Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017447/001.

Names and composition

"NORPACE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017447/001 NORPACE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
017447/002 NORPACE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017447/001 NORPACE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
017447/002 NORPACE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
018655/001 NORPACE CR DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
018655/002 NORPACE CR DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070101/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070102/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070138/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070139/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070173/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070174/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070186/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070187/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070240/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070241/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070351/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070352/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070470/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070471/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
070940/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
070941/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
071190/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 100MG BASE
071191/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE
071200/001 DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE DISOPYRAMIDE PHOSPHATE CAPSULE, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL EQ 150MG BASE

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Has anybody taken Norpace during pregnancy?
Hi everybody! I recently found out I'm pregnant [a little over 6 weeks] and my fiance and I couldn't be more excited! However, I am a little worried due to a medical condition I have, neurovascular syncope. The best way to describe it is when my heart rate is supposed to speed up, say when waking up in the morning... Asked by Jeffrey Part 1 year ago.

Hi everybody! I recently found out I'm pregnant [a little over 6 weeks] and my fiance and I couldn't be more excited! However, I am a little worried due to a medical condition I have, neurovascular syncope. The best way to describe it is when my heart rate is supposed to speed up, say when waking up in the morning or standing up quickly, the nerve that send the signal to speed up doesn't work -- this results in a drop in blood pressure and can cause me to faint. I was diagnosed with this at 14 [I'm now 22] and have been taking Norpace, with no problems. I am worried now because Norpace is a Class C drug. My OB explained to me that this means the drug should be taken if the benefit to the mother outweighs any risk. She also explained to me that I take a very low dose, and SHOULD have nothing to worry about. I'm just curious if anybody has taken this drug during pregnancy, or knows anybody who has? My family doctor & OB don't seemed too concerned. I also called and left a message with my cardiologist, explaining I'm pregnant and worried about my medication, yet I haven't heard back from her. Sorry this is so long, I'm just a little worried and looking for any advice! Thanks! Answered by Danille Brichetto 1 year ago.

The effects of Norpace during pregnancy have not been adequately studied. to find more info. check out this link. Answered by Hermelinda Frint 1 year ago.


I have these symptoms, irregular heart beat, back pain, bloating in stomach & have a hard time breathing help?
I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, and a pace maker was recently implanted for my heart rate. I am taking norpace and diovan.It is hard to breathe sometimes. I think there is another problem.My doctor doesn't seem to be concerned Asked by Charles Sgambati 1 year ago.

Call your doctor's office and ask your doctor. Talk to his nurse if he cannot take the call. If need be, make an appointment. Take a list of your questions and make him answer them. It is a difficult time that your are going through and part of his obligation as your doctor is to make you comfortable with your treatment and to give you answers and reassurance. Shame on him for not doing this already. DEMAND ANSWERS..........IF HE SAYS DO NOT WORRY, SAY OK, BUT WHY AM I HAVING THESE SYMPTOMS. You have a right to know! If you feel like you are in immediate danger call 911 or go to the nearest ER. Good luck and good health to you. Answered by Dian Winesett 1 year ago.

It sounds as though your Dr. has done everything possible to help you. If he's not concerned, perhaps you should slow down and stop worrying about this problem. It could be that is what is causing you to be stressed out. Believe me, it's difficult after going through all this, for you not to be worried. I went through heart surgery a long, long time ago when things were barbaric, and everytime I'd have any kind of twinge or pain, I'd think there was something else wrong with me. If you seriously think you have another problem, then by all means get a second opinion. I'd be perfectly honest with your Dr. and tell him you have quite a concern over this, and he would probably be the first to tell you to make an appointment with another Specialist for a second opinion. Dr's have been known to make a mistake in diagnosis. Answered by Bobby Corella 1 year ago.

i have a bloated stomach and find it hard to breath sometimes , my doctor told me that it was acid coming up my windpipe that was causing the problem even though i didn't have heartburn , if this doesn't help read up on the tablets you are taking to see if they can cause shortness of breath .... good luck Answered by Gwendolyn Mandigo 1 year ago.

Get another doctor. Asap Answered by Jodi Zajc 1 year ago.


I have these symptoms, irregular heart beat, back pain, bloating in stomach & have a hard time breathing help?
I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, and a pace maker was recently implanted for my heart rate. I am taking norpace and diovan.It is hard to breathe sometimes. I think there is another problem.My doctor doesn't seem to be concerned Asked by Marc Bottiglieri 1 year ago.

