Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018686/001.

Names and composition

"NORMODYNE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018686/001 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018687/001 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018687/002 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018687/003 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018687/004 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018686/001 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018687/001 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018687/002 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018687/003 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018687/004 NORMODYNE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018716/001 TRANDATE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
018716/002 TRANDATE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
018716/003 TRANDATE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
018716/004 TRANDATE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 400MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019425/001 TRANDATE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
074787/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074787/002 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
074787/003 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
074989/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
074989/002 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
074989/003 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075113/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075113/002 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075113/003 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075133/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075133/002 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075133/003 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075215/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075215/002 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075215/003 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075223/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
075223/002 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
075223/003 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG
075239/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075240/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075242/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075303/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075355/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075431/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
075524/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
076051/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
079134/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
090699/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
200908/001 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 100MG
200908/002 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 200MG
200908/003 LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE LABETALOL HYDROCHLORIDE TABLET/ORAL 300MG

Ask a doctor

A licensed doctor will try to answer your question for free as quickly as possible. Free of charge during the beta period.

Answered questions

Sounds like normadien its high blood pressure medication?
Asked by Jorge Diangelo 1 year ago.

Only a Physician can make the choice regarding medication. And yes, most blood pressure medication has some side affects initially. Most people do adjust to this. You can talk to your Doctor about meds that don't cause sexual problems. Answered by Christian Lumm 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Deedee Lamarca 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Loyd Borrow 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Darwin Medal 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Jonas Davanzo 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Gilberto Henn 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Talia Ashkettle 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Kareem Henry 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Shawnda Sirwet 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Johnie Eversman 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Vernia Jonte 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Marianela Tlucek 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Lyn Debiasio 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Tamie Ristaino 1 year ago.


What are the top ten medications for high blood pressure?
Asked by Helene Antolini 1 year ago.

Top ten? I could name ten off the top of my head that I use for Cardiac patients: Norvasc (amlodipine besylate) Lopressor (metoprolol succinate) Atenolol (Tenormin) Labetolol (Normodyne) Hydrocholorthiazide Lasix (Furosemide) Lisinopril (Prinvil) Diltiazem (Cardizem) Carvedilol (Coreg) Verapamil These are some of the common ones. Answered by Precious Cissell 1 year ago.

These are all the medication used for high blood pressure I couldn't give the top ten as different medication work differently for each individuals. Accuretic Acebutolol Acepril Acezide Adalat Adipine Adizem Aldomet Aliskiren Ambrisentan Amias Amilamont Amiloride Amiloride/Bumetanide Amiloride/Furosemide Amiloride/Hydrochlorothiazide Amlodipine Amlodipine besilate/Valsartan Amlostin Angiopine Angiozem Angitil Apresoline Aprinox Aprovel Atenix Atenix Co Atenolol Atenolol/Chlortalidone Atenolol/Nifedipine Baratol Bedranol Bendroflumethiazide Bendroflumethiazide/Timolol Beta-Adalat Betaloc Beta-Prograne Betim Bi-Carzem Bipranix Bisoprolol Bosentan Bumetanide Burinex Cabren Calchan Calcicard Candesartan Capoten Capozide Captopril Captopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Carace Carace Plus Cardene Cardicor Cardioplen Cardura Carvedilol Cascor Catapres Celectol Celiprolol Chlortalidone Cilazapril Clonidine Clopamide/Pindolol CoAprovel Co-Betaloc Co-Diovan Coracten Cordilox Corgard Cozaar Cozaar-Comp Co-zidocapt Dilcardia Diltiazem Dilzem Diovan Disogram Diurexan Doxadura Doxazosin Ecopace Emcor Enalapril Enalapril/Hydrochlorothiazide Epoprostenol Eprosartan Eucardic Exforge Felendil Felodipine Felodipine/Ramipril Felogen Felotens Flolan Fortipine Fosinopril Froop Froop Co Fru-Co Frumil Frusol Furosemide Furosemide/Spironolactone Furosemide/triamterene Gopten Guanethidine Horizem Hydralazine Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Metoprolol Hydrochlorothiazide/Olmesartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Quinapril Hydrochlorothiazide/Telmisartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Valsartan Hygroton Hypolar Hypovase Hytrin Iloprost trometamol Indapamide Indapamide Indapamide hemihydrate Indapamide/Perindopril arginine Inderal Indoramin hydrochloride Innovace Innozide Irbesartan Ismelin Isradipine Istin Istin Kentipine Kenzem Labetalol Lacidipine Lasilactone Lasix Lasoride Lercanidipine Lisinopril Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Lisopress Loniten Lopace Lopresor Losartan Metenix Methyldopa Metolazone Metoprolol Micardis MicardisPlus Minijet furosemide Minoxidil Moduret Moduretic Moexipril Motens Moxonidine Nadolol Natrilix Natrilix SR Nebilet Nebivolol Neofel Neo-Naclex Nicardipine Nifedipine Nifopress Nindaxa Olmesartan Olmetec Olmetec Plus Oxprenolol Parmid Perdix Perdix Perindopril arginine Physiotens Pindolol Pinefeld Plendil Prazosin Prescal Prestim Propranolol Quinapril Quinil Ramipril Ranvera Rapranol Rasilez Retalzem Revatio Sectral Securon Sildenafil citrate Slofedipine Slo-Pro Slozem Slozem Staril Syprol Tarka Telmisartan Tenif Tenoret Tenoretic Tenormin Tensipine Tensopril Terazosin Teveten Teveten Tildiem Tildiem Timolol Torasemide Torem Tracleer Trandate Trandolapril Trandolapril/Verapamil Triapin Tritace Univer Valsartan Vascace Vascalpha Ventavis Verapamil Vera-Til Vertab Viazem Viskaldix Visken Vivacor Volibris Xipamide Zanidip Zemtard Zestoretic Zestril Zolvera Hope this was helpful Answered by John Sciotti 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Rowena Alegria 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Iesha Schmuff 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Zona Ekis 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Diedra Eclarinal 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Ahmad Schwizer 1 year ago.


