NITROFURANTOIN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 073652/001.

Names and composition

"NITROFURANTOIN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE.

Answered questions

Can you die from an overdose of nitrofurantoin?
??????????? (: Asked by Caren Bobb 4 months ago.

Nitrofurantoin: Adverse effects Nitrofurantoin can cause nausea and vomiting, fever, rash, hypersensitivity pneumonitis. When given for long periods of time, nitrofurantoin can cause progressive pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. All these side effects are much more common in the elderly. Patients should be informed that nitrofurantoin colours urine a dark orange-brown; this is completely harmless. Neonates (babies up to the age of one month) have immature enzyme systems in their red blood cells (glutathione instability) and nitrofurantoin must therefore not be used because it can cause haemolytic anaemia. For the same reason, nitrofurantoin should not be given to pregnant women after 38 weeks of pregnancy, or who are about to give birth. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in patients with decreased renal function (CrCl < 60ml/min) due to systemic accumulation and subtherapeutic levels reached in the urinary tract. [edit] Precautions Nitrofurantoin must be taken with food and can cause bleeding in the stomach, vomiting and other gastrointestinal disruptions if these warnings are not adhered to. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency because of risk of extravascular hemolysis resulting in anemia. Answered by Geraldine Henningsen 4 months ago.

Nitrofurantoin Overdose Answered by Joaquina Priesmeyer 4 months ago.


Has anyone used Nitrofurantoin (100mg)...generic Macrobid?
for a urinary tract infection.....Please list side effects.... thanks Asked by Christoper Kofutua 4 months ago.

The most common side effects noted with nitrofurantoin are gastrointestinal, including nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. The side effects also can be minimized by using a lower dose (with the physician's consent) or by taking the drug with food or milk. Headache is the most common nervous system effect. Nitrofurantoin can cause serious lung injury. The reaction can occur within hours of the start of treatment if the patient has previously received nitrofurantoin or within a few days of starting nitrofurantoin for the first time. Symptoms include difficult breathing, chills, fever, chest pain, and cough. In other persons, lung injury may occur after approximately a month of treatment. Symptoms include difficult breathing, rapid breathing, and cough. Fortunately, the symptoms usually resolve within a week if the medication is stopped. In still other persons, lung injury may not develop until after several months or years of therapy. Unless it is recognized and treated, this delayed lung injury can result in permanent lung damage that remains even after the drug is stopped. Allergic skin reactions also can occur, including some which are severe. A condition known as peripheral neuropathy (damage to the nerves of the arms and legs), may occur with nitrofurantoin therapy, most commonly causing tingling in the extremities. The condition can become severe and is more likely to occur in patients with diabetes mellitus, vitamin B deficiency or general debilitation. A type of anemia (reduced red blood cell count) called hemolytic anemia can occur during therapy with nitrofurantoin. This reaction occurs most frequently in persons with a deficiency of an enzyme called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase which is very important to the survival of red blood cells. Nitrofurantoin also can cause liver damage leading to jaundice or a form of hepatitis which can be fatal. Elevated liver enzymes indicate liver damage and are a reason to stop the drug. Answered by Vincenza Vizzi 4 months ago.

i recognize how you experience. I had to have one at the same time as i mandatory an emergency ultrasound at 9 weeks. It changed into terrible! I never opt for to experience that back, i concept it would experience extra constructive at the same time as it is being bumped off even though it feels worse! i have in effortless words heard of them utilizing a catheter for the duration of complicated artwork in case you get a c-area. i'm no longer confident about epidurals although. If it is mandatory like in a c-area i don't believe of you could refuse because they don't opt for you peeing on your self. they received't eliminate it until eventually you could walk back and get your feeling back. it is terrible i recognize yet there is alot we ought to pass through only for slightly one. after I had the catheter put in me I felt like I had to pee quite undesirable and prefer my bladder changed into going to burst. The nurse pronounced that it changed into in basic terms the catheter and that i'd not pee. minutes later I peed on myself, i changed into so embarrassed yet now I in basic terms look back on it and snicker. i do no longer opt for to adventure that back. Answered by Thi Walterscheid 4 months ago.


I have UTI and im 5 months pregnant my Dr gave me nitrofurantoin is it safe during pregnancy?!?
i reed some awful stuff about nitrofurantoin and its side effects so now i dont know if i should take it or not?:S im really lost im scared that it might hurt the baby or something i need some adwice ASAP ......... Asked by Cristine Ptaschinski 4 months ago.

