NIFEDIPINE Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 072409/001.

Names and composition

"NIFEDIPINE" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NIFEDIPINE.
It belongs to the class Calcium-channel blockers and is used in Hypertension (Cardiovascular System)

Answered questions

Anyone been on Nifedipine?
Has anyone taken this for pre-term labor to stop contractions? just curious as to what happened once you stopped taking it! Asked by Tina Ni 3 months ago.

Do not stop taking nifedipine without first talking to your doctor, even if you begin to feel better. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. Do not crush, chew, or break any form of nifedipine. Swallow the pills whole. Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. What is nifedipine? Nifedipine is in a class of drugs called calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine relaxes (widens) your blood vessels (veins and arteries), which makes it easier for the heart to pump and reduces its workload. Nifedipine is used to lower hypertension (high blood pressure) and to treat angina (chest pain). Nifedipine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking nifedipine? Before taking nifedipine, tell your doctor if you have ■kidney disease; ■liver disease; ■another disease of the heart or blood vessels such as sick sinus syndrome, aortic stenosis, heart failure, low blood pressure, or coronary artery disease. You may not be able to take nifedipine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. Nifedipine is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether nifedipine will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take nifedipine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment. Nifedipine passes into breast milk. Do not take nifedipine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 65 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from nifedipine. Your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of this medication. How should I take nifedipine? Take nifedipine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. Take each dose with a full glass of water. Adalat CC should be taken on an empty stomach. Do not crush, chew, or break any form of nifedipine. Swallow the pills whole. Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Occasionally, the Procardia XL tablet shell may be seen in the stool. This is not harmful. The medicine has been absorbed by the body and the tablet shell is designed to be eliminated in the stool. Do not stop taking nifedipine without first talking to your doctor, even if you begin to feel better. If you stop taking the medication, your condition could become worse. Store nifedipine at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication. What happens if I overdose? Seek emergency medical attention. Symptoms of a nifedipine overdose include dizziness, weakness, chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting, an unusually fast or slow heartbeat, coma, slurred speech, and confusion. What should I avoid while taking nifedipine? Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. Use caution when you stand or sit up from a lying position, especially if you wake up during the night. You may become dizzy when changing positions. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking nifedipine. What are the possible side effects of nifedipine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking nifedipine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: ■an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); ■unusually fast or slow heartbeats; ■severe dizziness or fainting; ■psychosis; ■yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice); or ■swelling of the legs or ankles. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take nifedipine and talk to your doctor if you experience ■headache, fatigue, or tiredness; ■flushing; ■insomnia; ■vivid or abnormal dreams; ■nausea or c Answered by Ardelle Thury 3 months ago.

ask the doc Answered by Brittny Gomes 3 months ago.


High Blood Pressure medication Nifedipine, what are the side effect?
Hi, i am on Nifedipine 20 mg twice a day on morning and evening for my high blood pressure. Nifedipine is a belong a to group of high blood pressure medication calcium blocker, on a long term usage will it has any serious side effect on the body and will it effect my bone density on long run? thanks Asked by Daniele Drescher 3 months ago.