Does st john wart have effect with beta blocker meds?
Asked by Alta Lessin 1 year ago.

Possibly. I am sensitive to St John's Wort. So it is pretty powerful. It does effect your serotonin levels. It does affect beta blockers--beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), acebutolol (Sectral), pindolol (Visken), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), sotalol (Betapace), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), and carvedilol (Coreg). Answered by Sherril Chaim 1 year ago.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist, moron. Answered by Evelin Roperto 1 year ago.


True/False: Beta blockers are contraindicated for use in patients after they experience a heart attack.?
Asked by Katrice Maertz 1 year ago.

False! Heart Disease and Beta-Blocker Therapy Beta-blockers are one of the most widely prescribed class of drugs to treat hypertension (high blood pressure) and are a mainstay treatment of congestive heart failure. Beta-blockers slow the heart's rate, thereby decreasing the heart’s demand for oxygen. Long-term use of beta-blockers helps manage chronic heart failure. Examples of beta-blockers include: - Sectral (acebutolol) - Zebeta (bisoprolol) - Brevibloc (esmolol) - Inderal (propranolol) - Tenormin (atenolol) - Normodyne, Trandate (labetalol) - Coreg (carvedilol) - Lopressor, Toprol-XL (metoprolol) Beta-blockers are often prescribed for these heart conditions: - Heart failure - High blood pressure - Angina - Abnormal heart rhythms - Heart attack Answered by Coralee Winterholler 1 year ago.

Heart always tries to adapt to body demands, so when the heart starts to work harder - beats faster, more forceful contraction, which is in case of low oxygen or blood supply to the heart. The overload puts stress on cardiag muscle and after long period causes heart attack. So beta blockers decrease heart rate and contraction, and helps to prevent heart failure. Answered by Dirk Grein 1 year ago.

False. Beta blockers are also used to control high blood pressure. Answered by Rolland Requarth 1 year ago.

False, they may help prevent a second attack. Answered by Arletha Rende 1 year ago.


Sounds like normadien its high blood pressure medication?
Asked by Denise Loeschner 1 year ago.

Only a Physician can make the choice regarding medication. And yes, most blood pressure medication has some side affects initially. Most people do adjust to this. You can talk to your Doctor about meds that don't cause sexual problems. Answered by Cory Gentle 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Miesha Haymon 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Edison Melnik 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Candis Prager 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Annelle Golkin 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Phebe Ran 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Cedrick Bouma 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Elizbeth Moehrle 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Corliss Balvanz 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Herma Petrouits 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Sara Talyor 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Jonah Broxson 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Mohammad Fornaro 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Andrea Uher 1 year ago.


What are the top ten medications for high blood pressure?
Asked by Rhiannon Eovaldi 1 year ago.

Top ten? I could name ten off the top of my head that I use for Cardiac patients: Norvasc (amlodipine besylate) Lopressor (metoprolol succinate) Atenolol (Tenormin) Labetolol (Normodyne) Hydrocholorthiazide Lasix (Furosemide) Lisinopril (Prinvil) Diltiazem (Cardizem) Carvedilol (Coreg) Verapamil These are some of the common ones. Answered by Zoe Burlingame 1 year ago.

These are all the medication used for high blood pressure I couldn't give the top ten as different medication work differently for each individuals. Accuretic Acebutolol Acepril Acezide Adalat Adipine Adizem Aldomet Aliskiren Ambrisentan Amias Amilamont Amiloride Amiloride/Bumetanide Amiloride/Furosemide Amiloride/Hydrochlorothiazide Amlodipine Amlodipine besilate/Valsartan Amlostin Angiopine Angiozem Angitil Apresoline Aprinox Aprovel Atenix Atenix Co Atenolol Atenolol/Chlortalidone Atenolol/Nifedipine Baratol Bedranol Bendroflumethiazide Bendroflumethiazide/Timolol Beta-Adalat Betaloc Beta-Prograne Betim Bi-Carzem Bipranix Bisoprolol Bosentan Bumetanide Burinex Cabren Calchan Calcicard Candesartan Capoten Capozide Captopril Captopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Carace Carace Plus Cardene Cardicor Cardioplen Cardura Carvedilol Cascor Catapres Celectol Celiprolol Chlortalidone Cilazapril Clonidine Clopamide/Pindolol CoAprovel Co-Betaloc Co-Diovan Coracten Cordilox Corgard Cozaar Cozaar-Comp Co-zidocapt Dilcardia Diltiazem Dilzem Diovan Disogram Diurexan Doxadura Doxazosin Ecopace Emcor Enalapril Enalapril/Hydrochlorothiazide Epoprostenol Eprosartan Eucardic Exforge Felendil Felodipine Felodipine/Ramipril Felogen Felotens Flolan Fortipine Fosinopril Froop Froop Co Fru-Co Frumil Frusol Furosemide Furosemide/Spironolactone Furosemide/triamterene Gopten Guanethidine Horizem Hydralazine Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Metoprolol Hydrochlorothiazide/Olmesartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Quinapril Hydrochlorothiazide/Telmisartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Valsartan Hygroton Hypolar Hypovase Hytrin Iloprost trometamol Indapamide Indapamide Indapamide hemihydrate Indapamide/Perindopril arginine Inderal Indoramin hydrochloride Innovace Innozide Irbesartan Ismelin Isradipine Istin Istin Kentipine Kenzem Labetalol Lacidipine Lasilactone Lasix Lasoride Lercanidipine Lisinopril Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Lisopress Loniten Lopace Lopresor Losartan Metenix Methyldopa Metolazone Metoprolol Micardis MicardisPlus Minijet furosemide Minoxidil Moduret Moduretic Moexipril Motens Moxonidine Nadolol Natrilix Natrilix SR Nebilet Nebivolol Neofel Neo-Naclex Nicardipine Nifedipine Nifopress Nindaxa Olmesartan Olmetec Olmetec Plus Oxprenolol Parmid Perdix Perdix Perindopril arginine Physiotens Pindolol Pinefeld Plendil Prazosin Prescal Prestim Propranolol Quinapril Quinil Ramipril Ranvera Rapranol Rasilez Retalzem Revatio Sectral Securon Sildenafil citrate Slofedipine Slo-Pro Slozem Slozem Staril Syprol Tarka Telmisartan Tenif Tenoret Tenoretic Tenormin Tensipine Tensopril Terazosin Teveten Teveten Tildiem Tildiem Timolol Torasemide Torem Tracleer Trandate Trandolapril Trandolapril/Verapamil Triapin Tritace Univer Valsartan Vascace Vascalpha Ventavis Verapamil Vera-Til Vertab Viazem Viskaldix Visken Vivacor Volibris Xipamide Zanidip Zemtard Zestoretic Zestril Zolvera Hope this was helpful Answered by Marcelina Mcgurn 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Rosio Keliiholokai 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Lashawnda Piccillo 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Adele Luiz 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Warner Biddix 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Gema Scola 1 year ago.