NITROFURANTOIN/NITROFURANTOIN MACROCRYSTALS - ORAL During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It must not be used if you are near the end of your pregnancy (38-42 weeks), or at the time of labor and delivery. Doing so may cause a certain blood disorder (hemolytic anemia) in your baby. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. NITROFURANTOIN - ORAL This medication should be used only when clearly needed during pregnancy. This medication should not be taken if you are at term (weeks 38-42 of pregnancy), near or at the time of delivery due to possible harm to the newborn, such as a certain blood problem (hemolytic anemia). Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. This is the only information I could find on it. If you are worried about it you can call a Pharmacist or your doctor. Good luck Answered by Leonila Mellas 4 months ago.

most people will say if the doc gave it to you it is safe but i think your concern is very wise. i do not know about that particular medication but i do know all medicine has some side affect and just because a doc gives it does not make it 100% safe. personally i would try getting rid of the uti by flushing your system first. such as drinking lots and lots of water and cranberry juice. if that does not work you may need to take the medicine. and from just taking it the one time it probably will have no ill effects but for possible future uti's i would definitely continue to drink water and cranberry juice as a preventative. i was prescribed codeine for a chest cold and told it was completely safe but come to find out it had never been tested on pregnant women and therefore how could they truly know. i had taken it and for 2 days and had some really strange and scary experiences with my pregnancy. i do not know if it was harmful considering i have not had the child as of yet. i am 7 months but all seems well since i quit taking the medicine. anyway if your instincts are telling you not to take it then do not take it. follow your gut feelings they are usually accurate. Answered by Quinn Virtue 4 months ago.

no you are able to truly desire to tell you the way lots weight you are able to desire to benefit. as long as you're ingesting healthful ingredients and doing what's physically powerful - then your weight could desire to truly no longer be a controversy. the bigger question is that if the toddler is healthful. With my first toddler I lost 15 pounds interior the 1st 2 months and only gained 5 pounds back. My toddler replaced into on the traditional levels all the way via my being pregnant. With my daughter i replaced into on mattress relax for 7 months and gained eighty pounds - she additionally greater at general fees. So do no longer enable absolutely everyone make you sense like a bad mom on your weight as long as you're doing the main suitable issues. I felt like a bad mom the entire being pregnant of my daughter because of the fact i replaced into having great time issues - we theory we've been going to lose her for various months. It replaced right into a bad deal yet I did what my physician mentioned and she or he replaced into born rather healthful. once you're a small lady then 30 to 40 pounds could placed you at extra possibility for different themes like intense blood tension. i'm no longer a small lady and 30 to 40 pounds could be ok for me yet eighty replaced into thank you to lots. even with the undeniable fact that when you consider that Carly replaced into progressing usually the physician mentioned it replaced into ok. So communicate on your physician and verify the toddler is healthful and to hell with everybody else. Answered by Ramonita Heter 4 months ago.

Your doctor obviously knows that you are pregnant, and we have faith in our doctors because of the oath they take to first do no harm. I don't think he would have given you a medicine that would knowingly cause harm to your baby....especially since all medications have potentially dangerous side effects. However, if you have serious doubts, call your ob/gyn and ask them, or try calling a pharmacy and talking to them. They are very knowlegable about drugs and their side effects. Answered by Rupert Lemucchi 4 months ago.

It is also called Macrobid. It is safe. I took it when I was preg. I had LOTS of UTIs. Answered by Malorie Kowalowski 4 months ago.

Call a pharmacist and ask or call and talk with the answering service for your doctor. Answered by Brett Hilvers 4 months ago.

I don't know personally. But if your doctor prescribed it to you, and they know you're pregnant, it should be fine. Answered by Janine Marland 4 months ago.