Nifedipine is generic for Adalat or Procardia or Procardia XL What should I avoid while taking nifedipine? Do not consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice during treatment with nifedipine. Nifedipine can interact with grapefruit and grapefruit juice, and the interaction may have dangerous effects. You should discuss the use of grapefruit and grapefruit juice with your doctor. Follow any recommendations your doctor makes about diet or exercise. Use caution when you stand or sit up from a lying position, especially if you wake up during the night. You may become dizzy when changing positions. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may further lower blood pressure and increase drowsiness or dizziness while taking nifedipine. What are the possible side effects of nifedipine? If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking nifedipine and contact your doctor immediately or seek emergency medical treatment: an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); unusually fast or slow heartbeats; severe dizziness or fainting; psychosis; yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice); or swelling of the legs or ankles. Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take nifedipine and talk to your doctor if you experience headache, fatigue, or tiredness; flushing; insomnia; vivid or abnormal dreams; nausea or constipation; or increased urination. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect nifedipine? Before taking nifedipine, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: another heart medication to treat the same or another condition; cimetidine (Tagamet, Tagamet HB); erythromycin (E-Mycin, E.E.S., Eryc, Ery-Tab, others); itraconazole (Sporanox) or ketoconazole (Nizoral); carbamazepine (Tegretol); phenytoin (Dilantin); or rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane) or rifabutin (Mycobutin). You may not be able to take nifedipine, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with nifedipine or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products. Now, here comes the numerous controversies. A lot of articles stated that pts on CCB (calcium channel blockers) such as Nifepidine(Procardia) , Verpamil,(Calan) Diltiazem (Cardizem) shouldn't be taking calcium supplements. Calcium supplements ( may contain lead) may also decrease the efficacy of calcium channel . However, other studies suggested that Inadequate calcium intake may contribute to accelerated bone loss and density. .There is an ongoing debate whether these calcium channel blockers increase the risks of heart attacks.; as these meds block the transport of calcium across the muscle cell membrane. Calcium. Calcium regulates the tone of the smooth muscles lining blood vessels, and population studies have found that people who have sufficient dietary calcium have lower blood pressure than those who do not. Hypertension itself increases calcium loss from the body. The effects of extra calcium on blood pressure, however, are mixed with some even showing higher pressure. Effects of Anti-Hypertensive Drugs on Exercise. Certain anti-hypertensive medications, including diuretics and beta-blockers, can interfere with exercise capacity. ACE inhibitors or calcium-channel blockers are the best drugs for active individuals. However, patients who must take drugs that interfere somewhat with exercise capability should still adhere to an exercise program and consult a physician on how best to balance medications with exercise. Dash Diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) is rcommended for Hypertensive pts. It's low salt to avoid more potassium loss. It's rich in fruits and vegetables. and nutrients and calcium obtained from foods naturally. They also contain other nutirents such as potassium and magnesium which help in the absorption of Ca. The site below also mentioned no bone loss: Times Leader | 01/23/2007 | Blood pressure medicine will not cause bone ... Blood pressure medicine will not cause bone loss Ask Dr. H ... Norvasc is in the class of blood pressure medications called "calcium channel blockers. ...www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/l... Answered by Zulema Soo 3 months ago.

3 years ago, I was diagnosed - hypertension with a reading of 160/100. I used to feel dizzy a lot, my legs had awful cramps, and levels were very low in my potassium, causing my fingers and toes to always cramp together. One day I started to feel really faint while I was driving with my daughter in the back seat and I passed out, hitting 3 cars and ending up in a ditch. That moment,I knew I had to do something because my meds weren't working. I heard about this diet from a friend and thought I'd give it a shot. The results have been remarkable. In just 21 days, I honestly can't remember feeling this good, my blood pressure went from 175/110 to 125/70. Answered by Mark Ranildi 3 months ago.

Nifedipine Side Effects Answered by Kurt Keslar 3 months ago.

I found a great link for you on long term uses of Captopril (Nifedipine), and I am a nurse, and I have seen patients on this for the rest of their of life, no bad side effects become of it. As far as bone density, you will just need to take a multi-vitamin that has calcium in it just to keep your calcium level up. I hope this article helps and good luck. Answered by Earle Lampman 3 months ago.

Hey guys, The best progress that I have ever had was with Rays perfect remedy (just google it) Without a doubt the most incredible results that I have ever had for diabetes. Answered by Bok Wamsley 3 months ago.

like both, fruits: berries, oatmeal, pears, peaches, dragonfruit, pomegranate.... Vegetables: CUCUMBERS, bok choy, green beans, broccoli,.... We guess the two are great. Answered by Maragaret Deshazer 3 months ago.