Does st john wart have effect with beta blocker meds?
Asked by Kacy Seith 1 year ago.

Possibly. I am sensitive to St John's Wort. So it is pretty powerful. It does effect your serotonin levels. It does affect beta blockers--beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), acebutolol (Sectral), pindolol (Visken), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), sotalol (Betapace), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), and carvedilol (Coreg). Answered by Darrin Brosnahan 1 year ago.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist, moron. Answered by Keith Sengupta 1 year ago.


SGPT very high?
I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Asked by Marilee Trawick 1 year ago.

I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Answered by Garnet Jarva 1 year ago.

ALT of 166 IU/L is not very high. If it was 1600 IU, then that would be very high. And you can have this kind of result when you have serious liver illness. There are many possible causes for elevated liver enzymes such as ALT and AST. And only your doctor is in a position to investigate it further and tell you whether you need to do something about it or not. Some common causes of moderately elevated ALT and AST results such as yours are: Alcohol Cirrhosis Hepatitis B (chronic) Hepatitis C (chronic) Steatosis/steatohepatitis Medications/toxins Acute viral hepatitis Less common hepatic causes Autoimmune hepatitis Hemochromatosis Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency Wilson's disease Nonhepatic causes Celiac disease Hemolysis Myopathy Hyperthyroidism Strenuous exercise Macro-AST Consumption of the followig Medications Herbal supplements/vitamins can also cause eleveated ALT and AST levels: Acetaminophen Chaparral leaf Amiodarone (Cordarone) Ephedra Amoxicillin- clavulanic acid Gentian Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Germander Fluconazole (Diflucan) Jin bu huan Glyburide (Micronase) Kava Heparin Scutellaria (skullcap) Isoniazid (INH) Senna Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Shark cartilage Labetalol (Normodyne) Vitamin A Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Phenytoin (Dilantin) Protease inhibitors Sulfonamides Trazodone (Desyrel) Answered by Evita Demerchant 1 year ago.

Very High Sgpt Answered by Megan Roemhild 1 year ago.

Greater-than-normal ALT levels may indicate: * Celiac disease * Cirrhosis * Hepatitis (viral, autoimmune) * Hereditary hemochromatosis * Liver ischemia (blood flow deficiency to the liver) * Liver tumor * Use of drugs that are poisonous to the liver Answered by Kristi Rorex 1 year ago.

Thankyou for all the answers. Answered by Tomasa Marvin 1 year ago.


Sounds like normadien its high blood pressure medication?
Asked by Madeleine Bertran 1 year ago.

Only a Physician can make the choice regarding medication. And yes, most blood pressure medication has some side affects initially. Most people do adjust to this. You can talk to your Doctor about meds that don't cause sexual problems. Answered by Kendall Meholick 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Kit Vandall 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Sharice Honus 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Maximina Purdon 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Pamelia Heiderman 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Kristal Torrence 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Shan Skrine 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Lynell Knudsvig 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Cleotilde Ewan 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Sammy Whitewater 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Lissa Knezovich 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Celsa Blas 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Marcelene Foret 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Ozie Kolopajlo 1 year ago.


What are the top ten medications for high blood pressure?
Asked by Rudolph Lucious 1 year ago.

Top ten? I could name ten off the top of my head that I use for Cardiac patients: Norvasc (amlodipine besylate) Lopressor (metoprolol succinate) Atenolol (Tenormin) Labetolol (Normodyne) Hydrocholorthiazide Lasix (Furosemide) Lisinopril (Prinvil) Diltiazem (Cardizem) Carvedilol (Coreg) Verapamil These are some of the common ones. Answered by Luis Swida 1 year ago.

