Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018705/001.

Names and composition

"NITROLINGUAL" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NITROGLYCERIN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018705/001 NITROLINGUAL NITROGLYCERIN AEROSOL/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018531/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018537/001 TRIDIL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018537/002 TRIDIL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
018588/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.8MG per ML
018588/002 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018621/001 NITRO-BID NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018672/001 NITRONAL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
018672/002 NITRO IV NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018705/001 NITROLINGUAL NITROGLYCERIN AEROSOL/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
018705/002 NITROLINGUAL PUMPSPRAY NITROGLYCERIN SPRAY, METERED/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
018774/001 NITROL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.8MG per ML
019970/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per 100ML
019970/002 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per 100ML
019970/003 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per 100ML
020144/001 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/002 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/003 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/004 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/005 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.8MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020145/001 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
020145/002 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
020145/003 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.3MG per HR
020145/004 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
020145/005 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
020145/006 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.8MG per HR
021134/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.3MG
021134/002 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG
021134/003 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.6MG
021359/001 RECTIV NITROGLYCERIN OINTMENT/INTRA-ANAL 0.4%
021780/001 NITROMIST NITROGLYCERIN AEROSOL, METERED/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
040047/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.2MG per HR
040048/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.4MG per HR
040049/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.6MG per HR
070026/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070077/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070633/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070634/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070863/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070871/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
070872/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
071094/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Injectable/ Injection 5MG per ML
071095/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Injectable/ Injection 10MG per ML
071159/001 NITRO-BID NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
071203/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
071492/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
071846/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per 100ML
071847/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per 100ML
071848/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per 100ML
072034/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074083/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
074559/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
074559/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
074559/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
074559/004 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
074992/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
074992/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
074992/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
074992/004 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
075073/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
075075/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
075076/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
075115/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
075115/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
087355/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN OINTMENT/TRANSDERMAL 2%
089771/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
089772/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
089773/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
089774/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
089884/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
089885/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
089886/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
091496/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN SPRAY, METERED/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
208191/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.3MG
208191/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG
208191/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.6MG
208424/001 GONITRO NITROGLYCERIN POWDER/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per PACKET

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Answered questions

Can nitrolingual be used with strokes?
If I feel that I;m having a stroke, could I use nitrolingual as I would if I felt a heart attack coming? Asked by Walter Cofone 1 year ago.

Bad idea. Giving a nitro lowers your blood pressure and lowers the blood supply to the brain. Even if a stroke patient's BP in the hospital is high, it's never "dropped" to normal. Answered by Wynell Dimodica 1 year ago.


Taking Generic Cialis 10mg?
My friends daring me to take a Generic Cialis 10mg, im 27yrs would something bad happen to me? Asked by Lore Amezaga 1 year ago.

From the Cialis home page : Do not take Cialis if you are allergic to tadalafil, or if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems, including nitroglycerin(Nitro Dur, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat, Transderm Nitro, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate, Isordil, Isochron), isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket), or recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). If you become dizzy or nauseated during sexual activity, or if you have pain, numbness, or tingling in your chest, arms, neck, or jaw, stop and call your doctor right away. You could be suffering from a serious side effect of this medicine. Do not take Cialis more than once a day. Allow 24 hours to pass between doses. Contact your doctor or seek emergency medical attention if your erection is painful or lasts longer than 4 hours. A prolonged erection (priapism) can damage the penis. Cialis can decrease blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye, causing sudden vision loss. This has occurred in a small number of people taking Cialis, most of whom also had heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. It is not clear whether Cialis is the actual cause of vision loss. Stop using Cialis and get emergency medical help if you have sudden vision loss. Do not take Cialis if you are allergic to tadalafil. Cialis should not be used together with nitrate medication, such as nitroglycerin (Nitro Dur, Nitrolingual, Nitrostat, Transderm Nitro, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate, Isordil, Isochron), isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket), or recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking Cialis with a nitrate medicine for chest pain or heart problems can cause a sudden and serious decrease in blood pressure. If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a Cialis dose adjustment or special tests: heart disease or heart rhythm problems; a recent heart attack (within the past 90 days); a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a stroke, or congestive heart failure; angina (chest pain), high or low blood pressure; liver disease; kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. Cialis can decrease blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye, causing sudden vision loss. This has occurred in a small number of people taking Cialis, most of whom also had heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. It is not clear whether Cialis is the actual cause of vision loss. Stop using Cialis and get emergency medical help if you have sudden vision loss. FDA pregnancy category B. Cialis is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether tadalafil passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. good luck my friend , i wouldn't do it if i was you .. but its your choice ... Answered by Christeen Michal 1 year ago.