A pacemaker will not control A Fib. It must be controlled with either medication or a internal shock converter type of implant. Some situations a Dr will allow a patient to remain in A Fib if they are not staying it it all the time. The reason it becomes hard to breath is because you heart rate is too fast while in th A Fib. Depending on how large and/or strong your heart muscle is, will dictate which medications they will choose for you. See your Dr and tell him how uncomfortable you are....discuss the options and then if he does not explain why he is not concerned or you feel you could do better, switch drs. Answered by Cori Trenton 1 year ago.

It sounds as though your Dr. has done everything possible to help you. If he's not concerned, perhaps you should slow down and stop worrying about this problem. It could be that is what is causing you to be stressed out. Believe me, it's difficult after going through all this, for you not to be worried. I went through heart surgery a long, long time ago when things were barbaric, and everytime I'd have any kind of twinge or pain, I'd think there was something else wrong with me. If you seriously think you have another problem, then by all means get a second opinion. I'd be perfectly honest with your Dr. and tell him you have quite a concern over this, and he would probably be the first to tell you to make an appointment with another Specialist for a second opinion. Dr's have been known to make a mistake in diagnosis. Answered by Sun Onstead 1 year ago.

If i was you i would go to the E.R you may have a leak in your aorta called a AAA. I'm not a doctor and it is the worse case scenario. So get checked out buddy. p.s your heart beat should be regular now with the pacemaker inserted, if you are back in A.F you must get checked out!!!!! Answered by Rubye Lasane 1 year ago.

Hiatal Hernia! Hiatal Hernia! Hiatal Hernia! This common condition can cause all of your symptoms. Best wishes and good luck. Answered by Alexander Achilles 1 year ago.

maybe you should go to another doctor office where he / she knows alot about the diagnosed with atrial fibrillation more then your first doctor who doesnt even know much about it . cause not many doctors arent doing thier jobs or didnt even study about the symptoms . so u should check out some other clincs centers or go to the hositpal they have nurses do those kind of jobs . Answered by Laurette Vitalo 1 year ago.

I wish that I saw this sooner! Are you having those symptoms now?! Please go to an E.R., If not, but in the past, you need to seek another opinion. I would get another opinion soon! Answered by Evelyn Cossano 1 year ago.

Well why don't you go see another doctor? That would be the smart thing to do, don't you think? Have a nice day! Answered by Dillon Federick 1 year ago.

It does not matter whether you doctor is concerned or not - you are concerned and that is what is important. Make an appointment with him just to talk - take a list of concerns and make him answer each one. if not - see another doctor who is compassionate to your concerns. Answered by Ellena Nodal 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Linette Joy 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Marlin Durando 1 year ago.


Medication for someone with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)?
What kinds of medication is given to someone who has Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy? What does the medication do, if there is any? Asked by Cassidy Cherian 1 year ago.

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is when the heart muscle becomes thicker than usual, making it harder for the heart to pump blood (I'm sure you already know that). The goal of treatments in this case is to relieve symptoms/pain & avoid sudden death. There are several treatments that you can consider Medication, like beta blockers/calcium blockers or Norpace, can be taken to relax and slow down the heartbeat rate so that the heart can pump blood more efficiently. Septal myectomy, an open-heart procedure in which the surgeon removes part of the thickened, overgrown septum between the ventricles. This improves blood flow and reduces mitral regurgitation. Myectomy may be recommended if medications don't relieve symptoms. Most people who have myectomy have no further symptoms. Septal ablation in which a small portion of the thickened heart muscle is destroyed by injecting alcohol through a catheter into the artery supplying blood to that area. Possible complications with this procedure include heart block — a disruption of the heart's electrical system — which requires implantation of a pacemaker. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), a pager-sized device implanted in the chest like a pacemaker. An ICD continuously monitors heartbeat. ICD may be recommended for people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who are at high risk of sudden cardiac death because of abnormal heart rhythms. Other than medical treatments, some lifestyle changes can truly make a difference. Like maintaining a healthy diet, exercising regularly (with caution) and maintaining a healthy body weight. Answered by Rusty Genta 1 year ago.

