Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 014214/002.

Names and composition

"NEGGRAM" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NALIDIXIC ACID.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014214/002 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 250MG
014214/004 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
014214/005 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 1GM
017430/001 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID SUSPENSION/ORAL 250MG per 5ML

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
014214/002 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 250MG
014214/004 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
014214/005 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 1GM
017430/001 NEGGRAM NALIDIXIC ACID SUSPENSION/ORAL 250MG per 5ML
070270/001 NALIDIXIC ACID NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 250MG
070271/001 NALIDIXIC ACID NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 500MG
070272/001 NALIDIXIC ACID NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 1GM
071919/001 NALIDIXIC ACID NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 1GM
071936/001 NALIDIXIC ACID NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 250MG
072061/001 NALIDIXIC ACID NALIDIXIC ACID TABLET/ORAL 500MG

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Answered questions

Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Bula Paschke 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Jodee Wooddell 1 year ago.


What exactly is a BLISTER?
I mean, I know what one is, I have two huge ones at the moment from my silly black boots... but WHAT is it..? Asked by Yung Padamadan 1 year ago.

A blister is a bubble of fluid under the skin. The clear, watery liquid inside a blister is called serum. It leaks in from neighboring tissues as a reaction to injured skin. If the blister remains unopened, serum can provide natural protection for the skin beneath it. Small blisters are called vesicles. Those larger than half an inch are called bullae. A blood blister is filled with blood, rather than serum. There are many causes of blisters, including: Irritation — Blisters can be caused by physical factors that irritate the skin, such as friction (rubbing the skin), irritating chemicals or extreme cold or heat. Blisters on the feet can result from shoes that are either too tight or rub the skin in one particular area. Blisters also can be caused by contact dermatitis, a skin reaction to some type of chemical irritant. Intense cold can trigger frostbite, which often leads to blisters once the skin is rewarmed. Any type of burn, even sunburn, also can cause blisters. Allergies — Allergic contact dermatitis, a form of dermatitis or eczema, may result in blisters. Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by an allergy to a chemical or poison, such as poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac. Infections — Infections that cause blisters include bullous impetigo, an infection of the skin caused by staphylococci (staph) bacteria; viral infections of the lips and genital area due to the herpes simplex virus (types 1 and 2); chickenpox and shingles, which are caused by the varicella zoster virus; and coxsackievirus infections, which are more common in childhood. Skin diseases — Numerous skin diseases cause blisters. Examples include dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigoid and pemphigus. There also are inherited forms of blistering skin conditions, such as epidermolysis bullosa (in which pressure or trauma commonly leads to blisters) and porphyria cutanea tarda (in which sun exposure provokes blisters). Medications — Many medications, such as nalidixic acid (NegGram) and furosemide (Lasix), can cause mild, blistering skin reactions. Others, such as the doxycycline (Vibramycin), can increase the risk of blistering sunburn by increasing the skin's sensitivity to sunlight. In more dramatic cases, medications can trigger more severe, even life-threatening, blistering disorders, such as erythema multiforme or toxic epidermal necrolysis, also known as TEN, an illness that causes severe skin damage and typically involves 30% or more of the body's surface. i hope this helps Answered by Porfirio Senato 1 year ago.

I can reply this. :) In first grade, i used to be swinging at the monkey bars of my college's playground. I obtained off and that i noticed that there have been spots that we stretched. and quickly sufficient, it grew to be a bubble. I feel it is stretched dermis, and air begins to fill it in. Which i don't have any concept, the way it does that. lol. Answered by Sonny Vongal 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Yuriko Lataquin 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Letty Mettee 1 year ago.


What exactly is a BLISTER?
I mean, I know what one is, I have two huge ones at the moment from my silly black boots... but WHAT is it..? Asked by Tamar Clutter 1 year ago.