These are all the medication used for high blood pressure I couldn't give the top ten as different medication work differently for each individuals. Accuretic Acebutolol Acepril Acezide Adalat Adipine Adizem Aldomet Aliskiren Ambrisentan Amias Amilamont Amiloride Amiloride/Bumetanide Amiloride/Furosemide Amiloride/Hydrochlorothiazide Amlodipine Amlodipine besilate/Valsartan Amlostin Angiopine Angiozem Angitil Apresoline Aprinox Aprovel Atenix Atenix Co Atenolol Atenolol/Chlortalidone Atenolol/Nifedipine Baratol Bedranol Bendroflumethiazide Bendroflumethiazide/Timolol Beta-Adalat Betaloc Beta-Prograne Betim Bi-Carzem Bipranix Bisoprolol Bosentan Bumetanide Burinex Cabren Calchan Calcicard Candesartan Capoten Capozide Captopril Captopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Carace Carace Plus Cardene Cardicor Cardioplen Cardura Carvedilol Cascor Catapres Celectol Celiprolol Chlortalidone Cilazapril Clonidine Clopamide/Pindolol CoAprovel Co-Betaloc Co-Diovan Coracten Cordilox Corgard Cozaar Cozaar-Comp Co-zidocapt Dilcardia Diltiazem Dilzem Diovan Disogram Diurexan Doxadura Doxazosin Ecopace Emcor Enalapril Enalapril/Hydrochlorothiazide Epoprostenol Eprosartan Eucardic Exforge Felendil Felodipine Felodipine/Ramipril Felogen Felotens Flolan Fortipine Fosinopril Froop Froop Co Fru-Co Frumil Frusol Furosemide Furosemide/Spironolactone Furosemide/triamterene Gopten Guanethidine Horizem Hydralazine Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Metoprolol Hydrochlorothiazide/Olmesartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Quinapril Hydrochlorothiazide/Telmisartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Valsartan Hygroton Hypolar Hypovase Hytrin Iloprost trometamol Indapamide Indapamide Indapamide hemihydrate Indapamide/Perindopril arginine Inderal Indoramin hydrochloride Innovace Innozide Irbesartan Ismelin Isradipine Istin Istin Kentipine Kenzem Labetalol Lacidipine Lasilactone Lasix Lasoride Lercanidipine Lisinopril Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Lisopress Loniten Lopace Lopresor Losartan Metenix Methyldopa Metolazone Metoprolol Micardis MicardisPlus Minijet furosemide Minoxidil Moduret Moduretic Moexipril Motens Moxonidine Nadolol Natrilix Natrilix SR Nebilet Nebivolol Neofel Neo-Naclex Nicardipine Nifedipine Nifopress Nindaxa Olmesartan Olmetec Olmetec Plus Oxprenolol Parmid Perdix Perdix Perindopril arginine Physiotens Pindolol Pinefeld Plendil Prazosin Prescal Prestim Propranolol Quinapril Quinil Ramipril Ranvera Rapranol Rasilez Retalzem Revatio Sectral Securon Sildenafil citrate Slofedipine Slo-Pro Slozem Slozem Staril Syprol Tarka Telmisartan Tenif Tenoret Tenoretic Tenormin Tensipine Tensopril Terazosin Teveten Teveten Tildiem Tildiem Timolol Torasemide Torem Tracleer Trandate Trandolapril Trandolapril/Verapamil Triapin Tritace Univer Valsartan Vascace Vascalpha Ventavis Verapamil Vera-Til Vertab Viazem Viskaldix Visken Vivacor Volibris Xipamide Zanidip Zemtard Zestoretic Zestril Zolvera Hope this was helpful Answered by Claris Aono 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Renaldo Frasher 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Shiela Stephany 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Mardell Cummingham 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Nikole Parilla 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Seymour Vierk 1 year ago.


Does st john wart have effect with beta blocker meds?
Asked by Ethel Nishio 1 year ago.

Possibly. I am sensitive to St John's Wort. So it is pretty powerful. It does effect your serotonin levels. It does affect beta blockers--beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), acebutolol (Sectral), pindolol (Visken), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), sotalol (Betapace), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), and carvedilol (Coreg). Answered by Barry Hulstine 1 year ago.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist, moron. Answered by Nathan Balcerzak 1 year ago.


SGPT very high?
I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Asked by Bambi Rehrig 1 year ago.

I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Answered by Halina Shimo 1 year ago.

ALT of 166 IU/L is not very high. If it was 1600 IU, then that would be very high. And you can have this kind of result when you have serious liver illness. There are many possible causes for elevated liver enzymes such as ALT and AST. And only your doctor is in a position to investigate it further and tell you whether you need to do something about it or not. Some common causes of moderately elevated ALT and AST results such as yours are: Alcohol Cirrhosis Hepatitis B (chronic) Hepatitis C (chronic) Steatosis/steatohepatitis Medications/toxins Acute viral hepatitis Less common hepatic causes Autoimmune hepatitis Hemochromatosis Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency Wilson's disease Nonhepatic causes Celiac disease Hemolysis Myopathy Hyperthyroidism Strenuous exercise Macro-AST Consumption of the followig Medications Herbal supplements/vitamins can also cause eleveated ALT and AST levels: Acetaminophen Chaparral leaf Amiodarone (Cordarone) Ephedra Amoxicillin- clavulanic acid Gentian Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Germander Fluconazole (Diflucan) Jin bu huan Glyburide (Micronase) Kava Heparin Scutellaria (skullcap) Isoniazid (INH) Senna Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Shark cartilage Labetalol (Normodyne) Vitamin A Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Phenytoin (Dilantin) Protease inhibitors Sulfonamides Trazodone (Desyrel) Answered by Kimberlie Nacion 1 year ago.

Very High Sgpt Answered by Lonna Lacusky 1 year ago.

