NITROGLYCERIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 018531/001.

Names and composition

"NITROGLYCERIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NITROGLYCERIN.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018531/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
040047/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.2MG per HR
040048/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.4MG per HR
040049/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.6MG per HR
070026/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070077/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070633/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070634/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
071094/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Injectable/ Injection 5MG per ML
071095/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Injectable/ Injection 10MG per ML
071203/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
071492/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
072034/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074559/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
074559/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
074559/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
074559/004 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
074992/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
074992/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
074992/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
074992/004 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
075073/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
075075/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
075076/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
075115/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
075115/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
087355/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN OINTMENT/TRANSDERMAL 2%
089884/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
089885/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
089886/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
091496/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN SPRAY, METERED/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
208191/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.3MG
208191/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG
208191/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.6MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018531/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018537/001 TRIDIL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018537/002 TRIDIL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.5MG per ML
018588/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.8MG per ML
018588/002 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018621/001 NITRO-BID NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018672/001 NITRONAL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
018672/002 NITRO IV NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
018705/001 NITROLINGUAL NITROGLYCERIN AEROSOL/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
018705/002 NITROLINGUAL PUMPSPRAY NITROGLYCERIN SPRAY, METERED/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
018774/001 NITROL NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.8MG per ML
021134/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.3MG
021134/002 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG
021134/003 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.6MG
040047/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.2MG per HR
040048/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.4MG per HR
040049/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Film, Extended Release/ Transdermal 0.6MG per HR
070026/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
070077/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
208424/001 GONITRO NITROGLYCERIN POWDER/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per PACKET
019970/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per 100ML
019970/002 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per 100ML
019970/003 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per 100ML
020144/001 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/002 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/003 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/004 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020144/005 TRANSDERM-NITRO NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.8MG per HR **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
020145/001 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
020145/002 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
020145/003 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.3MG per HR
020145/004 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
020145/005 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
020145/006 NITRO-DUR NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.8MG per HR
021359/001 RECTIV NITROGLYCERIN OINTMENT/INTRA-ANAL 0.4%
089771/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
089772/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
089773/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
071159/001 NITRO-BID NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
070633/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
071846/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per 100ML
021780/001 NITROMIST NITROGLYCERIN AEROSOL, METERED/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
070863/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
089774/001 MINITRAN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
070634/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
071847/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 20MG per 100ML
070871/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
071094/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Injectable/ Injection 5MG per ML
071848/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 40MG per 100ML
070872/001 NITROSTAT NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 10MG per ML
071095/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN Injectable/ Injection 10MG per ML
074083/001 NITROGLYCERIN IN DEXTROSE 5% NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.1MG per ML
071203/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
071492/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
072034/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN INJECTABLE/INJECTION 5MG per ML
074559/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
074559/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
074559/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
074559/004 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
074992/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
074992/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
074992/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
074992/004 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
075073/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
075075/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
075076/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/ TRANSDERMAL 0.1MG per HR
075115/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
075115/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
087355/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN OINTMENT/TRANSDERMAL 2%
089884/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.2MG per HR
089885/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.4MG per HR
089886/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN FILM, EXTENDED RELEASE/TRANSDERMAL 0.6MG per HR
091496/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN SPRAY, METERED/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG per SPRAY
208191/001 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.3MG
208191/002 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.4MG
208191/003 NITROGLYCERIN NITROGLYCERIN TABLET/SUBLINGUAL 0.6MG

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Answered questions

Nitroglycerin sublingual?
Asked by Marylouise Noren 1 month ago.

