Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 016636/001.

Names and composition

"NARCAN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE.

Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016636/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016636/002 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016636/003 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
071083/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
071084/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071311/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
208411/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 4MG per SPRAY
208411/002 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 2MG per SPRAY

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
016636/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016636/002 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
016636/003 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML **Federal Register determination that product was not discontinued or withdrawn for safety or efficacy reasons**
070171/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
070172/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070188/001 NALOXONE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
070189/001 NALOXONE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
070190/001 NALOXONE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070191/001 NALOXONE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070252/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
070253/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
070254/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070255/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070256/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070257/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070298/001 NALOXONE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070299/001 NALOXONE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070417/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070496/001 NALOXONE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070639/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070648/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
070649/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
070661/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
070678/001 NALOXONE HCL NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 0.02MG per ML
070679/001 NALOXONE HCL NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 0.4MG per ML
070680/001 NALOXONE HCL NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE Injectable/ Injection 1MG per ML
071083/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
071084/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071272/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
071273/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071274/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071287/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071311/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071339/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
071604/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
071671/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
071672/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
071681/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
071682/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
071683/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
071811/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
072076/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072081/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
072082/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
072083/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
072084/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
072085/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.02MG per ML
072086/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
072087/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
072088/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
072089/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
072090/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
072091/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072092/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072093/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
072115/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 1MG per ML
204997/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
205014/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
205787/001 EVZIO NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, SUBCUTANEOUS 0.4MG per 0.4ML (0.4MG per 0.4ML)
207634/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
208411/001 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 4MG per SPRAY
208411/002 NARCAN NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE SPRAY, METERED/NASAL 2MG per SPRAY
208871/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
208872/001 NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE INJECTABLE/INJECTION 0.4MG per ML
209862/001 EVZIO NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE SOLUTION/INTRAMUSCULAR, SUBCUTANEOUS 2MG per 0.4ML (2MG per 0.4ML)

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Answered questions

What are the uses for the drug called Narcan?
Aside from being used to counter Overdoses of Morphine and Opium, what are it's other uses. and what are the dangers of it? Please name sources. Asked by Cortney Mesick 2 years ago.

Narcan is a drug used to reverse the effects of opiates. The drug binds to the opiate receptors in the body and prevents morphine, oxycodone, demerol, and other opiate-type drugs from binding to the receptors. For that reason, Narcan can reverse the effects of an opiate overdose. Narcan is used extensively in the field by paramedics to reverse overdoses of heroin. We also use it in the hospital on patients whose respirations are depressed from opiate pain relief. Narcan can also inhibit the effects of PCP, ketamine, dextromethorphan if given prior to their administration. Finally, Narcan can reduce gastritis and esophagitis associated with opioid therapy during mechanical ventilation. It's important to remember that Narcan's use can bring about serious side effects when administered to an opiate dependent individual. Nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis (sweating), hypertension, seizures, and cardiac arrest have all been reported. Answered by Valda Williston 2 years ago.

GENERIC NAME: NALOXONE - INJECTION (nal-OX-own) BRAND NAME(S): Narcan Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. HOW TO USE: This medication is administered by injection into a vein or muscle. The dose may be repeated as needed or this may be continuously infused depending on your condition and the purpose it is being used. This medication must be used under close medical supervision so the dose can be adjusted to the response. SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take, including: narcotic pain medications. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval. OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. NOTES: This medication can cause withdrawal symptoms in persons addicted to narcotic pain relievers. Answered by Maragaret Jung 2 years ago.

This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur Usually used for overdose patients, in order to get the drugs out of their system faster. Answered by Eveline Kravitz 2 years ago.

What Is Narcan Used For Answered by Deshawn Sweigard 2 years ago.


Has any one ever heard of narcan? if so, what is it used for?
Asked by Lavonia Schlemmer 2 years ago.

NARCAN (naloxone hydrochloride injection), is an opioid antagonist. Mostly given to patients whom may have overdosed on morphine, heroin or other opioids. However, patients in "Septic Shock" may also be prescribed this drug. It is most commonly injected intravenously for fastest action. The drug generally acts within a minute, and its effects may last up to 45 minutes. According to it's pharmacodynamics, naloxone has an extremely high affinity for μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Naloxone is a μ-opioid receptor competitive antagonist, and its rapid blockade of those receptors often produces rapid onset of withdrawal symptoms. Naloxone also has an antagonist action, though with a lower affinity, at κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Furthermore, adverse events associated with the postoperative use of NARCAN are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows: -Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. -Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting, nausea -Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion -Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness -Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia -Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating -Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing. Good Luck! Answered by Gabriele Venier 2 years ago.

Narcan can reverse the effects of drugs like morphine, heroin and even Demerol. In my early days of pediatric practice, sometimes a newborn would be very sluggish as a result to drugs given to the mother during labor. Narcan usually brought them back. Obstetric anesthesia has improved since then, and I needed to use Narcan much less frequently when attending deliveries later in my career. Answered by Elisha Buxbaum 2 years ago.

it is used to treat opiate overdose. it reverses the effects of narcotics, including respiratory depression. Answered by Kindra Nealon 2 years ago.


Does Narcan cross the placental barrier?
This is for a paramedic class....not for my personal information but for an educational reason. Please don't tell me to look it up on the Internet - I was hoping that somebody in EMS or the healthcare related field could help me out. Thank you. Asked by Abraham Dassow 2 years ago.

Narcan does cross the placental barrier. So when narcan is given to a pregnant opiate addict, the fetus may be thrown into withdrawal. So discretion is advised. However, if the mother is not breathing then the fetus is not recieving oxygen. That is an indication to provide narcan. You could always start off at 0.4mg then go up from there, until she starts breathing, or yelling at you for getting rid of her high. Answered by Nigel Maraia 2 years ago.

Webmd says: This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Mose Lavene 2 years ago.

Yes it does....it is also pregnancy class B medicine so it has no adverse effects on the fetus that is known.....because when they test medications for the pregnancy risks they test on animals and class B is no adverse effects on animals and that is it not tested on humans. Answered by Homer Callagher 2 years ago.

Look it up on the internet. If it says not to use it when pg, it does cross. Answered by Lia Kaighn 2 years ago.

Most likely it would, then you will have 2 pissed off patients. Answered by Freddy Partmann 2 years ago.

i'm thinking no.... Answered by Shannon Strutton 2 years ago.


Can 2 full doses of Narcan put someone into Cardiac Arrest?
Asked by Cher Whittenton 2 years ago.

Yes, it can, but it is not common and is usually linked to a pre-existing condition. Please see the reference below. "As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it." For starters, opiate wirthdraw does not kill you; however, it may make you feel like you are dying. Secondly, narcan is not a pill and is not commonly prescribed for outpatient use. It is an injeectable drug that is used in emergent situations to antagonize the effects of narcotics and prevent someone from dying from hypoemia associated with a narcotic overdose. Thirdly, narcan is to be titrated to the return of spontaneous respirations. "Slamming" narcan is a good way to get assasulted by your "patient" and is considered bad form. As per the NIH: Abrupt postoperative reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tremulousness, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death. Excessive doses of NARCAN in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression). Several instances of hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest have been reported in postoperative patients. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. These have occurred in patients most of whom had pre-existing cardiovascular disorders or received other drugs which may have similar adverse cardiovascular effects. Although a direct cause and effect relationship has not been established, NARCAN should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or patients who have received medications with potential adverse cardiovascular effects, such as hypotension, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and pulmonary edema. It has been suggested that the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with the use of NARCAN is similar to neurogenic pulmonary edema, i.e., a centrally mediated massive catecholamine response leading to a dramatic shift of blood volume into the pulmonary vascular bed resulting in increased hydrostatic pressures. Answered by Esperanza Kreeger 2 years ago.

Not usually. It works on receptors in the brain to block effects of narcotics. Dosage is usually 2mg and most likely won't cause arrest. In some cases multiple doses are need to reverse affects of narcotics. There is a side effect of ventricular arrhythmias, but very highly unlikely and I have never heard it happen. It is most likely a cause of cardiac hx and not the Narcan. Answered by Chassidy Ziglar 2 years ago.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. MISSED DOSE: It is important that each dose be taken as needed. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as remembered. Skip the missed dose. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Trinh Macisaac 2 years ago.