Cialis increases blood flow that's what erections are all about, eh? but this can have important health benefits throughout the body as lack of circulation can effect many tissues including those in the brain. One four-week study of males found that Cialis use induced profound and highly desireable cardiovascular and endothelial changes, including increases in the all-important FMD . Cialis helps to increase blood flow to the penis, enabling a man to hold an erection for a longer duration. While similar to its competitors, sildenafil and vardenafil , Cialis is known as “the weekend pill” because its effects last for up to 36 hours. Answered by Kimberley Corre 1 year ago.

Cialis can boast of an extremely high success rate. The success rate of Cialis when given to men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction is often reported to be over 70%. The drug can also be used with any food or alcohol without its effects being affected in any way, which is again a unique benefit as the other main erectile dysfunction drugs are affected by these things. It has also been shown in many studies that Cialis does not offer a higher risk of any of the risk of symptoms that are commonly associated with all common erectile dysfunction drugs and so the drug can offer many benefits without offering any other side effects. Answered by Rebecca Weppler 1 year ago.

ordering drugs online can cut costs considerably. A Consumer Reports study found that savings can reach 25% or more. Experts say, sites that offer to sell "lifestyle" drugs such as Viagra and Propecia without a visit to your doctor's office. Those sites can charge as much as cheaper the usual cost of such drugs. Recommended Sites: www.ustabs.com www.nycpill.com Don't forget to include shipping expenses in your online prescription comparisons. Although the cost of delivery by standard mail is nominal at many sites, and free at others, it can become quite expensive if you need overnight delivery. Generic drugs are less expensive because generic manufacturers don't have the investment costs of the developer of a new drug. New drugs are developed under patent protection. The patent protects the investment--including research, development, marketing, and promotion--by giving the company the sole right to sell the drug while it is in effect. As patents near expiration, other manufacturers can apply to the FDA to sell generic versions. Because those manufacturers don't have the same development costs, they can sell their product at substantial discounts. Also, once generic drugs are approved, there is greater competition, which keeps the price down. Today, almost half of all prescriptions are filled with generic drugs. Recommended Sites: www.tabscanada.com www.opharmarcy.com Answered by Doug Dematteis 1 year ago.

First i do like to say that, do not do this type if this, if you do not require them. Also if yo want you can take all the information regarding that medicine at drugsdropship24 which is an online pharmacy. At this source you can get all the related information regarding the medicine, how it works, doses preparation and other related information. Answered by Kaley Mackowski 1 year ago.

You shouldn't do it. The "generic" Cialis and Viagra are not genuine generic drugs. Pharmaceutical companies have a certain time to produce drugs under patent protection, then after several years the patent expires allowing other drug companies to produce the drug. Cialis and Viagra are still under patent protection, so the "generic" versions may not contain the correct drug. Answered by Marguerite Carson 1 year ago.

if you interested to buy Viagra pills at an aggressive rates, Kindly Drop a mail at umasesyes@gmail.com Thanks Answered by Anastacia Prach 1 year ago.


Stopping a heat attack?
I know as soon as you think something is wrong you should call 911. But while help is coming are there any steps to help prolong or stop the heart attack and keep the person alive for as along as possible? Asked by Stewart Chew 1 year ago.

In my experience the best is to keep the patient, for that CPR is mandatory in order to keep the heart and respiration working . Many hypothetical types of first aid are advised, e.g aspirin, nitrolinguals, etc. but they have their pros and cons. If you know CPR the patient can be saved. This article from Mayo Hospital will be helpful, in support of my statement you will have a better insight view: If you or someone else may be having a heart attack: * Dial 911 or your local emergency medical assistance number. Don't tough out the symptoms of a heart attack for more than five minutes. If you don't have access to emergency medical services, have a neighbor or a friend drive you to the nearest hospital. Police or fire rescue units may also be a source of transportation. Drive yourself only as a last resort, if there are absolutely no other options, and realize that it places you and others at risk when you drive under these circumstances. * Consider taking an aspirin if your doctor has previously specifically recommended that you take an aspirin if you ever think you're having a heart attack. But seek emergency help first, such as calling 911. Take the aspirin just as your doctor advised. If you haven't talked to your doctor about taking aspirin if you think you may be having a heart attack, then don't take aspirin. If you take an aspirin and it turns out that you have another condition, you risk putting yourself in more danger. * Take nitroglycerin, if prescribed. If you think you're having a heart attack and your doctor has previously prescribed nitroglycerin for you, take it as directed. Do not take anyone else's nitroglycerin, as that could put you in more danger. * Begin CPR. If you are with a person who might be having a heart attack and he or she is unconscious, tell the 911 dispatcher or another emergency medical specialist. You may be advised to begin cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Even if you're not trained, a dispatcher can instruct you in CPR until help arrives. You should learn CPR procedure as one day you will save a precious life. Answered by Providencia Abdulmateen 1 year ago.