Can Nifedipine be addicting?
Hey I'm 15 years old and I just recently started taking Nifedipine to help the blood in my feet and toes. At first I was told by the doctor to take 1 pill, 3 times a day, so a total of 3 pills a day. Unfortunately because the pills weren't working too well, he raised it to 2 and then to 3. Now I"m... Asked by Thomas Glandon 3 months ago.

Hey I'm 15 years old and I just recently started taking Nifedipine to help the blood in my feet and toes. At first I was told by the doctor to take 1 pill, 3 times a day, so a total of 3 pills a day. Unfortunately because the pills weren't working too well, he raised it to 2 and then to 3. Now I"m taking 3 pills, 3 times a day so a total of 9 pills daily. My parents are worried that I'll get addicted to these pills and highly depend on them for the rest of my life. Does anyone know if this is true? Thank you in advance (: Answered by Ali Foutz 3 months ago.

NIFEDIPINE (nye FED i peen) is a calcium-channel blocker. It affects the amount of calcium found in your heart and muscle cells. This relaxes your blood vessels, which can reduce the amount of work the heart has to do. This medicine is used to treat high blood pressure and chest pain caused by angina. This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions. What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine? They need to know if you have any of these conditions: •heart problems, low blood pressure, slow or irregular heartbeat •kidney disease •liver disease •previous heart attack •an unusual or allergic reaction to nifedipine, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives •pregnant or trying to get pregnant •breast-feeding How should I use this medicine? Take this medicine by mouth with a glass of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Do not cut, crush or chew. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often then directed. Do not suddenly stop taking this medicine. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose will be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects. Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed. Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once. NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others. What if I miss a dose? If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses. What may interact with this medicine? •barbiturates, like phenobarbital •cimetidine •diuretics •grapefruit juice •local or general anesthetics •medicines for high blood pressure or heart problems •warfarin This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine. What should I watch for while using this medicine? Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular check ups. Check your blood pressure and pulse rate regularly. Ask your doctor or health care professional what your blood pressure and pulse rate should be and when you should contact him or her. You may get drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Alcohol may interfere with the effect of this medicine. Avoid alcoholic drinks. If you are taking Procardia XL, you may notice the empty shell of the tablet in your stool. What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine? Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible: •blood in the urine •difficulty breathing •fast heartbeat, palpitations, irregular heartbeat, chest pain •redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth •reduced amount of urine passed •skin rash •swelling of the legs and ankles Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome): •constipation •facial flushing •headache •weakness or tiredness This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Where should I keep my medicine? Keep out of the reach of children. Store at room temperature below 30 degrees C (86 degrees F). Protect from moisture and humidity. Keep container tightly closed. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date. This is what the net said about nifedipine. Your prescription should of came with paper work saying all this information and it would of told if it had addictive propertities. All your parents had to do was read the paper work or ask your doctor. Answered by Noe Hoskie 3 months ago.

yes, very addicted. I have another account that is on level 7. I made a back up account just in case. Answered by Oma Glatzel 3 months ago.


How long do nifedipine withdrawal symptoms last?
Asked by Jolynn Rousso 3 months ago.

Nifedipine is used to treat high blood pressure and to control angina (chest pain). Nifedipine is in a class of medications called calcium-channel blockers. It works by relaxing the blood vessels so the heart does not have to pump as hard. It also increases the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart. Nifedipine controls high blood pressure and chest pain (angina) but does not cure them. Continue to take nifedipine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking nifedipine without talking to your doctor. Your doctor will probably decrease your dose gradually. Consult your doctor or a pharmacist. Answered by Stevie Wojtowich 3 months ago.

Extremely good question, hopefully we will get some good opinions Answered by Shirl Lanzi 3 months ago.


How long does it take to achieve effective Nifedipine levels?
Hi,I have started taking two Nifedipine 5mg capsules daily, for the past two weeks, as prescribed by my doctor. I was wondering if anyone would know when the Nifedipine should achieve an effective level in my body?I gather this is variable from person to person, but for your information I am a 15 year old male,... Asked by Renata Kudasik 3 months ago.

