or tingling in the hands and feet, rash, fever, swollen glands, sore throat, stomach pains or tenderness rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane), also called RIF 10 mg/kg up to 600 mg Hepatitis (rare), headache, muscle pain, bone pain, heartburn, upset stomach, vomiting, stomach cramps, chills, diarrhea, rash, sores on skin or in the mouth, fever, yellowing of the skin or eyes. Urine, stools, saliva, sputum, sweat, and tears may turn red-orange. pyrazinamide, also called PZA 1,000 mg for patients weighing 40 – 55 kg (88 – 121 lbs) 1,500 mg for patients weighing 56 – 75 kg (123 – 165 lbs) 2,000 mg for patients weighing 76 – 90 kg (167 – 198 lbs) Hepatitis (rare), upset stomach, fatigue, rash, fever, vomiting, loss of appetite, yellowing of the skin or eyes, darkened urine, pain and swelling in the joints, unusual bleeding or bruising, difficulty urinating ethambutol (Myambutol), also called EMB 800 mg for patients weighing 40 – 55 kg (88 – 121 lbs) 1,200 mg for patients weighing 56 – 75 kg (123 – 165 lbs) 1,600 mg for patients weighting 76 – 90 kg (167 – 198 lbs) Blurred vision, sudden changes in vision, inability to see the colors red and green, loss of appetite, upset stomach, vomiting, numbness and tingling in the hands. Pyrazinamide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: upset stomach fatigue If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: skin rash fever vomiting loss of appetite yellowing of the skin or eyes darkened urine pain and swelling in the joints * unusual bleeding or bruising difficult urination Answered by Neville Lewan 1 year ago.

I dont think you have tuberculosis. hand and knees cramps have nothing to do with it symptoms include a productive, prolonged cough of more than three weeks duration, chest pain, and coughing up blood. Systemic symptoms include fever, chills, night sweats, appetite loss, weight loss, paling, and easy fatigability. Answered by Abe Juhl 1 year ago.


What could be the cause of this sudden increase in ALT level?
I got tested and i got 91.7 and that's really high.I dont drink,i dont do drugs,and ive never had sex or used someones razors and stuff and i dont have hepatitis i got tested for that before so im sure i dont have it.i am going to c a doctor tomorrow anyways but i just need to calm my nerves down a bit. Asked by Lajuana Stehr 1 year ago.

Your liver is a vital organ that produces bile to aid digestion, removes chemicals from the blood and produces proteins necessary for well-being. Certain prescribed medications as well as over-the-counter medications, herbs and vitamins can cause liver damage. Acetaminophen An acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose can cause liver damage. The amount of liver damage depends on the dosage ingested. In the U.S. and the United Kingdom, the leading cause of rapid onset liver failure is acetaminophen overdose. People who are at an increased risk for liver damage resulting from high levels of acetaminophen ingestion are those who drink alcohol regularly, malnourished individuals and people who take acetaminophen along with phenytoin (Dilantin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital or isoniazid (Nydrazid, Laniazid). Cholesterol Medications Statin medications are used to lower "bad" cholesterol to prevent strokes and heart attacks. Liver injury is rare, but statins can cause mild elevations of liver enzymes such as ALT and AST. Examples of statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor), simvastatin (Zocor), lovastatin (Mevacor), pravastatin (Pravachol) and rosuvastatin (Crestor). Due to the small risk of severe liver damage, the FDA recommends patients have liver enzyme blood tests performed before beginning statin medications, again 12 weeks after beginning treatment and then periodically. Niacin is another medication used to treat high cholesterol and can cause increased liver enzymes, yellowing of the skin and, rarely, liver failure. The generic name for Niacin is nicotinic acid. People who drink regularly and those with pre-existing liver disease are at a greater risk for liver damage. The extended-release form of Niacin is more likely to cause liver damage than the immediate-release form. Cordarone Cordarone is a medication prescribed for irregular heart rhythms. The generic name of Cordarone is amiodarone. Cordarone can cause elevated liver enzymes, rapid liver failure and irreversible cirrhosis. Less than 1 percent of patients are at risk for serious liver damage. Liver damage can occur even after the medication is discontinued because Coradarone is stored in the liver. Serious liver damage can result in the need for a liver transplant. Methotrexate Methotrexate is prescribed for people with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis and Crohn's disease. The brand names of methotrexate are Rheumatrex and Trexall. This medication can cause liver cirrhosis, depending on the dose prescribed. People who drink alcohol regularly, who are obese and those with a pre-existing liver conditions are at an increased risk for cirrhosis while taking methotrexate. Antibiotics Certain antibiotics such as isoniazid, nitrofurantoin and augmentin can cause liver problems. Other antibiotics that can cause liver damage are minocycline and Cotrimoxazole. Isoniazid is a medication used to treat tuberculosis. This medication can cause mild liver enzyme elevation and can cause isoniazid-induced hepatitis in 1 to 2 percent of patients. The risk of liver damage increases when isoniazid is taken with Tylenol and rifampin. Nitrofurantoin is an antibiotic used to treat urinary tract infections. This medication can cause elevated liver enzymes and sudden onset and chronic liver disease. In rare cases, nitrofurantoin can cause nitrofurantoin hepatitis. Augmentin is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections. This medication can rarely cause Augmentin-induced cholestasis that can result in cirrhosis, liver failure and liver transplant. NSAIDs NSAIDs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, are used for joint and bone related inflammations. Examples of NSAIDs are ibuprofen (Motrin), diclofenac (Voltaren), indomethacin (Indocin), naproxen (Naprosyn), nabumetone (Relafen) and piroxicam (Feldene). These medications are generally safe when properly used, but can worsen liver function in people with advanced liver disease and cirrhosis. Liver disease from NSAID use is rare, but diclofenac carries a slightly higher risk for producing hepatitis. Other Medications Tacrine (Cognex) is prescribed for treating Alzheimer's disease. This medication can cause elevated liver enzymes and, rarely, hepatitis and serious liver damage. Disulfiram (Antabuse) is used to treat alcoholism and can cause a sudden onset of hepatitis which can lead to acute liver failure and liver transplant.... Answered by Eldon Counceller 1 year ago.