A blister is a bubble of fluid under the skin. The clear, watery liquid inside a blister is called serum. It leaks in from neighboring tissues as a reaction to injured skin. If the blister remains unopened, serum can provide natural protection for the skin beneath it. Small blisters are called vesicles. Those larger than half an inch are called bullae. A blood blister is filled with blood, rather than serum. There are many causes of blisters, including: Irritation — Blisters can be caused by physical factors that irritate the skin, such as friction (rubbing the skin), irritating chemicals or extreme cold or heat. Blisters on the feet can result from shoes that are either too tight or rub the skin in one particular area. Blisters also can be caused by contact dermatitis, a skin reaction to some type of chemical irritant. Intense cold can trigger frostbite, which often leads to blisters once the skin is rewarmed. Any type of burn, even sunburn, also can cause blisters. Allergies — Allergic contact dermatitis, a form of dermatitis or eczema, may result in blisters. Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by an allergy to a chemical or poison, such as poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac. Infections — Infections that cause blisters include bullous impetigo, an infection of the skin caused by staphylococci (staph) bacteria; viral infections of the lips and genital area due to the herpes simplex virus (types 1 and 2); chickenpox and shingles, which are caused by the varicella zoster virus; and coxsackievirus infections, which are more common in childhood. Skin diseases — Numerous skin diseases cause blisters. Examples include dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigoid and pemphigus. There also are inherited forms of blistering skin conditions, such as epidermolysis bullosa (in which pressure or trauma commonly leads to blisters) and porphyria cutanea tarda (in which sun exposure provokes blisters). Medications — Many medications, such as nalidixic acid (NegGram) and furosemide (Lasix), can cause mild, blistering skin reactions. Others, such as the doxycycline (Vibramycin), can increase the risk of blistering sunburn by increasing the skin's sensitivity to sunlight. In more dramatic cases, medications can trigger more severe, even life-threatening, blistering disorders, such as erythema multiforme or toxic epidermal necrolysis, also known as TEN, an illness that causes severe skin damage and typically involves 30% or more of the body's surface. i hope this helps Answered by Ignacio Adzhabakyan 1 year ago.

I can reply this. :) In first grade, i used to be swinging at the monkey bars of my college's playground. I obtained off and that i noticed that there have been spots that we stretched. and quickly sufficient, it grew to be a bubble. I feel it is stretched dermis, and air begins to fill it in. Which i don't have any concept, the way it does that. lol. Answered by Janett Montgomery 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Amos Stjean 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Rocky Bueno 1 year ago.


What exactly is a BLISTER?
I mean, I know what one is, I have two huge ones at the moment from my silly black boots... but WHAT is it..? Asked by Mamie Hebel 1 year ago.

A blister is a bubble of fluid under the skin. The clear, watery liquid inside a blister is called serum. It leaks in from neighboring tissues as a reaction to injured skin. If the blister remains unopened, serum can provide natural protection for the skin beneath it. Small blisters are called vesicles. Those larger than half an inch are called bullae. A blood blister is filled with blood, rather than serum. There are many causes of blisters, including: Irritation — Blisters can be caused by physical factors that irritate the skin, such as friction (rubbing the skin), irritating chemicals or extreme cold or heat. Blisters on the feet can result from shoes that are either too tight or rub the skin in one particular area. Blisters also can be caused by contact dermatitis, a skin reaction to some type of chemical irritant. Intense cold can trigger frostbite, which often leads to blisters once the skin is rewarmed. Any type of burn, even sunburn, also can cause blisters. Allergies — Allergic contact dermatitis, a form of dermatitis or eczema, may result in blisters. Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by an allergy to a chemical or poison, such as poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac. Infections — Infections that cause blisters include bullous impetigo, an infection of the skin caused by staphylococci (staph) bacteria; viral infections of the lips and genital area due to the herpes simplex virus (types 1 and 2); chickenpox and shingles, which are caused by the varicella zoster virus; and coxsackievirus infections, which are more common in childhood. Skin diseases — Numerous skin diseases cause blisters. Examples include dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigoid and pemphigus. There also are inherited forms of blistering skin conditions, such as epidermolysis bullosa (in which pressure or trauma commonly leads to blisters) and porphyria cutanea tarda (in which sun exposure provokes blisters). Medications — Many medications, such as nalidixic acid (NegGram) and furosemide (Lasix), can cause mild, blistering skin reactions. Others, such as the doxycycline (Vibramycin), can increase the risk of blistering sunburn by increasing the skin's sensitivity to sunlight. In more dramatic cases, medications can trigger more severe, even life-threatening, blistering disorders, such as erythema multiforme or toxic epidermal necrolysis, also known as TEN, an illness that causes severe skin damage and typically involves 30% or more of the body's surface. i hope this helps Answered by Keiko Dirollo 1 year ago.

I can reply this. :) In first grade, i used to be swinging at the monkey bars of my college's playground. I obtained off and that i noticed that there have been spots that we stretched. and quickly sufficient, it grew to be a bubble. I feel it is stretched dermis, and air begins to fill it in. Which i don't have any concept, the way it does that. lol. Answered by Shammah 1 year ago.


Please help ten points for the best answer...what are the 38 drugs that can cause drug induced lupus?
Asked by Joseph Orwin 1 year ago.