GENERIC NAME: NITROGLYCERIN - SUBLINGUAL (nye-troh-GLISS-er-in) BRAND NAME(S): Nitrostat Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage | Medical Alert USES: This medication is a nitrate used to relieve and prevent chest pain (angina). Nitroglycerin relaxes blood vessels allowing more blood to flow through. This reduces the workload on the heart and improves blood flow to the heart. HOW TO USE: At the first sign of chest pain, sit down and place one tablet under the tongue or between your cheek and gum allowing it to dissolve. The drug is absorbed directly through the lining of the mouth. Do not chew or swallow the tablet. Do not eat, drink or smoke while the nitroglycerin is in your mouth. Relief of symptoms should begin in 1 to 3 minutes. If after 5 minutes there is no relief of chest pain, use another tablet. If after an additional 5 minutes there is no relief, use a third tablet. If after another 5 minutes there is no relief, go to a hospital emergency room immediately. To prevent an angina attack, take one tablet 5-10 minutes before activities that you feel may cause an angina attack, such as exercise or sexual intercourse; or as directed by your doctor. Carry this medication with you at all times. SIDE EFFECTS: Burning or tingling under the tongue, headache, dizziness, flushing, or restlessness may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly. To minimize dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a seated or lying position. Tell your doctor immediately if any of these serious side effects occur: blurred vision, dry mouth, nausea, pale skin, rapid heartbeat. Headache is often a sign the medication is working. Treat headaches with an aspirin or non-aspirin pain reliever as recommended by your doctor. If the headaches continue or become severe, notify your doctor. A serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include: rash, itching, swelling, severe dizziness, trouble breathing. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: Before taking nitroglycerin, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other nitrates; or if you have any other allergies. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: anemia, glaucoma, head injury or surgery, heart problems, severe kidney disease, liver problems, thyroid conditions. This drug may make you dizzy; use caution engaging in activities requiring alertness such as driving or using machinery. Avoid alcoholic beverages while using this medication. Alcoholic beverages may increase the risk of fainting or dizziness. This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. It is not known whether this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. DRUG INTERACTIONS: This drug should not be used with the following medications because very serious (possibly fatal) interactions may occur: drugs to treat impotence (e.g., sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil). If you are currently using any of these medications, tell your doctor or pharmacist before starting nitroglycerin. Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist of all prescription and nonprescription/herbal products you may use, especially of: alteplase, aspirin, drugs for high blood pressure (e.g., ACE inhibitors such as fosinopril or lisinopril, alpha blockers such as prazosin or doxazosin, beta-blockers such as propranolol), certain migraine drugs (ergot alkaloids such as ergotamine). This product can affect the results of certain lab tests. Make sure laboratory personnel and your doctors know you use this drug. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval. OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. Symptoms of overdose may include a persistent, throbbing headache; severe dizziness; confusion; weakness; sweating; changes in heart rate; changes in vision; flushing; severe nausea and vomiting. NOTES: Do not share this medication with others. Some persons may develop a tolerance to the effects of this medication over time. Notify your doctor if the medication appears to be losing its effectiveness or if the chest pain continues while taking this drug. Always have this medication readily available. Do not keep it in your pants or shirt pockets. Your body heat may decrease the effectiveness of this medication. Keep the bottle loose and away from you body in a jacket pocket, tote bag, or purse. MISSED DOSE: This medication is used only at the onset of an attack of chest pain or 10 to 15 minutes before engaging in an activity that may cause chest pain. This medication is not for routine use. STORAGE: If the bottle of tablets contains cotton, remove it and throw the cotton away. Replacing the cotton in the bottle may cause the medication to lose its effectiveness. Store this medication at room temperature away from heat, moisture and sunlight. Keep it in the original screw-cap glass bottle with the cap tightly closed. Otherwise, this drug will not be as effective and may not work as well. Once you have opened the bottle, the expiration date may not apply. Ask your pharmacist for specific storage instructions and about your brand's open bottle expiration date. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets. MEDICAL ALERT: Your condition can cause complications in a medical emergency. For enrollment information call MedicAlert at 1-800-854-1166 (USA), or 1-800-668-1507 (Canada). Answered by Sylvia Belfi 1 month ago.

It is a small tablet used to treat anginal pains (chest pains) from contractures of the blood vessels of the heart. It is called nitroglycerin as its chemical name but there are many different trade names and they are all the same. Sub-lingual (Sub means under....Lingual means tongue) So this medication is not swallowed but placed under the tongue for rapid absorption. Most patients diagnosed with angina carry a small box of nitroglycerin with them at all times and when they are stressed either emotionally or physical and begin to have chest pain, they put one under the tongue for fast relief. Answered by Tracy Yago 1 month ago.