As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it. Answered by Barbera Erving 2 years ago.


Does anybody know where i can purchase narcan drug?
"narcan" is used in hospitals by doctors to reverse the effects of an overdose. (used to save lifes). Asked by Kimberlee Borden 2 years ago.

Narcan is the trade name, naloxone is the generic name of the drug. If my memory is correct, it only comes in the IV form. The drug is readily available in the hospital setting, but not at your local pharmacy. The better question is WHY would you need naloxone? Answered by Danna Gribbin 2 years ago.

I can't conceive as to why a provider would prescribe Naloxone/Narcan, out of an emergency room or anesthesia setting. It can be very hazardous to use in that it can also precipitate withdrawal and is relatively short acting compared to the duration of action of the narcotic targeted. Hence it requires follow up dosing.........a slippery slope. Your run of the mill pharmacy would likely, have to special order it. Best bet...The recipient should be hospitalized if that profoundly "narcotized". Answered by Monika Uong 2 years ago.

I don't know why you would want to buy Narcan. But you do have to have a valid prescription to get it. I just doubt any doctor will give it to you. No prescription? If you try to purchase it, it is felony prescription fraud. Answered by Mei Earnhardt 2 years ago.


Will Narcan reverse opiate overdose once cardiac arrest has occurred?
Asked by Zack Kutchie 2 years ago.

That person was dead wrong. Ok, first of all, allow me to explain Narcan...it's drug that blocks the bodys absorbtion of narcotics...simple as that. You could shoot anyone with Narcan, if they aren't on the drug, it won't do anything to them, if they are they will lose their high as the drug will no longer affect them. Now, about your question: Narcan WILL cancel out what's left of the drug, HOWEVER if the heart has stopped, and the drug cannot circulate, it may not work as well...but CPR can fix that. Here's the problem: MOST overdoses go into cardiac arrest not because the heart stops, but because the person stops breathing...and when you stop breathing everything else shuts down. Here's the bottom line: If they haven't been down too long, they can be revived, but Narcan alone cannot save someone who is already in cardiac arrest. If they've been down too long there will be too much damage to reverse, even with Narcan and an effort to bring them back. Answered by Veronica Boruvka 2 years ago.

The paramedic is right. IF the ambulance gets there soon enough after the person arrests, then there is a CHANCE of survival. Narcan will knock out the opiate, but damage to the heart, brain, and kidneys may have already occurred. Answered by Gearldine Hillan 2 years ago.

NO no no!!! Narcan is only to be used if the person under situations where a person has received morphine in a clinical setting and they are having a reaction to it. Not for overdose; they will need advanced cardiac life saving with a defibrillator and ACLS drugs. Answered by Shawanda Maiello 2 years ago.


Can IM administration of Narcan in a cardiac arrest victim be helpful?
Asked by Isobel Seller 2 years ago.

Narcan is used in respiratory failure due to opiate overdose. It will help as it stops the opiate's resp depression abilities. It does nothing specific for the heart. It is given IV in most cases. Answered by Tora Maslow 2 years ago.

Narcan is a narcotic antagonist. It is given through an IV to reverse the effects of pain medications that can suppress the respiratory system or, if a patient cannot be aroused because they are heavily sedated. This is NOT used during a cardiac arrest. On of the adverse reactions of Narcan can cause ventricular fibrillation , this condition would result in a cardiac arrest. In this situation, a code would be called. I hope that this helps. Answered by Jc Rafidi 2 years ago.

Hey there! Narcan, as is mentioned by the others, is an antidote for narcotics. It is not, however, listed in any ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocols as a treatment for cardiac arrest. If someone is in cardiac arrest, anything given IM is futile until adequate circulation is restored. Hope this helps! Answered by Jeffie Vareschi 2 years ago.

Narcan is used for narcotic overdoses. At least in NYS, it is not in our protocol to use it in the event of cardiac arrest. In fact, if used on someone with a cardiac history, which we do not always have knowledge of depending on the circumstances, there is a risk. Answered by Lewis Munsterman 2 years ago.

Narcan is an antidote to opiate-based drugs (morphine, fentanyl). If a person has not ingested these drugs (or taken them in another manner), Narcan will not have any effect. It is often given in situations where a person has overdosed on drugs of this nature. EMT Answered by Chanell Florencio 2 years ago.


What are the side effects of narcan IV for overdose of demerol IV?
When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42.... Asked by Ruby Talayumptewa 2 years ago.

When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42. Is this normal? Usually normal does not appply to me. Answered by Kyoko Rudolph 2 years ago.

Naloxone 0.1 mg/kg or Narcan is usually given IV to counteract or almost instantaneously reverse ALL of the opiate effects- not just the respiratory depression of the analgesic- Demerol and other narcotics. There are usually no side effects of Narcan. Actually it's a life-saver. I had to have a hysterectomy at 32. And a bladder lift at 36. Your hysterectomy, vomiting,and diarrhea have nothing to do with your overdose nor the Narcan. Urinary incontinence has many causes. One of them is childbirth and pregnancy and poor support from the pelvic floor muscles. Your bladder and pelvic floor muscles communicate with each other to help hold urine in the bladder without leaking. In women, the bladder and uterus (womb) lie close to one another and are supported by the same muscles and ligaments. Any surgery that involves a woman's reproductive system — for example, removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) — runs the risk of damaging the supporting pelvic floor muscles, which can lead to incontinence. Answered by Shayna Bredeson 2 years ago.

This I happen to know. Demerol can be administered either way. When administered IV, the drug takes effect immediately [depending on the strength] IM, about 15 min. 50mg to 100mg are the preferred dosage. Side effects include foggy brain, thick tongue and not being able to say "no", sexually speaking. I know this first hand. Enjoy the feeling. Answered by Maurice Weasel 2 years ago.

Well I think that you should go to your family dr. and see what they say! Answered by Jordon Wallwork 2 years ago.


Could Narcan given at the hospital skew a toxicology report and possibly hide a pain medication drug overdose?
Asked by Hershel Matusiewicz 2 years ago.

No. Narcan only acts as an inhibitor of the narcotics, it doesn't remove them from the blood. Narcan attaches itself to the nerve receptors that respond to narcotics and doesn't allow the narcotics to bind to those receptors, thereby keeping the body from responding to them. Answered by Hyacinth Miralles 2 years ago.

VERY in all likelihood. Hydrocodone is hassle-free for intense facet effects, yet while it somewhat is an overdose then he likely has taken the drug previously and is familiar with the way it impacts him. Bloody diarrhea is the main substantial clue that he desires scientific interest at present! After his restoration, he might might desire to be dealt with for drug dependancy and melancholy - because of the fact he took too plenty on purpose Answered by Janean Moustafa 2 years ago.


What are the uses for the drug called Narcan?
Aside from being used to counter Overdoses of Morphine and Opium, what are it's other uses. and what are the dangers of it? Please name sources. Asked by Avery Carini 2 years ago.

Narcan is a drug used to reverse the effects of opiates. The drug binds to the opiate receptors in the body and prevents morphine, oxycodone, demerol, and other opiate-type drugs from binding to the receptors. For that reason, Narcan can reverse the effects of an opiate overdose. Narcan is used extensively in the field by paramedics to reverse overdoses of heroin. We also use it in the hospital on patients whose respirations are depressed from opiate pain relief. Narcan can also inhibit the effects of PCP, ketamine, dextromethorphan if given prior to their administration. Finally, Narcan can reduce gastritis and esophagitis associated with opioid therapy during mechanical ventilation. It's important to remember that Narcan's use can bring about serious side effects when administered to an opiate dependent individual. Nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis (sweating), hypertension, seizures, and cardiac arrest have all been reported. Answered by Polly Kwilosz 2 years ago.

GENERIC NAME: NALOXONE - INJECTION (nal-OX-own) BRAND NAME(S): Narcan Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. HOW TO USE: This medication is administered by injection into a vein or muscle. The dose may be repeated as needed or this may be continuously infused depending on your condition and the purpose it is being used. This medication must be used under close medical supervision so the dose can be adjusted to the response. SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take, including: narcotic pain medications. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval. OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. NOTES: This medication can cause withdrawal symptoms in persons addicted to narcotic pain relievers. Answered by Mitchel Coover 2 years ago.

