Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 020920/001.

Names and composition

"NATRECOR" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NESIRITIDE RECOMBINANT.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020920/001 NATRECOR NESIRITIDE RECOMBINANT FOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 1.5MG per VIAL

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
020920/001 NATRECOR NESIRITIDE RECOMBINANT FOR SOLUTION/INTRAVENOUS 1.5MG per VIAL

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Answered questions

If the hospital pt is taking Natrecor. ?
can you use the hospital pneumatic tube system if you run out of medication? Asked by Von Privalsky 1 year ago.

You're asking if the pharmacy could tube up the bag. I'd be worried about the bag leaking during transport. Answered by Myrtie Zalewski 1 year ago.

I suppose this is related to the old bar joke: Three vampires walk into a bar. The first two order a glass of blood, the third a glass of plasma. The bartender, being careful, says, "Let me be sure. That's two Bloods and one Blood Lite." Answered by Darcey Hawke 1 year ago.


A hospital patient is taking Natrecor.?
the patient's nurse calls you because she will run out of the medication in 10 minutes and does not have another bag to hang its place. you notice that you have a bag for the patient that will go up on the next run in 30 minutes. she asks you to use the hospital pneumatic tube system to get it to her sooner. what... Asked by Sharmaine Schwulst 1 year ago.

the patient's nurse calls you because she will run out of the medication in 10 minutes and does not have another bag to hang its place. you notice that you have a bag for the patient that will go up on the next run in 30 minutes. she asks you to use the hospital pneumatic tube system to get it to her sooner. what do you tell her? Answered by Jacqualine Kisner 1 year ago.

I think that you and a fellow student have posted the same question. I'd be leery due to a risk of leakage. Besides, someone could easily get it there in time. Answered by Gladis Wisnowski 1 year ago.

To check her drip rate because she's running the medicine too fast? Or to step out of her time warp because almost no one uses it anymore... Answered by Dalene Klapperich 1 year ago.


What is the effect of the hormone Cardiac Peptide on urine?
Umm... any answer would be appreciated =) Asked by Laurine Chapen 1 year ago.

If you are referring to Natrecor (nesiritide), it is a b-type natriuretic ("cardiac") pedtide. it stimulates the production of a smooth muscle relaxing agent called cyclicGMP. It is mostly used for people with acute heart failure. Effect on the urine? It should increase urine production by increasing blood flow to the glomerula of the kidneys. This is why it is contraindicated in people with low-volume heart failure. The urine would probably be more dilute (lower specific gravity). Answered by Belle Milliard 1 year ago.


Attention ICU and Cardiac Nurses?
I am looking for the name of a med that was hung on my aunt to fight renal and CHF in the ICU. IT had to be kept cool and she could not be on it for >72hours. It began with NES....I think. It is not nipride or nitroglycerin. The jist that the Rn told me was that it would help re strengthen her heart (her E/F... Asked by Jae Villari 1 year ago.

I am looking for the name of a med that was hung on my aunt to fight renal and CHF in the ICU. IT had to be kept cool and she could not be on it for >72hours. It began with NES....I think. It is not nipride or nitroglycerin. The jist that the Rn told me was that it would help re strengthen her heart (her E/F is 10%). I would like to look up more information. thanks Answered by Vannesa Aronowitz 1 year ago.

Nesiritide also known as Natrecor. It doesn't help strengthen the heart, but is commonly used in heart failure to promote diuresis. Answered by Louanne Ratleff 1 year ago.


If any of you actually HAVE CHF & severe edema - then please inform me?
I'm suffering in great pain from severe edema which made my legs rigid and unable to bend at all. My liver is swollen with ascites. I have a bit of fluid in base of lungs. since oral diuretics have not diminished the edema yet - I'm worsening daily. I want to go for a relatively recent powerful treatment... Asked by Roxann Suozzi 1 year ago.

I'm suffering in great pain from severe edema which made my legs rigid and unable to bend at all. My liver is swollen with ascites. I have a bit of fluid in base of lungs. since oral diuretics have not diminished the edema yet - I'm worsening daily. I want to go for a relatively recent powerful treatment called ultrafiltration where they hook someone up to 2 catheters, left & right, & using a special filtration machine (not dialysis) they can filter the blood andremove up to 5 liters of water during a 8-hour stretch to relieve the systemic edema. But here in NY city - I called many doctors, cardiology depts., hospitals, and they scowled and gave me no help to track down how to receive this treatment & where it is done. Most knew what it was but refused to guide me to how to get it. Please can anyone help me to locate a facility in NYCity which accepts CHF patients for this dramatic, powerful, rapid method of resolving their edema. All whom I spoke to scorned me. Please help me. Answered by Janice Treherne 1 year ago.