Hi, I have started taking two Nifedipine 5mg capsules daily, for the past two weeks, as prescribed by my doctor. I was wondering if anyone would know when the Nifedipine should achieve an effective level in my body? I gather this is variable from person to person, but for your information I am a 15 year old male, 5' 9 and around 12 st. Thanks. Answered by Charlie Stofferan 3 months ago.


Does a doctor have to prescribe nifedipine or can i just go in and buy in from a chemist?
and is it good at stoping hands turning purple/blue. called rynaus Asked by Refugio Pribish 3 months ago.

Nifedipine is an anti hypertensiveve, i.e. a medicine used to control blood pressure. If you've been prescribed it by a physician/ cardiologist, once its over, for continuing the therapy ( because once anti hypertensives are started they've to be taken life long), you can buy it from a chemist. but if somebody who is not a specialist suggests you this medicine, never buy it from a chemist shop. Answered by Linwood Peyatt 3 months ago.


Are nimodipine and nifedipine the same medicine?
hospital ordered the first medicine but pharamacy gave me the second medicine is the same or generic or do i need to go to emergency room Asked by Ester Collie 3 months ago.

No they are not the same medication, however they are in the same class of medications called dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers. Nimodipine is very rarely used as an anti-hypertensive medication, and is used primarily for cerebral hemorrhaging, or hemorrhagic stroke (brain bleeding) to stop the influx of calcium into the hemorrhaging cranial blood vessel, thus attempting to control the bleed. Nifedipine would work for this too, as would any dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker. Nifedipine is primarily used in the treatment of hypertension. It is also used in obstetrics to slow down premature uterine contractions. If nifedipine is used for blood pressure control, it is recommended that it is used in the extended release form. This is because the immediate release form of nifedipine, when dumped as a single dose into the system, will act as a calcium channel blocker, but it has a side effect that no other dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers cause, reflex tachycardia. So both of these drugs are in the same class or family, but they are different drugs, with different uses, and different range of pharmacological efficacy. If you had a cranial bleed, and they prescribed you nimodipine, and the pharmacy dispensed you nifedipine, you either need to go back to the pharmacy and let them know of their mistake, and let them get you the correct medication; or if you are starting to experience symptoms again, then you might need to visit the ER, it all depends on how you're feeling, but the pharmacy and your Dr need to be informed of the misfill, so that you can get the right medication, and documentation that might prolong your treatment. I hope this gets taken care of swiftly, and that you haven't suffered adverse effects from the misfill. Answered by Siobhan Jorda 3 months ago.


I am 32 weeks and on nifedipine to stop my contractions ...is this medication hurting me lil man?
i have contraction still with taking the med.. can he come anytime??? Asked by Marge Kauo 3 months ago.

Hi! I am still on Nifedipine (Procardia). I was put on it after I went into the hospital for preterm labor at 32 weeks. So I can relate to you! I did a little bit of reading on the subject of preterm labor, and I read that this drug is newer and much safer than previous drugs used to stop contractions. It actually dialates the blood vessels and lower your blood pressure to relax your uterine muscle. I still get contractions ocassionally, but it's mostly because i am moving around too much. Usually, I drink a lot of water and lay down on my left side and they subside after a while. I am on the 90mg once-a-day pill. I've ocasionally had to take the next pill an hour or 2 early because contractions will start. Are you on bedrest with it? I am. In any case, no this medicine isn't affecting your baby- only you. He will be fine! The best thing for him is to relax and spend his time finishing up his developments inside you! And if you are contracting a lot, it could stress him out and cause you to give birth prematurely. Take care hon and relax! I'm 36 weeks 5 days now and almost done with my meds, and baby is doing very well! You will get through this! =) Answered by Henry Boleware 3 months ago.