This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur Usually used for overdose patients, in order to get the drugs out of their system faster. Answered by Shelby Pontiff 2 years ago.

What Is Narcan Used For Answered by Debbi Furr 2 years ago.


Has any one ever heard of narcan? if so, what is it used for?
Asked by Joetta Maietta 2 years ago.

NARCAN (naloxone hydrochloride injection), is an opioid antagonist. Mostly given to patients whom may have overdosed on morphine, heroin or other opioids. However, patients in "Septic Shock" may also be prescribed this drug. It is most commonly injected intravenously for fastest action. The drug generally acts within a minute, and its effects may last up to 45 minutes. According to it's pharmacodynamics, naloxone has an extremely high affinity for μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Naloxone is a μ-opioid receptor competitive antagonist, and its rapid blockade of those receptors often produces rapid onset of withdrawal symptoms. Naloxone also has an antagonist action, though with a lower affinity, at κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Furthermore, adverse events associated with the postoperative use of NARCAN are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows: -Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. -Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting, nausea -Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion -Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness -Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia -Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating -Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing. Good Luck! Answered by Sima Haggins 2 years ago.

Narcan can reverse the effects of drugs like morphine, heroin and even Demerol. In my early days of pediatric practice, sometimes a newborn would be very sluggish as a result to drugs given to the mother during labor. Narcan usually brought them back. Obstetric anesthesia has improved since then, and I needed to use Narcan much less frequently when attending deliveries later in my career. Answered by Sachiko Gudgel 2 years ago.

it is used to treat opiate overdose. it reverses the effects of narcotics, including respiratory depression. Answered by Eveline Brzostowski 2 years ago.


Does Narcan cross the placental barrier?
This is for a paramedic class....not for my personal information but for an educational reason. Please don't tell me to look it up on the Internet - I was hoping that somebody in EMS or the healthcare related field could help me out. Thank you. Asked by Joyce Bomberger 2 years ago.

Narcan does cross the placental barrier. So when narcan is given to a pregnant opiate addict, the fetus may be thrown into withdrawal. So discretion is advised. However, if the mother is not breathing then the fetus is not recieving oxygen. That is an indication to provide narcan. You could always start off at 0.4mg then go up from there, until she starts breathing, or yelling at you for getting rid of her high. Answered by Dong Muenchow 2 years ago.

Webmd says: This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Agatha Heideman 2 years ago.

Yes it does....it is also pregnancy class B medicine so it has no adverse effects on the fetus that is known.....because when they test medications for the pregnancy risks they test on animals and class B is no adverse effects on animals and that is it not tested on humans. Answered by Roxanne Biesinger 2 years ago.

Look it up on the internet. If it says not to use it when pg, it does cross. Answered by Chuck Vanhouten 2 years ago.

Most likely it would, then you will have 2 pissed off patients. Answered by Augustine Cavrak 2 years ago.

i'm thinking no.... Answered by Mellisa Detraglia 2 years ago.


Can 2 full doses of Narcan put someone into Cardiac Arrest?
Asked by Jung Vangieson 2 years ago.

Yes, it can, but it is not common and is usually linked to a pre-existing condition. Please see the reference below. "As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it." For starters, opiate wirthdraw does not kill you; however, it may make you feel like you are dying. Secondly, narcan is not a pill and is not commonly prescribed for outpatient use. It is an injeectable drug that is used in emergent situations to antagonize the effects of narcotics and prevent someone from dying from hypoemia associated with a narcotic overdose. Thirdly, narcan is to be titrated to the return of spontaneous respirations. "Slamming" narcan is a good way to get assasulted by your "patient" and is considered bad form. As per the NIH: Abrupt postoperative reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tremulousness, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death. Excessive doses of NARCAN in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression). Several instances of hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest have been reported in postoperative patients. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. These have occurred in patients most of whom had pre-existing cardiovascular disorders or received other drugs which may have similar adverse cardiovascular effects. Although a direct cause and effect relationship has not been established, NARCAN should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or patients who have received medications with potential adverse cardiovascular effects, such as hypotension, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and pulmonary edema. It has been suggested that the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with the use of NARCAN is similar to neurogenic pulmonary edema, i.e., a centrally mediated massive catecholamine response leading to a dramatic shift of blood volume into the pulmonary vascular bed resulting in increased hydrostatic pressures. Answered by Donette Tretera 2 years ago.

Not usually. It works on receptors in the brain to block effects of narcotics. Dosage is usually 2mg and most likely won't cause arrest. In some cases multiple doses are need to reverse affects of narcotics. There is a side effect of ventricular arrhythmias, but very highly unlikely and I have never heard it happen. It is most likely a cause of cardiac hx and not the Narcan. Answered by Marge Depolito 2 years ago.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. MISSED DOSE: It is important that each dose be taken as needed. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as remembered. Skip the missed dose. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Elaine Pangelinan 2 years ago.

As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it. Answered by Lillie Underkofler 2 years ago.


Does anybody know where i can purchase narcan drug?
"narcan" is used in hospitals by doctors to reverse the effects of an overdose. (used to save lifes). Asked by Emiko Norise 2 years ago.

Narcan is the trade name, naloxone is the generic name of the drug. If my memory is correct, it only comes in the IV form. The drug is readily available in the hospital setting, but not at your local pharmacy. The better question is WHY would you need naloxone? Answered by Shona Remfert 2 years ago.

I can't conceive as to why a provider would prescribe Naloxone/Narcan, out of an emergency room or anesthesia setting. It can be very hazardous to use in that it can also precipitate withdrawal and is relatively short acting compared to the duration of action of the narcotic targeted. Hence it requires follow up dosing.........a slippery slope. Your run of the mill pharmacy would likely, have to special order it. Best bet...The recipient should be hospitalized if that profoundly "narcotized". Answered by Jeff Transue 2 years ago.

I don't know why you would want to buy Narcan. But you do have to have a valid prescription to get it. I just doubt any doctor will give it to you. No prescription? If you try to purchase it, it is felony prescription fraud. Answered by Narcisa Wood 2 years ago.


Will Narcan reverse opiate overdose once cardiac arrest has occurred?
Asked by Brenda Ennis 2 years ago.

That person was dead wrong. Ok, first of all, allow me to explain Narcan...it's drug that blocks the bodys absorbtion of narcotics...simple as that. You could shoot anyone with Narcan, if they aren't on the drug, it won't do anything to them, if they are they will lose their high as the drug will no longer affect them. Now, about your question: Narcan WILL cancel out what's left of the drug, HOWEVER if the heart has stopped, and the drug cannot circulate, it may not work as well...but CPR can fix that. Here's the problem: MOST overdoses go into cardiac arrest not because the heart stops, but because the person stops breathing...and when you stop breathing everything else shuts down. Here's the bottom line: If they haven't been down too long, they can be revived, but Narcan alone cannot save someone who is already in cardiac arrest. If they've been down too long there will be too much damage to reverse, even with Narcan and an effort to bring them back. Answered by Albert Brumett 2 years ago.

The paramedic is right. IF the ambulance gets there soon enough after the person arrests, then there is a CHANCE of survival. Narcan will knock out the opiate, but damage to the heart, brain, and kidneys may have already occurred. Answered by Boyd Hadler 2 years ago.

NO no no!!! Narcan is only to be used if the person under situations where a person has received morphine in a clinical setting and they are having a reaction to it. Not for overdose; they will need advanced cardiac life saving with a defibrillator and ACLS drugs. Answered by Laure Zenzen 2 years ago.


Can IM administration of Narcan in a cardiac arrest victim be helpful?
Asked by Mercedes Mistretta 2 years ago.

Narcan is used in respiratory failure due to opiate overdose. It will help as it stops the opiate's resp depression abilities. It does nothing specific for the heart. It is given IV in most cases. Answered by Dean Sonkin 2 years ago.

Narcan is a narcotic antagonist. It is given through an IV to reverse the effects of pain medications that can suppress the respiratory system or, if a patient cannot be aroused because they are heavily sedated. This is NOT used during a cardiac arrest. On of the adverse reactions of Narcan can cause ventricular fibrillation , this condition would result in a cardiac arrest. In this situation, a code would be called. I hope that this helps. Answered by Vennie Ganis 2 years ago.