Be wary with ultrafiltration--it is dramatic, but it's not a permanent solution. It is approved for therapy, and we do use it frequently for patients with acute renal failure or severely decompensated CHF, but usually only when high dose IV diuretics/natrecor/inotropes (medicines usually only administered in a hospital CCU) have failed. There are centers that will use ultrafiltration as a 1st line therapy for certain patients , but the trials to determine whether it SHOULD be used this way are ongoing. The most recent trial I read about this was UNLOAD. There's a cardiologist by the name of Restaino at Columbia/Presbyterian who was one of the authors--he could probably give you the best advice in the city on whether you're a candidate. Best of luck. Answered by Rolland Garrow 1 year ago.

I don't know of any hospitals in this country that offer that particular treatment. Last I heard of it, it was being trialed in Europe. Most cardiologists will not do it, because while the fluid is indeed drawn off as you say, it simply causes the body to produce that much more and the edema comes back two or three times worse than it was to begin with. You have a chronic condition, and it isn't going to get better. With medications and proper dietary controls it is possible to control it. Unfortunately, once CHF has taken hold, it will progress over time. The best medicine can do is slow the process. I empathize with your situation, my CHF is controlled, but both my parents died from it. Answered by Chantay Pankowski 1 year ago.


I have severe refractory edema from CHF - I value hearing your insights?
MEEP_MEEP - does every hospital have ultrafiltration equipment and staff trained for it? Or is it some rarely available modality? You know, I am in medical debt already from th eauto which struck me. I owe 100K in bills. Hospitals might treat me, but will sue me in court to recover daily charges ,... Asked by Sharleen Krovious 1 year ago.

I got CHF after MASSIVE MI post car crash. Today, my Ejection fraction is 50% & holding steady. My kidney functions, creatinine clearance, albumin, liver panel & lipids are fine. 9 months after car crash, I thought myself stable. slowly, urination dwindled & fluids swelled up throughout lower trunk & liver area. I am nauseous, can barely drink a bit of liquid. I can't sleep lying down, breathing worsens, I sleep standing up,(U figure) I gasp upon exertion, mild activity, I have legs rigid and swollen like pressurized balloon. AM in agony from pain. Drs gave me torsemide diuretic. Totally failed to expel fluids. (btw I take lisinopril & hydralazine for HTN) Tell me, someone, anyone, when diuretics fail, & fluid swells the body, what are possible treatments? I won't enter hospital;- I'm terrified,uninsured & I've been told that diuretics are their only reliance also. Any uncommon meds U know of for outpatients? If I am hopeless, how will my death come about?? PRAY FOR ME, PLEASE! Answered by Chau Pushcar 1 year ago.

to SRS629 - thanks for your kind reply. Sadly, the torsemide never produced a drop of urine. HCTZ had faint activity only. I speculate that my damaged heart pump does not perfuse the kidneys with enough blood to function, regardless of drugs used. I consume less than 500 mg. sodium daily. i do severe fluid restriction. And i will try for Rx for drug you mentioned & hope it might help. I researched that 25 mg.spironolactone in those who take ACE-inhibitors has a synergism.for severe edema. I hope to try that, if MDs agree. Specialists told me the in hospitals they rely on same drugs as outside. I prefer natural death at home and will refuse forcible entry to med facilities. CHF is insurable and has no definite resolution, is a lifelong struggle to the end - just like AIDS. Please Doctor, your comments?? Thanks and God bless you. Answered by Lester Sechrist 1 year ago.

MEEP_MEEP - does every hospital have ultrafiltration equipment and staff trained for it? Or is it some rarely available modality? You know, I am in medical debt already from th eauto which struck me. I owe 100K in bills. Hospitals might treat me, but will sue me in court to recover daily charges , avg.=5000/day. They can reeze my Bank assets and make me homeless. Yes , it matters to me to not be sued by hospitals. It's happened. And I',m alone with no one to see me in the hospital. That's when they abuse people when no relatives come to investigate.pt. treatment. Answered by Evangeline Grenke 1 year ago.