Coreg is one. You can check its chief actions online. This is not the only thing though. You do want to prevent preload and decrease afterload. Answered by Darla Capan 1 year ago.


Should I continue taking Toprol XL (Beta Blocker) or discontinue?
I should also add that my doc suggested I could "just stop taking it altogether" if I wanted... I'm tapering anyway... cold turkey after 8 years sounds to me, risky, but maybe not (at 50mg a day anyway). Asked by Theresa Macphee 1 year ago.

Eight years ago I went to the ER for atrial fibrillation and a high heart rate (around 180bpm)... the onset was sudden but not the first time... after two days of intravenous dosing of beta blocker meds and TWO cardio versions, I was still in Afib. Then suddenly, like the 3-4 other times it happened at home, all went back to normal. I do not have and never had high blood pressure, just a slightly higher than average heart rate (75-85 bpm) and a sensitivity to MSG, artificial sweeteners and big doses of salt... all of which will cause my heart to beat funny even while taking toprol xl. I was told never to stop taking the med for any reason... then my mom who's on it for a heart attack, was told to stop taking it for 48 hours prior to some testing they wanted to do on her. After 2 days of no toprol, her blood pressure was NORMAL... when any other time it has always been higher while taking toprol xl. I need to know if I'm making things worse or what. I don't like toprol... it's always affected me in ways I don't like... so if I don't need to be on it, I don't want it. Of course my doc says I have to be on it from now on... and other docs say it shouldn't be taken long term. Does ANYONE know the truth about beta blockers, metroprolol xl? Answered by Malorie Plimpton 1 year ago.

I was taking 50mg of Toprol XL for the eight years I've been on it... now two days in to tapering off, I'm at 25mg per day... I've noticed a heightened sensitivity to sound, visual stimulation and some long forgotten memories pop in my head... other than that... steady rhythm, regular pulse (85-95bpm)... nothing out of the ordinary. Actually I feel MORE calm that average... my doc has me on Klonopin 1mg daily for anxiety (he attributed) from the Toprol. By what Dr. Guess says, I'll stay on 25mg for a week, then down to 12mg next week... then off and see how I feel. The only other thing I take (started 3 weeks ago) is L-Dopa 32mg OTC variety... seems to quicken pulse for a few hours then resumes to normal and calmness, lowered voice as well (thought that was odd). Answered by Shira Alirez 1 year ago.