The longer he stays in, the more mature/healthy he will be. That said, 32 weeks is decently mature. The doctor(s) may want to check how developed his lungs are, to decide if its worth trying to continue to stop the contractions or if it'd be better to let him come. There are lots of different factors in that decision. Talk with your doctor(s), and ask them to explain as much as they can. Answered by Emilie Winnie 3 months ago.

nifepidine is a tocolytic drug (agents that prevent premature labor). It is one of the most common agent given to pregnant women for that reason. The drug is approved for treatment of heart disease and blood pressure and its use in pregnancy is an off-label use. Your doctor may also give you steroidal drugs for faster maturation of your baby's lungs so that he is ready for an early delivery. Read up the information in the link, elsewhere and then talk to your doctor. You have to be your own advocate (and baby's). Good luck! Answered by Tracie Snoderly 3 months ago.

I don't know about the meds your taking, but if your doc prescribed them, then I'm sure they are safe. I hope your on bed rest. It is ideal to make it to at least 36 months, 38 is better. hope all goes well. Answered by Amberly Foose 3 months ago.


Did anyone take nifedipine to stop preterm labor?
How long after you stopped taking it did you go into labor?I took nifedipine for 3 days at 27 weeks because I was having contractions. Thank God I only took them for 3 days and they stopped. I'm now 34w4d and again started having frequent contractions so I started the med again and they have stopped..I'm... Asked by Eldora Kendrew 3 months ago.

How long after you stopped taking it did you go into labor? I took nifedipine for 3 days at 27 weeks because I was having contractions. Thank God I only took them for 3 days and they stopped. I'm now 34w4d and again started having frequent contractions so I started the med again and they have stopped..I'm wondering until how many weeks I will take this and when I leave the nifedipine how long does it usually take for labor to start? Thanks Answered by Clotilde Dilox 3 months ago.

Well as im sure you know, nifedipine stops contractions, so if you have no contractions, you cant really dilate. So pretty much whenever you are contracting, and don't take this medicine, you could start labor as soon as you start contracting. I was put on nifedipine when I was 35 weeks pregnant and had to take it every time I felt as if I were having contractions. I took a pill at almost 36 weeks and after an hour the pill diidnt stop my contractions so I went to the hospital and they gave me 2 shots of steroids in my butt for the babys lungs in case I went into preterm labor. But eventually the contractions stopped and I was good to go home. When I was 38 weeks along I started to feel them again, (only this time I was considered full term so I didnt take the meds). I waited until they were about 3-4 minutes apart. (about an hour or two after they started) went to the hospital and I was 6 cm dilated and 100% effaced. Got my epidural and had my baby girl a few hours later. Answered by Van Sepeda 3 months ago.

Nifedipine or Procardia is a calcium channel blocker as a rule used to regard angina or high blood pressure. However, in being pregnant it is vitally as a rule used to regard preterm exertions as it could possibly sluggish or quit uterine contractions. It has been used for lots of, a long time in pregnant females and there used to be an vast research performed on it is results in the course of being pregnant. All drugs, even Tylenol have facet results. Just watch your BP and middle cost to be certain they do not get too low.( in a variety your healthcare professional can provide you ) I labored as an OB nurse for awhile and the healthcare professional I labored for used it alot for preterm later. YOu are best 28 wks so it is nice to check out to lengthen your youngster's keep in utero for awhile as he has alot of constructing but to do. Good good fortune, you're going to be first-class. Answered by Victor Mcguigan 3 months ago.


Have you ever taken NIFEDIPINE to stop contractions?
Im 33 weeks pregnant and have been have major contractions so my doctor put me on NIFEDIPINE to help stop my contractions. Today is the first time ive taken the pills and I feel so weird when Im on them. My head feels like a Bobble Head and Im so loopy and I just feel weird. If youv ever taken this before did... Asked by Ernie Appelgren 3 months ago.