Four things: 1. Take an aspirin (chew it if possible) it can decrease mortality and morbidity up to 25% if taken early enough. 2. Sit down and rest. This will reduce the hearts demand for oxygen possibly saving heart muscle. 3. If you have been prescribed nitroglycerin then take the pills or spray every 5 minutes until arrival of the ambulance. 4. Have your medical history (medications, allergies, surgeries, health problems, and contact information) available on a USB memory stick and in printed format available (This will help you get expedited care by EMS, and the emergency room, it will also ensure that your MD and family are notified quickly). Answered by Leif Willhelm 1 year ago.

If you are not allergic to asprin take an adult asprin and chew it up. It is a blood thinner, be sure to tell the Emergency personel you took aspirin and what time. Try to stay calm as you can. Answered by Caroyln Campfield 1 year ago.

Crush an aspirin between two spoons and place the powder under the tongue. Answered by Florine Nordmeyer 1 year ago.

place an AED device on their chest...have them chew one adult aspirin...check for breathing and pulse...if they lose either begin CPR... Answered by Effie Illsley 1 year ago.

Asprin, caffiene, coaffing...etc. Not too sure. Answered by Jude Patience 1 year ago.


Is Levitra good for a guy who has diabetes and had a heart surgery?
Asked by Marilyn Stroll 1 year ago.

If your Doctor says so, otherwise NO - read some of the warnings below Do not take vardenafil if you are also using a nitrate drug for chest pain or heart problems. This includes nitroglycerin (Nitrostat, Nitrolingual, Nitro-Dur, Nitro-Bid, and others), isosorbide dinitrate (Dilatrate-SR, Isordil, Sorbitrate), and isosorbide mononitrate (Imdur, ISMO, Monoket). Nitrates are also found in some recreational drugs such as amyl nitrate or nitrite ("poppers"). Taking vardenafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a serious decrease in blood pressure, leading to fainting, stroke, or heart attack. A small number of patients have had a sudden loss of eyesight after taking vardenafil. This type of vision loss is caused by decreased blood flow to the optic nerve of the eye. It is not clear whether vardenafil is the actual cause of such vision loss. Sudden vision loss with vardenafil use has occurred most often in people with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or certain pre-existing eye problems, and in those who smoke or are over 50 years old. Before taking vardenafil, tell your doctor if you have: -heart disease or heart rhythm problems; -a recent history (in the past 6 months) of a heart attack, -angina (chest pain), or congestive heart failure; -a history of stroke or blood clots; -a personal or family history of "Long QT syndrome"; -high or low blood pressure; -liver disease; -kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); -a blood cell disorder such as sickle cell anemia, multiple myeloma, or leukemia; -a bleeding disorder such as hemophilia; -a stomach ulcer; retinitis pigmentosa (an inherited condition of the eye); -a physical deformity of the penis (such as Peyronie's disease); or -if you have been told you should not have sexual intercourse for health reasons. If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to use vardenafil or you may need a dosage adjustment or special tests during treatment. Answered by Marin Schinnell 1 year ago.

A man with diabetes and a history of heart disease has a lot of risk factors and should be consulting his doctor. I wouldn't recommend looking for advice from anonymous people online who can't be held accountable if something were to go wrong. Answered by Bess Sirrine 1 year ago.

Probably not. I don't think Levitra is good for anybody, really... because it's just another drug. But you should really ask your doctor to be sure. Answered by Junie Hugghis 1 year ago.

NO, it seriously interacts with heart meds. And will affect your hearth rhythm. Please ask a doctor before use Answered by Yasmin Contrerras 1 year ago.

your going to have to go to a doctor to get it anyway ask them. Answered by Novella Reategui 1 year ago.


Have you any Healthy Heart Advice Please?
OK, so,,,,,,,,, l had an Angina Attack Last Night, l used my Nitrolingual spray, 3 times........ it bought my Blood Pressure Real low, and it hasn't picked up today.---- Is There Anything l can Do -to bring it back up To Normal?. l feel sick and faint.Thank you Very Much for Your Help. Asked by Georgiana Lutchman 1 year ago.