Greater-than-normal ALT levels may indicate: * Celiac disease * Cirrhosis * Hepatitis (viral, autoimmune) * Hereditary hemochromatosis * Liver ischemia (blood flow deficiency to the liver) * Liver tumor * Use of drugs that are poisonous to the liver Answered by Domingo Buonomo 1 year ago.

Thankyou for all the answers. Answered by Desmond Tomash 1 year ago.


Sounds like normadien its high blood pressure medication?
Asked by Francesco Maga 1 year ago.

Only a Physician can make the choice regarding medication. And yes, most blood pressure medication has some side affects initially. Most people do adjust to this. You can talk to your Doctor about meds that don't cause sexual problems. Answered by Odette Dughi 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Akilah Knoerzer 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Roosevelt Turrubiartes 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Erich January 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Frederica Alverez 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Delicia Ellert 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Ezra Lamaster 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Myesha Mayeski 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Allyn Corping 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Alphonso Mody 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Jill Gossett 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Temeka Palakiko 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Sharda Herzberger 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Lino Hadnott 1 year ago.


What are the top ten medications for high blood pressure?
Asked by Eneida Rong 1 year ago.

Top ten? I could name ten off the top of my head that I use for Cardiac patients: Norvasc (amlodipine besylate) Lopressor (metoprolol succinate) Atenolol (Tenormin) Labetolol (Normodyne) Hydrocholorthiazide Lasix (Furosemide) Lisinopril (Prinvil) Diltiazem (Cardizem) Carvedilol (Coreg) Verapamil These are some of the common ones. Answered by Marlyn Somani 1 year ago.

These are all the medication used for high blood pressure I couldn't give the top ten as different medication work differently for each individuals. Accuretic Acebutolol Acepril Acezide Adalat Adipine Adizem Aldomet Aliskiren Ambrisentan Amias Amilamont Amiloride Amiloride/Bumetanide Amiloride/Furosemide Amiloride/Hydrochlorothiazide Amlodipine Amlodipine besilate/Valsartan Amlostin Angiopine Angiozem Angitil Apresoline Aprinox Aprovel Atenix Atenix Co Atenolol Atenolol/Chlortalidone Atenolol/Nifedipine Baratol Bedranol Bendroflumethiazide Bendroflumethiazide/Timolol Beta-Adalat Betaloc Beta-Prograne Betim Bi-Carzem Bipranix Bisoprolol Bosentan Bumetanide Burinex Cabren Calchan Calcicard Candesartan Capoten Capozide Captopril Captopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Carace Carace Plus Cardene Cardicor Cardioplen Cardura Carvedilol Cascor Catapres Celectol Celiprolol Chlortalidone Cilazapril Clonidine Clopamide/Pindolol CoAprovel Co-Betaloc Co-Diovan Coracten Cordilox Corgard Cozaar Cozaar-Comp Co-zidocapt Dilcardia Diltiazem Dilzem Diovan Disogram Diurexan Doxadura Doxazosin Ecopace Emcor Enalapril Enalapril/Hydrochlorothiazide Epoprostenol Eprosartan Eucardic Exforge Felendil Felodipine Felodipine/Ramipril Felogen Felotens Flolan Fortipine Fosinopril Froop Froop Co Fru-Co Frumil Frusol Furosemide Furosemide/Spironolactone Furosemide/triamterene Gopten Guanethidine Horizem Hydralazine Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Metoprolol Hydrochlorothiazide/Olmesartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Quinapril Hydrochlorothiazide/Telmisartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Valsartan Hygroton Hypolar Hypovase Hytrin Iloprost trometamol Indapamide Indapamide Indapamide hemihydrate Indapamide/Perindopril arginine Inderal Indoramin hydrochloride Innovace Innozide Irbesartan Ismelin Isradipine Istin Istin Kentipine Kenzem Labetalol Lacidipine Lasilactone Lasix Lasoride Lercanidipine Lisinopril Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Lisopress Loniten Lopace Lopresor Losartan Metenix Methyldopa Metolazone Metoprolol Micardis MicardisPlus Minijet furosemide Minoxidil Moduret Moduretic Moexipril Motens Moxonidine Nadolol Natrilix Natrilix SR Nebilet Nebivolol Neofel Neo-Naclex Nicardipine Nifedipine Nifopress Nindaxa Olmesartan Olmetec Olmetec Plus Oxprenolol Parmid Perdix Perdix Perindopril arginine Physiotens Pindolol Pinefeld Plendil Prazosin Prescal Prestim Propranolol Quinapril Quinil Ramipril Ranvera Rapranol Rasilez Retalzem Revatio Sectral Securon Sildenafil citrate Slofedipine Slo-Pro Slozem Slozem Staril Syprol Tarka Telmisartan Tenif Tenoret Tenoretic Tenormin Tensipine Tensopril Terazosin Teveten Teveten Tildiem Tildiem Timolol Torasemide Torem Tracleer Trandate Trandolapril Trandolapril/Verapamil Triapin Tritace Univer Valsartan Vascace Vascalpha Ventavis Verapamil Vera-Til Vertab Viazem Viskaldix Visken Vivacor Volibris Xipamide Zanidip Zemtard Zestoretic Zestril Zolvera Hope this was helpful Answered by Monica Riese 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Nia Prehoda 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Rosy Pewo 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Phebe Cordle 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Mathilde Crall 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Trinidad Hubin 1 year ago.


Does st john wart have effect with beta blocker meds?
Asked by Kenneth Eckerman 1 year ago.

Possibly. I am sensitive to St John's Wort. So it is pretty powerful. It does effect your serotonin levels. It does affect beta blockers--beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), acebutolol (Sectral), pindolol (Visken), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), sotalol (Betapace), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), and carvedilol (Coreg). Answered by Valorie Rubinoff 1 year ago.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist, moron. Answered by Janie Minning 1 year ago.