The ALT and AST are liver enzymes. It is true that these will give the doctor an idea if there is liver cell damage. However, different things can cause these enzymes to rise: exercising before the test was done, taking certain kinds of medications, having a muscle injury or intramuscular injection, consuming alcohol, and so much more. The liver enzymes (ALTAnswered by Bernardina Coville 1 year ago.


Ms. Bates presents the pharmacy with a list of medications that she takes on a regular basis?
Atenolol 50 mg PO daily, HCTZ 25 mg PO daily, INH 300 mg PO daily What is the third drug on the list? Based on the dose of the third drug, which disease and phase is being treated? Asked by Elaina Bomilla 1 year ago.

INH is isoniazid. Other brand names of this drug include: Isotamine, Nydrazid, or Laniazid. It is a first-line therapy for active tuberculosis when used in combination with other drugs. Alone, it is used to prevent tuberculosis in patients who have been exposed to the disease. Answered by Niesha Hilsenbeck 1 year ago.

isoniazid. he's being treated for latent tb. Answered by Jasmin Tingen 1 year ago.


What does the term MAIO inhibiting drugs mean?
I was asked about drug interactions and this term came up. My question is what drugs are considered maio inhibitors. Asked by Jada Eisenzimmer 1 year ago.

I think you mean MAOI?? Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOI) drugs and trade names: • Furazolidone: Furoxone • Isocarboxazid: Marplan® • Isoniazid: Laniazid®, Nydrazid® • Isoniazid rifampin: Rifamate®, Rimactane®/INH • Moclobemide • Pargyline: Eutonyl® • Phenelzine: Nardil® • Procarbazine: Matulane® • Selegiline: Atapryl®, Deprenyl®, Eldepryl® • Tranylcypromine: Parnate® type of drug: Two groups: • Hydrazine derivatives: phenelzine, isocarboxazid • Non-hydrazine derivatives: tranylcypromine, pargyline mechanism: Agents that inhibit monoamine oxidase and alter catecholamine metabolism (down-regulating noradrenergic synpases and upregulating serotogenic synapses); includes other agents with secondary MAOI action, e.g., phenelzine. used to treat: Depression (refractory to tricyclic antidepressants); antineoplastic (procarbazine), antibiotic (furoxone); adjunctive treatment in Parkinson's (selegine) and hypertension (pargyline). Answered by Madelaine Horney 1 year ago.

Mono Amine Oxidase Inhibitors - MAOI See the wiki page about it They are old fashioned antidepressants and associated with the necessity to stick to a particular diet and avoid certain foods. There is a new class of MAOI's now, the RIMA's Reversible Inhibitors of Monoamine oxidase A: moclobemide This is a better drug as it is safer and does not require the diet. It is considered a mild antidepressant as it's efficacy is not quite up to par with the hard core tricyclics and SSRI's The wiki page has a list of the names of these: # Isocarboxazid (Marplan) # Moclobemide (Aurorix, Manerix, Moclodura®) # Phenelzine (Nardil) # Tranylcypromine (Parnate) # Selegiline (Selegiline, Eldepryl), and Emsam # Nialamide # Iproniazid (Marsilid, Iprozid, Ipronid, Rivivol, Propilniazida) # Iproclozide # Toloxatone Answered by Marry Senecal 1 year ago.

