NORPRAMIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 014399/001.

Names and composition

"NORPRAMIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Answered questions

Is Darvocet similar to norpramin in its molecular structure?
Thank you for the first answer, but I am looking for a word that sounds similar to "Naparadene" and has a molecular structure similar to Darvocet. what is this word?? Thanks! Asked by Gilma Gigante 5 months ago.

nope ........they are not related chemically (or in pharmacological action) to each other, Darvocet is an analgesic compound that cotains 65 miligrams of propoxiphene napsilate....can make you very drowsy,,,its an artificial narcotic compound.... and norpramin, is a tryciclic derivative used mainly as antidepressant, although many other uses have been found recently, in urinary incontinence of children (bed-wetting) and night bruxism (clenching teeth) out of anxiety in adults And thousand more applicationof both (not enough paper here) Answered by Zulema Se 5 months ago.

of path the superb questioning consequences in the belief of the writer, any element you spot or manage, there could be a maker (fashion designer) in the back of it, like the motor vehicle, airplane,workstation,pen,pincil,paper,fi... billions of people, souls, planets, plant life, stars, seas and what in it, atoms, mild, day, night, earth, death, existence, time, viruses, DNA, Gravity, area, mountains, heavens, universe think you have billions of characters and you thru them up, do you anticipate after falling to have an essay in medicine or scientific seek or some element comprehensible? of path it rather is impossible, and in case you spot the similarity between the strikes of the atom contents and the strikes of the photograph voltaic device contents, you will understand that the maker is one, and effective he's not a human, because of the fact human die, turns into ill, turns into vulnerable, has constrained information however the writer not something from that ensue for him, he's the God not something like him, he's the only. he's Allah the writer of each and every element, he mentioned in the Quran: {{{{{[d82c8d1619ad8176d665453cfb2e55f0d8... we can tutor them Our warning signs in the universe, and of their very own selves, till it turns into show up to them that this (the Qur'ân) is the actuality. Is it not sufficient in regard on your Lord that he's a Witness over all issues?}}}}} Answered by Clarence Genter 5 months ago.


Imipramine (Tofranil) and desipramine (Norpramin) are examples of:?
A)MAOIs. B)SSRIs. C)second-generation antidepressants. D)TCAs. Asked by Deb Boutelle 5 months ago.

Its D) TCAs. But I don't understand WATS the use of asking this question with option Answered by Dagny Lossett 5 months ago.


Can someone tell me how save is the Nardil, Mellaril,and Norpramin medication?
or how danger they could be for an 18-21 young men. and if you could be kind of telling me the streanth and color of the different pills of nardil. I don't ask for the others cause I have knoledge about it. thanks for your help Asked by Rickie Liptok 5 months ago.

Side Effects of Nardil: Some common side effects reported with this medicine include: upset stomach drowsiness weakness or tiredness excitement or anxiety insomnia nightmares dry mouth skin more sensitive to sunlight than usual changes in appetite or weight Excessive fluid retention in the body tissues, resulting in swelling (edema) Life-threatening progressive damage and destruction of the live. Never overdose even a little on this pill! If you miss a dose don't worry just ignore it! Talk to your pharmacist about any of the drugs you are taking, that's why they went to collage. I wouldn't take (mellaril) thioradzine it can lead to sudden death, no kidding! Stick with nardil! I myself also suggest you try mediation for mind, instead of feeding it drugs feed it quiet and peace! Answered by Shayla Munnis 5 months ago.


Anti depressants?
I have had a hard time finding an antidepressant that does not make me sick to my stomach. I found pamelor and it worked well but then gave me terrible headaches. But no GI problems which was great. Does anyone with knowledge on antidepressants know of one that is in the same category/type like pamelor? that would... Asked by Edris Tullius 5 months ago.

