Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018776/002.

Names and composition

"NORCURON" is the commercial name of a drug composed of VECURONIUM BROMIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018776/002 NORCURON VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018776/003 NORCURON VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018776/002 NORCURON VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018776/003 NORCURON VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
074334/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
074334/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
074688/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
074688/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
075164/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
075164/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
075218/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
075218/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
075549/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
075549/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
075558/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 4MG per VIAL
078274/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
078274/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
079001/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
079001/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
090243/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
090243/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL
205390/001 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per VIAL
205390/002 VECURONIUM BROMIDE VECURONIUM BROMIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per VIAL

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Answered questions

Can combined drugs create a false/positive?
I was in a car accident and the state is trying to give me a DUI tho it wasn't my fault and I was the one that got hurt. I went to the hospital and they gave me this:Etonidate 24mgSuccincholine 120mgNoricuron 10mgMorphine 4mgVersed 2mgIn the next hour I was apparently positive for ETHoL and... Asked by Naoma Chastang 1 year ago.

I was in a car accident and the state is trying to give me a DUI tho it wasn't my fault and I was the one that got hurt. I went to the hospital and they gave me this: Etonidate 24mg Succincholine 120mg Noricuron 10mg Morphine 4mg Versed 2mg In the next hour I was apparently positive for ETHoL and Drugs... But Thats not me... i was in a coma and don't remember anything and it was a serious car accident... So could these drugs combined make a false positive? Answered by Laveta Eapen 1 year ago.

As you had etomidate, sux (succinylcholine) and Norcuron (vecuronium), I suspect you were anesthetized and intubated because of the coma. These three drugs would not cause a positive alcohol/drug screen. However, the morphine and Versed could cause a positive drug screen. Morphine is a very strong narcotic and works very quickly when injected through an IV or into the muscles, and would be in your drug screen. Versed is a dissociative anesthetic, but it is also a benzodiazepine. So you would likely have tested positive for both narcotics (morphine can show up as heroin) and benzodiazepines. This is not a false positive, it is positive for those drugs, but if those two drugs were given before the drug test, the test would show positive for narcotics and benzos. That being said, none of these drugs would cause a positive result for alcohol (ETOH). Answered by Brianna Longs 1 year ago.


If a mouse is injected with a small dose of a paralytic, can it survive?
my mother is an emergency room physician.. she has all kinda drugs that have forgotten to be wasted i guess or taken out of the pixus and never used.. and i am an er tech and have tons of straight sticks and syringes that i have accumulated over time.. my thought was to actually not scare the mouse but to torture it.. Asked by Quinton Ponzi 1 year ago.

but what if when paralyzed or in shock it is still not scared? maybe instead you should be naked except a hockey mask and flash the lights on and off for an hour. that works with mice. Answered by Tressa Schapp 1 year ago.

Well, Versed won't paralyze it - it's a benzodiazepine, and without neuromuscular blocking effects. Norcuron will more than likely kill it. It doesn't take much to paralyze humans. The dose you're suggesting is probably 1-2 mg/kg, which is 10-20 times what we use as an intubating dose in people. That being said, different species can react quite differently than humans to a given drug. Do you actually think the mouse will LEARN from its experience and find a new home? Kill the sucker. They'll make more, trust me. A litter every 30 days. Do the math. And where are you getting Norcuron from? Answered by Bernadette Oligschlaeger 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Lauryn Derenthal 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Fredrick Landevos 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Kathern Bastida 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Bruce Benning 1 year ago.


What it the name of this general anethesia that gives severe headaches and nausea real bad?
The only reason it was used was because the one they were gonna give me was low in stock and that one is used alot less because that reason. Asked by Omer Leuckel 1 year ago.