Metoprolol is nothing special. I really don't understand all the fuss about such a medication. It works with the Beta1 receptors. It is very predictable -- Aside from a secondary use of performance anxiety reduction, it is used primarily for hypertension. Not Atrial Fibrillation -- You said your heart rhythm went back on its own and stabilizes (I assume) in that you are no longer in atrial fib at the moment or have been. Regardless, this medication does little if anything at preventing or stopping the fibrillation. It works by reducing cardiac output, reducing heart rate (pulse), and heart contractility. These effects contribute to its blood pressure lowering abilities. It has a short half life, meaning you need to dose it several times a day to prevent rebound effects and just as importantly allow it to stay at balanced serum levels for maximum effect. Which is why you are given the slow release version .. for convenience. :) This isn't the king of beta blockers, but in the preparation you have it isn't a bad choice for HYPERTENSION. They dosed you with betablockers during your afib in the hospital more because of your tachycardia - fast heart rate.. In lowering such a high rate, .. it helps with the sinal impulses in that particular heart node to mediate atrial fibrillation. The medications of choice for Atrial Fibrillation would be (and I'm sure you got this..in the hospital) is - anti arrhythmic. Such examples are: Cordarone, Norpace, Tikosyn, Tambocor, Rythmol.. etc. There are quite a few. These work by slowing your heart rate, and working on the sinus node as referred to before. Some really concentrating on the A/V node. Basically without explaining why this happens (because you probably know all of it already) -- they work on the heart tissues and the electrical impulse action and reactions in the heart to reestablish normal rhythm. Sort of like a liquid pacemaker until the heart 'switches back on its own to this rhythm'. Often people with atrial fib never switch back. In these cases they will either opt for a pace maker or depending on the severity of the afib, age, and other co-morbid factors they will opt for medication. Anti arrhythmic meds as explained before. If these work,.. then they are preferred over such a device implant. I have seen both kinds of patients whose heart will regulate with simply medications, and others whom rhythm will flip flop constantly with tachy and brady occuring concurrently -- that medications just have zero effect on. Some of these people don't have any negative effects from their afib and we just monitor.. most are fitted for some type of device or allowed to continue to try various AA meds to see if things will improve over time. With you -- the only thing that worrys me slightly is the Sinus node occaisonally getting out of wack. IE: You developing transient atrial fibrillation. The elevated heart rate is highly common in afib,.. with the combination of the emergency room, people acting fast and moving about, your own nervousness , and so on. The heart is trying to restablish normal rhythm .. believe it or not the high heart beat is part of the body's own built in reaction to reestablish this rhythm. But the body over compensates, naturally,.. But you say your rhythm like the other few times it has occurred goes back to a normal rhythm and stays there. *if* your rhythm has stayed non afib for years at a time.. then this is what I would do. You are most likely getting a dose of 150-400mg's daily. You cannot (or shouldn't) reduce the medication suddenly , or cold-turkey shall we say. You will need to reduce it slowly over several weeks. A titration downard. If you have some of the non time released version it would be somewhat easier.. but you can break the time released versions of this medication and not lose the time released action. I would recommend starting by breaking it into quarters -- Reducing a quarter the first week. (Taking 3/4's dose for a week). 2nd week, reduce another quarter -- stay on half a pill. 3rd week, stay on the half.. 4th week, reduce to one quarter -- 5th week -- Stop completely. Sounds tedious but needs to be done. There is rebound hypertension, elevated heart rate, increased contractility and so on that can and likely will occur because your body has adapted to the medication. What is key during all of this -- Have an accurate Blood pressure monitor. -- Monitor several times a day every day. Use a legal pad, or some sort of log, to write down your readings each time... note the date, the time of day, the systolic and diastolic readings.. and in your case note the pulse (heart rate). If at any time your blood pressure exceeds 140/90 continue to retake the pressure in a seated or laying down position. If it does not go down re-up your dose slightly to stabliize the pressure. if it is reading 141/92 or so... it isn't anything major.. Answered by Bambi Eastling 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Should I continue taking Toprol XL (Beta Blocker) or discontinue? Eight years ago I went to the ER for atrial fibrillation and a high heart rate (around 180bpm)... the onset was sudden but not the first time... after two days of intravenous dosing of beta blocker meds and TWO cardio versions, I was still in Afib. Then suddenly, like the 3-4 other times it... Answered by Judy Looft 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Dosing Answered by Janet Chizmar 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl 25mg Answered by Granville Seidle 1 year ago.

From you calling it 'Toprol-XL' I can tell you're in the USA, this helps with my advice since medications vary in different countries. Side-effects of Metoprolol include nausea, dizziness, light-headedness, vision problems and diarrhea. If you're suffering all of the side-effects and the cons outweight the pro's then you should see your Doctor and ask to switch to another beta-blocker if you need to take them. I can't tell if you definitely need beta-blockers because I haven't seen your test results so your Doctor is who you need to see. Ask him if you could switch to another like Acebutolol or Esmolol. Hope I helped, Ryan Answered by Bronwyn Hedges 1 year ago.

You never want to stop taking medicine, with out your doctors consent. With your mothers situation, her BP was normal, because the Toprol is still in her system. My father stopped taking his meds, because he said he felt better, his chol. wasn't high neither was his BP. Well....that resulted in 2 heart attacks within two months...a couple months after he quit his meds. I would speak with your physician...maybe there is another drug out there that will suit you better. My father is on Toprol...and hasn't had a problem with it. But, before doing anything, please discuss it with your cardiologist. Answered by Raymond Dahms 1 year ago.

You say "doctor" do you mean a family doctor ? go to a cardiologist and have a complete make up run. The accept his advise. And, in what ways don't you like that they affect you. Answered by Beula Horrell 1 year ago.


Can you take benadryl with biaxon?
Asked by Kimberli Askins 1 year ago.

As everyone else who answered has said, yes it is safe to give your dog Benadryl. The general rule of thumb is to give 1 mg for every 1 pound of body weight. In your case, you would give your dog 45 mg. You need to consult w/ a veterinarian before doing this though. He may up the dosage or cut it back depending on the severity of your dog's allergies. You can always just call him and ask instead of taking your dog in, but I suggest taking him in for an exam to rule out fleas or mites. Your vet can also give her a steroid shot called Depo Medrol to help w/ the itching. Good luck and I hope your dog gets some relief soon! Answered by Pamila Cobrin 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Monica Mccoil 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Joselyn Brickle 1 year ago.