5 mg. There's 1000mg in a gram and 200x5=1000 Answered by Gonzalo Pestka 1 month ago.

my mom uses a liquid nitro spray. a shot or 2 under the tongue when she has pain. for her it is almost any pain above the waist. ear, throat, back, neck.. Answered by Penny Zuckerwar 1 month ago.

Yes...For acute anginal pain. Answered by Son Roehler 1 month ago.

It's a treatment for acute angina... So...? {{{ r u randy? }}} . Answered by Natalya Thoeny 1 month ago.

YES WHAT ABOUT IT. Answered by Oretha Dominguez 1 month ago.

Please see the webpages for more details on Glyceryl trinitrate-sublingual. Answered by Leoma Rotman 1 month ago.


Why is nitroglycerin explosive?
Asked by Jacinda Nish 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin is a dense, oily liquid that detonates if heated to 218°C or if subjected to mechanical shock. The molecule is explosive for three reasons: Nitroglycerin contains both oxidant and fuel. Nitroglycerin molecules contain three nitrate groups (that act as powerful oxidizing agents) bound directly to a glycerol fragment (which acts as a fuel): Nitroglycerin, the nitric acid triester of glycerol. Click on either image for a 3D Chime model. Hydrocarbons like gasoline usually burn rather than exploding because oxygen must come into contact with the fuel in the combustion reaction. Nitroglycerine contains its own oxidant; oxygen doesn't have to diffuse to the fuel to keep the reaction going. The decomposition is highly exothermic. Many reactions occur when nitroglycerin detonates, but the overall process can be written 4 C3H5(ONO2)3() 12 CO2(g) + 10 H2O(g) + 6 N2(g) + O2(g) The reaction releases an enormous amount of heat because many strong bonds in the product gas molecules replace the fewer, weaker bonds in nitroglycerin. Every mole of nitroglycerin that detonates releases about 1.5 MJ of heat! A large volume of gas is produced when nitroglycerin detonates. Nitroglycerin has a density of 1.6 g/mL around room temperature. Four moles of nitroglycerin (MW 227.09) occupy about 570 mL; the gases produced by detonation of this amount of nitroglycerin would have a volume of about 710 L at room temperature; the actual volume would be much higher if the temperature rise accompanying the reaction were considered. Nitroglycerin mixed with inert materials is much less sensitive to concussion. For example, it is mixed with diatomaceous earth to make dynamite; dynamite won't explode if dropped. Nitroglycerin tablets and sprays prescribed as heart medication [2] contain tiny amounts of nitroglycerin diluted by inert matter and are completely nonexplosive. Answered by Eddie Shisila 1 month ago.

cuse it explodes Answered by Savanna Pottorff 1 month ago.


What is Nitroglycerin?
Asked by Arletta Musil 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin spray and tablets are used to treat episodes of angina (chest pain) in people who have coronary artery disease (narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart). The spray and tablets may also be taken just before activities that may cause episodes of angina in order to prevent the angina from occurring. Nitroglycerin extended-release (long-acting) capsules are used to prevent episodes of angina in people who have coronary artery disease. The extended-release capsules can only be used to prevent angina attacks; they cannot be used to treat an attack once it has begun. Nitroglycerin is in a class of medications called vasodilators. It works by relaxing the blood vessels so the heart does not need to work as hard and therefore does not need as much oxygen. Answered by Anabel Ackley 1 month ago.

It is a vasodilator that is used to treat severe angina. Someone would take nitroglycerin only if they thought they were about to have a heart attack or have chest pain that may seem like the onset of a heart attack. It is meant to work very fast kinda like an inhaler for asthma how it immediately opens your lungs. Although it obviously cannot stop a heart attack once it has happened because the artery is already completely clogged. Answered by Sharda Rolfson 1 month ago.


Nitroglycerin?
Answers that are insulting or irrelivant will be reported... Asked by Kristel Fleury 1 month ago.