Nothing we do routinely causes headaches, and a lot of what we use can cause nausea. Headache after anesthesia is common, and most of the time it is due to caffeine withdrawal. General anesthesia is a mixture of a bunch of drugs. Typical drugs used are propofol (Diprivan), midazolam (Versed), fentanyl (Sublimaze), sevoflurane, desflurane, succinylcholine (Anectine), vecuronium (Norcuron), rocuronium (Zemuron), neostigmine, glycopyrrolate, morphine, hydromorphone. Ketamine is sometimes used as well. I can't come up with anything that starts with a C or T. Thiopental? Not really used anymore, it's even hard to find these days. The first thing that came to mind with your question was ether, but that hasn't been used in something like 50 years, and is banned from modern OR's because of the explosion risk. Answered by Claire Russomanno 1 year ago.

Are you asking this because you are having surgery again soon and you are worried? If so just be sure to tell your anesthesologist that you got sick from the medications last time. I recently had surgery and they gave me dramamine before the operation benedryl during and zofran after. All helped with the nausea and vomiting. Answered by Alva Swarat 1 year ago.

Try this acupressure factor there's two factor at the mandible's (that is in which the shrink jaw is hooked up to the higher jaw). Place your two fore palms roughly in which your two shrink molars are, and transfer your mouth up and down you are going to discover the hinge, in case you positioned mild stress on them they are going to be very smooth. Massage those features in a round movement till the tenderness is going. If you do that as quickly as you recognize you're having a migraine the higher. it may cross in mins. If it does now not paintings it's due to the fact that you haven't bought the correct situation. maintain attempting. GOOD LUCK. Answered by Jasmin Mcgalliard 1 year ago.


What do doctors use to calm patients?
I'm writing a story, and I need to know because the main character is freaking out majorly. Oh, and if you can tell me what it feels like to come out of a two year coma, I'd really appreciate it. :) Asked by Cleora Fuerte 1 year ago.

Well it kinda depends on what the doctors want to do to him/her... Are they trying to calm him/her down? Just trying to ease the panicking/fear? Or do they want to knock him/her out for a couple of hours? Anti-depressants are often used with panicking disorders. Mainly the TCA's such as Clomipramine, Dosulepine, Doxepine, Amitriptyline, ... Possible side effects are: weight gain, sexual problems (ejaculation- and erectiondisfunction), shivering and sweating, higher risk of having suicidal toughts (ironic, isn't it?) For fear the most used group are the benzodiazepines, like diazepam (a favourite in House M.D if i'm not mistaken) Also you could go for a antipsychotic. If you want to knock him/her back out, you have to go for an anaestetic. Here you have things like esmeron, celocurine, mivacron, nimbex, norcuron, ... which are admininstered intra-muscular And the intra-venous anaesthetics such as diprivan, hypnomidate, ketalar,... Hope this gives you some inspiration! Answered by Hortense Plateros 1 year ago.

usually they use some injection t's like tranquilizers Answered by Wilford Cunnick 1 year ago.


Can combined drugs create a false/positive?
I was in a car accident and the state is trying to give me a DUI tho it wasn't my fault and I was the one that got hurt. I went to the hospital and they gave me this:Etonidate 24mgSuccincholine 120mgNoricuron 10mgMorphine 4mgVersed 2mgIn the next hour I was apparently positive for ETHoL and... Asked by Rene Jarema 1 year ago.

I was in a car accident and the state is trying to give me a DUI tho it wasn't my fault and I was the one that got hurt. I went to the hospital and they gave me this: Etonidate 24mg Succincholine 120mg Noricuron 10mg Morphine 4mg Versed 2mg In the next hour I was apparently positive for ETHoL and Drugs... But Thats not me... i was in a coma and don't remember anything and it was a serious car accident... So could these drugs combined make a false positive? Answered by Parthenia Willyard 1 year ago.

As you had etomidate, sux (succinylcholine) and Norcuron (vecuronium), I suspect you were anesthetized and intubated because of the coma. These three drugs would not cause a positive alcohol/drug screen. However, the morphine and Versed could cause a positive drug screen. Morphine is a very strong narcotic and works very quickly when injected through an IV or into the muscles, and would be in your drug screen. Versed is a dissociative anesthetic, but it is also a benzodiazepine. So you would likely have tested positive for both narcotics (morphine can show up as heroin) and benzodiazepines. This is not a false positive, it is positive for those drugs, but if those two drugs were given before the drug test, the test would show positive for narcotics and benzos. That being said, none of these drugs would cause a positive result for alcohol (ETOH). Answered by Toya Gleisner 1 year ago.