SGPT very high?
I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Asked by Camellia Kirkconnell 1 year ago.

I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Answered by Tosha Walking 1 year ago.

ALT of 166 IU/L is not very high. If it was 1600 IU, then that would be very high. And you can have this kind of result when you have serious liver illness. There are many possible causes for elevated liver enzymes such as ALT and AST. And only your doctor is in a position to investigate it further and tell you whether you need to do something about it or not. Some common causes of moderately elevated ALT and AST results such as yours are: Alcohol Cirrhosis Hepatitis B (chronic) Hepatitis C (chronic) Steatosis/steatohepatitis Medications/toxins Acute viral hepatitis Less common hepatic causes Autoimmune hepatitis Hemochromatosis Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency Wilson's disease Nonhepatic causes Celiac disease Hemolysis Myopathy Hyperthyroidism Strenuous exercise Macro-AST Consumption of the followig Medications Herbal supplements/vitamins can also cause eleveated ALT and AST levels: Acetaminophen Chaparral leaf Amiodarone (Cordarone) Ephedra Amoxicillin- clavulanic acid Gentian Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Germander Fluconazole (Diflucan) Jin bu huan Glyburide (Micronase) Kava Heparin Scutellaria (skullcap) Isoniazid (INH) Senna Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Shark cartilage Labetalol (Normodyne) Vitamin A Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Phenytoin (Dilantin) Protease inhibitors Sulfonamides Trazodone (Desyrel) Answered by Alton Drury 1 year ago.

Very High Sgpt Answered by Luann Batel 1 year ago.

Greater-than-normal ALT levels may indicate: * Celiac disease * Cirrhosis * Hepatitis (viral, autoimmune) * Hereditary hemochromatosis * Liver ischemia (blood flow deficiency to the liver) * Liver tumor * Use of drugs that are poisonous to the liver Answered by Tony Serasio 1 year ago.

Thankyou for all the answers. Answered by Griselda Limones 1 year ago.


Sounds like normadien its high blood pressure medication?
Asked by Rubye Zimmerer 1 year ago.

Only a Physician can make the choice regarding medication. And yes, most blood pressure medication has some side affects initially. Most people do adjust to this. You can talk to your Doctor about meds that don't cause sexual problems. Answered by Frankie Kwilosz 1 year ago.


Pre-term labor question??? Twins?
I forgot to add, the On-call doctor decided not to prescribe the Terbutaline pills to me after she saw my reaction. I guess it scared them. I have asthma and they wouldnt let me use my inhaler when I was short of breath. It was scary. Asked by Elmo Zirker 1 year ago.

Hello to all :) I am 34 weeks pregnant with twins. I went into pre-term labor 2 weeks ago. I was advised to go to the hospital and did. They were advised by an on-call doctor at my dr office, to give me 2 bags of IV fluid and to give me 2 shots of Terbutalene and 1 Terbutalene pill to take. Well, I started having complications from the medicines. My heart started racing, and I couldnt breathe, I also had severe chest pain and they had to perform 2 EKG's. They later released me to the ER where I was placed on oxygen for an hour until my heart rate returned to normal. My contractions did stop that day but have been ongoing ever since. I have been having "real" contractions, not Braxton Hicks. I have no idea if I have dialated. Basically my Dr. wants me to go to the hospital and get more of the medicine that almost killed me so they can stop the contractions. I know I have the right to not take it. I feel like if its time, its time. How would you handle this with your dr? Answered by Caryn Vanhorne 1 year ago.

This is YOUR pregnancy and you need to do what you feel is right. If this stuff nearly killed you, it may happen again. You dying is not going to help those babies! Talk to your doctor about options. If he won't be cooperative, ask if you can talk to someone else for a second opinion. Ask if they can try a different medication. If not, weigh the pros and cons of delivering now or attempting to take the medication again. It's always better if the babies are delivered full term but many babies have been delivered at 34 weeks due to preterm labor or complications with the mother, baby(s), and/or pregnancy. Although they have a higher risk of complications, it is sometimes necessary to do this and many are just fine. My own siblings (twins) were delivered at 34 weeks and spent a couple weeks in the NICU. No complications other than they were small and needed help breathing for a few days. They're now 26 years old and perfectly normal. Good luck and I hope things work out for you. Congratulations on your twins! Answered by Danille Weitzman 1 year ago.

From my understanding twins ussually come early and are smaller anyways. My husband is a twin. They were born at 32 weeks and weighed about 3.5 lbs a piece and are both fine. When I first found out I was pregnant I was wondering if it was twins seeing as how it runs in both our families, and had asked him about it. Althogh 37 weeks is "full term" He also said that technology is so advance that babies are surviving at 20+ weeks. I would think bue to your reaction to the meds last time that theywould never give it to you again and putit on file that it is not for you! If your contractions are real close together and you are thinking it is time I would jsut go strait to the hospital tell them tht theycan not stop your labor with the meds because this happened 2 weeks ago with it, and they hopefully will listen! Some er docs I learned are alot better in these situations than your doc that wants you to wait. Good luk and congrats on the twins. I hope you find a way to relax and sooth yourself until that point! Answered by Amber Manaugh 1 year ago.

If you are having strong, frequent contractions, there is no question about it, you need to go in and be checked. People confuse braxton hicks, thinking they are "fake", but they can feel very strong at times. It's possible you haven't dilated enough to worry about it yet. If you are in labor, and they can't give you anything else to stop contractions, maybe they can go ahead and check on the twins via ultrasound to see how they are doing. It's possible that a delivery at this point could be ok. After all 34 weeks isn't all that early for twins anyway. Answered by Leah Kuja 1 year ago.