It is a definite safe tab for you and your baby. About nitrofurantoin, Prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections caused by susceptible gram-negative and some gram-positive organisms including E. coli, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Enterococa, and S. aureus; Pseudomonas, Serratia, and most species of Proteus are generally resistant to nitrofurantoin. About side effects, none, a safe drug during pregnancy. Details, while it is safe. Urinary tract infections are common during pregnancy, and the most common causative organism is Escherichia coli. Asymptomatic bacteriuria can lead to the development of cystitis or pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be screened for bacteriuria and subsequently treated with antibiotics such as nitrofurantoin, sulfisoxazole or cephalexin. Ampicillin should no longer be used in the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria because of high rates of resistance. Pyelonephritis can be a life-threatening illness, with increased risk of perinatal and neonatal morbidity. Recurrent infections are common during pregnancy and require prophylactic treatment. Pregnant women with urinary group B streptococcal infection should be treated and should receive intrapartum prophylactic therapy. (Am Fam Physician 2000;61:713-21.) Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequently encountered in the family physician's office. UTIs account for approximately 10 percent of office visits by women, and 15 percent of women will have a UTI at some time during their life. In pregnant women, the incidence of UTI can be as high as 8 percent.1,2 This article briefly examines the pathogenesis and bacteriology of UTIs during pregnancy, as well as patient-oriented outcomes. We review the diagnosis and treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and pyelonephritis, plus the unique issues of group B streptococcus and recurrent infections. Pathogenesis Pregnant women are at increased risk for UTIs. Beginning in week 6 and peaking during weeks 22 to 24, approximately 90 percent of pregnant women develop ureteral dilatation, which will remain until delivery (hydronephrosis of pregnancy). Increased bladder volume and decreased bladder tone, along with decreased ureteral tone, contribute to increased urinary stasis and ureterovesical reflux.1 Additionally, the physiologic increase in plasma volume during pregnancy decreases urine concentration. Up to 70 percent of pregnant women develop glycosuria, which encourages bacterial growth in the urine. Increases in urinary progestins and estrogens may lead to a decreased ability of the lower urinary tract to resist invading bacteria. This decreased ability may be caused by decreased ureteral tone or possibly by allowing some strains of bacteria to selectively grow.1,3 These factors may all contribute to the development of UTIs during pregnancy. Bacteriology The organisms that cause UTIs during pregnancy are the same as those found in nonpregnant patients. Escherichia coli accounts for 80 to 90 percent of infections. Other gram-negative rods such as Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae are also common. Gram-positive organisms such as group B streptococcus and Staphylococcus saprophyticus are less common causes of UTI. Group B streptococcus has important implications in the management of pregnancy and will be discussed further. Less common organisms that may cause UTI include enterococci, Gardnerella vaginalis and Ureaplasma ureolyticum.1,4,5 Diagnosis and Treatment of UTIs UTIs have three principle presentations: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and pyelonephritis. The diagnosis and treatment of UTI depends on the presentation. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Significant bacteriuria may exist in asymptomatic patients. In the 1960s, Kass6 noted the subsequent increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Significant bacteriuria has been historically defined as finding more than 105 colony-forming units per mL of urine.7 Recent studies of women with acute dysuria have shown the presence of significant bacteriuria with lower colony counts. This has not been studied in pregnant women, and finding more than 105 colony-forming units per mL of urine remains the commonly accepted standard. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common, with a prevalence of 10 percent during pregnancy.6,8 Thus, routine screening for bacteriuria is advocated. Untreated asymptomatic bacteriuria leads to the development of symptomatic cystitis in approximately 30 percent of patients and can lead to the development of pyelonephritis in up to 50 percent.6 Asymptomatic bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of intrauterine growth retardation and low-birth-weight infants.9 The relatively high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria during pregnancy, the significant consequences for women and for the pregnancy, plus the ability to avoid sequelae with treatment, justify screening pregnant women for bacteriuria. Answered by Yuki Lavista 4 months ago.

if anything ask your docter Answered by Jorge Markway 4 months ago.


Is there any drug or food interactions you need to be aware of while taking nitrofurantoin-micro?
Asked by Amie Dungy 4 months ago.

Nitrofurantoin is an antibiotic that fights bacteria in the body. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath (even with mild exertion), fever, chills, cough, chest pain, yellowing of the skin or eyes; pale skin, unusual weakness, numbness or tingling, or diarrhea that is watery or bloody. Avoid using antacids without your doctor's advice Take each dose with a full glass of water. Take nitrofurantoin with food or milk Before taking nitrofurantoin, tell your doctor if you are taking: magnesium salicylate (Doan's Pills, Mobidin, Momentum); choline magnesium salicylate (Tricosal, Trilisate); probenecid (Benemid); or sulfinpyrazone (Anturane). Answered by Florence Feimster 4 months ago.

Probenecid may increase the effect of Nitrofurantoin and too much can possibly cause toxicity. Space the dosing with antacids by at least 3 hours apart. Take with meals to slow the rate of absorption and decrease side effects. Answered by Scottie Bambeck 4 months ago.