Just lay back and take it easy Jo. Hope you feel better soon. Hope you called your doctor too. love honey Answered by Charley Cua 1 year ago.

Relax and take it easy. Hope you feel better soon. Go see the Doctor Answered by Sharlene Kimmes 1 year ago.

Awww....my poor litle Jo! *Hugs* You just lay back, take it easy, and relax. Get better real soon, I'm worried!! : ( Answered by Keisha Vanlith 1 year ago.

DON'T get too worked out... Relax yourself whenever u can.. Have a good rest.. Take care.. Answered by Harlan Sharrai 1 year ago.

10 tips for a healthy heart The low-drug or no-drug approach PREVENTION 1 Eat plenty of fiber and good fat. New research suggests that inflammation of the arteries may be as big a risk factor for heart disease as clogging with cholesterol deposits. And a high-fiber diet featuring plenty of beneficial fats proved better at controlling that damaging inflammation than the standard low-fat diet, according to a recent two-year clinical trial. (Participants also found it tastier and more filling.) Good sources of fiber include fruits, legumes, nuts, whole grains, and vegetables. Best of all: the soluble fiber from barley, beans, and oats. As for fat, choose high-omega-3 but low-mercury fish such as salmon, sardines, and trout, and vegetable oils such as canola, olive, safflower, and soybean. Stay away from trans fats, which move cholesterol numbers in the wrong direction. The Nutrition Facts label on packaged food now includes the trans-fat count. Read more about the benefits of a heart-healthy diet plus tips on how to fit them into your life. 2 Lay off cholesterol and salt. Anyone diagnosed with an elevated level of LDL (bad) cholesterol should consume less than 200 milligrams of cholesterol a day. That's the amount in one egg yolk, 8 ounces of skinless chicken breast, or 10 ounces of lean sirloin. As for salt, if you have high blood pressure or are at risk of developing it, cutting back on salt could reduce your risk of a heart attack by 25 percent or more. Your goal should be less than 2,300 mg of sodium a day, which is about a teaspoon of salt. Find out more tips on non-drug ways to lower your cholesterol. 3 Lose the gut. Even if you are not significantly overweight, carrying extra fat around your middle is bad, bad, bad. It raises blood pressure, adversely affects blood lipids, causes insulin resistance, and produces substances that inflame the arteries. The critical point is a waist measurement of 40 inches or more for men, or 35 inches for women, regardless of height. Sadly, no amount of crunches can spot reduce belly fat. The only way to get rid of it is to lose weight overall, preferably through a combination of diet and exercise. Get some more practical tips to plan your own do-it-yourself diet. 4 Huff and pump. Name a cardiac risk factor, and regular aerobic and strength exercise can improve it—including arterial inflammation. Updated recommendations from the American Heart Association and the American College of Sports Medicine call for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, five days a week, or 20 minutes of vigorous activity, such as jogging, three days a week. Strength training, in addit ion to improving overall fitness, improves fat-burning capacity by increasing muscle mass. Do a strength workout twice a week, on non-consecutive days to give your muscles time to recover. Include a couple of sets of exercises involving the major muscles in the arms, legs, and torso, and use weights or bands resistant enough that you can complete only 8 to 12 repetitions. If you're over 45, already have some kind of cardiovascular problem, or haven't exercised regularly for years, see a doctor before lacing up your workout shoes. Find out more about staying active and fit. 5 Calm down. Negative emotions, such as stress or panic attacks, trigger the release of hormones that can threaten your heart; studies show that people who experience those troubles have more heart attacks and strokes than calmer, more cheerful types. Curbing negative emotions is almost as good for your heart as proper diet and exercising. For stress, try yoga, tai chi, meditation, and measured breathing. Regular aerobic exercise helps ease depression. If you can't shake negative emotions and they are interfering with your functioning, seek professional counseling. For more ideas, try these stress-reduction strategies. 6 Drink a little, but don't smoke. Drinking a little bit of alcohol—one drink a day for women, one or two a day for men—can raise HDL (good) cholesterol and reduce inflammation and blood clots. But more than that can cause heart problems. As for smoking, don't. Cigarette smokers have twice the heart attack risk of nonsmokers. If you can't quit on your own, try a nicotine replacement product and, if necessary, add the prescription antidepressant bupropion (Zyban and generic). Read more about ways to stop smoking. 7 Know your CRP number. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein, or CRP, serve as a marker for artery inflammation, even if you have no other symptoms. Ask your doctor to include the inexpensive blood test for CRP the next time your cholesterol is checked. (And be sure to floss. To find out why, see Dental care: Preventing gum disease.) Here are some more ways to control inflammation for your heart’s health. TREATMENT 8 Avoid CT angiography. This high-tech test uses an ultrafast CT scanner to create a three-dimensional image of coronary arteries. However, it rarely provides any useful information for people without symptoms such as angina, while exposing them to as much as 325 times the radiation of a regular chest X-ray. People who already have angina are going to require the traditional "gold standard," angiography, to measure the number and extent of blockages, regardless of the outcome of a CT test, so there's no need to go to the expense and radiation exposure in the first place. 9 Weight loss, exercise, stopping smoking, and taking cardiovascular medications can work as well as angioplasty. Hold off on angioplasty. If an angiogram reveals severe narrowing in more than two major coronary arteries, you will need bypass surgery. If blockages are less severe, immediate angioplasty is not a good idea. It triggers a heart attack in 1 to 2 percent of patients. Instead, treat the angina with weight loss, exercise, and stopping smoking, and with cardiovascular medications. Research suggests that for most people, those measures are as effective as angioplasty for relieving angina pain, while lowering the risk of heart attack or stroke. (However, angioplasty is a lifesaver for people who have just had a heart attack or who have heart pain increasing in severity and frequency, or occurring at rest.) Read our guide on common tests for heart pain. 10 Know your symptoms. Almost everyone knows that chest pain and shortness of breath are symptoms of heart attacks, according to a survey published in February by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But in this survey of 71,994 adults, only 48 percent knew that pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back can be a heart attack symptom. Only 62 percent recognized another symptom, feeling weak, light-headed, or faint. Eighty-five percent knew about the fifth symptom, discomfort in the arms or shoulders. If you experience any of those symptoms, call 911 for an ambulance to the emergency room; getting treatment within an hour can greatly increase your chances of a good recovery. While waiting for the ambulance to arrive, chew and swallow one 325-mg regular aspirin or four low-dose (81 mg) aspirin to prevent blood clots from forming. Answered by Richard Kempf 1 year ago.