I have had a hard time finding an antidepressant that does not make me sick to my stomach. I found pamelor and it worked well but then gave me terrible headaches. But no GI problems which was great. Does anyone with knowledge on antidepressants know of one that is in the same category/type like pamelor? that would not cause GI problems? thanks (zoloft and lexapro made me very very sick throwing up/diarrhea) Answered by Jestine Saggione 5 months ago.

amitriptyline (Elavil®, Endep®) clomipramine (Anafranil®) desipramine (Norpramin®, Pertofrane®) dosulepin (dothiepin) (Prothiaden®) doxepin (Adapin®, Sinequan®) imipramine (Tofranil®) nortriptyline (Pamelor®) protriptyline (Vivactil®) trimipramine (Surmontil®) lofepramine All in the same category: Tricyclics. Answered by Margaret Herron 5 months ago.

im currently in school for pharmacy tech...... and ive heard this alot about those 2 anti deppressants i thnink personally the best one to be on is the paxil it calms you down and makes you feel good.... ive never heard anything bad about this one you should give it a try i think it might help you Answered by Frieda Tunks 5 months ago.


None of the depression medications are working, and my therapist is driving me crazy?
Jamie im trying to find one who makes me happy and you have a good point there because the therapist person should make you happy or else why are you even going there but i dunno maybe i set my expectation too high or somethin Asked by Elidia Rewis 5 months ago.

I've taken Lexapro, Prozac, Paxil, Celexa, Zoloft, Norpramin, Vivactil, Effexor, and Parnate, and am currently on Surmontil (100 mg-blue/white capsules) (3 in the morning / day), and I still feel like crap sometimes. I'm really talkative and hyper and than all of a sudden I just want to be left alone and die, like even before I started taking all the meds. My therapist also drives me crazy, she is boring and I just want to fall asleep, nothing she says is relevant and she is like my 7th one I've been too. Sometimes I just see her lips moving and I go yeh, yeh, yeh, alright..because she doesn't ever stop. What can I do, it's driving me crazy, I just want her to go away, and something to start working. Answered by Susann Bodrey 5 months ago.

Yeh so she has a pic of her children hanging on the wall and she'll just point to em and be like oooh this is my son he is in uni trying to be a lawyer, ohhh and this is my daughter going to school to be a doctor and im so proud of my children and okay lady thats cool but talk about your children sometime else cause yeh Answered by Mike Jurewicz 5 months ago.

Hi, If you have tried ten medications and nothing is really working, your doctor should refer you to a psychiatrist for recommendations. They are the experts on medications for depression, anxiety, etc. It doesn't sound like you have a therapeutic relationship with your therapist. It's not appropriate for the therapist to be focusing on herself and her family when she's talking to you. The focus should be on helping you to gain coping strategies for your problems. You should tell your doctor what you just told us, and ask for a referral to a different counsellor. I admire you for having this much patience with your treatment to date. Start by being very honest with your family doctor, especially tell him the part about feeling like being left alone to die. That's an indication that you are pretty depressed and discouraged. Know that you are loved, and keep on trying. Best wishes to you. Answered by Romana Nenno 5 months ago.

A couple years ago I saw a therapist and was diagnosed with depression. They suggested I take medication, so they prescribed me Wellbutrin. I took it for a few weeks and did notice a small change. I felt like I was getting better so quit the meds and the therapist; I don't know if any of this helps, because I wasn't on the medication that long and I don't attribute all of my feeling better to the meds, as there were outside things that helped me. The important thing to know is that a pill won't simply make you better or happy. As I understand them, they're designed to help increase certain chemicals (different for different medications) in the brain which help you be more positive (or less negative, depending on how you look at it). You have to WANT to get better--but if only seeing a therapist isn't helping, I'd definitely consider medication if I were you. However, I wouldn't recommend mixing anti-depressents with alcohol. And since alcohol is a depressant, it's only going to make your depressive state even worse. Bottom line, if you continue drinking, it's going to be almost impossible for you to get better. Think about some AA meetings. And don't be afraid to ask your doctor questions about the medication; they're there to help. Answered by Carleen Stencil 5 months ago.

Well in some people a higher dose of drug is needed and some people 1,2,3, different types of drugs are needed and some need a less of a dose it all depends most drugs take like a week to start to work,etc. Therapist is trying to get u to open up! I know u don't want to talk about anything But u need to start talking about what u are feeling or let off some steam. Talking is the 1st step in getting out of depression and then working on what is really the problem - eating at u is next! Remember this takes time and u going to have to make the therapy work for u! Answered by Alejandra Poss 5 months ago.

Over the last five years I had begun to have increasingly withdraw into a downward spiral of depression.. But now with the method I can fully focus my energy and thoughts into a decisive line on how to make my life better constantly. And it works like magic! I'm beginning to attract people to me once again and things have just been looking up since then. Helping you eliminate depression? Answered by Hugo Lambertson 5 months ago.

