Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 017546/001.

Names and composition

"NIPRIDE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017546/001 NIPRIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017546/001 NIPRIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL
018450/001 NITROPRESS SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
018581/001 SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
070031/001 SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL
070566/001 NITROPRESS SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL
071555/001 NITROPRESS SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 50MG per VIAL
071961/001 NITROPRESS SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
073465/001 SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
207426/001 SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
207499/001 SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
208635/001 SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 25MG per ML
209387/001 NIPRIDE RTU IN SODIUM CHLORIDE 0.9% SODIUM NITROPRUSSIDE SOLUTION/IV (INFUSION) 50MG per 100ML (0.5MG per ML)

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Answered questions

A hypertensive patient weigh 165 lbs. His physician prescribed Nipride 3 mcg/kg/minute,IV. To administer,?
50 mg of Nipride has to be added to a 250 ml solution of D5W. This solution would contain a concentration of Nipride,_______mcg/ml. Using an infusion pump, the nurse would set the flow rate at _____ml/hr? Please can you give the answer and how to calculate it!!! Asked by Van Pickenpaugh 1 year ago.

do your own homework, it's how you learn. Answered by Whitney Morelli 1 year ago.


Why mix nipride in d5w?
Asked by Julissa Mcaloon 1 year ago.

the answer is in the link I provided. Go, look it up! Answered by Chrystal Lohwasser 1 year ago.


Complete this Pt weighs 185 pounds Nipride 50mg/250ml D5W 1mcg/kg/min & 0.5 mcg/kg/min find ml/hr for each?
i have 1mcg/kg/min= 25.2ml/hr 0.5mcg/kg/min=12.6 ml/hr and i was wondering if these were right Asked by Luanna Benckendorf 1 year ago.

do your own homework Answered by Peter Naff 1 year ago.

I'm not doing your homework for you! Read your book, stay awake in class and Ask your instructor for help!! Answered by Garret Humm 1 year ago.

Your answers are correct. Go to the head of the class. Answered by Jennifer Beveridge 1 year ago.


Nipride 2 mcg/kg/min has been ordered for a 78 kg patient. the solution has a strength of 50 mg/250 mL D5W.?
-----------dosage/ min and --------mL/hr flow rate Asked by Juana Ferdico 1 year ago.

2 mcg x 78 = 156 mcg/min 156 mcg = 0.156 mg/min 50 mg divided by 250 ml = 0.2 mg/ml Formula: mg/min x 60 min. divided by mg/ml= ml/hour 0.156 mg/min x 60 = 9.36 mg/hr divided by 0.2 mg/ml = 46.8 ml/hr 46.8 ml/hr divided by 60 = 0.78 ml/min Check: __9.36 mg__ = __50 mg__ ******x*************250 ml*** 9.36 x 250 = 2340 divided by 50 = 46.8 ml Answered by Matilde Vangorder 1 year ago.

The math is simple enough if you just give yourself a break and get everything into the same units. You can think of your dose as about 160 mcg/min if you want, or about 9 or 10 mg/hr (whichever you feel better with). You can think of the nitroprusside hidden in that bag as 200 mg/l or 200 mcg/ml. As long as you're figuring using mg with both, or mcg with both, and not trying to mix the two, you can do the math. Answered by Roberta Guldemond 1 year ago.

(2mcg/kg/min)*78kg = 156mcg/min We form a ratio, we want 156 mcg in one minute, our given solution is 50mg/250ml or 50000mcg/250ml 156mcg/Xml = 50000mcg/250ml solve for X, you might find X = 0.78, which mean you infuse 0.78ml/min. There are 60minutes in an hour so (60min/hr)*(0.78ml/min) = 46.8ml/hour. Please check for errors. Answered by Jessie Glanzer 1 year ago.


Order: Nipride 100mg in 500 mL 5% D/W, IV infuse a flow rate of 18 µgtt/min. How many milliliters per hour is?
DO THIS WITH WORKING.... Asked by Kelsie Pauley 1 year ago.