Please do not attempt to make this oh I found it on the net its not hard to find. Who knows it may not even be real....... Nitroglycerin Recipe by the Jolly Roger Like all chemists I must advise you all to take the greatest care and caution when you are doing this. Even if you have made this stuff before. This first article will give you information on making nitroglyerin, the basic ingredient in a lot of explosives such as straight dynamites, and geletin dynamites. Making nitroglycerin 1. Fill a 75-milliliter beaker to the 13 ml. Level with fuming red nitric acid, of 98% pure concentration. 2. Place the beaker in an ice bath and allow to cool below room temp. 3. After it has cooled, add to it three times the amount of fuming sulferic acid (99% h2so4). In other words, add to the now-cool fuming nitric acid 39 ml. Of fuming sulferic acid. When mixing any acids, always do it slowly and carefully to avoid splattering. 4. When the two are mixed, lower thier temp. By adding more ice to the bath, about 10-15 degrees centigrade. (Use a mercury-operated thermometer) 5. When the acid solution has cooled to the desired temperature, it is ready for the glycerin. The glycerin must be added in small amounts using a medicine dropper. (Read this step about 10 times!) Glycerin is added slowly and carefully (i mean careful!) Until the entire surface of the acid it covered with it. 6. This is a dangerous point since the nitration will take place as soon as the glycerin is added. The nitration will produce heat, so the solution must be kept below 30 degrees centigrade! If the solution should go above 30 degrees, immediately dump the solution into the ice bath! This will insure that it does not go off in your face! 7. For the first ten minutes of nitration, the mixture should be gently stirred. In a normal reaction the nitroglycerin will form as a layer on top of the acid solution, while the sulferic acid will absorb the excess water. 8. After the nitration has taken place, and the nitroglycerin has formed on the top of the solution, the entire beaker should be transferred slowly and carefully to another beaker of water. When this is done the nitroglycerin will settle at the bottem so the other acids can be drained away. 9. After removing as much acid as posible without disturbing the nitroglycerin, remove the nitroglycerin with an eyedropper and place it in a bicarbonate of soda (sodium bicarbonate in case you didn't know) solution. The sodium is an alkalai and will nuetralize much of the acid remaining. This process should be repeated as much as necesarry using blue litmus paper to check for the presence of acid. The remaining acid only makes the nitroglycerin more unstable than it already is. 10. Finally! The final step is to remove the nitroglycerin from the bicarbonate. His is done with and eye- dropper, slowly and carefully. The usual test to see if nitration has been successful is to place one drop of the nitroglycerin on metal and ignite it. If it is true nitroglycerin it will burn with a clear blue flame. ** Caution ** Nitro is very sensative to decomposition, heating dropping, or jarring, and may explode if left undisturbed and cool. -------------Jolly Roger Answered by Margarett Goettel 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin is used medically as tablets, patches, and sprays. The amount of nitroglycerine used in those forms, though, is very small and mixed with other inert ingredients, so that the nitroglycerin is no longer unstable and explosive. Nitroglycerin has been used more than 125 years to treat certain heart conditions, especially sudden chest pain called angina. Only about ten years ago, though, researchers figured out that the human body turns nitroglycerine into nitric oxide and that nitric oxide naturally relaxes blood vessels, allowing more blood to flow, in this case to the heart. It essentially "dilates" the blood vessels, opening them up a bit. Drugs, like nitroglycerin, that cause this dilation are called vasodilators. Answered by Cathleen Bielik 1 month ago.

Like I told a friend of mine . If I told you the secrets. I would have to sleep with you're sister. Answered by Maribel Neidig 1 month ago.


Why was nitroglycerine used for dynamite instead of gasoline?
It is more explosive? More stable? Asked by Page Papen 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin and any dilutents can certainly deflagrate, i.e. burn. However, the explosive power of nitroglycerin is derived from detonation: energy from the initial decomposition causes a pressure wave or gradient that detonates the surrounding fuel. This is a self-sustained shock wave that propagates through the explosive medium at some 30 times the speed of sound as a near-instantaneous pressure-induced decomposition of the fuel into a white hot gas. Detonation of nitroglycerin generates gases that would occupy more than 1,200 times the original volume at ordinary room temperature and pressure. Moreover, the heat liberated raises the temperature to about 5,000 °C (9,030 °F).[10] This is totally different from deflagration, which depends solely upon available fuel regardless of pressure or shock. It is possible to chemically "desensitize" nitroglycerin to a point where it can be considered approximately as "safe" as modern high explosive formulations, by the addition of approximately 10–30% ethanol, acetone,[8] or dinitrotoluene (percentage varies with the desensitizing agent used). Desensitization requires extra effort to reconstitute the "pure" product. Failing this, it must be assumed that desensitized nitroglycerin is substantially more difficult to detonate, possibly rendering it useless as an explosive for practical application. So to answer your question: More Explosive and Safer. Answered by Ashlee Mandril 1 month ago.