You need to be re-evaluated for the meds that you are on. Something needs to change. Also look around, talk to people to see if they would recommend a new therapist. You have to be happy with the person that is supposed to be "helping" you through this. I'm sorry that you have to go through all this just to be happy, but good luck. Answered by Teisha Viray 5 months ago.

I know you've been to a million therapists, but you really need to find a new one. Your therapist sounds like my therapist, who I hate, so I'm getting another one. I'm often suicidal but I always stop myself before I do anything drastic by thinking about who would miss me and what I'd missing out on, even if I didn't even believe it. I hope you feel better someday. Answered by Herma Mattes 5 months ago.

depression meds never really work, they're just for psychiatrists to make money, if you feel depressed take a walk while listening to some uplifting music, that always works for me, even when i'm sobbing like a maniac, just focus your attention on the music, and the neighborhood. Some bands that always make me happy are, the kooks, lily allen, and led zeppelin. Answered by Tyron Tossie 5 months ago.

i suggest you get a male counselor who is like in his 20's so he doesn't annoy the s h i t out of you depression is i hard thing last year i went through of few months when i was depressed mostly kiddie stuff tho it wasn't bad but i felt like c r ap Answered by Jaimee Collins 5 months ago.

sounds like you could have adhd, which can make you depressed. i thought i was depressed because i had racing thoughts and i was sad sometimes. then i got re evaluated and i found out i had adhd. Answered by Mikel Bega 5 months ago.


What is this pill i found?
On my kids desk was a random pill, its white, round and has the imprint GG 166. I had looked it up on pill identifier but all i got was some pottassium pill and knowing my teen thats not what it is. So any thoughts? Asked by Bruce Wojcik 5 months ago.

Generic Name: Desipramine (des-IP-ra-meen) Brand Name: Norpramin Desipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. Exactly how it works is not fully understood. It is thought to increase the activity of certain chemicals in the brain (norepinephrine, serotonin), which help elevate mood. from www.drugs.com Answered by Daine Luco 5 months ago.

Take it in to your local chemist and show them the pill..they may have some ideas *Also it sounds like you have issues with your son about this sort of thing..maybe you need to sort this out with a counsellor or doctor..someone you can trust and also talk to your son.Get help before he gets in deep Answered by Mattie Ottinger 5 months ago.

It's an anti-depressant Answered by Davis Pederson 5 months ago.

maybe it's your oxycontin..... LOL Answered by Isabell Bertoldo 5 months ago.


How many anti depressants is there on the Market?
Asked by Edra Preist 5 months ago.

•Amitriptyline (Elavil®) •Amoxapine (Asendin®) •Bupropion (Aplenzin™, Budeprion XL®, Budeprion™ SR, Buproban®, Wellbutrin SR®, Wellbutrin XL®, Wellbutrin®, Zyban®) •Citalopram (Celexa®) •Clomipramine (Anafranil®) •Desipramine (Norpramin®) •Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq™) •Doxepin (Sinequan®, Silenor®) •Duloxetine (Cymbalta®) •Escitalopram (Lexapro®) •Fluoxetine (Prozac®, Sarafem®, Selfemra™) •Fluvoxamine (Luvox®, Luvox® CR) •Imipramine hydrochloride (Tofranil®) •Imipramine pamoate (Tofranil PM®) •Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) •Maprotiline (Ludiomil®) •Mirtazapine (Remeron®) •Nefazodone (Serzone®) •Nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) •Phenelzine (Nardil®) •Protriptyline (Vivactil®) •Selegiline (Emsam®) •Sertraline (Zoloft®) •Tranylcypromine (Parnate®) •Trazodone (Desyrel®) or trazodone ER (Oleptro™) •Trimipramine (Surmontil®) •Venlafaxine (Effexor®, Effexor XR®). •Citalopram (Celexa®) •Escitalopram (Lexapro®) •Fluoxetine (Prozac®, Sarafem®, Selfemra™) •Fluvoxamine (Luvox®, Luvox® CR) •Paroxetine (Paxil®, Paxil CR®, Pexeva®) •Sertraline (Zoloft®). Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) include: •Duloxetine (Cymbalta®) •Desvenlafaxine (Pristiq™) •Venlafaxine (Effexor®, Effexor XR®). There is one SNRI, milnacipran (Savella™) that is not approved for treating depression, although it may be used "off-label" for this purpose. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) used for depression include: •Isocarboxazid (Marplan®) •Phenelzine (Nardil®) •Selegiline (Emsam®) •Tranylcypromine (Parnate®). Tricyclic antidepressants include: •Amitriptyline (Elavil®) •Amoxapine (Asendin®) •Clomipramine (Anafranil®) •Desipramine (Norpramin®) •Doxepin (Sinequan®, Silenor®) •Imipramine hydrochloride (Tofranil®) •Imipramine pamoate (Tofranil PM®) •Maprotiline (Ludiomil®) •Nortriptyline (Pamelor®) •Protriptyline (Vivactil®) •Trimipramine (Surmontil®). Miscellaneous other antidepressants include: •Bupropion (Aplenzin™, Budeprion XL®, Budeprion™ SR, Buproban®, Wellbutrin SR®, Wellbutrin XL®, Wellbutrin®, Zyban®), a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor (NDRI) •Mirtazapine (Remeron®) •Nefazodone (Serzone®) •Trazodone (Desyrel®) or trazodone ER (Oleptro™). Answered by Luanne Grun 5 months ago.