Has anybody taken Norpace during pregnancy?
Hi everybody! I recently found out I'm pregnant [a little over 6 weeks] and my fiance and I couldn't be more excited! However, I am a little worried due to a medical condition I have, neurovascular syncope. The best way to describe it is when my heart rate is supposed to speed up, say when waking up in the morning... Asked by Hanna Shala 1 year ago.

Hi everybody! I recently found out I'm pregnant [a little over 6 weeks] and my fiance and I couldn't be more excited! However, I am a little worried due to a medical condition I have, neurovascular syncope. The best way to describe it is when my heart rate is supposed to speed up, say when waking up in the morning or standing up quickly, the nerve that send the signal to speed up doesn't work -- this results in a drop in blood pressure and can cause me to faint. I was diagnosed with this at 14 [I'm now 22] and have been taking Norpace, with no problems. I am worried now because Norpace is a Class C drug. My OB explained to me that this means the drug should be taken if the benefit to the mother outweighs any risk. She also explained to me that I take a very low dose, and SHOULD have nothing to worry about. I'm just curious if anybody has taken this drug during pregnancy, or knows anybody who has? My family doctor & OB don't seemed too concerned. I also called and left a message with my cardiologist, explaining I'm pregnant and worried about my medication, yet I haven't heard back from her. Sorry this is so long, I'm just a little worried and looking for any advice! Thanks! Answered by Leonardo Birkeland 1 year ago.

The effects of Norpace during pregnancy have not been adequately studied. to find more info. check out this link. Answered by Cathy Woolfolk 1 year ago.


I have these symptoms, irregular heart beat, back pain, bloating in stomach & have a hard time breathing help?
I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, and a pace maker was recently implanted for my heart rate. I am taking norpace and diovan.It is hard to breathe sometimes. I think there is another problem.My doctor doesn't seem to be concerned Asked by Annemarie Asselmeier 1 year ago.

Call your doctor's office and ask your doctor. Talk to his nurse if he cannot take the call. If need be, make an appointment. Take a list of your questions and make him answer them. It is a difficult time that your are going through and part of his obligation as your doctor is to make you comfortable with your treatment and to give you answers and reassurance. Shame on him for not doing this already. DEMAND ANSWERS..........IF HE SAYS DO NOT WORRY, SAY OK, BUT WHY AM I HAVING THESE SYMPTOMS. You have a right to know! If you feel like you are in immediate danger call 911 or go to the nearest ER. Good luck and good health to you. Answered by Pasty Trusillo 1 year ago.

It sounds as though your Dr. has done everything possible to help you. If he's not concerned, perhaps you should slow down and stop worrying about this problem. It could be that is what is causing you to be stressed out. Believe me, it's difficult after going through all this, for you not to be worried. I went through heart surgery a long, long time ago when things were barbaric, and everytime I'd have any kind of twinge or pain, I'd think there was something else wrong with me. If you seriously think you have another problem, then by all means get a second opinion. I'd be perfectly honest with your Dr. and tell him you have quite a concern over this, and he would probably be the first to tell you to make an appointment with another Specialist for a second opinion. Dr's have been known to make a mistake in diagnosis. Answered by Lois Kornfield 1 year ago.

i have a bloated stomach and find it hard to breath sometimes , my doctor told me that it was acid coming up my windpipe that was causing the problem even though i didn't have heartburn , if this doesn't help read up on the tablets you are taking to see if they can cause shortness of breath .... good luck Answered by Elisa Moots 1 year ago.

Get another doctor. Asap Answered by Joshua Yockers 1 year ago.


I have these symptoms, irregular heart beat, back pain, bloating in stomach & have a hard time breathing help?
I was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, and a pace maker was recently implanted for my heart rate. I am taking norpace and diovan.It is hard to breathe sometimes. I think there is another problem.My doctor doesn't seem to be concerned Asked by Evita Blattler 1 year ago.