What does it mean by saying "The container must be primed before first use"?
Specifically, I want to know what primed means when used in this context, how to primed a container? This container is a nitrolingual pumpspray, use in a heart attack situation. thank you. Asked by Courtney Reap 1 year ago.

When you prime a pump (for example a meter dose inhaler or a nasal spray), it is necessary to squeeze the device a few times until liquid, mist, etc. exits through the pump. This ensures that the device is ready to go when needed, in this case, for angina. If the pump is not primed, no spray will come out when compressed for the first time. Answered by Magen Amsbaugh 1 year ago.

Primed, in this context, usually means to fill it up and empty it out WITHOUT injecting it into a patient. THEN fill it up for when you inject it into the person having the cardiac arrest. Check with the manufactuer or qualified professional to be absolutely sure - universally good advice with medical devices. Answered by Tatum Adorno 1 year ago.


Is there a product containing glyceryl trinitrate in an ointment form available without a prescription in US?
If anyone knows of such a product please post information on where to get it. Thank you Asked by Summer Harbottle 1 year ago.

To date there is not. But here's some great info on the subject for you. About Glyceryl Trinitrate This belongs to the group of medicines known as Nitrates. Nitrates are used to treat and prevent the symptoms of angina (chest pain) and other heart conditions including heart failure. Angina is pain or tightness of the chest caused by a lack of oxygen reaching the heart muscle. Nitrates work in two different ways. They widen the arteries that carry blood to the heart muscle and they relax the veins that return blood from the body to the heart. Together these actions allow more oxygen to reach the heart muscle and reduce the work of the heart. This lowers the overall strain on the heart reducing the risk of angina and relieving the pain associated with an acute angina attack. Glyceryl Trinitrate can be used to treat an angina attack or can be taken before exercise or exertion to help prevent an attack. Glyceryl Trinitrate is available in sublingual (under the tongue) tablets, aerosol spray, buccal tablets (dissolve next to the cheek), patches, ointment and injection form. It is also available as a modified release tablet which means it is released slowly to give a more even effect.. Glyceryl Trinitrate is also sometimes known as: GTN; Coro-Nitro; Glytrin; Nitrolingual; Nitromin; Suscard; Sustac; Nitrocine; Nitronal; Deponit; Minitran; Nitrodur; Transiderm Nitro; Trintek; Percutol.. You may notice the use of any of these names on the packaging of your medicine. Before Using Glyceryl Trinitrate Before using any of this preparation make sure your doctor or pharmacist knows: if you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding if you have ever had an allergic reaction to this or any other medicine if you suffer from heart, liver or kidney problems if you suffer from hypotension (low blood pressure) if you have recently suffered a head injury or brain haemorrhage if you suffer from anaemia if you suffer from thyroid problems if you suffer from glaucoma if you are taking any products to help treat erectile dysfunction if you are taking any other medicines, including those available to buy without a prescription, herbal and complementary medicines How to Take Glyceryl Trinitrate Your doctor will tell you when and how often you should take your medicine. Always read the manufacturer's information leaflet, if possible, before beginning treatment. Do not stop using this medicine without consulting your doctor. Sublingual Tablets: One tablet should be placed under the tongue and allowed to dissolve when needed as directed by your doctor. Aerosol Spray: Spray one or two sprays under your tongue. Close your mouth immediately after each spray. Buccal Tablet: The tablet should be put between your top lip and your gum just to the left or right of your front teeth and allowed to dissolve. It may take a few hours to completely disappear. Do not move the tablet around your mouth. Put the tablet to the other side of your front teeth the next time you take one. Modified release tablet: Swallow the tablet whole without crushing or chewing it. Take between meals. Patches and Ointment: Use this preparation exactly as directed by your doctor. The instructions on which part of the body you should place your patches or apply the ointment may vary, if in doubt where to place the patch or apply the ointment check the manufacturer's information leaflet you should have received with this preparation. The patches and ointment should be used on a different area of the skin each time. Never take more than the prescribed dose. If you suspect that you or someone else has taken an overdose of Glyceryl Trinitrate contact your doctor or go to the accident and emergency department of your local hospital at once. Always take the container with you, if possible, even if empty. This medicine is for you. Never give it to others even if their condition appears to be the same as yours. Getting the most from your treatment Before taking any 'over-the-counter' medicines, check with your pharmacist which medicines are safe for you to take alongside Glyceryl Trinitrate. If your angina symptoms are not helped after using your glyceryl trinitrate product speak to your doctor. This preparation may cause dizziness. Make sure your reactions are normal before driving, operating machinery or doing other jobs, which could be dangerous, if you were not fully alert. If you feel dizzy, particularly when getting up from a sitting or lying position, getting up slowly may help. Alcohol can make the dizziness worse. If you drink alcohol, drink only a little and be aware of its effect on you. Before having any kind of surgery, including dental or emergency treatment, tell the doctor, dentist or surgeon you are taking Glyceryl Trinitrate. Can Glyceryl Trinitrate cause problems? Along with their needed effects, all medicines can cause unwanted side effects, which usually improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine. Speak with your pharmacist or doctor if any of the following side effects continue or become troublesome. Throbbing headache, hot flushes, dizziness and fast or fluttering heartbeat. Injection only: If you have been given the injection you may feel sick, sweat, feel restless, have twitching muscles, stomach pain or faint. If you experience any other worrying side effects, which you think may be due to this medicine, discuss them with your pharmacist or doctor. How to store Glyceryl Trinitrate Keep all medicines out of the reach of children. Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light. The sublingual tablets should be kept in the container they came in and should be thrown away 8 weeks after opening. Never keep out of date or unwanted medicines. Discard them safely out of the reach of children or take them to your local pharmacist who will dispose of them for you. Answered by Sharie Lingberg 1 year ago.


What is the ACS Protocol for a person suffering from acute chest, he is diabetic and hypertensive too?
Asked by Roma Zabik 1 year ago.

This is a very vast practical question, however I will write the basics: Treatment : Pain Killer in I/V form. O2 Inhalation Nitrolingual. I/V Nitrates e.g.Isoket @10 drops / minute keeping BP in view. Clot blasters (SK) if necessary. Control BP and Diabetes followed by blood thinner. Standby for any surgical cardiac intervention from stent to cardiac transplant. Hospitalization till patient is out of danger. Investigations: Trop T or tropinin I (repeat if necessary) Continuous EKG monitoring. Cardiac Enzymes. CT scan. Answered by Gerri Sultzer 1 year ago.