I asked my doctor recently. It is a group of drugs that used to be used for treating depression. They are still used but not very often. I don't have the names of the drugs but if you aren't being treated for depression, you should be ok. If in doubt, call a 24 hr. pharmacy and ask to speak to the pharmacist. Answered by Cyndi Rabenstein 1 year ago.

Certain types of antideppressants. (BTW, it's MAOI) Look this up on the internet and it will give you the names of them. Most health care professionals are steering away from these now because of the many interactions with other meds and even foods, such as cheese and wine. Answered by Bradly Toborg 1 year ago.

Maoi Drug Names Answered by Zella Collica 1 year ago.


Treatment and prevention of Tuberculosis?
Im doing a project Asked by Katharine Lawley 1 year ago.

TUBERCULOSIS:: Tuberculosis (TB),has been around for many many yrs.it has declined in the past century, but there has been an increase with the homeless folks living in the inner cities and people infected with HIV also from other country's., TB is a long lasting (chronic) bacterial infection. You can breath this in from someone elses sneezes or coughs since its an air boren disease. TB varies directly with the frequency and intensity of your contacts with people who are infected .TB results from the bacterium mycobacterium tuberculosis. If a person is expsoed to TB this organism may gain entry to the lungs Can be infected but have no symptoms initially, or you may develope a light fever or cough. The TB organism can spread through the lymph nodes and blood to almost any part of the body. Areas most commonly effected are the lungs and the membranes that cover the lungs (pleural membranes), the spine ,large joints, and the kidneys, if the kidneys are effected the feeling is like a bad bladder infection. A simple skin test can let a person know if they have been infected. this test is a small needle with the tuberculin purified protein derivative into the skin . If infected this will cause a reaction at injection site within 48-72 hours if this is very active infection or the immune system is suppressed the TB test reaction may be falsely negative. A preliminary diagnosis of TB is often based on a chest X ray where changes may appear within 2-3 months after the initial infection.Your doctor may want a person to collect sputum for staining and examination under a microscope. A diagnosis is confirmed by growing the organism (culturing) in a laboratory. The sputum is usually the easiest sample to obtain for a culture,another way is urine and stomach secretions.Stomach secretions are collected by passing a small tube through the nose,down the back of the throatthrough the esophagus and into the stomach.the doctor may get preliminary results fr4om a staining test much faster than a culture the staining is up in 24 hours as to the culture takes at least 3-8 weeks because the TB bacterium grows very slow. Some strains of the TB organism require different or more intensive treatments than other strains.Sometimes the TB develops within week after initial exposure.however the TB organism may lie dormant for years before the disease becomes apparent. The disease may be reactivated under a weak immune system with age,alcoholism. and malnutrition or the use of immunosuppressant medications or the present of certain illnesses like HIV / Aids or Cancers. Drugs have been the main treatment for this disease but as time goes on the drugs offered have become resistant (the organisms) that have been commonly usedActive Tb strats with 4 type drugs isoniazid (Laniazid,Nydrazid), Rifampin (Rifadin). Pyrazinamidecan be combined into one pill (rifater)and Ethambutol(myambutol).. To determine the bactera's sensitivity or resistance to each drug cultures of either stutum or other body secetions or tissues are evaluated in a laboratory when theses results are complete some drugs may need to be replaced with either stronger or a new drug all together. Once a drug regimen is started improvement is seen in the symptoms in 3-4 weeks.with a follow up chest X ray this treatment may last for 1 year this is to be sure the TB is destroyed for good. If you have a positive TB skin test especially if you or some one you know has been in close contact with any one with the TB diseasethe doc may consider giving you isoniazid to decrease the risk of developing active TB this must be taken for 9 months in addition the rest of the family may have to take this or another similar one to keep all from getting the TB disease. Answered by Edie Scharp 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Robbie Davers 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Talisha Veeneman 1 year ago.


Can anyone tell me what cladidimine and acetametaphin are and what they are used for?
Asked by Reynalda Kivel 1 year ago.