To be honest, ir oral torsemide isn't cutting it any more then you're probably stuck needing an IV diuretic. If you can still afford to see your doctor (even if you can't afford to be hospitalized), you might want to ask to add zaroxylyn (a different type of oral diuretic) to take before the torsemide--it can help to potentiate it. Strict blood pressure control with the hydralazine and lisinopril will also in the long run help you to mobilize fluids. It doesn't sound like salt or fluid restriction will help much at this point. Just saw your update--if you're not getting any urine output from torsemide, you're absolutely right, you're not perfusing your kidneys well enough right now. Yes, if I were admitting you to the hospital, I'd use IV toresemide, but it gets absorbed about 2-3x as well as oral torsemide, as when you're in florid CHF your gut become swollen and can't absorb meds. At this point aldactone, while an excellent med, won't give you the diuresis you need. I've seen a lot of patients turn around with a few days of IV torsemide. That being said, if your kidneys aren't working very well, you could get IV meds that aren't available to outpatients, namely natrecor and dobutamine, which would help take the fluid off and improve the pumping power of your heart. This isn't a hopeless situation, the meds can make you feel a heckuva lot better--it's not just diuretics. You should take a trip to the local ER ASAP. Answered by Charity Freas 1 year ago.

You have a lot of good answers already listed, and it appears to be that your still in a fluid crisis situation. CHF IS TREATED FOR THOSE THAT ARE UNINSURED. With CHF, the reason that you go to a hospital is that your body can't get back to a workable fluid status for your heart to take it alone. The longer you may wait, weakens the heart further and reduces your chances of bouncing back to a workable level of fluid. Going to the hospital now, can help you to get back to being able to work more productively, and just plain enjoy everyday activities more. It appears that you have diuretic-resistant CHF, which CAN BE TREATED, but these treatments can only be done in a hospital. Ultrafiltration, listed earlier in the answers, actually pulls the water from the blood and has been shown to quickly pull off 1-5liters of fluid off a day (2-12lbs of weight), depending on how your blood pressure tolerates this. Other treatments exist, yet this is one that I know works for 9 out of 10 people (in my experience). Look up an article (google or some other search engine) from Dr. William Abraham on "diuretic resistance." You can get back to a workable level of CHF, and then you will be able to get the most out of life again. CHF is not curable, but neither does it need to cause so much pain, and constant discomfort. Yes, I will pray for you. Answered by Albertine Thorner 1 year ago.

Sounds to me like you have some liver disfunction of some sort, being swollen in that area would indicate that. Also, being swollen in your legs is a flair up of your CHF. Now, Im not sure of your reasoning to not go to the hospital. If you are terrified of the hospital, I think you need to decide what is more important to you. R u terrified more to die or go to the hospital? Diuretics are not the only options, but they are a big part of it. Your death will come about when your lungs are so full of fluids that you cant breath at all anymore, and i would imagine its not a nice way to die. At least at the hospital, you could get some pain medicine. I wish you luck and will pray for you. Answered by Silvana Fulginiti 1 year ago.

Your doctor might try different diuretics, most CHF patients wind up on Lasix which seems to work well for them. You really need to see a specialized doctor (cardiologist) for specific treatment; a general doctor can try his best but he doesn't have the specific knowledge for a case like yours. You really need to get treatment for this, even if it means being admitted to the hospital, because things can rapidly go downhill. Don't worry about the insurance, nearly all hospitals will treat you no matter your ability to pay. A lot of CHF patients need to go to the hospital to get their edema under control - it's quite common. In the hospital, they can give you treatment that they can't give you as an out patient. You aren't hopeless, you and your doctor just need to find the treatment that works best for you. Good wishes... Answered by Boyd Randolf 1 year ago.

Lasix but it only last six hours hint to the name. Death from CHF is axphision yes the person will drown in the own fluids. Since you are noncomplying once you go unconscious and can no longer say no there is a duty to act and if some one calls 911 you will end up at the Hosp. I wish the best for you. Answered by Annamarie Lindenmuth 1 year ago.

You really can't mess around with CHF. In my opinion you need to be admited to the hospital and be given lasix or ultra filtration. the only home thing I can think of since you refuse to go to the hospital is to avoid sodium all together and put yourself on a fluid restriction. Answered by Jon Paranada 1 year ago.


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