NOROXIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 019384/002.

Names and composition

"NOROXIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NORFLOXACIN.

Answered questions

Will noroxin antibiotics harm the fetus?
i discover now that im pregnant. my last period was at march 2 and my ovulation was at 16,17,18 and during this i had pain in urine and cramp but gone when make sex. after ovulation ended pain became worse so i took noroxin ( i have took it before) for 5 days 400 mg twice a day one at morning and other at night... Asked by Mertie Faul 3 months ago.

i discover now that im pregnant. my last period was at march 2 and my ovulation was at 16,17,18 and during this i had pain in urine and cramp but gone when make sex. after ovulation ended pain became worse so i took noroxin ( i have took it before) for 5 days 400 mg twice a day one at morning and other at night directly after eating. but now im afraid since now im pregnant and my fear is will it affect the baby? help plz Answered by Pauletta Sansoucie 3 months ago.

noroxin has not been tested in pregnant women, so no one can tell you if there will be any effect on the fetus. Suggest you ask your obstetrician what he thinks, and consider amniocentesis testing to find out if there are any abnormalities. Answered by Verena Regis 3 months ago.

Noroxin is a trade name for the antibiotic norfloxacin. Like a lot of drugs, norfloxacin has never undergone testing specifically looking for effects on the fetus when women take the drug in pregnancy. There are therefore no guarantees that norfloxacin is safe. However, your situation is not uncommon (taking an antibiotic without realizing you're pregnant). No specific problems have been noted in the women who have taken norfloxacin whilst pregnant. So, overall, it is very very unlikely that you taking norfloxacin will have had any effect on the fetus whatsoever. However, for the rest of your pregnancy, you shouldn't take any medications without checking with a doctor first, as there are medications that definitely can harm the unborn child. Answered by Albert Fenix 3 months ago.

A better question is why were you taking an antibiotics that obviously wasn't prescribed for you for a specific condition and where did you get them in the first place? But to answer the question even if you are "pregnant' you aren't far enough for a fetus yet anyway. Answered by Retta Banda 3 months ago.


Does Noroxin (Norfloxacin) interfere with birth control pills?
I'm taking Norfloxacin 400MG (Noroxin) for a UTI and I was wondering would it interfere with my birth control pills? (Marvelon). Cipro (Ciprofloxacin), what I took for a UTI before does not interfere with the pills. Thanks! Asked by Rebeca Marcin 3 months ago.

Norfloxacin is in a class of antibiotics known as Fluoroquinolones. Other antibiotics in this class include Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin), Floxin (ofloxacin), and Avelox (moxifloxacin). This drug class is not known for interacting with birth control pills, so when taken at the same time they should not decrease the effectiveness of birth control pills. Answered by Ettie Bigio 3 months ago.


What is urobacid pill is used for?
urobacid 400 mg pill Asked by Myrtle Scherbel 3 months ago.

American name is Noroxin; it's for a urinary tract infection or gastrointestinal bacterial infection. Answered by Christian Rodriguez 3 months ago.

Urobacid 400 Mg Answered by Hisako Swanston 3 months ago.


What is noxorin and tenutan used for?
Asked by Davina Lawrentz 3 months ago.

Noroxin is an antibiotic, I thik you mean that. Tenuate is for wieight loss primarily, I think you mean that Or maybe it's Tevetan-which is for high blood pressure Answered by Ceola Lubawy 3 months ago.

Noroxin is Merck-Frosst trade name for the quinolone antibiotic norfloxacin. The antibiotic inhibits D.N.A. synthesis by attacking the enzyme bacterial D.N.A. gyrase. ( the bacterial version of eukaryote topoisomerase. The activity was originally discovered in the antibacterial function of nalidixic acid. Answered by Julianne Lagman 3 months ago.


Can any doctors or pharmacists answer this?
I was prescribed Noroxin 400mg for a UTI and it has been making me nauseous. I saw my doc today and he told me I can take it with food, however I know the prescription info says to take it at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after food so what kind of food should I eat with it?I really don't want to get... Asked by Alicia Euertz 3 months ago.

I was prescribed Noroxin 400mg for a UTI and it has been making me nauseous. I saw my doc today and he told me I can take it with food, however I know the prescription info says to take it at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after food so what kind of food should I eat with it? I really don't want to get nauseous again, but I know I really should take the meds. Answered by Antone Flagstad 3 months ago.

If it makes you nauseous on an empty stomach, you can take it with food, just no dairy, iron or antacids. Those items bind with the medication making it impossible to absorb. Answered by Merrill Wical 3 months ago.