Being that this alt med web page has been hijacked by means of druggies, I am now not certain what so as to add. Do your due diligence regarding drug results. If you arn't suidical and are open to "choices", check out one million hr full of life rigorous activity according to day that could be running, get a few solar, or typical gentle in your dermis, and watch much less TV. Make certain your bod can tolerate activity, get a pressure scan if integral. Answered by June Foyer 5 months ago.


Taken Clomipramine for 2 days dont like how i feel can i stop?
with no problems Asked by Lupe Rickert 5 months ago.

hope this helps to answer your? clomipramine Generic Name: clomipramine (kloe MI pra meen) Brand Names: Anafranil What is the most important information I should know about clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Do not use clomipramine if you are allergic to it or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. You will need to be monitored for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. What is clomipramine? Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. It affects chemicals in the brain that may become unbalanced. Clomipramine is used to treat symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) such as recurrent thoughts or feelings and repetitive actions. Clomipramine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking clomipramine? Do not use this medication if you are allergic to clomipramine or to similar drugs such as amitriptyline (Elavil, Etrafon), amoxapine (Ascendin), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Janimine, Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), protriptyline (Vivactil), or trimipramine (Surmontil). Do not use clomipramine if you have recently had a heart attack, or if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) within the past 14 days. Serious, life-threatening side effects can occur if you take clomipramine before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body. Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have: heart disease or a history of heart attack, stroke, or seizures; bipolar disorder (manic-depression), schizophrenia or other mental illness; kidney or liver disease; overactive thyroid or adrenal gland tumor (pheochromocytoma); glaucoma; or problems with urination. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. You may have suicidal thoughts or behavior when you first start taking an antidepressant, especially if you are under 18 years old. Watch for worsening symptoms of depression or suicidal thoughts. Your doctor should check you at regular visits during the first 12 weeks of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed. In addition to you watching for changes in your own symptoms, your family or caregivers should be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Contact your doctor promptly if you have any of the following side effects, especially if they are new symptoms or if they get worse: mood changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, irritability, agitation, aggressiveness, severe restlessness, mania (mental and/or physical hyperactivity), thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself. FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Clomipramine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take clomipramine? Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Take clomipramine with food to reduce stomach upset. If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking clomipramine. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time. Do not stop using clomipramine without first talking to your doctor. You may need to use less and less before you stop the medication completely. It may take up to 4 weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 4 weeks of treatment. Store clomipramine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine. An overdose of clomipramine can be fatal. Symptoms may include fast or uneven heart rate, extreme drowsiness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, blurred vision, sweating, muscle stiffness, increased or decreased urination, swelling, shortness of breath, blue lips or fingernails, feeling light-headed, fainting, seizure (convulsions), or coma. What should I avoid while taking clomipramine? Avoid drinking alcohol. It can cause dangerous side effects when taken together with clomipramine. Avoid using other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold medicine, pain medication, muscle relaxers, medicine for seizures, or other antidepressants). They can add to sleepiness caused by clomipramine. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with clomipramine. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor before increasing or decreasing the amount of grapefruit products in your diet. Clomipramine can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid exposure to sunlight or artificial UV rays (sunlamps or tanning beds). Clomipramine can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight and sunburn may result. Use a sunscreen (minimum SPF 15) and wear protective clothing if you must be out in the sun. What are the possible side effects of clomipramine? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; feeling light-headed, fainting; fever, confusion, muscle stiffness, sweating, fast or uneven heartbeats; pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness; o urinating more than usual. Less serious side effects may be more likely to occur, such as: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea; dry mouth, unpleasant taste; increased appetite, weight changes; feeling anxious, restless, dizzy, drowsy, or tired; blurred vision, trouble concentrating; sleep problems (insomnia), nightmares; blurred vision; increased sweating; or decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect clomipramine? Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), or sertraline (Zoloft). Before taking clomipramine, tell your doctor if you are currently using any of the following drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet); guanethidine (Ismelin); methylphenidate (Concerta, Ritalin, Daytrana); phenytoin (Dilantin); warfarin (Coumadin); heart or blood pressure medication such as clonidine (Catapres) or digoxin (Lanoxin); heart rhythm medications such as flecainide (Tambocor), propafenone (Rhythmol), or quinidine (Cardioquin, Quinidex, Quinaglute); or anti-psychotic medications such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), haloperidol (Haldol), thioridazine (Mellaril), clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zydis), quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone (Risperdal), or ziprasidone (Geodon). If you are using any of these drugs, you may not be able to use clomipramine, or you may need dosage adjustments or special tests during treatment. There are many other medicines that can interact with clomipramine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list with you of all the medicines you use and show this list to any doctor or other healthcare provider who treats you. Where can I get more information? Your pharmacist has information about clomipramine written for health professionals that you may read. What does my medication look like? Clomipramine is available with a prescription under the brand name Anafranil. Other brand or generic forms may also be available. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about this medication, especially if it is new to you. Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2006 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 7.02. Revision Date: 10/11/06 12:16:21 PM. Answered by Wesley Hieronymus 5 months ago.