Im 33 weeks pregnant and have been have major contractions so my doctor put me on NIFEDIPINE to help stop my contractions. Today is the first time ive taken the pills and I feel so weird when Im on them. My head feels like a Bobble Head and Im so loopy and I just feel weird. If youv ever taken this before did you feel the same thing? Im concidering stopping taking the pills because of how it makes me feel but then I know that it's helping me not have this baby this early. 7 weeks early isn't good on an Infant. So, please let me know what you think. Should I stop taking them or should I just deal with the contractions and possibly deliver early? That's a toughy one! Answered by Yuonne Rokicki 3 months ago.

I took nifedipine for over a month when I was pregnant with my first son (2003) and it made me really jittery and it gave tachycardia (rapid heartbeat). I switched doctors after that and my new MD took me off it IMMEDIATELY, but she put me on Brethine pills to stop my contractions. I took that for 3 weeks and had my son at 36 weeks (healthy 6lbs 7oz). Don't stop taking the nifedipine until you talk to your doctor. Tell him/her how the pills are effecting you and ask what other medications are available. There are other options......... Answered by Annamarie Callow 3 months ago.

i just got put on the same drug last night and im 35 weeks...i dont think you should stop taking your pill..the doctor gave them to you for a reason...33 weeks is really early to have a baby....and you dont want to put your baby at risk...b/c delivering that early the baby wont be able to breathe and eat on its own and will need to be in ICU until baby can do those things on his own...yea i feel a little loopy on them also..but the drug is like a muscle relaxer...if you feel uncomfortable taking the drug...talk to your doctor..he/she will know something else to put you on...good luck!! Answered by Jennefer Inks 3 months ago.

I have not taken the drug, but hang in there as long as you can. The more days your baby can grow safetly within you the better. If side effects are too dramatic, contact your doc and see if there are other alternatives. Hang in there :-) Answered by Rosamond Gulbrandson 3 months ago.

i was put on this same drug when i was 30wks pregnant to help stop contractions and it helped, i didnt notice feelin funny while on it. my dr took me off the drug when i was 34 wks. now im 37 wks. i would advise you to talk to your dr before you stop taking the medicine. Answered by Melody Hervig 3 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
072409/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072556/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
072579/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072651/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072781/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
073250/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
073421/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074045/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
075108/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075269/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075269/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075289/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075289/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075414/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 90MG
075414/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
076070/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
077127/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
077127/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
077410/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
077899/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
077899/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
077899/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
090602/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
090602/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
090602/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
090649/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
090649/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
090649/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
201071/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
201071/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
201071/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
202644/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
202644/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
202987/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
202987/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
202987/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
203126/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
203126/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
203126/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
018482/001 PROCARDIA NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
018482/002 PROCARDIA NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
019478/001 ADALAT NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
019478/002 ADALAT NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
019684/001 PROCARDIA XL NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
019684/002 PROCARDIA XL NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
019684/003 PROCARDIA XL NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
020198/001 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
020198/002 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
020198/003 ADALAT CC NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
072409/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072556/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
072579/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072651/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
072781/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
073250/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
073421/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
074045/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
075108/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075128/001 AFEDITAB CR NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075269/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075269/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075289/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
075289/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
075414/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ ORAL 90MG
075414/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
075659/001 AFEDITAB CR NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
076070/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
077127/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
077127/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
077410/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
077899/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
077899/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
077899/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
090602/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
090602/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
090602/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
090649/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
090649/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
090649/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
201071/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
201071/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
201071/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
202644/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 10MG
202644/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE CAPSULE/ORAL 20MG
202987/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
202987/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
202987/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG
203126/001 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 30MG
203126/002 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 60MG
203126/003 NIFEDIPINE NIFEDIPINE TABLET, EXTENDED RELEASE/ORAL 90MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Bayer plc
Chiesi Ltd
Ranbaxy (UK) Ltd
UCB Pharma Ltd
Concordia International
Dexcel Pharma Ltd
Genus Pharmaceuticals
Winthrop Pharmaceuticals

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