Please note that this list is only partial - there now appear to be at least 70 meds which can cause DILE or DIL, drug-induced Lupus Erythematosis Atenolol (Tenormin) Captopril (Capoten) Carbamazepine Chlorpromazine HCl (Thorazine) Clonidine HCl (Catapres) Danazol (Danocrine) Diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren) Disopyramide (Norpace) Ethosuximide (Zarontin) Gold compounds Griseofulvin Hydralazine HCl (Apresoline) Ibuprofen Interferon alfa Isoniazid (Laniazid, Nydrazid) Labetalol HCl (Normodyne, Trandate) Leuprolide acetate (Lupron) Levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa) Lithium carbonate Lovastatin (Mevacor) Mephenytoin (Mesantoin) Methyldopa (Aldomet) Methysergide maleate (Sansert) Minoxidil (Loniten, Rogaine) Nalidixic acid (NegGram) Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin, Macrobid, Macrodantin) Oral contraceptives Penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen) Penicillin Phenelzine sulfate (Nardil) Phenytoin sodium (Dilantin) Prazosin (Minipress) Primidone (Mysoline) Procainamide HCl (Procan, Pronestyl) Promethazine HCl (Anergan, Phenergan) Propylthiouracil Psoralen Quinidine Spironolactone (Aldactone) Streptomycin sulfate Sulindac (Clinoril) Sulfasalazine (Azulfidine) Tetracycline Thioridazine HCl (Mellaril) Timolol maleate (Betimol, Timoptic) Tolazamide (Tolinase) Tolmetin sodium (Tolectin) Trimethadione (Tridione) One thing I happened to notice is that several meds used to treat Parkinson's disease are in this list. And the problem is that although Lupus is not curable, in DILE, the symptoms are reversible once the medications are discontinued. Of course in PD, that might not be possible, The most common problems are caused by only a handful of the above. Answered by Inger Garrell 1 year ago.


What exactly is a BLISTER?
I mean, I know what one is, I have two huge ones at the moment from my silly black boots... but WHAT is it..? Asked by Margret Butzke 1 year ago.

A blister is a bubble of fluid under the skin. The clear, watery liquid inside a blister is called serum. It leaks in from neighboring tissues as a reaction to injured skin. If the blister remains unopened, serum can provide natural protection for the skin beneath it. Small blisters are called vesicles. Those larger than half an inch are called bullae. A blood blister is filled with blood, rather than serum. There are many causes of blisters, including: Irritation — Blisters can be caused by physical factors that irritate the skin, such as friction (rubbing the skin), irritating chemicals or extreme cold or heat. Blisters on the feet can result from shoes that are either too tight or rub the skin in one particular area. Blisters also can be caused by contact dermatitis, a skin reaction to some type of chemical irritant. Intense cold can trigger frostbite, which often leads to blisters once the skin is rewarmed. Any type of burn, even sunburn, also can cause blisters. Allergies — Allergic contact dermatitis, a form of dermatitis or eczema, may result in blisters. Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by an allergy to a chemical or poison, such as poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac. Infections — Infections that cause blisters include bullous impetigo, an infection of the skin caused by staphylococci (staph) bacteria; viral infections of the lips and genital area due to the herpes simplex virus (types 1 and 2); chickenpox and shingles, which are caused by the varicella zoster virus; and coxsackievirus infections, which are more common in childhood. Skin diseases — Numerous skin diseases cause blisters. Examples include dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigoid and pemphigus. There also are inherited forms of blistering skin conditions, such as epidermolysis bullosa (in which pressure or trauma commonly leads to blisters) and porphyria cutanea tarda (in which sun exposure provokes blisters). Medications — Many medications, such as nalidixic acid (NegGram) and furosemide (Lasix), can cause mild, blistering skin reactions. Others, such as the doxycycline (Vibramycin), can increase the risk of blistering sunburn by increasing the skin's sensitivity to sunlight. In more dramatic cases, medications can trigger more severe, even life-threatening, blistering disorders, such as erythema multiforme or toxic epidermal necrolysis, also known as TEN, an illness that causes severe skin damage and typically involves 30% or more of the body's surface. i hope this helps Answered by Hermine Yepes 1 year ago.

I can reply this. :) In first grade, i used to be swinging at the monkey bars of my college's playground. I obtained off and that i noticed that there have been spots that we stretched. and quickly sufficient, it grew to be a bubble. I feel it is stretched dermis, and air begins to fill it in. Which i don't have any concept, the way it does that. lol. Answered by Jamar Hee 1 year ago.


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