Also probably watch out for Neurontin, Avonex. There are dozens of adverse reports that involved nitrofurantoin and each (or more) of these drugs. Answered by Normand Shamblin 4 months ago.

pickles and Paxil. sorry, I'm retarded. Answered by Gavin Muncil 4 months ago.


Can dogs take nitrofurantoin?
Asked by Francis Russian 4 months ago.

No. Dogs should not take Nitrofurantoin, Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin, Urantoin. or anything similar. That is dangerous and can kill your dog. Why would you even want to give your dog that anyway? It is usually used in treating urinary tract infection, it is often used against E. coli. Is it because its an antibiotic and you think it will treat a infection on a dog? It won't help your dog, only make it worse. Baytril is a common dog antibiotic given by vets. If its an infection ask your vet to prescribe that or another type of antibiotic for dogs. Don't do something your not sure of. But before you go requesting medicine always take your dog into the vet to make sure it gets the proper diagnoses. Answered by Merrilee Gruben 4 months ago.

Human Medication is TOXIC to pets ASK YOUR OWN VET PRIOR TO TREATING YOUR DOGS Answered by Edgar Salzer 4 months ago.


Question about nitrofurantoin for UTI?
I have a UTI and was prescribed nitrofurantoin. Doc said that this drug is pretty benign as far as causing nasty side effects and is very commonly prescribed for UTI. Do you agree? Did she pick a good med for me? She did look at my urine so it's not like she totally guessed at what it was like.So, it's... Asked by Roxy Fullenwider 4 months ago.

I have a UTI and was prescribed nitrofurantoin. Doc said that this drug is pretty benign as far as causing nasty side effects and is very commonly prescribed for UTI. Do you agree? Did she pick a good med for me? She did look at my urine so it's not like she totally guessed at what it was like. So, it's been 5 hours since I took the first capsule and the only thing I'm feeling is tired. I have no gastro problems. Does this mean I'm out of the woods as far as nasty gastro side effects? If I were going to get them, would I have gotten them by now? Thanks. I need all the encouragment I can get because I get a bit nervous when taking the antibiotics. Oh also, is nitrofurantoin in a class of nasty ,powerful antibiotics? I sure hope not. I looked it up on wikipedia which puts it in the class of "others." Thanks again. Answered by Aiko Discenza 4 months ago.

Nitrofurantoin is very effective against e coli in the urinary tract. It is also a category B drug which means, "No evidence of risk in humans-Adequate, well controlled studies in pregnant women have not shown increased risk of fetal abnormalities despite adverse findings in animals, or In the absence of adequate human studies, animal studies show no fetal risk. The chance of fetal harm is remote, but remains a possibility." If you are not having side effects yet, that is a good sign. Keep taking the med and see what happens. This drug is not in the class of antibiotics that are toxic and given only to people who are critically ill. An example of that kind of drug is Vancomycin. Answered by Daria Isley 4 months ago.

Nitrofurantoin generally has very few side effects. It's an unusual antibiotic that doesn't really get absorbed through your body, almost all of it just goes straight into the urine and then out. It sounds like you're just coincidentally sick with something else! The nausea especially would be more obvious if it was due to the medication, antibiotics tend to cause nausea within an hour of taking them. Unless for the first day and a half you took it with food, then took it on an empty stomach before getting sick... Taking antibiotics with food helps alot with nausea as long as it's okay to eat with that particular antibiotic, and nitrofurantoin IS one you're supposed to take with food. If it gets alot worse though, you might possibly be having an unusual reaction and should see a doctor. But it's pretty unlikely! Answered by Hal Ringuette 4 months ago.

The treatment for urinary tract infection starts with a series of consultation with your doctor. A laboratory inspection of urine is required. For milder cases of this disease, the use of antibacterial drugs is sufficient. Examples of such drugs are Bactrim, Amoxil, and Cipro. Doctors usually recommend that these drugs are taken within a couple of weeks in order to suppress the infection in the urethra and prevent the kidneys from being affected. Other drugs that can be used to treat UTI are Periostat and Achromycin. Additionally, patients suffering from urinary tract infection are advised not to soak in the bath tub as the water and the scents placed in it could further irritate the urethra. Take a shower instead of using the bath tub. It is also important to urinate often if you have UTI to eliminate the bacteria. Keeping it in may exacerbate the condition as urine is mainly composed of wastes. Answered by Caleb Mccoyle 4 months ago.