Gasoline is not a spontaneous explosive, whereas nitroglycerin is. Dynamite was invented after a nitroglycerin explosion in the factory of Alfred Nobel killed a number of workers. In order to make it safer, the nitroglycerin was allowed to absorb on diatomaceous earth, forming dynamite. Alfred Nobel later set up the Nobel Prize trust fund. Answered by Reda Helmes 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin is more explosive then gasoline and was invented earlier. Nitro. is very unstable and when it is mixed with clay becomes more stable that's how dynamite was invented. In very old dynamite the nitro sweats out and again becomes unstable. Answered by Laurence Schmiesing 1 month ago.

Gasoline didn't exist when dynamite was invented, that's why. Nitro 1846, Gasoline 1913. Dynamite was invented in 1866. Edit: I had to double check the dates to confirm, nitro was mid 19th century and gasoline wasn't needed until cars came along so that was early 1900s, gasoline was created for vehicles. Nitro was created first and then it was later discovered that mixing it with silica created a paste and that was used to make dynamite. Answered by Ernestina Skaff 1 month ago.


What would taking a high dose of nitroglycerin without heart problem cause?
what can a sudden drop of blood pressure do? Asked by Stephen Ortega 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin spray and tablets are used to treat episodes of angina (chest pain) in people who have coronary artery disease (narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart). The spray and tablets may also be taken just before activities that may cause episodes of angina in order to prevent the angina from occurring. Nitroglycerin extended-release (long-acting) capsules are used to prevent episodes of angina in people who have coronary artery disease. The extended-release capsules can only be used to prevent angina attacks; they cannot be used to treat an attack once it has begun. Nitroglycerin is in a class of medications called vasodilators. It works by relaxing the blood vessels so the heart does not need to work as hard and therefore does not need as much oxygen. If you take nitroglycerin without heart problems, the symptoms of overdose will be felt. Symptoms of overdose may include: * headache * confusion * fever * dizziness * slow or pounding heartbeat * nausea * vomiting * bloody diarrhea * fainting * shortness of breath * sweating * flushing * cold, clammy skin * loss of ability to move the body * coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time) * seizures Answered by Colton Reddoch 1 month ago.

Well Nitroglycerin is a vasodilator, usually used for angina pectoris, to decrease the demand for oxygen since the chest pain is caused from constriction of the coronary arteries when the myocardium is receiving a deficiency in oxygen. When a person takes nitroglycerin without being prescribed for it, the body receives less oxygen, blood pressure goes down, and the individual experiences anemia, lethargy, breathlessness, cyanosis (blue nails, lips...), and so on. You should never take medication that is not prescribed to you. The individual may collapse and faint, seizure, vomit, etc.. It is important to tell your primary care physician if you have uneven heart rhythms (arrhythmias), nausea, vomiting... so that a lower dosage can be applied if you have been prescribed nitroglycerin. Answered by Hertha Hagler 1 month ago.

Massive headache, Drop in B/P, Possible fainting, dizziness. You said massive-- how massive? --Stop your heart ? Maybe damage kidneys due to lack of blood flow. You may not die especially if only swallowed. It is a short acting drug. But the potential is there Not smart to try it. Take care Edit: From medicineplus. •Airways and lungs ◦Shortness of breath ◦Slow breathing •Eyes, ears, nose, and throat ◦Blurred vision ◦Double vision •Heart and blood vessels ◦Heart palpitations ◦Low blood pressure ◦Rapid heartbeat or slow heartbeat •Nervous system ◦Convulsions ◦Coma ◦Confusion ◦Dizziness ◦Fainting ◦Headache •Skin ◦Bluish color to lips and fingernails ◦Cold skin ◦Flushing •Stomach and intestines ◦Diarrhea ◦Cramping ◦Loss of appetite ◦Nausea and vomiting Answered by Judi Latzke 1 month ago.