Hey there Winter Lion! Not sure I'm buying into all the answers you've gotten so far. How long has this person had diabetes? What kind of medications is the person on and are they keeping the hypertension and diabetes in control? Oxygen and nitroglycerin are certainly a part of the protocol. Probably a beta-blocking drug like lopressor. The dose of that would depend on how they presented at the hospital...and I'm assuming that this person is there by now!!! If things are pretty hot and heavy there they may give 3, 5mg IV pushes of it. If the patient is somewhat stable at the time they may give it in pill form. This drug is great for reducing the stress and excitability of the heart both in the acute phase and as a long term treatment. If there are some changes on the EKG then it may warrant a quick trip to the cath lab to take a look and see what, if any blockages there are. Diabetes is tricky in heart disease. It can block some of the pain so if a long term diabetic is having chest pain it can be really serious. Normally they don't have the typical type of pain because their pain receptors aren't working right. Morphine is a part of the heart attack protocol but I'd try the nitro and lopressor (metoprolol) first. Morphine can mask problems sometimes. Answered by Kathaleen Drape 1 year ago.

If you were just hypertensive I'd say a beer a day actually. Why? Harvard did a study - so did the AHA - and people with heart issues / high blood pressure actually respond quite well to LOW (one beer per day, one shot per day) daily alcohol consumption.. As a matter of fact, so do healthy people. The diabetes thing though.. I would not drink at all. Especially not beer. Beer has too many calories and too much simple carbs in it for a diabetic.. But if you have to drink anything, I would suggest something like a half shot / threefourths shot of vodka (not rum, not tequila, not a liqueur) mixed in a NO-SUGAR drink (like diet soda) twice maybe three times a week. Before I'd make your alcoholic drink a regular thing though, I would test to see how your sugar levels respond to it like the person before suggested. If you respond badly, I'm sorry, tough break.. You asked is wine better? For someone with heart issue yes. For you, with diabetes, again.. SUGAR IS BAD :) Answered by Rita Armiger 1 year ago.

saline IV fluids, sublingual nitro and transport to hospital asap. In hospital, oxygen, elevate head of bed, ms 2mg IV for pain, EKG and draw cardiac chem panel, monitor. Answered by Stefan Harkrader 1 year ago.


What are the effects of women usin Kamagra?
Asked by Ariana Monsees 1 year ago.