Can nitrofurantoin mono/mac be used to treat Strep Throat/a sore throat?
Have a gnarly sore throat, have some nitrofurantoin mono/mac... can I get rid of both by taking the antibiotic? Or is it ONLY for UTI and kidney infections? Please help. :( Asked by Arianne Mortell 4 months ago.

Katie Edel, As you rightly suppose, nitrofurantoin is an antibiotic used for treating and preventing urinary tract infections caused by certain bacteria - Bladder Infection caused by Enterobacter, Infection of the Urinary Tract caused by Enterococcus, Urinary Tract Infection due to E. Coli Bacteria, Urinary Tract Infection caused by Klebsiella Bacteria, Urinary Tract Infection caused by Staphylococcus Aureus. Nitrofurantoin Oral may also be used to treat Staphylococcus Saprophyticus Infection of Urinary Tract, Urinary Tract Infection Prevention. Apart from the fact that it is not really suitable for a sore throat, there are three points that I would raise at this moment. 1. Why would you have a surplus of this medication? If medications are stopped before the stipulated time, the causative organism that the antibiotic was prescribed for, may well not have been eliminated and if it should infect again, it may be resistant to that medication. 2. If you use a medication always check the “Use By” date. 3. When a medication is ‘left over’ always return it to the pharmacy for disposal. ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED. It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms. The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Hope this helps matador 89 Answered by Tami Noggles 4 months ago.

Know the asteroid wellhead tonsil stones them for many years and it's been title not eventually. Best decision I've ever made! I was shocked by the way of getting out the stones out. It was so easy, but more importantly, painless. I really liked the little trick he had for preventing gag reflex. He have one happy customer here. Cure Tonsil Stones Permanently? Answered by Keely Peakes 4 months ago.

Any Antibiotic will treat a strep/scarlet fever infection, I would recommend a penicillin based antibiotic for strep. Answered by Lise Gubin 4 months ago.


Can I take ibuprofen for a headache while at the same time taking Nitrofurantoin Mono?
The Nitrofurantoin Mono is for UTI. Asked by Loyce Louthan 4 months ago.

Not sure what Nitrofurantoin Mono is but I would just stick with the ibuprofen for the headache. That should be enough to help by itself. Answered by Boyd Waldenmyer 4 months ago.

Tell your doctor if you are taking an antidepressant such as citalopram (Celexa), duloxetine (Cymbalta), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), or venlafaxine (Effexor). Taking any of these drugs with ibuprofen may cause you to bruise or bleed easily. Before taking ibuprofen, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: aspirin or other NSAIDs such as diclofenac (Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), indomethacin (Indocin), meloxicam (Mobic), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), piroxicam (Feldene), and others; an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and others; lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid); diuretics (water pills) such as furosemide (Lasix); methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall); steroids (prednisone and others); or a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin). Just to be safe... i wouldn't take it without consulting a doctor. Answered by Marvella Welle 4 months ago.

That,s a BIG-NO, unless you want to end up in A&E. NEVER EVER MIX TWO LIKE THAT, or TWO OF ANYTHING, unless your doc, tell,s you to, OK. Answered by Raeann Cohen 4 months ago.


What kind of medication is nitrofurantoin mono/mac?
Asked by Conrad Earenfight 4 months ago.