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Nitroglycerin, C3H5N3O3?
A) has equal amounts of C and N by wright B) has less 50% O by weight C) none of these D) has the same weight percent of C and N E) has the same proportion of N to H atoms as does NH3 Asked by Jefferey Bartamian 1 month ago.

Actually, the correct formula for nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate) is C3H5(NO3)3 and its molecular weight is 227. Since a nitrogen atom has a mass number of 14 and carbon 12, and a molecule of nitro contains 3 carbon atoms and 3 N atoms then a molecule of nitro has a smaller weight fraction (and thus percentage) of carbon than nitrogen, so choices A and D are not correct. Nine O atoms have a total mass of 144 amu, which is more than 50% the total molecular weight of the nitroglycerin, so it's more than 50% O by weight and choice B is wrong. The proportion of N to H atoms in nitro is 3 to 5 and in ammonia it's 1 to 3, so choice E is wrong. The only correct choice is C - none of these. Hope this answers your question! Answered by Magnolia Rappa 1 month ago.

C ans. actually the nitroglycerin is 1.2.3 trinitro propane or tri nitro glycerin the formula is C3 H5 N3 O9 or ( NO3) --CH 2 -- H-C --( NO3) --CH2 --(NO3 Answered by Cindi Laszlo 1 month ago.


Can you die from an overdose of Nitroglycerin?
the person in the story does not have a heart condition. but he doesn not take it knowingly. it would be sliped into his food or something Asked by Latisha Humphrey 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin causes vasodilation, so a person who overdosed on it would rapidly go into shock. Their blood pressure would drop precipitously, leading to loss of consciousness. Before passing out, the person would probably experience a severe headache due to blood vessel dilation in the head as well as tachycardia (rapid heart beat). Death would occur due to lack of oxygen to the brain secondary to the drop in blood pressure and circulatory collapse. It would take quite some time for death to occur - and nitroglycerin is metabolized by the body rapidly. A nitroglycerin OD would screw a person up, but probably would not cause rapid death. Answered by Gaynell Gregoire 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin Overdose Answered by Dorcas Bonamico 1 month ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: can you die from an overdose of Nitroglycerin? I'm writing a story where the victim dies of an overdose of a drug which overdose symptoms are similar to a heart attack. I thought Nitroglycerin would be good but can you actually die from that? Answered by Thomas Falconeri 1 month ago.

Yes, you can die from an overdose of nitroglycerine. Symptoms would be lightheadedness and fainting prior to death, however. If you are looking to simulate heart attack symptoms (with chest pain and heart dysrhythmias) I would suggest Potassium Chloride (KCl). Answered by Dave Oehlert 1 month ago.

yes. nitroglycerine can lower your blood pressure to a dangerous and sometimes lethal level. Answered by Shaunta Burke 1 month ago.

It can kill pretty fast in pediatric cases. In adults, deaths have occurred, but are rare. Answered by Leigh Tynan 1 month ago.

Uh, unless you have a heart condition DO NOT TAKE NITRO! Answered by Tasia Scoles 1 month ago.


Nitroglycerin, when it gives you a headache?
My mother told me that IF it gives you a headache that means YOU DO "NOT" NEED IT!I am not sure, is this correct? As I know it gives me a headache sometimes, I figured it means that I did not use ENOUGH. ( the ER they gave me more after I told them I used it and did not get a headache!)I am so... Asked by Shayna Celeste 1 month ago.