What is the drop factor conversion for the IV set you are using? EDIT: I am going to assume a mini-drip set with 60gtts/ml. ALWAYS include the units when doing calculations. Set up your problem first and cancel out the units. If you are left with the units needed, your set-up is probably correct. Set-up: 18gtts/min x 1ml/60gtts x 60min/hr Cancel out the min and gtts and you are left with ml/hr Cancel out the 60 You are left with 18ml/hr Trick of the trade: A set with a drip rate of 60gtts/ml is a direct conversion from gtts/min to ml/hr ie. 100gtts/min = 100ml/hr If you have any questions you can email me. Answered by Santo Keeley 1 year ago.

This is a math problems where you divide the total amount by the time 500 ml / 4 hours = 125 ml per hour Answered by Melody Vallee 1 year ago.


Need help on a Advanced intravenous calculation for dosage calculation for medical admin class?
thank you daddyrx. i just kept confusing myself. and the client thing, thats how the paper worded it. thanks again. happy thanksgiving Asked by Soledad Potes 1 year ago.

Please, we don't treat clients, we treat patients. Weight in Kg: 120lbs * 1kg/2.2lbs = 54.55kg A) 54.55kg * 2mcg/kg/min = 109.1mcg/min 1mg = 1000mcg 109.1mcg * 1mg/1000mcg = 0.1091mg or 0.11mg/min B) 0.11mg/min * 250ml/50mg * 60min/1hr [the mg and min cancel out leaving ml/hr] (0.11mg * 250ml * 60min) / (1min * 50mg * 1hr) 33ml/hr If you have any questions, just email me. Answered by Remedios Basich 1 year ago.


Attention ICU and Cardiac Nurses?
I am looking for the name of a med that was hung on my aunt to fight renal and CHF in the ICU. IT had to be kept cool and she could not be on it for >72hours. It began with NES....I think. It is not nipride or nitroglycerin. The jist that the Rn told me was that it would help re strengthen her heart (her E/F... Asked by Cherri Hudman 1 year ago.

I am looking for the name of a med that was hung on my aunt to fight renal and CHF in the ICU. IT had to be kept cool and she could not be on it for >72hours. It began with NES....I think. It is not nipride or nitroglycerin. The jist that the Rn told me was that it would help re strengthen her heart (her E/F is 10%). I would like to look up more information. thanks Answered by Ardelle Lanzarin 1 year ago.

Nesiritide also known as Natrecor. It doesn't help strengthen the heart, but is commonly used in heart failure to promote diuresis. Answered by Rona Vose 1 year ago.


What would you give to a patient with CHF...?
Yes, Nitro is a vasodilator...thats why its used in CHF situations. Veins open allowing fluid from the lungs to empty. I'm not sure what you're protocols are, but here we give it. Asked by Heath Chio 1 year ago.

Obviously, nitro is one of the first meds given. But have any doctors, medics or nurses etc been a situation where there blood pressure dropped to dangerous levels after administration? Whats the recommended procedure, you wouldn't want to give them fluids because the duration of nitro is so short and you'd probably kill them when it wears off. Trandelenburg? I dunno...just curious, sounds like a tough situation. Answered by Virgil Huckstep 1 year ago.

I agree with my colleagues. Lasix is first line. In critical care areas, drips such as nipride, nitroglycerin, or dopamine are used. In REALLY sick patients, I've seen dopamine or dobutamine AND nitro or nipride. Talk about confusing! It gets quite complicated, but they don't cancel each other out. Answered by Portia Ruscher 1 year ago.

Nitro For Chf Answered by Wanita Robbert 1 year ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What would you give to a patient with CHF...? Obviously, nitro is one of the first meds given. But have any doctors, medics or nurses etc been a situation where there blood pressure dropped to dangerous levels after administration? Whats the recommended procedure, you wouldn't want to give them fluids because the duration of nitro is so... Answered by Dorsey Locklier 1 year ago.

If the patient is in fluid overload in the setting of CHF then a diuretic like furosemide (Lasix) is usually given to remove water and thereby allow the heart to pump against less volume. Diuretics will also lower the blood pressure. If the patient is having dyspnea then noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (CPAP, BiPAP) can be used. In the setting of hypotension a vasopressor and inotrope can be used to increase cardiac output. Answered by Luigi Hofhine 1 year ago.