Hey there! Narcan, as is mentioned by the others, is an antidote for narcotics. It is not, however, listed in any ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocols as a treatment for cardiac arrest. If someone is in cardiac arrest, anything given IM is futile until adequate circulation is restored. Hope this helps! Answered by Ayanna Cornick 2 years ago.

Narcan is used for narcotic overdoses. At least in NYS, it is not in our protocol to use it in the event of cardiac arrest. In fact, if used on someone with a cardiac history, which we do not always have knowledge of depending on the circumstances, there is a risk. Answered by Eldon Moffitt 2 years ago.

Narcan is an antidote to opiate-based drugs (morphine, fentanyl). If a person has not ingested these drugs (or taken them in another manner), Narcan will not have any effect. It is often given in situations where a person has overdosed on drugs of this nature. EMT Answered by Ione Gaudin 2 years ago.


What are the side effects of narcan IV for overdose of demerol IV?
When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42.... Asked by Glenna Meares 2 years ago.

When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42. Is this normal? Usually normal does not appply to me. Answered by Chung Mourning 2 years ago.

Naloxone 0.1 mg/kg or Narcan is usually given IV to counteract or almost instantaneously reverse ALL of the opiate effects- not just the respiratory depression of the analgesic- Demerol and other narcotics. There are usually no side effects of Narcan. Actually it's a life-saver. I had to have a hysterectomy at 32. And a bladder lift at 36. Your hysterectomy, vomiting,and diarrhea have nothing to do with your overdose nor the Narcan. Urinary incontinence has many causes. One of them is childbirth and pregnancy and poor support from the pelvic floor muscles. Your bladder and pelvic floor muscles communicate with each other to help hold urine in the bladder without leaking. In women, the bladder and uterus (womb) lie close to one another and are supported by the same muscles and ligaments. Any surgery that involves a woman's reproductive system — for example, removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) — runs the risk of damaging the supporting pelvic floor muscles, which can lead to incontinence. Answered by Phoebe Radel 2 years ago.

This I happen to know. Demerol can be administered either way. When administered IV, the drug takes effect immediately [depending on the strength] IM, about 15 min. 50mg to 100mg are the preferred dosage. Side effects include foggy brain, thick tongue and not being able to say "no", sexually speaking. I know this first hand. Enjoy the feeling. Answered by Dorie Eskola 2 years ago.

Well I think that you should go to your family dr. and see what they say! Answered by Waldo Harlor 2 years ago.


Could Narcan given at the hospital skew a toxicology report and possibly hide a pain medication drug overdose?
Asked by Ardath Truxler 2 years ago.

No. Narcan only acts as an inhibitor of the narcotics, it doesn't remove them from the blood. Narcan attaches itself to the nerve receptors that respond to narcotics and doesn't allow the narcotics to bind to those receptors, thereby keeping the body from responding to them. Answered by Audra Cajigas 2 years ago.

VERY in all likelihood. Hydrocodone is hassle-free for intense facet effects, yet while it somewhat is an overdose then he likely has taken the drug previously and is familiar with the way it impacts him. Bloody diarrhea is the main substantial clue that he desires scientific interest at present! After his restoration, he might might desire to be dealt with for drug dependancy and melancholy - because of the fact he took too plenty on purpose Answered by Juliet Augustin 2 years ago.


What are the uses for the drug called Narcan?
Aside from being used to counter Overdoses of Morphine and Opium, what are it's other uses. and what are the dangers of it? Please name sources. Asked by Britany Waligora 2 years ago.

Narcan is a drug used to reverse the effects of opiates. The drug binds to the opiate receptors in the body and prevents morphine, oxycodone, demerol, and other opiate-type drugs from binding to the receptors. For that reason, Narcan can reverse the effects of an opiate overdose. Narcan is used extensively in the field by paramedics to reverse overdoses of heroin. We also use it in the hospital on patients whose respirations are depressed from opiate pain relief. Narcan can also inhibit the effects of PCP, ketamine, dextromethorphan if given prior to their administration. Finally, Narcan can reduce gastritis and esophagitis associated with opioid therapy during mechanical ventilation. It's important to remember that Narcan's use can bring about serious side effects when administered to an opiate dependent individual. Nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis (sweating), hypertension, seizures, and cardiac arrest have all been reported. Answered by Dorcas Paschke 2 years ago.

GENERIC NAME: NALOXONE - INJECTION (nal-OX-own) BRAND NAME(S): Narcan Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. HOW TO USE: This medication is administered by injection into a vein or muscle. The dose may be repeated as needed or this may be continuously infused depending on your condition and the purpose it is being used. This medication must be used under close medical supervision so the dose can be adjusted to the response. SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take, including: narcotic pain medications. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval. OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. NOTES: This medication can cause withdrawal symptoms in persons addicted to narcotic pain relievers. Answered by Raelene Freiseis 2 years ago.

This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur Usually used for overdose patients, in order to get the drugs out of their system faster. Answered by Suzy Juhasz 2 years ago.

What Is Narcan Used For Answered by Maricruz Dammad 2 years ago.


Has any one ever heard of narcan? if so, what is it used for?
Asked by Theron Dechant 2 years ago.

NARCAN (naloxone hydrochloride injection), is an opioid antagonist. Mostly given to patients whom may have overdosed on morphine, heroin or other opioids. However, patients in "Septic Shock" may also be prescribed this drug. It is most commonly injected intravenously for fastest action. The drug generally acts within a minute, and its effects may last up to 45 minutes. According to it's pharmacodynamics, naloxone has an extremely high affinity for μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Naloxone is a μ-opioid receptor competitive antagonist, and its rapid blockade of those receptors often produces rapid onset of withdrawal symptoms. Naloxone also has an antagonist action, though with a lower affinity, at κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Furthermore, adverse events associated with the postoperative use of NARCAN are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows: -Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. -Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting, nausea -Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion -Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness -Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia -Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating -Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing. Good Luck! Answered by Shavonda Pefferkorn 2 years ago.

Narcan can reverse the effects of drugs like morphine, heroin and even Demerol. In my early days of pediatric practice, sometimes a newborn would be very sluggish as a result to drugs given to the mother during labor. Narcan usually brought them back. Obstetric anesthesia has improved since then, and I needed to use Narcan much less frequently when attending deliveries later in my career. Answered by Vilma Ospina 2 years ago.

it is used to treat opiate overdose. it reverses the effects of narcotics, including respiratory depression. Answered by Melia Reck 2 years ago.


Does Narcan cross the placental barrier?
This is for a paramedic class....not for my personal information but for an educational reason. Please don't tell me to look it up on the Internet - I was hoping that somebody in EMS or the healthcare related field could help me out. Thank you. Asked by Willetta Ruggiano 2 years ago.

Narcan does cross the placental barrier. So when narcan is given to a pregnant opiate addict, the fetus may be thrown into withdrawal. So discretion is advised. However, if the mother is not breathing then the fetus is not recieving oxygen. That is an indication to provide narcan. You could always start off at 0.4mg then go up from there, until she starts breathing, or yelling at you for getting rid of her high. Answered by Riley Emmitt 2 years ago.

Webmd says: This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Le Leimer 2 years ago.

Yes it does....it is also pregnancy class B medicine so it has no adverse effects on the fetus that is known.....because when they test medications for the pregnancy risks they test on animals and class B is no adverse effects on animals and that is it not tested on humans. Answered by Lyndsay Fecher 2 years ago.

Look it up on the internet. If it says not to use it when pg, it does cross. Answered by Mao Cogburn 2 years ago.

Most likely it would, then you will have 2 pissed off patients. Answered by Raven Sensibaugh 2 years ago.

i'm thinking no.... Answered by Roseann Turntine 2 years ago.


Can 2 full doses of Narcan put someone into Cardiac Arrest?
Asked by Mao Ogami 2 years ago.