This is the best I could find hope it helps you but every website i went to said woman should not use this product. ______________________________________ Important information about usage, risks and possible side-effects OF KAMAGRA. Kamagra is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). Some medicines or medical conditions may interact with Kamagra. INFORM YOUR DOCTOR OR PHARMACIST of all prescription and over-the-counter medicine that you are taking. DO NOT TAKE KAMAGRA if you are also taking or using nitroglycerin or other nitrates in any form, INCLUDING RECREATIONAL USE OF 'POPPERS'. ADDITIONAL MONITORING OF YOUR DOSE OR CONDITION may be needed if you are taking cimetidine, erythromycin, ketoconazole, itraconazole, mibefradil, or an HIV protease inhibitor. Inform your doctor of any other medical conditions or allergies. DO NOT USE KAMAGRA if you have a history of heart conditions, high or low blood pressure, stroke, or retinitis pigmentosa. Contact your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns about taking Kamagra, or Viagra, follow the directions for using Kamagra (Sildenafil Citrate), or Viagra, provided by your doctor. TAKE Kamagra about 1 hour before sexual activity, although it may be taken from 30 minutes to 4 hours before sexual activity. DO NOT EXCEED THE RECOMMENDED DOSE without checking with your doctor. DO NOT TAKE KAMAGRA MORE THAN once a day. DO NOT TAKE KAMAGRA IF YOU TAKE OR USE NITROGLYCERIN, including nitroglycerin tablets, patches, or ointment, OR OTHER NITRATES, such as 'POPPERS', isosorbide. If you are not sure whether a certain medicine is a nitrate, contact your doctor or pharmacist. SIDE EFFECTS that may occur while taking Kamagra include headache, flushing, upset stomach, stuffy nose, diarrhea, blurred vision, changes in blue or green vision, or increased light sensitivity. If they continue or are bothersome, check with your doctor. CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE if you experience prolonged abnormal, painful erections. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. DO NOT SHARE KAMAGRA with others. DO NOT USE KAMAGRA for other health conditions. KEEP KAMAGRA out of the reach of children. IF USING KAMAGRA FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF TIME, obtain refills before your supply runs out. According to the FDA, women and children should not take Kamagra (Isn’t that obvious?), along with men who are already prescribed medications that contain nitrates. Taking Kamagra with certain medications such as erythromycin, ketoconazole, itraconazole and saquinavir can raise the blood levels of Kamagra. Following is a list of drugs, legal and otherwise, that contain nitrates. Never use Kamagra with these drugs: Nitroglycerin Deponit Minitran Nitrek Nitro-Bid Nitrocine Nitro-Derm Nitro Disc Nitro-Dur Nitrogard Nitroglycerin Nitroglycerin T/R Nitroglyn Nitrol Ointment Nitrolan Nitrolingual Spray Nitrong Nitropar Nitropress Nitroprex Nitro S.A. Nitrospan Nitrostat Nitro-Trans System Nitro Transdermal Nitro-Time Transderm-Nitro Tridil Isosorbide Mononitrate Imdur ISMO Isosorbide Mononitrate Monoket Isosorbide Nitrate Dilatrate-SR Iso-bid Isordil Isordil Tembids Isosorbide Dinitrate Isosorbide Dinitrate LA Sorbitrate Sorbitrate SA Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Peritrate Peritrate SA Erythrityl Tetranitrate Cardilate Isosorbide Dinitrate/Phenobarbital Isordil w/PB Illicit Substances Containing Organic Nitrates e.g., amyl nitrate or nitrite (It is known that amyl nitrate or nitrite is sometimes abused. In abused situations, amyl nitrate or nitrite may be known by various names, including poppers.)e.g., butyl nitrate “A word of caution must be given about the use of sildenafil. Because