My cousin took the same medicine & could hardly breath when she took them. 34 wks for twins is good, but the longer u go the better the chance that their lungs have matured, and they won't be in the nicu. I was 37 wks w/ a single baby and contractions & they would not deliver me either. My Dr. said 38 weeks plus for the babies lungs. If u feel u r contracting, go to the Dr. and get checked right away,don't take chances. Dr.'s don't want to do anything until they actually see you. I think they r so used to their job they forget u r the one going through this & its all new to u. Congratulations on the twins & making it to 34wks Answered by Dorathy Staley 1 year ago.

Signs of preterm labor: Call your midwife or doctor right away if you're having any of the following symptoms in your second or third trimester (before 37 weeks): • An increase in vaginal discharge • A change in the type of discharge — if it becomes watery, mucus-like, or bloody (even if it's pink or just tinged with blood) • Any vaginal bleeding or spotting • Abdominal pain, menstrual-like cramping, or more than four contractions in one hour (even if they don't hurt) • An increase in pressure in the pelvic area (a feeling that your baby is pushing down) • Low back pain, especially if you didn't previously have back pain These symptoms can be confusing because some of them, such as pelvic pressure or low back pain, occur during normal pregnancies, too, and sporadic early contractions may just be Braxton Hicks contractions. But it's always better to be safe than sorry, so call your midwife or doctor right away if you're experiencing anything unusual. Answered by Maxie Wildeboer 1 year ago.

My 2nd pregnancy was twins, I also had preterm labor at 32wks, was given meds to stop it...it's common for those meds to make your heart race just not the chest pain. I went into labor again at 34wks 5days and they let me deliver that time. Twins were great weights and extremely healthy. I don't know why on earth she'd give you those meds again but if you're in labor and having real contractions that are regular you need to go in. If they are real but irregular then you should be fine, ,maybe jsut call and let them know? If I were you I wouldn't take the meds again especially not at this point. Answered by Karissa Kozeyah 1 year ago.

I had twins and early contractions 30 weeks. my specialist put me on bed rest and gave me the same stuff. It made my heart race, but that's it. I was told it was OK to go into labor at 34 weeks. I did go into labor at 34 weeks and 3 days and they delivered me. Is there a reason they wont deliver you now? Or is there something else they can give you because you had such a bad reaction. Answered by Kathlene Pulkkinen 1 year ago.

I would talk to your doc and tell him your concerns. I think that it is your right not to take it. Just remember that you have two little ones inside you and the longer they stay there the better off they are. Congrats and Good Luck Answered by Edna Barff 1 year ago.

I'm all with betsy on this one. Have you also considered the fact that this may be due to an allergic reaction? Ask whats in that stuff and see. Answered by Marquis Stites 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Vicky Paulas 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Christa Cranston 1 year ago.


What are the top ten medications for high blood pressure?
Asked by Latia Swierczek 1 year ago.

Top ten? I could name ten off the top of my head that I use for Cardiac patients: Norvasc (amlodipine besylate) Lopressor (metoprolol succinate) Atenolol (Tenormin) Labetolol (Normodyne) Hydrocholorthiazide Lasix (Furosemide) Lisinopril (Prinvil) Diltiazem (Cardizem) Carvedilol (Coreg) Verapamil These are some of the common ones. Answered by Sasha Vossler 1 year ago.

These are all the medication used for high blood pressure I couldn't give the top ten as different medication work differently for each individuals. Accuretic Acebutolol Acepril Acezide Adalat Adipine Adizem Aldomet Aliskiren Ambrisentan Amias Amilamont Amiloride Amiloride/Bumetanide Amiloride/Furosemide Amiloride/Hydrochlorothiazide Amlodipine Amlodipine besilate/Valsartan Amlostin Angiopine Angiozem Angitil Apresoline Aprinox Aprovel Atenix Atenix Co Atenolol Atenolol/Chlortalidone Atenolol/Nifedipine Baratol Bedranol Bendroflumethiazide Bendroflumethiazide/Timolol Beta-Adalat Betaloc Beta-Prograne Betim Bi-Carzem Bipranix Bisoprolol Bosentan Bumetanide Burinex Cabren Calchan Calcicard Candesartan Capoten Capozide Captopril Captopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Carace Carace Plus Cardene Cardicor Cardioplen Cardura Carvedilol Cascor Catapres Celectol Celiprolol Chlortalidone Cilazapril Clonidine Clopamide/Pindolol CoAprovel Co-Betaloc Co-Diovan Coracten Cordilox Corgard Cozaar Cozaar-Comp Co-zidocapt Dilcardia Diltiazem Dilzem Diovan Disogram Diurexan Doxadura Doxazosin Ecopace Emcor Enalapril Enalapril/Hydrochlorothiazide Epoprostenol Eprosartan Eucardic Exforge Felendil Felodipine Felodipine/Ramipril Felogen Felotens Flolan Fortipine Fosinopril Froop Froop Co Fru-Co Frumil Frusol Furosemide Furosemide/Spironolactone Furosemide/triamterene Gopten Guanethidine Horizem Hydralazine Hydrochlorothiazide/Losartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Metoprolol Hydrochlorothiazide/Olmesartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Quinapril Hydrochlorothiazide/Telmisartan Hydrochlorothiazide/Valsartan Hygroton Hypolar Hypovase Hytrin Iloprost trometamol Indapamide Indapamide Indapamide hemihydrate Indapamide/Perindopril arginine Inderal Indoramin hydrochloride Innovace Innozide Irbesartan Ismelin Isradipine Istin Istin Kentipine Kenzem Labetalol Lacidipine Lasilactone Lasix Lasoride Lercanidipine Lisinopril Lisinopril/Hydrochlorothiazide Lisopress Loniten Lopace Lopresor Losartan Metenix Methyldopa Metolazone Metoprolol Micardis MicardisPlus Minijet furosemide Minoxidil Moduret Moduretic Moexipril Motens Moxonidine Nadolol Natrilix Natrilix SR Nebilet Nebivolol Neofel Neo-Naclex Nicardipine Nifedipine Nifopress Nindaxa Olmesartan Olmetec Olmetec Plus Oxprenolol Parmid Perdix Perdix Perindopril arginine Physiotens Pindolol Pinefeld Plendil Prazosin Prescal Prestim Propranolol Quinapril Quinil Ramipril Ranvera Rapranol Rasilez Retalzem Revatio Sectral Securon Sildenafil citrate Slofedipine Slo-Pro Slozem Slozem Staril Syprol Tarka Telmisartan Tenif Tenoret Tenoretic Tenormin Tensipine Tensopril Terazosin Teveten Teveten Tildiem Tildiem Timolol Torasemide Torem Tracleer Trandate Trandolapril Trandolapril/Verapamil Triapin Tritace Univer Valsartan Vascace Vascalpha Ventavis Verapamil Vera-Til Vertab Viazem Viskaldix Visken Vivacor Volibris Xipamide Zanidip Zemtard Zestoretic Zestril Zolvera Hope this was helpful Answered by Coralie Meisner 1 year ago.