Nitro is not given to patient with CHF. It's a vasodilator used in CAD or angina associated with CAD. The patient can be titrated on digitalis to improve cardiac output and additional short acting vasopressors can be given until the patient is stabilized. If the patient has no significant adema fluids can be given too. Additionally, if the situation warrants the patient can have a cardiac assist pump implanted. Answered by Stefani Kilbride 1 year ago.

I would ask your doctor, since the restrictions for all CHF patients might not be the same. In general NSAIDS (like ibuprofen, naproxen and the like) are not a good idea because they will cause your diuretics to work less well and thereby you will retain fluid. It is not a good idea to take them and increase your diuretics, by the way, because doing so could damage your kidneys. Do not take more aspirin than you are being told to take anyway (probably something between 81 mg and 325 mg per day) for your heart. Aspirin in the amounts used for headaches and aches and pains can also decrease diuretic effectiveness. For mild aches and pains, over the counter Tylenol (generic is acetaminophen) is OK, but avoid combinations with other ingredients. Steer clear of anything labelled "Sinus". Also you should avoid the same sorts of drugs as people with hypertension need to avoid. So things like over the counter cold meds that contain pseudophedrine or other "decongestants." Plain antihistamines are generally OK, but avoid the ones with "D" in their name. Plain Claritin (generic is loratadine) is probably OK unless your doctor has some other reason for you not to take it (I don't know everything you are taking) , but avoid Claritin D which contains the decongestant. Mucinex is also most probably OK (plain extended release guaifenesin tablet), but watch out for the combinations like Mucinex D which again contains the decongestant. Also if you have CHF you are probably taking something like an ACEI (ace inhibitor) or ARB (angiotensin receptor blocker) or spironolactone (Aldactone). These medications tend to conserve or raise blood levels of potassium. Be careful about low sodium foods like low sodium tomato juice and low sodium V8 since these foods tend to replace the sodium with potassium and it is easy to get too much potassium from them. Also don't take over the counter potassium supplement unless your doctor OKs it. High potassium is dangerous because it causes heart rhythm problems and in extreme elevations can stop the heart from beating. Many patients with CHF are also taking warfarin or coumadin. If you are taking one of these, the people regulating your protime (medication dosage) should instruct you about what foods and meds to avoid .. Also if you are taking coumadin or warfarin, make sure that anyone who prescribes antibiotics for you is aware of this. Some antibiotics like Cipro and Septra can affect the metabolism of these drugs and the protime (PT/INR) will get too long (blood gets too thin) which can cause bleeding). Since every heart patient is different and may be on different combinations of medications, there is no one list of drugs that everyone should avoid. It's important that anyone who prescribes medications for you know everything you are taking, so that they can avoid unexpected interactions (It's possible to look interactions up in a book, but there are softwear programs that do it for you. If you get all your medications at one pharmacy or pharmacy chain, their record-keeping softwear will most probably alert the pharmacist about signficant interactions.) Also don't forget that if you are unsure about an OTC med, you can ask your pharmacist if it is OK to take with your other prescriptions. They most probably can assist you with that. Hope this is helpfull. Answered by Kimi Ehrle 1 year ago.

From a historical standpoint: In the 1960s we used rotating tourniquets to reduce blood return to the heart, loosening one every 15 minutes, putting it on the un-tourniqueted extremity; gave a shot of mercurhydrin as a diuretic, and then cedilanid, a rapid acting form of digitalis. Sometimes we also gave the patient iv aminophylline very slowly. Quite different from the procedures followed today. Answered by Karey Humber 1 year ago.

IN the ER we diuresis the excess fluids off the lungs with a good dose of lasix. We want several liters in urine. We do not give nipride or nitro (which is for chest pain). Not sure where you practice. Answered by Olympia Nabavian 1 year ago.

Well new studies actually prove that giving fluids are becoming a problem. It is better to keep somebody barley alive then to pump them with fluids. Heart Monitor, and prepare for them to code is the best you can really do with EMS. That's all I can put into this. Answered by Jenniffer Jenning 1 year ago.

Are you thinking of acute pulmonary oedema? You give nitro to them. But congestive heart failure you treat with frusemide acutely, and ace-inhibitors and beta blockers to improve heart function. Answered by Ashanti Hippler 1 year ago.


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