Although many folks wont agree, you have to get off the meds. It is in all likelihood that every one of those meds are inflicting a extreme hormonal and neurological chemical imbalance for your mind. Consult your medical professional earlier than nevertheless. You are NOT possessed! God and the Devil don't seem to be truly. Religion is only a hypnotizer and some way to provide an explanation for matters we dont realise. As a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, my recommendation could be get off the juice. It could also be very feasible that you're conveniently having night time terrors. I have had many sufferers experiencing them and I think that's a developing contributor to intellectual instability. DO NOT act on any irregular ideas you've got. DO NOT attempt to kill your self. If you do think that you're having unusual emotions and many others. then please name 911 as quickly as feasible. It is critical that you just obtain on the spot aid in a suicidal concern. There is desire for you but and the reply isn't God, its your possess frame. Answered by Randee Palu 5 months ago.

Medications are to make you better and to fix whatever chemical imbalance you have. They are optional. If you don't feel good then quit taking them. I was given Prozac for depression and ended up with heart palpitations. so I quit. Now I feel better.You are your own best doctor and if they aren't helping you then don't do it!!! Answered by Adaline Sugahara 5 months ago.

How to stop taking desipramine? Answered by Soon Lizana 5 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014399/001 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
014399/003 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
014399/004 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
014399/005 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
014399/006 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
014399/007 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
013621/001 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
013621/002 PERTOFRANE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
014399/001 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
014399/003 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
014399/004 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
014399/005 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
014399/006 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
014399/007 NORPRAMIN DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
071588/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071601/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071602/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071766/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
071803/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071803/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071803/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071803/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
071864/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
071865/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
071866/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
071867/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072099/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
072100/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
072101/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
072102/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
072103/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
072104/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
074430/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
074430/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
205153/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
205153/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
205153/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
205153/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
205153/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
205153/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
207433/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
207433/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
207433/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
207433/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
207433/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
207433/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG
208105/001 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 10MG
208105/002 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 25MG
208105/003 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 50MG
208105/004 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 75MG
208105/005 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
208105/006 DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE DESIPRAMINE HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 150MG

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