Pls help i think i have UTI.?
guy i just read the symptom of UTI (urenia track infection) and i think i have it...But i'm scared to go to the doctor bcs i'm been having this for months maybe 5-6months and i scared to get some really bad news.i would like to know if anyone here had UTI b4 and how long did u wait b4 u went to the doc??? Asked by Mercedez Forcello 3 months ago.

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated. Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. During treatment, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Answered by Candelaria Bannon 3 months ago.

It looks such as you may desire to have a minor one. In my adventure, the least puzzling answer is to drink lots of cranberry juice (it particularly is a organic anti-biotic). yet an alternate decision is to take cranberry supplements. you will get them at any drug keep. you will possibly desire to objective to pee after intercourse - it enables "wash" out any bacteria that could have been pushed up there. If none of that enables, flow to the surgeon for an antibiotic. Answered by Kasandra Dejaeger 3 months ago.

Don't need a doc for UTI....drink some cranberry juice or you can buy some pills. They're not that serious Answered by Franklyn Meis 3 months ago.


Girl Problem! Please Help!!?
okay. i believe im in the beginning of getting a UTI. I've Had One once Before And I Just Had To Tough It Out And I Didnt Go To The Doctor. But Now That Im Getting One Again. I Still Cant Go To The Doctor But I Heard From An Ex-Friend That There Is Some Type Of Over The Counter Med To Treat It. Does Any one... Asked by Norris Kurt 3 months ago.

okay. i believe im in the beginning of getting a UTI. I've Had One once Before And I Just Had To Tough It Out And I Didnt Go To The Doctor. But Now That Im Getting One Again. I Still Cant Go To The Doctor But I Heard From An Ex-Friend That There Is Some Type Of Over The Counter Med To Treat It. Does Any one Know The Name Of That Medicine Or Any other Remidies That Could Help Me. Oh I Know The Whole Cranberry Juice Thing But That took A While. Answered by Rosalinda Kalinowski 3 months ago.

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated. Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. During treatment, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Answered by Nelia Tugman 3 months ago.

I know it's time consuming, but you should really just go to a doctor, because if indeed it is a UTI then you need antibiotics. If you go then you will be able to start feeling better quicker anyway, so it's the most logical solution. Also, if you leave it and it gets worse then you can end up with kidney damage or the infection could spread to your other organs. I had a friend who became really ill because of a UTI she left untreated. but as some other people have said, in the meantime drink lots and lots of water, to try and flush out some of the infection. You could also get these homeopathic cranberry extract sachets from the pharmacy.. I'm not sure if you have them over there, but there must be something similar. They worked for me when I had a very mild UTI once. Good luck, and go to the doctor! Answered by Gloria Cahoon 3 months ago.

The ones that I know of are Uricalm, Azo, and Cystex (not too sure about the last one). I think that Uricalm and Azo have the same ingredients, but Uricalm has more milligrams of the active ingredient in it and I think it may even be cheaper, too. I've used them and they've been very helpful with the pain. Don't neglect to see your doctor, though, because if you do have a UTI, it can become very serious if you don't get the proper treatment for it. Answered by Elva Coulas 3 months ago.

Water, Water, Water. I still have kidney stones. If you let it get to bad without medical attention it could derive into something worse. Have you not heard on the news were a Brazilian Miss Teen died from a UTI? The bacteria can be fatal and spread if not corrected. This is rare, however not impossible. Drink plenty of water and pee pee pee. But I encourage you to go to a doctor asap. Answered by Dusty Stepanek 3 months ago.

YOU CANT GET RID OF A BLADDER INFECTION WITHOUT ANTI BIOTICS do you know how dangerous that is ? you can loose your kidney! you might have made some of the side effects go away with your toughing it out but the infection itself is always there.go to the doctor, all you have to do is describe your symptoms and pee in a cup and then he gives you a 7 to 10 day med please GO! Answered by Kiersten Taborn 3 months ago.

try the cranberry pills. they are stronger and i take like 2 to 3 a day... plus drink LOADS of water to flush yourself out. in the future make sure you take the pills or juice everyday to prevent them Answered by Shane Abellera 3 months ago.


How can I relieve Urinal-track infection naturally?
Asked by Hermine Treftz 3 months ago.