A pacemaker will not control A Fib. It must be controlled with either medication or a internal shock converter type of implant. Some situations a Dr will allow a patient to remain in A Fib if they are not staying it it all the time. The reason it becomes hard to breath is because you heart rate is too fast while in th A Fib. Depending on how large and/or strong your heart muscle is, will dictate which medications they will choose for you. See your Dr and tell him how uncomfortable you are....discuss the options and then if he does not explain why he is not concerned or you feel you could do better, switch drs. Answered by Georgeanna Vanveldhuize 1 year ago.

It sounds as though your Dr. has done everything possible to help you. If he's not concerned, perhaps you should slow down and stop worrying about this problem. It could be that is what is causing you to be stressed out. Believe me, it's difficult after going through all this, for you not to be worried. I went through heart surgery a long, long time ago when things were barbaric, and everytime I'd have any kind of twinge or pain, I'd think there was something else wrong with me. If you seriously think you have another problem, then by all means get a second opinion. I'd be perfectly honest with your Dr. and tell him you have quite a concern over this, and he would probably be the first to tell you to make an appointment with another Specialist for a second opinion. Dr's have been known to make a mistake in diagnosis. Answered by Marcos Dalessandro 1 year ago.

If i was you i would go to the E.R you may have a leak in your aorta called a AAA. I'm not a doctor and it is the worse case scenario. So get checked out buddy. p.s your heart beat should be regular now with the pacemaker inserted, if you are back in A.F you must get checked out!!!!! Answered by Eryn Dibblee 1 year ago.

Hiatal Hernia! Hiatal Hernia! Hiatal Hernia! This common condition can cause all of your symptoms. Best wishes and good luck. Answered by Vena Mealey 1 year ago.

maybe you should go to another doctor office where he / she knows alot about the diagnosed with atrial fibrillation more then your first doctor who doesnt even know much about it . cause not many doctors arent doing thier jobs or didnt even study about the symptoms . so u should check out some other clincs centers or go to the hositpal they have nurses do those kind of jobs . Answered by Giuseppina Albornoz 1 year ago.

I wish that I saw this sooner! Are you having those symptoms now?! Please go to an E.R., If not, but in the past, you need to seek another opinion. I would get another opinion soon! Answered by Yvonne Rogue 1 year ago.

Well why don't you go see another doctor? That would be the smart thing to do, don't you think? Have a nice day! Answered by April Gollehon 1 year ago.

It does not matter whether you doctor is concerned or not - you are concerned and that is what is important. Make an appointment with him just to talk - take a list of concerns and make him answer each one. if not - see another doctor who is compassionate to your concerns. Answered by Cris Monterroza 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Alysha Korbal 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Digna Calciano 1 year ago.


Medication for someone with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM)?
What kinds of medication is given to someone who has Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy? What does the medication do, if there is any? Asked by Cherly Gulbrandsen 1 year ago.

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is when the heart muscle becomes thicker than usual, making it harder for the heart to pump blood (I'm sure you already know that). The goal of treatments in this case is to relieve symptoms/pain & avoid sudden death. There are several treatments that you can consider Medication, like beta blockers/calcium blockers or Norpace, can be taken to relax and slow down the heartbeat rate so that the heart can pump blood more efficiently. Septal myectomy, an open-heart procedure in which the surgeon removes part of the thickened, overgrown septum between the ventricles. This improves blood flow and reduces mitral regurgitation. Myectomy may be recommended if medications don't relieve symptoms. Most people who have myectomy have no further symptoms. Septal ablation in which a small portion of the thickened heart muscle is destroyed by injecting alcohol through a catheter into the artery supplying blood to that area. Possible complications with this procedure include heart block — a disruption of the heart's electrical system — which requires implantation of a pacemaker. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), a pager-sized device implanted in the chest like a pacemaker. An ICD continuously monitors heartbeat. ICD may be recommended for people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who are at high risk of sudden cardiac death because of abnormal heart rhythms. Other than medical treatments, some lifestyle changes can truly make a difference. Like maintaining a healthy diet, exercising regularly (with caution) and maintaining a healthy body weight. Answered by Alisia Braswell 1 year ago.

Coreg is one. You can check its chief actions online. This is not the only thing though. You do want to prevent preload and decrease afterload. Answered by Eboni Hollenbach 1 year ago.