Yes, it can, but it is not common and is usually linked to a pre-existing condition. Please see the reference below. "As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it." For starters, opiate wirthdraw does not kill you; however, it may make you feel like you are dying. Secondly, narcan is not a pill and is not commonly prescribed for outpatient use. It is an injeectable drug that is used in emergent situations to antagonize the effects of narcotics and prevent someone from dying from hypoemia associated with a narcotic overdose. Thirdly, narcan is to be titrated to the return of spontaneous respirations. "Slamming" narcan is a good way to get assasulted by your "patient" and is considered bad form. As per the NIH: Abrupt postoperative reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tremulousness, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death. Excessive doses of NARCAN in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression). Several instances of hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest have been reported in postoperative patients. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. These have occurred in patients most of whom had pre-existing cardiovascular disorders or received other drugs which may have similar adverse cardiovascular effects. Although a direct cause and effect relationship has not been established, NARCAN should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or patients who have received medications with potential adverse cardiovascular effects, such as hypotension, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and pulmonary edema. It has been suggested that the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with the use of NARCAN is similar to neurogenic pulmonary edema, i.e., a centrally mediated massive catecholamine response leading to a dramatic shift of blood volume into the pulmonary vascular bed resulting in increased hydrostatic pressures. Answered by Dwayne Ranildi 2 years ago.

Not usually. It works on receptors in the brain to block effects of narcotics. Dosage is usually 2mg and most likely won't cause arrest. In some cases multiple doses are need to reverse affects of narcotics. There is a side effect of ventricular arrhythmias, but very highly unlikely and I have never heard it happen. It is most likely a cause of cardiac hx and not the Narcan. Answered by Adrienne Hiles 2 years ago.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. MISSED DOSE: It is important that each dose be taken as needed. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as remembered. Skip the missed dose. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Sun Galyan 2 years ago.

As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it. Answered by Ron Brakeman 2 years ago.


Does anybody know where i can purchase narcan drug?
"narcan" is used in hospitals by doctors to reverse the effects of an overdose. (used to save lifes). Asked by Majorie Kinsella 2 years ago.

Narcan is the trade name, naloxone is the generic name of the drug. If my memory is correct, it only comes in the IV form. The drug is readily available in the hospital setting, but not at your local pharmacy. The better question is WHY would you need naloxone? Answered by Carley Elway 2 years ago.

I can't conceive as to why a provider would prescribe Naloxone/Narcan, out of an emergency room or anesthesia setting. It can be very hazardous to use in that it can also precipitate withdrawal and is relatively short acting compared to the duration of action of the narcotic targeted. Hence it requires follow up dosing.........a slippery slope. Your run of the mill pharmacy would likely, have to special order it. Best bet...The recipient should be hospitalized if that profoundly "narcotized". Answered by Tora Taus 2 years ago.

I don't know why you would want to buy Narcan. But you do have to have a valid prescription to get it. I just doubt any doctor will give it to you. No prescription? If you try to purchase it, it is felony prescription fraud. Answered by Claudine Olckhart 2 years ago.


Will Narcan reverse opiate overdose once cardiac arrest has occurred?
Asked by Estela Meleski 2 years ago.

That person was dead wrong. Ok, first of all, allow me to explain Narcan...it's drug that blocks the bodys absorbtion of narcotics...simple as that. You could shoot anyone with Narcan, if they aren't on the drug, it won't do anything to them, if they are they will lose their high as the drug will no longer affect them. Now, about your question: Narcan WILL cancel out what's left of the drug, HOWEVER if the heart has stopped, and the drug cannot circulate, it may not work as well...but CPR can fix that. Here's the problem: MOST overdoses go into cardiac arrest not because the heart stops, but because the person stops breathing...and when you stop breathing everything else shuts down. Here's the bottom line: If they haven't been down too long, they can be revived, but Narcan alone cannot save someone who is already in cardiac arrest. If they've been down too long there will be too much damage to reverse, even with Narcan and an effort to bring them back. Answered by Akiko Kabus 2 years ago.

The paramedic is right. IF the ambulance gets there soon enough after the person arrests, then there is a CHANCE of survival. Narcan will knock out the opiate, but damage to the heart, brain, and kidneys may have already occurred. Answered by Berneice Placencia 2 years ago.

NO no no!!! Narcan is only to be used if the person under situations where a person has received morphine in a clinical setting and they are having a reaction to it. Not for overdose; they will need advanced cardiac life saving with a defibrillator and ACLS drugs. Answered by Sara Porten 2 years ago.


Can IM administration of Narcan in a cardiac arrest victim be helpful?
Asked by Pearl Strozzi 2 years ago.

Narcan is used in respiratory failure due to opiate overdose. It will help as it stops the opiate's resp depression abilities. It does nothing specific for the heart. It is given IV in most cases. Answered by Winter Hesler 2 years ago.

Narcan is a narcotic antagonist. It is given through an IV to reverse the effects of pain medications that can suppress the respiratory system or, if a patient cannot be aroused because they are heavily sedated. This is NOT used during a cardiac arrest. On of the adverse reactions of Narcan can cause ventricular fibrillation , this condition would result in a cardiac arrest. In this situation, a code would be called. I hope that this helps. Answered by Tomika Ambagis 2 years ago.

Hey there! Narcan, as is mentioned by the others, is an antidote for narcotics. It is not, however, listed in any ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocols as a treatment for cardiac arrest. If someone is in cardiac arrest, anything given IM is futile until adequate circulation is restored. Hope this helps! Answered by Hosea Carstens 2 years ago.

Narcan is used for narcotic overdoses. At least in NYS, it is not in our protocol to use it in the event of cardiac arrest. In fact, if used on someone with a cardiac history, which we do not always have knowledge of depending on the circumstances, there is a risk. Answered by Carla Bicknase 2 years ago.

Narcan is an antidote to opiate-based drugs (morphine, fentanyl). If a person has not ingested these drugs (or taken them in another manner), Narcan will not have any effect. It is often given in situations where a person has overdosed on drugs of this nature. EMT Answered by Amberly Durian 2 years ago.


What are the side effects of narcan IV for overdose of demerol IV?
When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42.... Asked by Eldon Birkhimer 2 years ago.

When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42. Is this normal? Usually normal does not appply to me. Answered by Holley Szekely 2 years ago.

Naloxone 0.1 mg/kg or Narcan is usually given IV to counteract or almost instantaneously reverse ALL of the opiate effects- not just the respiratory depression of the analgesic- Demerol and other narcotics. There are usually no side effects of Narcan. Actually it's a life-saver. I had to have a hysterectomy at 32. And a bladder lift at 36. Your hysterectomy, vomiting,and diarrhea have nothing to do with your overdose nor the Narcan. Urinary incontinence has many causes. One of them is childbirth and pregnancy and poor support from the pelvic floor muscles. Your bladder and pelvic floor muscles communicate with each other to help hold urine in the bladder without leaking. In women, the bladder and uterus (womb) lie close to one another and are supported by the same muscles and ligaments. Any surgery that involves a woman's reproductive system — for example, removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) — runs the risk of damaging the supporting pelvic floor muscles, which can lead to incontinence. Answered by Retta Wichert 2 years ago.

This I happen to know. Demerol can be administered either way. When administered IV, the drug takes effect immediately [depending on the strength] IM, about 15 min. 50mg to 100mg are the preferred dosage. Side effects include foggy brain, thick tongue and not being able to say "no", sexually speaking. I know this first hand. Enjoy the feeling. Answered by Teressa Schnepf 2 years ago.

Well I think that you should go to your family dr. and see what they say! Answered by Jene Borris 2 years ago.


Could Narcan given at the hospital skew a toxicology report and possibly hide a pain medication drug overdose?
Asked by Dwayne Ruggiano 2 years ago.

No. Narcan only acts as an inhibitor of the narcotics, it doesn't remove them from the blood. Narcan attaches itself to the nerve receptors that respond to narcotics and doesn't allow the narcotics to bind to those receptors, thereby keeping the body from responding to them. Answered by Minna Form 2 years ago.

VERY in all likelihood. Hydrocodone is hassle-free for intense facet effects, yet while it somewhat is an overdose then he likely has taken the drug previously and is familiar with the way it impacts him. Bloody diarrhea is the main substantial clue that he desires scientific interest at present! After his restoration, he might might desire to be dealt with for drug dependancy and melancholy - because of the fact he took too plenty on purpose Answered by Ismael Brandolino 2 years ago.


What are the uses for the drug called Narcan?
Aside from being used to counter Overdoses of Morphine and Opium, what are it's other uses. and what are the dangers of it? Please name sources. Asked by Yee Garde 2 years ago.