potentially fatal hypotensive side effects can occur when this agent is used concurrently with nitrates, it should not be prescribed to patients who are taking nitrate medications or who may take nitroglycerin after exertional angina.” www.aafp.org Special Warnings: Kamagra was not studied in patients who have a history of the following conditions: Heart attack, stroke, or life-threatening irregular heart rhythm within the last 6 months Very low and very high blood pressure Heart failure or unstable chest pain Certain eye disorders Because Kamagra lowers blood pressure, your doctor will evaluate your overall medical condition to determine if Kamagra, in combination with sexual activity, could adversely affect you. Kamagra can cause a rare but serious condition of prolonged erection (priapism). It is important to contact your health care provider immediately if your erection lasts longer than 4 hours. Men for whom sexual activity is inadvisable may not be good candidates for Kamagra. Tell your doctor if you are taking protease inhibitors for the treatment of HIV. “From the marketing of sildenafil citrate (Viagra or Kamagra) in late March through July 1998, during which more than 3.6 million outpatient prescriptions were dispensed, the FDA received reports of 123 patients who died after having been prescribed this drug. Twelve deaths concerned foreign patients and 30 concerned patients with unverifiable information (from hearsay, rumor, the media, or unidentifiable reporters). In addition, reporters stated that they did not know if the drug had been used for 12, leaving 69 U.S. patients who died after having taken Sildenafil Citrate. Of these, cause of death was unmentioned or unknown for 21, two patients had strokes, and 46 had cardiovascular events (21 with definite or suspected myocardial infarction, 17 with cardiac arrest, 4 with cardiac symptoms, 3 with coronary artery disease, and one with severe hypotension leading to cardiac arrest).” “Single oral doses of sildenafil (100 mg) administered to healthy volunteers produced decreases in supine blood pressure (mean maximum decrease in systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 8.4/5.5 mmHg). The decrease in blood pressure was most notable approximately 1-2 hours after dosing, and was not different than placebo at 8 hours” “Sildenafil Citrate was administered to over 3700 patients (aged 19-87 years) during clinical trials worldwide. Over 550 patients were treated for longer than one year. In placebo-controlled clinical studies, the discontinuation rate due to adverse events for Sildenafil Citrate (2.5%) was not significantly different from placebo (2.3%). The adverse events were generally transient and mild to moderate in nature. In trials of all designs, adverse events reported by patients receiving Sildenafil Citrate were generally similar. In fixed-dose studies, the incidence of some adverse events increased with dose. The nature of the adverse events in flexible-dose studies, which more closely reflect the recommended dosage regimen, was similar to that for fixed-dose studies.” Answered by Carmella Theule 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What are the effects of women usin Kamagra? Answered by Marilu Blyden 1 year ago.

Kamagra For Women Answered by Steve Lotz 1 year ago.

As My Knowledge Kamagra Is Only For Mens You Should Try Lovegra 100 mg Answered by Yuonne Hearing 1 year ago.

Sorry I know I should not be here as this is a Men Poll but this ad is so repulsive. Turned my hubby off Linx for life and turned me off chocolate. Yuck. Men out there the Linx effect does not work in that aroma/flavour. I'm feeling ill now. Answered by Era Erlwein 1 year ago.


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