If a mouse is injected with a small dose of a paralytic, can it survive?
my mother is an emergency room physician.. she has all kinda drugs that have forgotten to be wasted i guess or taken out of the pixus and never used.. and i am an er tech and have tons of straight sticks and syringes that i have accumulated over time.. my thought was to actually not scare the mouse but to torture it.. Asked by Brenda Pablo 1 year ago.

but what if when paralyzed or in shock it is still not scared? maybe instead you should be naked except a hockey mask and flash the lights on and off for an hour. that works with mice. Answered by Kelle Holda 1 year ago.

Well, Versed won't paralyze it - it's a benzodiazepine, and without neuromuscular blocking effects. Norcuron will more than likely kill it. It doesn't take much to paralyze humans. The dose you're suggesting is probably 1-2 mg/kg, which is 10-20 times what we use as an intubating dose in people. That being said, different species can react quite differently than humans to a given drug. Do you actually think the mouse will LEARN from its experience and find a new home? Kill the sucker. They'll make more, trust me. A litter every 30 days. Do the math. And where are you getting Norcuron from? Answered by Chester Schoreplum 1 year ago.


How do medical professionals administer psych meds that can only be given IV to a combative patient?
I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation... Asked by Marcelino Dedrickson 1 year ago.

I understand the need to administer psychotropic medications to patients when it is court ordered or when a patient is not mentally ill, but needs treatment for physical injury. However, with respect to those who are mentally ill/acutely disturbed, those who would reject PO drugs, and for whom an IM/SQ formulation of the needed drug does not exist or would work too slowly or far too erraticly (diazepam) if given IM, do you establish patent IV access to administer the drug? Even those who are being held with every orderly and nurse in the ward can make miniscule movements that would seem to render a proper IV line placement difficult. Taking this further, how do you do this over and over, to a patient who is refusing something like valproate (the therapeutic portion being the valproate anion of compounds containing it valproic acid, sodium valproate, etc.) or another agent that can only be given PO or IV, due to tissue damage for instance? This would seem to be a very tedious task that would take up an enormous amount of staff resources if a medication had to be administered even just daily, but if this was a B.I.D. or T.I.D. dosing, and you had a refractory patient (refusing more out of spite than out of illness), this could go on ad infinitum. I'm adding the caveat that the medication does work when administered, which is a mitigating factor in ECT use. However, there again, even with ECT, most physicians would make an allowance for a short acting anesthetic (Brevital®, Diprivan®, etc.) and a paralytic (Anectine®, Pavulon®, Norcuron®, etc.) which are optimally given through an IV line (propofol can only be given that way). So with consistently refractory and recalcitrant patients, is a dose of remifentanil given IM and the anesthetic effect awaited? With ECT, can it just be administered unmodified? It can't be that painful, it will induce immediate unconsciousness anyway and it is the patient's fault, perhaps unmodified ECT can induce a change. I'm just curious to know from those who work in ER's, psych. wards/hospitals, etc. Answered by Bee Wilbon 1 year ago.

IV Medications used to treat combative patients is only administered if the patient cannot be reasoned with. At that point, the medications are simply used to sedate the patient so that they can be observed. Usually, that IV medication is something more similar to Xanax or Ativan used for short term relief of symptoms. Once a patient is sedated in the ER they would be involuntarily admitted to the psychology ward of the hospital. At that point, medication would be controlled by the doctor on staff and would not be administered through IV unless the patient refused medication in which case medication may be given involuntarily. However, the medication given in the ward would usually be meant to ease the symptoms of mental illness not sedate the patient. So, generally the patient will begin feeling better after taking the medications indicated for his/her condition and in turn become more compliant and there will no longer be a need to administer anything via IV. ECT is a last resort in many cases and is really only therapeutic for treating various forms of depression (though this point can be argued). Further, ECT is not meant to work as a sedating agent as you suggest with the above drugs. ECT is inherently sedating but the real reason for doing ECT is to change the patients brain chemistry so that their symptoms subside. Generally when a patient is undergoing ECT they are not combative. Answered by Ethel Pinner 1 year ago.