Narcan is a drug used to reverse the effects of opiates. The drug binds to the opiate receptors in the body and prevents morphine, oxycodone, demerol, and other opiate-type drugs from binding to the receptors. For that reason, Narcan can reverse the effects of an opiate overdose. Narcan is used extensively in the field by paramedics to reverse overdoses of heroin. We also use it in the hospital on patients whose respirations are depressed from opiate pain relief. Narcan can also inhibit the effects of PCP, ketamine, dextromethorphan if given prior to their administration. Finally, Narcan can reduce gastritis and esophagitis associated with opioid therapy during mechanical ventilation. It's important to remember that Narcan's use can bring about serious side effects when administered to an opiate dependent individual. Nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis (sweating), hypertension, seizures, and cardiac arrest have all been reported. Answered by Mitzie Edgehill 2 years ago.

GENERIC NAME: NALOXONE - INJECTION (nal-OX-own) BRAND NAME(S): Narcan Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. HOW TO USE: This medication is administered by injection into a vein or muscle. The dose may be repeated as needed or this may be continuously infused depending on your condition and the purpose it is being used. This medication must be used under close medical supervision so the dose can be adjusted to the response. SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take, including: narcotic pain medications. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval. OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. NOTES: This medication can cause withdrawal symptoms in persons addicted to narcotic pain relievers. Answered by Audrea Branton 2 years ago.

This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur Usually used for overdose patients, in order to get the drugs out of their system faster. Answered by Curt Giandomenico 2 years ago.

What Is Narcan Used For Answered by Roxanna Needs 2 years ago.


Has any one ever heard of narcan? if so, what is it used for?
Asked by Sabine Thay 2 years ago.

NARCAN (naloxone hydrochloride injection), is an opioid antagonist. Mostly given to patients whom may have overdosed on morphine, heroin or other opioids. However, patients in "Septic Shock" may also be prescribed this drug. It is most commonly injected intravenously for fastest action. The drug generally acts within a minute, and its effects may last up to 45 minutes. According to it's pharmacodynamics, naloxone has an extremely high affinity for μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Naloxone is a μ-opioid receptor competitive antagonist, and its rapid blockade of those receptors often produces rapid onset of withdrawal symptoms. Naloxone also has an antagonist action, though with a lower affinity, at κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Furthermore, adverse events associated with the postoperative use of NARCAN are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows: -Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. -Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting, nausea -Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion -Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness -Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia -Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating -Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing. Good Luck! Answered by Rebbeca Deschamps 2 years ago.

Narcan can reverse the effects of drugs like morphine, heroin and even Demerol. In my early days of pediatric practice, sometimes a newborn would be very sluggish as a result to drugs given to the mother during labor. Narcan usually brought them back. Obstetric anesthesia has improved since then, and I needed to use Narcan much less frequently when attending deliveries later in my career. Answered by Tomas Hampshire 2 years ago.

it is used to treat opiate overdose. it reverses the effects of narcotics, including respiratory depression. Answered by Jennie Nick 2 years ago.


Does Narcan cross the placental barrier?
This is for a paramedic class....not for my personal information but for an educational reason. Please don't tell me to look it up on the Internet - I was hoping that somebody in EMS or the healthcare related field could help me out. Thank you. Asked by Monserrate Arms 2 years ago.

Narcan does cross the placental barrier. So when narcan is given to a pregnant opiate addict, the fetus may be thrown into withdrawal. So discretion is advised. However, if the mother is not breathing then the fetus is not recieving oxygen. That is an indication to provide narcan. You could always start off at 0.4mg then go up from there, until she starts breathing, or yelling at you for getting rid of her high. Answered by Roscoe Lamattina 2 years ago.

Webmd says: This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Cora Crooker 2 years ago.

Yes it does....it is also pregnancy class B medicine so it has no adverse effects on the fetus that is known.....because when they test medications for the pregnancy risks they test on animals and class B is no adverse effects on animals and that is it not tested on humans. Answered by Ricardo Elefritz 2 years ago.

Look it up on the internet. If it says not to use it when pg, it does cross. Answered by Mora Kessinger 2 years ago.

Most likely it would, then you will have 2 pissed off patients. Answered by Toshiko Ercolano 2 years ago.

i'm thinking no.... Answered by Salvatore Eberl 2 years ago.


Can 2 full doses of Narcan put someone into Cardiac Arrest?
Asked by Isobel Daner 2 years ago.

Yes, it can, but it is not common and is usually linked to a pre-existing condition. Please see the reference below. "As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it." For starters, opiate wirthdraw does not kill you; however, it may make you feel like you are dying. Secondly, narcan is not a pill and is not commonly prescribed for outpatient use. It is an injeectable drug that is used in emergent situations to antagonize the effects of narcotics and prevent someone from dying from hypoemia associated with a narcotic overdose. Thirdly, narcan is to be titrated to the return of spontaneous respirations. "Slamming" narcan is a good way to get assasulted by your "patient" and is considered bad form. As per the NIH: Abrupt postoperative reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tremulousness, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death. Excessive doses of NARCAN in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression). Several instances of hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest have been reported in postoperative patients. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. These have occurred in patients most of whom had pre-existing cardiovascular disorders or received other drugs which may have similar adverse cardiovascular effects. Although a direct cause and effect relationship has not been established, NARCAN should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or patients who have received medications with potential adverse cardiovascular effects, such as hypotension, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and pulmonary edema. It has been suggested that the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with the use of NARCAN is similar to neurogenic pulmonary edema, i.e., a centrally mediated massive catecholamine response leading to a dramatic shift of blood volume into the pulmonary vascular bed resulting in increased hydrostatic pressures. Answered by Christal Wattley 2 years ago.

Not usually. It works on receptors in the brain to block effects of narcotics. Dosage is usually 2mg and most likely won't cause arrest. In some cases multiple doses are need to reverse affects of narcotics. There is a side effect of ventricular arrhythmias, but very highly unlikely and I have never heard it happen. It is most likely a cause of cardiac hx and not the Narcan. Answered by Patrick Hertzel 2 years ago.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. MISSED DOSE: It is important that each dose be taken as needed. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as remembered. Skip the missed dose. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Leslie Deguise 2 years ago.

As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it. Answered by Branden Alquesta 2 years ago.


Does anybody know where i can purchase narcan drug?
"narcan" is used in hospitals by doctors to reverse the effects of an overdose. (used to save lifes). Asked by Deloris Jording 2 years ago.

Narcan is the trade name, naloxone is the generic name of the drug. If my memory is correct, it only comes in the IV form. The drug is readily available in the hospital setting, but not at your local pharmacy. The better question is WHY would you need naloxone? Answered by Vernon Yepiz 2 years ago.

I can't conceive as to why a provider would prescribe Naloxone/Narcan, out of an emergency room or anesthesia setting. It can be very hazardous to use in that it can also precipitate withdrawal and is relatively short acting compared to the duration of action of the narcotic targeted. Hence it requires follow up dosing.........a slippery slope. Your run of the mill pharmacy would likely, have to special order it. Best bet...The recipient should be hospitalized if that profoundly "narcotized". Answered by Maire Pekar 2 years ago.

I don't know why you would want to buy Narcan. But you do have to have a valid prescription to get it. I just doubt any doctor will give it to you. No prescription? If you try to purchase it, it is felony prescription fraud. Answered by Lurlene Montante 2 years ago.


Will Narcan reverse opiate overdose once cardiac arrest has occurred?
Asked by Alma Mogan 2 years ago.

That person was dead wrong. Ok, first of all, allow me to explain Narcan...it's drug that blocks the bodys absorbtion of narcotics...simple as that. You could shoot anyone with Narcan, if they aren't on the drug, it won't do anything to them, if they are they will lose their high as the drug will no longer affect them. Now, about your question: Narcan WILL cancel out what's left of the drug, HOWEVER if the heart has stopped, and the drug cannot circulate, it may not work as well...but CPR can fix that. Here's the problem: MOST overdoses go into cardiac arrest not because the heart stops, but because the person stops breathing...and when you stop breathing everything else shuts down. Here's the bottom line: If they haven't been down too long, they can be revived, but Narcan alone cannot save someone who is already in cardiac arrest. If they've been down too long there will be too much damage to reverse, even with Narcan and an effort to bring them back. Answered by Chrystal Camara 2 years ago.