Inderal (Propranolol) -- what drug is the most similiar to Inderal?
Asked by Sidney Aracena 1 year ago.

Inderal (propranolol) is a non-selective beta-blocker. Meaning it blocks both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenoceptors. Any of the other non-selectives would be similar, ie. nadolol (Corgard), timolol (Blocadren), sotalol (Betapace) and labetalol (Normodyne). Atenolol (Tenormin), and metoprolol (Lopressor) are not similar, they are beta-1 specific. Answered by Sanford Riedle 1 year ago.

inderal is the brand name for propranaolol which is a beta blocker. It is very similar to Lopressor (Metoprolol) or Atenolol Answered by Ashly Kampner 1 year ago.


What all medications cannot be taken with bystolic?
it is a beta blocker. i want to know the names of other medications that cannot be taken with this medicine. Asked by Emiko Sanville 1 year ago.

seems like a lot. Before taking Bystolic, tell your doctor if you are using: digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin); clonidine (Catapres); reserpine; guanethidine (Ismelin); a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); heart rhythm medicine such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone (Rythmol), quinidine (Quinidex, Quin-Release Quin-G), and others; an antidepressant such as fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), and others; or another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), bisoprolol (Zebeta), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), or timolol (Blocadren), and others. This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with Bystolic. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor. Answered by Charline Folken 1 year ago.


Does st john wart have effect with beta blocker meds?
Asked by Elvera Recidivi 1 year ago.

Possibly. I am sensitive to St John's Wort. So it is pretty powerful. It does effect your serotonin levels. It does affect beta blockers--beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), acebutolol (Sectral), pindolol (Visken), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), sotalol (Betapace), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), and carvedilol (Coreg). Answered by Inger Vojtko 1 year ago.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist, moron. Answered by Winona Toure 1 year ago.


SGPT very high?
I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Asked by Lelia Harsey 1 year ago.

I took my blood test for my second time and the results show that my SGPT (ALT) level is 166 and my SGOT (AST) is 67. Since my first blood test my SGOT has gone down alot. Could there be a explanation for why my SGPT is so high? I haven't drank alchohal for more than a month. What could I possibly do to lower this? Answered by Marie Ungerecht 1 year ago.

ALT of 166 IU/L is not very high. If it was 1600 IU, then that would be very high. And you can have this kind of result when you have serious liver illness. There are many possible causes for elevated liver enzymes such as ALT and AST. And only your doctor is in a position to investigate it further and tell you whether you need to do something about it or not. Some common causes of moderately elevated ALT and AST results such as yours are: Alcohol Cirrhosis Hepatitis B (chronic) Hepatitis C (chronic) Steatosis/steatohepatitis Medications/toxins Acute viral hepatitis Less common hepatic causes Autoimmune hepatitis Hemochromatosis Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency Wilson's disease Nonhepatic causes Celiac disease Hemolysis Myopathy Hyperthyroidism Strenuous exercise Macro-AST Consumption of the followig Medications Herbal supplements/vitamins can also cause eleveated ALT and AST levels: Acetaminophen Chaparral leaf Amiodarone (Cordarone) Ephedra Amoxicillin- clavulanic acid Gentian Carbamazepine (Tegretol) Germander Fluconazole (Diflucan) Jin bu huan Glyburide (Micronase) Kava Heparin Scutellaria (skullcap) Isoniazid (INH) Senna Ketoconazole (Nizoral) Shark cartilage Labetalol (Normodyne) Vitamin A Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin) Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Phenytoin (Dilantin) Protease inhibitors Sulfonamides Trazodone (Desyrel) Answered by Shawanda Kinnion 1 year ago.

Very High Sgpt Answered by Arie Figaro 1 year ago.

Greater-than-normal ALT levels may indicate: * Celiac disease * Cirrhosis * Hepatitis (viral, autoimmune) * Hereditary hemochromatosis * Liver ischemia (blood flow deficiency to the liver) * Liver tumor * Use of drugs that are poisonous to the liver Answered by Julia Gruis 1 year ago.

Thankyou for all the answers. Answered by Cammie Desilva 1 year ago.


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