It relies upon on the meds. I by surprise met a difficulty the place the nurse refused to replenish my Effexor and that i went via withdrawal for 2 days (it grew to become into torture). from time to time the drugstore supply you a pair of days properly worth of meds in the event that they know you're seeing a physician quickly. If that's no longer an selection authentic now, I say bypass to the ER and get your meds. Then attempt to discover someplace the place you may get seen by utilising a psychiatrist often. in case you're on incapacity or Medicare, numerous places will see you (even extreme-scale places). you do no longer could desire to bypass to the interior sight well-being sanatorium. stable success! :) draw close in there!!! :) Answered by Epifania Hollon 1 year ago.


What it the name of this general anethesia that gives severe headaches and nausea real bad?
The only reason it was used was because the one they were gonna give me was low in stock and that one is used alot less because that reason. Asked by Lorita Cobbin 1 year ago.

Nothing we do routinely causes headaches, and a lot of what we use can cause nausea. Headache after anesthesia is common, and most of the time it is due to caffeine withdrawal. General anesthesia is a mixture of a bunch of drugs. Typical drugs used are propofol (Diprivan), midazolam (Versed), fentanyl (Sublimaze), sevoflurane, desflurane, succinylcholine (Anectine), vecuronium (Norcuron), rocuronium (Zemuron), neostigmine, glycopyrrolate, morphine, hydromorphone. Ketamine is sometimes used as well. I can't come up with anything that starts with a C or T. Thiopental? Not really used anymore, it's even hard to find these days. The first thing that came to mind with your question was ether, but that hasn't been used in something like 50 years, and is banned from modern OR's because of the explosion risk. Answered by Yaeko Warshauer 1 year ago.

Are you asking this because you are having surgery again soon and you are worried? If so just be sure to tell your anesthesologist that you got sick from the medications last time. I recently had surgery and they gave me dramamine before the operation benedryl during and zofran after. All helped with the nausea and vomiting. Answered by Fannie Teal 1 year ago.

Try this acupressure factor there's two factor at the mandible's (that is in which the shrink jaw is hooked up to the higher jaw). Place your two fore palms roughly in which your two shrink molars are, and transfer your mouth up and down you are going to discover the hinge, in case you positioned mild stress on them they are going to be very smooth. Massage those features in a round movement till the tenderness is going. If you do that as quickly as you recognize you're having a migraine the higher. it may cross in mins. If it does now not paintings it's due to the fact that you haven't bought the correct situation. maintain attempting. GOOD LUCK. Answered by Bessie Ozment 1 year ago.


What do doctors use to calm patients?
I'm writing a story, and I need to know because the main character is freaking out majorly. Oh, and if you can tell me what it feels like to come out of a two year coma, I'd really appreciate it. :) Asked by Malcolm Leneau 1 year ago.

Well it kinda depends on what the doctors want to do to him/her... Are they trying to calm him/her down? Just trying to ease the panicking/fear? Or do they want to knock him/her out for a couple of hours? Anti-depressants are often used with panicking disorders. Mainly the TCA's such as Clomipramine, Dosulepine, Doxepine, Amitriptyline, ... Possible side effects are: weight gain, sexual problems (ejaculation- and erectiondisfunction), shivering and sweating, higher risk of having suicidal toughts (ironic, isn't it?) For fear the most used group are the benzodiazepines, like diazepam (a favourite in House M.D if i'm not mistaken) Also you could go for a antipsychotic. If you want to knock him/her back out, you have to go for an anaestetic. Here you have things like esmeron, celocurine, mivacron, nimbex, norcuron, ... which are admininstered intra-muscular And the intra-venous anaesthetics such as diprivan, hypnomidate, ketalar,... Hope this gives you some inspiration! Answered by Ray Gieser 1 year ago.

usually they use some injection t's like tranquilizers Answered by Hermina Jermeland 1 year ago.


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