100MG CAP $36.99 $98.89 Request a prescription now Prices may vary at store - see details below Drug Information For: NITROFURANTOIN MONO/MAC 100MG CAP Ingredient Name: NITROFURANTOIN (nye-troe-fyoor-AN-toyn) Drug Manufacturer: MYLAN Common Uses: This medicine is an anti-infective used to treat or prevent infections of the urinary tract. It may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor. Before Using This Medicine: Some medicines or medical conditions may interact with this medicine. INFORM YOUR DOCTOR OR PHARMACIST of all prescription and over-the-counter medicine that you are taking. Inform your doctor of any other medical conditions, allergies, pregnancy, or breast-feeding. USE OF THIS MEDICINE IS NOT RECOMMENDED if you have a history of kidney conditions. Contact your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns about using this medicine. How to Use This Medicine: Follow the directions for using this medicine provided by your doctor. SWALLOW WHOLE. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing. TAKE THIS MEDICINE with food or milk. STORE THIS MEDICINE at room temperature, away from heat and light. TO CLEAR UP YOUR INFECTION COMPLETELY, continue taking this medicine for the full course of treatment even if you feel better in a few days. Do not miss any doses. IF YOU MISS A DOSE OF THIS MEDICINE, take it as soon as possible. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take 2 doses at once. Cautions: If your symptoms do not improve within a few days or if they become worse, check with your doctor. THIS MEDICINE MAY CAUSE drowsiness. Do not drive, operate machinery, or do anything else that could be dangerous until you know how you react to this medicine. THIS MEDICINE MAY COLOR THE URINE brown. BEFORE YOU BEGIN TAKING ANY NEW MEDICINE, either prescription or over-the-counter, check with your doctor or pharmacist. This includes antacids containing magnesium trisilicate. FOR WOMEN: THIS MEDICINE SHOULD BE USED ONLY WHEN CLEARLY NEEDED DURING PREGNANCY. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Avoid use at or past term (38 to 42 weeks of pregnancy) and during labor and delivery. THIS MEDICINE IS EXCRETED IN BREAST MILK. BREAST-FEEDING while you are using this medicine is not recommended for infants less than 1 month of age, or for infants with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency or sensitivity. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. IF YOU HAVE DIABETES MELLITUS, this medicine may cause false test results with some urine glucose tests. Check with your doctor before you adjust the dose of your diabetes medicine or change your diet. Possible Side Effects: SIDE EFFECTS, that may go away during treatment, include upset stomach, headache, loss of appetite, vomiting, dizziness, or drowsiness. If they continue or are bothersome, check with your doctor. CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE if you experience fever, chills, cough, chest pain, difficulty breathing, rash, or tingling or numbness in fingers or toes. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Overdose: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. Symptoms of overdose may include vomiting. Additional Information: DO NOT SHARE THIS MEDICINE with others for whom it was not prescribed. DO NOT USE THIS MEDICINE for other health conditions. KEEP THIS MEDICINE out of the reach of children. IF USING THIS MEDICINE FOR AN EXTENDED PERIOD OF TIME, obtain refills before your supply runs out. Answered by Nathanael Ogiamien 4 months ago.

Nitrofurantoin Mono Answered by Shonta Klein 4 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: what kind of medication is nitrofurantoin mono/mac? Answered by Serina Hackle 4 months ago.

The treatment for urinary tract infection starts with a series of consultation with your doctor. A laboratory inspection of urine is required. For milder cases of this disease, the use of antibacterial drugs is sufficient. Examples of such drugs are Bactrim, Amoxil, and Cipro. Doctors usually recommend that these drugs are taken within a couple of weeks in order to suppress the infection in the urethra and prevent the kidneys from being affected. Other drugs that can be used to treat UTI are Periostat and Achromycin. Additionally, patients suffering from urinary tract infection are advised not to soak in the bath tub as the water and the scents placed in it could further irritate the urethra. Take a shower instead of using the bath tub. It is also important to urinate often if you have UTI to eliminate the bacteria. Keeping it in may exacerbate the condition as urine is mainly composed of wastes. Answered by Jeanelle Stoeckel 4 months ago.

nitrofurantoin mono/mac is an anti- infective mostly used to treat or prevent infections of the urinary tract. Answered by Eleanora Kais 4 months ago.

It is a urinary tract anti-infective, antibiotic. It is used for pyelonephritis, pyelitis, and cystitis. If you were prescribed this drug I would think you have a bladder/UTI infection. Hope you feel better soon. Answered by Judy Langstaff 4 months ago.

it was prescribed for me for an episode of infection in both lower legs due to vascular insufficiency Answered by Jesse Meylor 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
073652/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
073671/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
073696/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
073696/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
073696/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
074336/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
074336/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
074336/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
074967/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
074967/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
077025/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
080003/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080003/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080043/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080043/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080078/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
080078/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080447/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 50MG
080447/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
084085/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
084326/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
084326/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
085796/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 100MG
085797/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN TABLET/ORAL 50MG
091095/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
091095/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
091095/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
201355/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per 5ML
201679/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per 5ML
201693/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per 5ML
201722/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
201722/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
201722/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
205180/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016620/001 MACRODANTIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
016620/002 MACRODANTIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
016620/003 MACRODANTIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
070248/001 NITROFURANTOIN MACROCRYSTALLINE NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
070249/001 NITROFURANTOIN MACROCRYSTALLINE NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
073652/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
073671/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
073696/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
073696/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
073696/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
074336/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
074336/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
074336/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
074967/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
074967/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
077025/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
091095/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
091095/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
091095/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG
201722/001 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 25MG
201722/002 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 50MG
201722/003 NITROFURANTOIN NITROFURANTOIN, MACROCRYSTALLINE CAPSULE/ORAL 100MG

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