The paramedic is right. IF the ambulance gets there soon enough after the person arrests, then there is a CHANCE of survival. Narcan will knock out the opiate, but damage to the heart, brain, and kidneys may have already occurred. Answered by Francine Fornea 2 years ago.

NO no no!!! Narcan is only to be used if the person under situations where a person has received morphine in a clinical setting and they are having a reaction to it. Not for overdose; they will need advanced cardiac life saving with a defibrillator and ACLS drugs. Answered by Sherell Banaszak 2 years ago.


Can IM administration of Narcan in a cardiac arrest victim be helpful?
Asked by Luna Lipka 2 years ago.

Narcan is used in respiratory failure due to opiate overdose. It will help as it stops the opiate's resp depression abilities. It does nothing specific for the heart. It is given IV in most cases. Answered by Bethanie Profitt 2 years ago.

Narcan is a narcotic antagonist. It is given through an IV to reverse the effects of pain medications that can suppress the respiratory system or, if a patient cannot be aroused because they are heavily sedated. This is NOT used during a cardiac arrest. On of the adverse reactions of Narcan can cause ventricular fibrillation , this condition would result in a cardiac arrest. In this situation, a code would be called. I hope that this helps. Answered by Martin Bucke 2 years ago.

Hey there! Narcan, as is mentioned by the others, is an antidote for narcotics. It is not, however, listed in any ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocols as a treatment for cardiac arrest. If someone is in cardiac arrest, anything given IM is futile until adequate circulation is restored. Hope this helps! Answered by Irma Bilello 2 years ago.

Narcan is used for narcotic overdoses. At least in NYS, it is not in our protocol to use it in the event of cardiac arrest. In fact, if used on someone with a cardiac history, which we do not always have knowledge of depending on the circumstances, there is a risk. Answered by Jackie Phung 2 years ago.

Narcan is an antidote to opiate-based drugs (morphine, fentanyl). If a person has not ingested these drugs (or taken them in another manner), Narcan will not have any effect. It is often given in situations where a person has overdosed on drugs of this nature. EMT Answered by Son Foushee 2 years ago.


What are the side effects of narcan IV for overdose of demerol IV?
When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42.... Asked by Kaylee Zirkle 2 years ago.

When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42. Is this normal? Usually normal does not appply to me. Answered by Loreta Piccolo 2 years ago.

Naloxone 0.1 mg/kg or Narcan is usually given IV to counteract or almost instantaneously reverse ALL of the opiate effects- not just the respiratory depression of the analgesic- Demerol and other narcotics. There are usually no side effects of Narcan. Actually it's a life-saver. I had to have a hysterectomy at 32. And a bladder lift at 36. Your hysterectomy, vomiting,and diarrhea have nothing to do with your overdose nor the Narcan. Urinary incontinence has many causes. One of them is childbirth and pregnancy and poor support from the pelvic floor muscles. Your bladder and pelvic floor muscles communicate with each other to help hold urine in the bladder without leaking. In women, the bladder and uterus (womb) lie close to one another and are supported by the same muscles and ligaments. Any surgery that involves a woman's reproductive system — for example, removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) — runs the risk of damaging the supporting pelvic floor muscles, which can lead to incontinence. Answered by Lucretia Antis 2 years ago.

This I happen to know. Demerol can be administered either way. When administered IV, the drug takes effect immediately [depending on the strength] IM, about 15 min. 50mg to 100mg are the preferred dosage. Side effects include foggy brain, thick tongue and not being able to say "no", sexually speaking. I know this first hand. Enjoy the feeling. Answered by Leta Szczepanski 2 years ago.

Well I think that you should go to your family dr. and see what they say! Answered by Tommie Trahan 2 years ago.


Could Narcan given at the hospital skew a toxicology report and possibly hide a pain medication drug overdose?
Asked by Ardell Pieri 2 years ago.

No. Narcan only acts as an inhibitor of the narcotics, it doesn't remove them from the blood. Narcan attaches itself to the nerve receptors that respond to narcotics and doesn't allow the narcotics to bind to those receptors, thereby keeping the body from responding to them. Answered by Carletta Cynova 2 years ago.

VERY in all likelihood. Hydrocodone is hassle-free for intense facet effects, yet while it somewhat is an overdose then he likely has taken the drug previously and is familiar with the way it impacts him. Bloody diarrhea is the main substantial clue that he desires scientific interest at present! After his restoration, he might might desire to be dealt with for drug dependancy and melancholy - because of the fact he took too plenty on purpose Answered by Leah Beiter 2 years ago.


What are the uses for the drug called Narcan?
Aside from being used to counter Overdoses of Morphine and Opium, what are it's other uses. and what are the dangers of it? Please name sources. Asked by Delphia Chaplin 2 years ago.

Narcan is a drug used to reverse the effects of opiates. The drug binds to the opiate receptors in the body and prevents morphine, oxycodone, demerol, and other opiate-type drugs from binding to the receptors. For that reason, Narcan can reverse the effects of an opiate overdose. Narcan is used extensively in the field by paramedics to reverse overdoses of heroin. We also use it in the hospital on patients whose respirations are depressed from opiate pain relief. Narcan can also inhibit the effects of PCP, ketamine, dextromethorphan if given prior to their administration. Finally, Narcan can reduce gastritis and esophagitis associated with opioid therapy during mechanical ventilation. It's important to remember that Narcan's use can bring about serious side effects when administered to an opiate dependent individual. Nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis (sweating), hypertension, seizures, and cardiac arrest have all been reported. Answered by Dorine Savidge 2 years ago.

GENERIC NAME: NALOXONE - INJECTION (nal-OX-own) BRAND NAME(S): Narcan Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. HOW TO USE: This medication is administered by injection into a vein or muscle. The dose may be repeated as needed or this may be continuously infused depending on your condition and the purpose it is being used. This medication must be used under close medical supervision so the dose can be adjusted to the response. SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take, including: narcotic pain medications. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval. OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. NOTES: This medication can cause withdrawal symptoms in persons addicted to narcotic pain relievers. Answered by Paulene Viscarro 2 years ago.

This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur Usually used for overdose patients, in order to get the drugs out of their system faster. Answered by Rayford Minchella 2 years ago.

What Is Narcan Used For Answered by Kassandra Trombley 2 years ago.


Has any one ever heard of narcan? if so, what is it used for?
Asked by Arvilla Surls 2 years ago.

NARCAN (naloxone hydrochloride injection), is an opioid antagonist. Mostly given to patients whom may have overdosed on morphine, heroin or other opioids. However, patients in "Septic Shock" may also be prescribed this drug. It is most commonly injected intravenously for fastest action. The drug generally acts within a minute, and its effects may last up to 45 minutes. According to it's pharmacodynamics, naloxone has an extremely high affinity for μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Naloxone is a μ-opioid receptor competitive antagonist, and its rapid blockade of those receptors often produces rapid onset of withdrawal symptoms. Naloxone also has an antagonist action, though with a lower affinity, at κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Furthermore, adverse events associated with the postoperative use of NARCAN are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows: -Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. -Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting, nausea -Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion -Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness -Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia -Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating -Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing. Good Luck! Answered by Shaun Hasselbarth 2 years ago.

Narcan can reverse the effects of drugs like morphine, heroin and even Demerol. In my early days of pediatric practice, sometimes a newborn would be very sluggish as a result to drugs given to the mother during labor. Narcan usually brought them back. Obstetric anesthesia has improved since then, and I needed to use Narcan much less frequently when attending deliveries later in my career. Answered by Hazel Curiel 2 years ago.

it is used to treat opiate overdose. it reverses the effects of narcotics, including respiratory depression. Answered by Tameika Gayden 2 years ago.


Does Narcan cross the placental barrier?
This is for a paramedic class....not for my personal information but for an educational reason. Please don't tell me to look it up on the Internet - I was hoping that somebody in EMS or the healthcare related field could help me out. Thank you. Asked by Charlie Estrela 2 years ago.

Narcan does cross the placental barrier. So when narcan is given to a pregnant opiate addict, the fetus may be thrown into withdrawal. So discretion is advised. However, if the mother is not breathing then the fetus is not recieving oxygen. That is an indication to provide narcan. You could always start off at 0.4mg then go up from there, until she starts breathing, or yelling at you for getting rid of her high. Answered by Elliot Vannatter 2 years ago.