Should I continue taking Toprol XL (Beta Blocker) or discontinue?
I should also add that my doc suggested I could "just stop taking it altogether" if I wanted... I'm tapering anyway... cold turkey after 8 years sounds to me, risky, but maybe not (at 50mg a day anyway). Asked by Angelo Yasurek 1 year ago.

Eight years ago I went to the ER for atrial fibrillation and a high heart rate (around 180bpm)... the onset was sudden but not the first time... after two days of intravenous dosing of beta blocker meds and TWO cardio versions, I was still in Afib. Then suddenly, like the 3-4 other times it happened at home, all went back to normal. I do not have and never had high blood pressure, just a slightly higher than average heart rate (75-85 bpm) and a sensitivity to MSG, artificial sweeteners and big doses of salt... all of which will cause my heart to beat funny even while taking toprol xl. I was told never to stop taking the med for any reason... then my mom who's on it for a heart attack, was told to stop taking it for 48 hours prior to some testing they wanted to do on her. After 2 days of no toprol, her blood pressure was NORMAL... when any other time it has always been higher while taking toprol xl. I need to know if I'm making things worse or what. I don't like toprol... it's always affected me in ways I don't like... so if I don't need to be on it, I don't want it. Of course my doc says I have to be on it from now on... and other docs say it shouldn't be taken long term. Does ANYONE know the truth about beta blockers, metroprolol xl? Answered by Lynne Prichard 1 year ago.

I was taking 50mg of Toprol XL for the eight years I've been on it... now two days in to tapering off, I'm at 25mg per day... I've noticed a heightened sensitivity to sound, visual stimulation and some long forgotten memories pop in my head... other than that... steady rhythm, regular pulse (85-95bpm)... nothing out of the ordinary. Actually I feel MORE calm that average... my doc has me on Klonopin 1mg daily for anxiety (he attributed) from the Toprol. By what Dr. Guess says, I'll stay on 25mg for a week, then down to 12mg next week... then off and see how I feel. The only other thing I take (started 3 weeks ago) is L-Dopa 32mg OTC variety... seems to quicken pulse for a few hours then resumes to normal and calmness, lowered voice as well (thought that was odd). Answered by Joette Popik 1 year ago.

Metoprolol is nothing special. I really don't understand all the fuss about such a medication. It works with the Beta1 receptors. It is very predictable -- Aside from a secondary use of performance anxiety reduction, it is used primarily for hypertension. Not Atrial Fibrillation -- You said your heart rhythm went back on its own and stabilizes (I assume) in that you are no longer in atrial fib at the moment or have been. Regardless, this medication does little if anything at preventing or stopping the fibrillation. It works by reducing cardiac output, reducing heart rate (pulse), and heart contractility. These effects contribute to its blood pressure lowering abilities. It has a short half life, meaning you need to dose it several times a day to prevent rebound effects and just as importantly allow it to stay at balanced serum levels for maximum effect. Which is why you are given the slow release version .. for convenience. :) This isn't the king of beta blockers, but in the preparation you have it isn't a bad choice for HYPERTENSION. They dosed you with betablockers during your afib in the hospital more because of your tachycardia - fast heart rate.. In lowering such a high rate, .. it helps with the sinal impulses in that particular heart node to mediate atrial fibrillation. The medications of choice for Atrial Fibrillation would be (and I'm sure you got this..in the hospital) is - anti arrhythmic. Such examples are: Cordarone, Norpace, Tikosyn, Tambocor, Rythmol.. etc. There are quite a few. These work by slowing your heart rate, and working on the sinus node as referred to before. Some really concentrating on the A/V node. Basically without explaining why this happens (because you probably know all of it already) -- they work on the heart tissues and the electrical impulse action and reactions in the heart to reestablish normal rhythm. Sort of like a liquid pacemaker until the heart 'switches back on its own to this rhythm'. Often people with atrial fib never switch back. In these cases they will either opt for a pace maker or depending on the severity of the afib, age, and other co-morbid factors they will opt for medication. Anti arrhythmic meds as explained before. If these work,.. then they are preferred over such a device implant. I have seen both kinds of patients whose heart will regulate with simply medications, and others whom rhythm will flip flop constantly with tachy and brady occuring concurrently -- that medications just have zero effect on. Some of these people don't have any negative effects from their afib and we just monitor.. most are fitted for some type of device or allowed to continue to try various AA meds to see if things will improve over time. With you -- the only thing that worrys me slightly is the Sinus node occaisonally getting out of wack. IE: You developing transient atrial fibrillation. The elevated heart rate is highly common in afib,.. with the combination of the emergency room, people acting fast and moving about, your own nervousness , and so on. The heart is trying to restablish normal rhythm .. believe it or not the high heart beat is part of the body's own built in reaction to reestablish this rhythm. But the body over compensates, naturally,.. But you say your rhythm like the other few times it has occurred goes back to a normal rhythm and stays there. *if* your rhythm has stayed non afib for years at a time.. then this is what I would do. You are most likely getting a dose of 150-400mg's daily. You cannot (or shouldn't) reduce the medication suddenly , or cold-turkey shall we say. You will need to reduce it slowly over several weeks. A titration downard. If you have some of the non time released version it would be somewhat easier.. but you can break the time released versions of this medication and not lose the time released action. I would recommend starting by breaking it into quarters -- Reducing a quarter the first week. (Taking 3/4's dose for a week). 2nd week, reduce another quarter -- stay on half a pill. 3rd week, stay on the half.. 4th week, reduce to one quarter -- 5th week -- Stop completely. Sounds tedious but needs to be done. There is rebound hypertension, elevated heart rate, increased contractility and so on that can and likely will occur because your body has adapted to the medication. What is key during all of this -- Have an accurate Blood pressure monitor. -- Monitor several times a day every day. Use a legal pad, or some sort of log, to write down your readings each time... note the date, the time of day, the systolic and diastolic readings.. and in your case note the pulse (heart rate). If at any time your blood pressure exceeds 140/90 continue to retake the pressure in a seated or laying down position. If it does not go down re-up your dose slightly to stabliize the pressure. if it is reading 141/92 or so... it isn't anything major.. Answered by Darline Rouhoff 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: Should I continue taking Toprol XL (Beta Blocker) or discontinue? Eight years ago I went to the ER for atrial fibrillation and a high heart rate (around 180bpm)... the onset was sudden but not the first time... after two days of intravenous dosing of beta blocker meds and TWO cardio versions, I was still in Afib. Then suddenly, like the 3-4 other times it... Answered by Jillian Waybright 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl Dosing Answered by Erwin Erb 1 year ago.