Brand name: Tylenol Pronounced: TIE-len-all Generic name: Acetaminophen Other brand name: Aspirin Free Anacin --------------------------------------... Why is this drug prescribed? Tylenol is a fever- and pain-reducing medication that is widely used to relieve simple headaches and muscle aches; the minor aches and pains associated with the common cold; backache; toothache; minor pain of arthritis; and menstrual cramps. --------------------------------------... Most important fact about this drug Do not use Tylenol to relieve pain for more than 10 days, or to reduce fever for more than 3 days unless your doctor has specifically told you to do so. --------------------------------------... How should you take this medication? Follow the dosing instructions on the label. Do not take more Tylenol than is recommended. --If you miss a dose... Take this medication only as needed. --Storage instructions... Store at room temperature. Protect extra strength gelcaps and geltabs from high humidity and excessive heat. Keep the extended relief caplets away from high heat. --------------------------------------... What side effects may occur? Tylenol is relatively free of side effects. Rarely, an allergic reaction may occur. If you develop any allergic symptoms such as rash, hives, swelling, or difficulty breathing, stop taking Tylenol immediately and notify your doctor. --------------------------------------... Special warnings about this medication Stop taking Tylenol and check with your doctor if you develop new symptoms, if redness or swelling are present, if pain gets worse or lasts more than 10 days, or if fever gets worse or lasts more than 3 days. Children's and Junior Strength Tylenol should not be used for more than 5 days for pain, or 3 days for fever. If you generally drink 3 or more alcoholic beverages per day, check with your doctor about using Tylenol and other acetaminophen-containing products, and never take more than the recommended dosage. There is a possibility of damage to the liver when large amounts of alcohol and acetaminophen are combined. --------------------------------------... Possible food and drug interactions when taking this medication If Tylenol is taken with certain other drugs the effects of either could be increased, decreased, or altered. It is especially important to check with your doctor before combining Tylenol with the following: Alcohol Cholestyramine (Questran) Isoniazid (Nydrazid) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as Dolobid and Motrin Oral Contraceptives Phenytoin (Dilantin) Warfarin (Coumadin) Zidovudine (Retrovir) Tylenol should not be used with other products containing acetaminophen. --------------------------------------... Special information if you are pregnant or breastfeeding Return to top As with all medications, ask your doctor or health care professional whether it is safe for you to use Tylenol while you are pregnant or breastfeeding. --------------------------------------... Recommended dosage ADULTS AND CHILDREN 12 YEARS AND OLDER --------------------------------------... Tylenol Regular Strength The usual dose is 2 tablets every 4 to 6 hours. Do not take more than 12 caplets or tablets in 24 hours. Tylenol Extra Strength The usual dose is 2 pills or tablespoonfuls every 4 to 6 hours. Do not take more than 8 pills or tablespoonfuls in 24 hours. Tylenol Extended Relief The usual dose is 2 caplets every 8 hours, not to exceed 6 caplets in any 24 hour period. Swallow each caplet whole. Do not crush, chew, or dissolve the caplets. CHILDREN 6 TO 12 YEARS OLD --------------------------------------... Tylenol Regular Strength One-half to 1 tablet every 4 to 6 hours. Children in this age group should not be given more than 5 doses in 24 hours. Junior Strength Tylenol All doses of Junior Strength Tylenol chewable tablets may be repeated every 4 hours, up to 5 times a day. The usual dose for children 6 to 8 years of age is 2 tablets; 9 to 10 years, 2-1/2 tablets; 11 years, 3 tablets; 12 years, 4 tablets Children's Tylenol All doses of Children's Tylenol may be repeated every 4 hours, but not more than 5 times daily. Chewable tablets: The usual dose for children 6 to 8 years of age is 4 tablets; 9 to 10 years, 5 tablets; 11 to 12 years, 6 tablets. Suspension liquid: (A special cup for measuring dosage is provided.) The usual dose for children 6 to 8 years of age is 2 teaspoons; 9 to 10 years, 2-1/2 teaspoons; 11 to 12 years, 3 teaspoons. CHILDREN UNDER 6 YEARS OLD --------------------------------------... Children's Tylenol All doses of Children's Tylenol may be repeated every 4 hours, but not more than 5 times daily. Children under 2 years old should be given Children's Tylenol only on the advice of a physician. Chewable tablets: The usual dose for children 2 to 3 years of age is 2 tablets; 4 to 5 years, 3 tablets. Suspension liquid: (A special cup for measuring dosage is provided.) The usual dose for children 4 to 11 months of age is 1/2 teaspoon; 12 to 23 months, 3/4 teaspoon; 2 to 3 years, 1 teaspoon; 4 to 5 years, 1-1/2 teaspoons. Infants' Tylenol Concentrated Drops The usual dose for children 0 to 3 months of age is 0.4 milliliter; 4 to 11 months, 0.8 milliliter; 12 to 23 months, 1.2 milliliters; 2 to 3 years, 1.6 milliliters. --------------------------------------... Overdosage Any medication taken in excess can have serious consequences. If you suspect an overdose, seek medical attention immediately. Massive doses of Tylenol may cause liver damage. Symptoms of Tylenol overdose may include: Excessive perspiration, exhaustion, general discomfort, nausea, vomiting Answered by Judy Sherrick 1 year ago.


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