My mother told me that IF it gives you a headache that means YOU DO "NOT" NEED IT! I am not sure, is this correct? As I know it gives me a headache sometimes, I figured it means that I did not use ENOUGH. ( the ER they gave me more after I told them I used it and did not get a headache!) I am so confused, thanks! I use the ointment and the ER uses the pills under the tounge, if that helps, and its for my choking on food, nothing else! Answered by Oralee Mcknight 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin always gives headaches unless the nitro is old, wet, and useless. The more nitro you have to take, the worse the headache. I had a heart attack a few years ago 5-6; I'd had symptoms, so I had an appointment with a cardiologist set up on Monday. I had the attack Sunday morning very, very early -- pain went on for four hours and I took everything I had for pain. When I saw the cardiologist the next day he stopped all the tests and put me in the hospital. They had nitro running into my system. I made the put the bed flat and no pillows -- the headache was worse than anything. The surgery (angioplasty and inserted a stent) was a breeze compared to the nitro. You probably have a small esophagus problem. It could be inflamed, you could have GERD, but I'd get it checked out if I were you. My mom and sometimes I take nitro for the heart burn and esophagus problems too. Make sure your internist checks your esophagus -- both my mom and dad had to have theirs stretched. Hope I don't have to do that. good luck and take care. Answered by Fermina Andersson 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin and nitrates dilate all vessels esp arteries and headache is due to the pounding of blood against the arterioles of the brain. It is a severe dull, sometimes intolerable pain. Some people are more prone. Answered by Mohammad Gunnells 1 month ago.

Don't crunch it with your teeth that would be the ultimate 'blow' Nitroglycerin = TNT It will not only blow your mind, it will blow your head off. LoL Answered by Tamra Miu 1 month ago.

Listen to your mother she knows Answered by Reginald Litzinger 1 month ago.

Ask your PCP and do as they say. Answered by Ian Rhoden 1 month ago.

ROTFLMAO Dune's got it babe, the ultimate "blow off" Answered by Hanh Mee 1 month ago.


Why do nitroglycerin explode ?
Asked by Rhoda Gionet 1 month ago.

This is because the molecule is very unstable. The nitro groups provide oxygen for the oxidation reaction already in the molecule, which contains stuff to oxidise. Nitroglycerin contains both oxidant and fuel. Nitroglycerin molecules contain three nitro groups (that act as powerful oxidizing agents) bound directly to a hydrocarbon fragment (which acts as a fuel): Nitroglycerin is the nitric acid triester of glycerol. Hydrocarbons like gasoline usually burn rather than exploding because oxygen must come into contact with the fuel in the combustion reaction. Nitroglycerine contains its own oxidant; oxygen doesn't have to diffuse to the fuel to keep the reaction going. The decomposition is highly exothermic. Many reactions occur when nitroglycerin detonates, but the overall process can be written 4 C3H5(ONO2)3() 12 CO2(g) + 10 H2O(g) + 6 N2(g) + O2(g) The reaction releases an enormous amount of heat because many strong bonds in the product gas molecules replace the fewer, weaker bonds in nitroglycerin. Every mole of nitroglycerin that detonates releases about 1.5 MJ of heat! A large volume of gas is produced when nitroglycerin detonates. Nitroglycerin has a density of 1.6 g/mL around room temperature. Four moles of nitroglycerin (MW 227.09) occupy about 570 mL; the gases produced by detonation of this amount of nitroglycerin would have a volume of about 710 L at room temperature; the actual volume would be much higher if the temperature rise accompanying the reaction were considered. Nitroglycerin mixed with inert materials is much less sensitive to concussion. For example, it is mixed with diatomaceous earth to make dynamite; dynamite won't explode if dropped. Nitroglycerin tablets and sprays prescribed as heart medication contain tiny amounts of nitroglycerin diluted by inert matter and are completely nonexplosive. Answered by Kaila Bastilla 1 month ago.

Nitroglycerin is used medically as pills, patches, and sprays. the quantity of nitroglycerine used in those kinds, inspite of the truth that, is amazingly small and mixed with different inert elements, so as that the nitroglycerin isn't any longer risky and explosive. Nitroglycerin has been used more desirable than 100 twenty 5 years to regulate particular heart circumstances, incredibly unexpected chest discomfort called angina. in uncomplicated words about ten years in the past, inspite of the truth that, researchers discovered that the human body turns nitroglycerine into nitric oxide and that nitric oxide evidently relaxes blood vessels, allowing more desirable blood to bypass, as a effect to the middle. It in truth "dilates" the blood vessels, establishing them up slightly. drugs, like nitroglycerin, that reason this dilation are called vasodilators. Answered by Raisa Melhorn 1 month ago.


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