Toprol Xl 25mg Answered by Cathern Lauture 1 year ago.

From you calling it 'Toprol-XL' I can tell you're in the USA, this helps with my advice since medications vary in different countries. Side-effects of Metoprolol include nausea, dizziness, light-headedness, vision problems and diarrhea. If you're suffering all of the side-effects and the cons outweight the pro's then you should see your Doctor and ask to switch to another beta-blocker if you need to take them. I can't tell if you definitely need beta-blockers because I haven't seen your test results so your Doctor is who you need to see. Ask him if you could switch to another like Acebutolol or Esmolol. Hope I helped, Ryan Answered by Alaina Luccous 1 year ago.

You never want to stop taking medicine, with out your doctors consent. With your mothers situation, her BP was normal, because the Toprol is still in her system. My father stopped taking his meds, because he said he felt better, his chol. wasn't high neither was his BP. Well....that resulted in 2 heart attacks within two months...a couple months after he quit his meds. I would speak with your physician...maybe there is another drug out there that will suit you better. My father is on Toprol...and hasn't had a problem with it. But, before doing anything, please discuss it with your cardiologist. Answered by Russ Markert 1 year ago.

You say "doctor" do you mean a family doctor ? go to a cardiologist and have a complete make up run. The accept his advise. And, in what ways don't you like that they affect you. Answered by Ruthanne Simonet 1 year ago.


Can you take benadryl with biaxon?
Asked by Minta Barile 1 year ago.

As everyone else who answered has said, yes it is safe to give your dog Benadryl. The general rule of thumb is to give 1 mg for every 1 pound of body weight. In your case, you would give your dog 45 mg. You need to consult w/ a veterinarian before doing this though. He may up the dosage or cut it back depending on the severity of your dog's allergies. You can always just call him and ask instead of taking your dog in, but I suggest taking him in for an exam to rule out fleas or mites. Your vet can also give her a steroid shot called Depo Medrol to help w/ the itching. Good luck and I hope your dog gets some relief soon! Answered by Sherry Mekee 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Crissy Popi 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Elba Elizabeth 1 year ago.


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