UTIs are treated with antibacterial drugs. The choice of drug and length of treatment depend on the patient's history and the urine tests that identify the offending bacteria. The sensitivity test is especially useful in helping the doctor select the most effective drug. The drugs most often used to treat routine, uncomplicated UTIs are trimethoprim (Trimpex), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra, Cotrim), amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin), and ampicillin (Omnipen, Polycillin, Principen, Totacillin). A class of drugs called quinolones includes four drugs approved in recent years for treating UTI. These drugs include ofloxacin (Floxin), norfloxacin (Noroxin), ciprofloxacin (Cipro), and trovafloxin (Trovan). Often, a UTI can be cured with 1 or 2 days of treatment if the infection is not complicated by an obstruction or other disorder. Still, many doctors ask their patients to take antibiotics for a week or two to ensure that the infection has been cured. Single-dose treatment is not recommended for some groups of patients, for example, those who have delayed treatment or have signs of a kidney infection, patients with diabetes or structural abnormalities, or men who have prostate infections. Longer treatment is also needed by patients with infections caused by Mycoplasma or Chlamydia, which are usually treated with tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ), or doxycycline. A followup urinalysis helps to confirm that the urinary tract is infection-free. It is important to take the full course of treatment because symptoms may disappear before the infection is fully cleared. Severely ill patients with kidney infections may be hospitalized until they can take fluids and needed drugs on their own. Kidney infections generally require several weeks of antibiotic treatment. Researchers at the University of Washington found that 2-week therapy with TMP/SMZ was as effective as 6 weeks of treatment with the same drug in women with kidney infections that did not involve an obstruction or nervous system disorder. In such cases, kidney infections rarely lead to kidney damage or kidney failure unless they go untreated. Various drugs are available to relieve the pain of a UTI. A heating pad may also help. Most doctors suggest that drinking plenty of water helps cleanse the urinary tract of bacteria. During treatment, it is best to avoid coffee, alcohol, and spicy foods. And one of the best things a smoker can do for his or her bladder is to quit smoking. Smoking is the major known cause of bladder cancer. Answered by Harrison Short 3 months ago.

relieve urinaltrack infection naturally Answered by Suzy Laatsch 3 months ago.

Go to the doctor and get some antibiotics! That's the only sure fire way to cure an infection. Answered by Cythia Flood 3 months ago.

it is Urinary and you can't. You HAVE TO HAVE antibiotics ASAP! If you don't it WILL turn into a kidney infection. Anything natural only PREVENTS a UTI it DOES NOT CURE one! Answered by Anisa Adolf 3 months ago.

Even if you could resolve a urinary infection, how would you know what bacteria are involved? See a doctor, get diagnosed and treated. Answered by Hsiu Habermehl 3 months ago.

It will usually clear up on its own, but drinking cranberry juice every day will help prevent future UTIs. Answered by Devona Nosel 3 months ago.


I had a short period can i be pregnant ?
Ok i had my periods this month but it only last three days during the periods i got uti and went on Noroxin can this be why my period was short . I did take a pregnancy test (clear blue) it was negative can some body help me with my problem am i pregnant . I did have a baby about a year a go. I have no cravings... Asked by Elza Yeung 3 months ago.

Ok i had my periods this month but it only last three days during the periods i got uti and went on Noroxin can this be why my period was short . I did take a pregnancy test (clear blue) it was negative can some body help me with my problem am i pregnant . I did have a baby about a year a go. I have no cravings ,i was peeing alot but that was the uti but it stop now , no aches , no morning sickness ,have bit of acne but that can be my diet . am not even feeling to eat.But i am underweight .Please help Answered by Karoline Hyberger 3 months ago.

highly doubtful you are pregnant. u probably had a short period because you are underweight - your body is trying to compensate for a lack of nutrients. Answered by Shizuko Eisenbrandt 3 months ago.


Antibiotics, drug induced Hepatitis, worries. Please ease my mind.(rebadged question)?
I have finished my dose of Norfloxacin antibiotics(8days) for a bad urinary tract infection (and was on 10 days of Cephalaxin antibiotics 1 week before this with no side effects) and am wondering how long the Norfloxacin stays in your system for.I had a Liver Function Test 2 and a bit days after finishing the... Asked by Charise Dunk 3 months ago.

I have finished my dose of Norfloxacin antibiotics(8days) for a bad urinary tract infection (and was on 10 days of Cephalaxin antibiotics 1 week before this with no side effects) and am wondering how long the Norfloxacin stays in your system for. I had a Liver Function Test 2 and a bit days after finishing the course and the ALT came back high.(Only 4 points above the normal average high cut off but 20 points above my last ALT reading) I have experienced pale stools and pain in my abdomen though the former has stopped since finishing the course and the latter has eased. I am worried about Drug Induced Hepatitis. My doctor didn't seem to think there was much to worry about re; the "just" high result but being a bit of a worrier I'm concerned. Could the antibiotics have caused my symptoms without it being a Hepatitis? Answered by Tilda Guillory 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019384/002 NOROXIN NORFLOXACIN TABLET/ORAL 400MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
019384/002 NOROXIN NORFLOXACIN TABLET/ORAL 400MG
019757/001 CHIBROXIN NORFLOXACIN SOLUTION/DROPS/OPHTHALMIC 0.3%

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