Webmd says: This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Vannesa Courchene 2 years ago.

Yes it does....it is also pregnancy class B medicine so it has no adverse effects on the fetus that is known.....because when they test medications for the pregnancy risks they test on animals and class B is no adverse effects on animals and that is it not tested on humans. Answered by Valerie Varrelman 2 years ago.

Look it up on the internet. If it says not to use it when pg, it does cross. Answered by Stacy Pohlmann 2 years ago.

Most likely it would, then you will have 2 pissed off patients. Answered by Fonda Cunas 2 years ago.

i'm thinking no.... Answered by Talitha Imbesi 2 years ago.


Can 2 full doses of Narcan put someone into Cardiac Arrest?
Asked by Irvin Soda 2 years ago.

Yes, it can, but it is not common and is usually linked to a pre-existing condition. Please see the reference below. "As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it." For starters, opiate wirthdraw does not kill you; however, it may make you feel like you are dying. Secondly, narcan is not a pill and is not commonly prescribed for outpatient use. It is an injeectable drug that is used in emergent situations to antagonize the effects of narcotics and prevent someone from dying from hypoemia associated with a narcotic overdose. Thirdly, narcan is to be titrated to the return of spontaneous respirations. "Slamming" narcan is a good way to get assasulted by your "patient" and is considered bad form. As per the NIH: Abrupt postoperative reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tremulousness, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death. Excessive doses of NARCAN in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression). Several instances of hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest have been reported in postoperative patients. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. These have occurred in patients most of whom had pre-existing cardiovascular disorders or received other drugs which may have similar adverse cardiovascular effects. Although a direct cause and effect relationship has not been established, NARCAN should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or patients who have received medications with potential adverse cardiovascular effects, such as hypotension, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and pulmonary edema. It has been suggested that the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with the use of NARCAN is similar to neurogenic pulmonary edema, i.e., a centrally mediated massive catecholamine response leading to a dramatic shift of blood volume into the pulmonary vascular bed resulting in increased hydrostatic pressures. Answered by Alta Niesporek 2 years ago.

Not usually. It works on receptors in the brain to block effects of narcotics. Dosage is usually 2mg and most likely won't cause arrest. In some cases multiple doses are need to reverse affects of narcotics. There is a side effect of ventricular arrhythmias, but very highly unlikely and I have never heard it happen. It is most likely a cause of cardiac hx and not the Narcan. Answered by Alexis Lubke 2 years ago.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. MISSED DOSE: It is important that each dose be taken as needed. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as remembered. Skip the missed dose. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Dannielle Milardo 2 years ago.

As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it. Answered by Johnathon Tatters 2 years ago.


Does anybody know where i can purchase narcan drug?
"narcan" is used in hospitals by doctors to reverse the effects of an overdose. (used to save lifes). Asked by Eda Tandus 2 years ago.

Narcan is the trade name, naloxone is the generic name of the drug. If my memory is correct, it only comes in the IV form. The drug is readily available in the hospital setting, but not at your local pharmacy. The better question is WHY would you need naloxone? Answered by Carlos Scarpa 2 years ago.

I can't conceive as to why a provider would prescribe Naloxone/Narcan, out of an emergency room or anesthesia setting. It can be very hazardous to use in that it can also precipitate withdrawal and is relatively short acting compared to the duration of action of the narcotic targeted. Hence it requires follow up dosing.........a slippery slope. Your run of the mill pharmacy would likely, have to special order it. Best bet...The recipient should be hospitalized if that profoundly "narcotized". Answered by Romona Osayande 2 years ago.

I don't know why you would want to buy Narcan. But you do have to have a valid prescription to get it. I just doubt any doctor will give it to you. No prescription? If you try to purchase it, it is felony prescription fraud. Answered by Ayako Yue 2 years ago.


Will Narcan reverse opiate overdose once cardiac arrest has occurred?
Asked by Julie Florentino 2 years ago.

That person was dead wrong. Ok, first of all, allow me to explain Narcan...it's drug that blocks the bodys absorbtion of narcotics...simple as that. You could shoot anyone with Narcan, if they aren't on the drug, it won't do anything to them, if they are they will lose their high as the drug will no longer affect them. Now, about your question: Narcan WILL cancel out what's left of the drug, HOWEVER if the heart has stopped, and the drug cannot circulate, it may not work as well...but CPR can fix that. Here's the problem: MOST overdoses go into cardiac arrest not because the heart stops, but because the person stops breathing...and when you stop breathing everything else shuts down. Here's the bottom line: If they haven't been down too long, they can be revived, but Narcan alone cannot save someone who is already in cardiac arrest. If they've been down too long there will be too much damage to reverse, even with Narcan and an effort to bring them back. Answered by Lyla Axelrod 2 years ago.

The paramedic is right. IF the ambulance gets there soon enough after the person arrests, then there is a CHANCE of survival. Narcan will knock out the opiate, but damage to the heart, brain, and kidneys may have already occurred. Answered by Fonda Bennard 2 years ago.

NO no no!!! Narcan is only to be used if the person under situations where a person has received morphine in a clinical setting and they are having a reaction to it. Not for overdose; they will need advanced cardiac life saving with a defibrillator and ACLS drugs. Answered by Dia Bobrowski 2 years ago.


Can IM administration of Narcan in a cardiac arrest victim be helpful?
Asked by Tamiko Hubbard 2 years ago.

Narcan is used in respiratory failure due to opiate overdose. It will help as it stops the opiate's resp depression abilities. It does nothing specific for the heart. It is given IV in most cases. Answered by Lisbeth Rippentrop 2 years ago.

Narcan is a narcotic antagonist. It is given through an IV to reverse the effects of pain medications that can suppress the respiratory system or, if a patient cannot be aroused because they are heavily sedated. This is NOT used during a cardiac arrest. On of the adverse reactions of Narcan can cause ventricular fibrillation , this condition would result in a cardiac arrest. In this situation, a code would be called. I hope that this helps. Answered by Maida Cayetano 2 years ago.

Hey there! Narcan, as is mentioned by the others, is an antidote for narcotics. It is not, however, listed in any ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocols as a treatment for cardiac arrest. If someone is in cardiac arrest, anything given IM is futile until adequate circulation is restored. Hope this helps! Answered by Shan Farenbaugh 2 years ago.

Narcan is used for narcotic overdoses. At least in NYS, it is not in our protocol to use it in the event of cardiac arrest. In fact, if used on someone with a cardiac history, which we do not always have knowledge of depending on the circumstances, there is a risk. Answered by Yong Biddulph 2 years ago.

Narcan is an antidote to opiate-based drugs (morphine, fentanyl). If a person has not ingested these drugs (or taken them in another manner), Narcan will not have any effect. It is often given in situations where a person has overdosed on drugs of this nature. EMT Answered by Sharron Celia 2 years ago.


What are the side effects of narcan IV for overdose of demerol IV?
When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42.... Asked by Vera Nebeker 2 years ago.

When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42. Is this normal? Usually normal does not appply to me. Answered by Harold Andrews 2 years ago.

Naloxone 0.1 mg/kg or Narcan is usually given IV to counteract or almost instantaneously reverse ALL of the opiate effects- not just the respiratory depression of the analgesic- Demerol and other narcotics. There are usually no side effects of Narcan. Actually it's a life-saver. I had to have a hysterectomy at 32. And a bladder lift at 36. Your hysterectomy, vomiting,and diarrhea have nothing to do with your overdose nor the Narcan. Urinary incontinence has many causes. One of them is childbirth and pregnancy and poor support from the pelvic floor muscles. Your bladder and pelvic floor muscles communicate with each other to help hold urine in the bladder without leaking. In women, the bladder and uterus (womb) lie close to one another and are supported by the same muscles and ligaments. Any surgery that involves a woman's reproductive system — for example, removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) — runs the risk of damaging the supporting pelvic floor muscles, which can lead to incontinence. Answered by Bryan Grabow 2 years ago.

This I happen to know. Demerol can be administered either way. When administered IV, the drug takes effect immediately [depending on the strength] IM, about 15 min. 50mg to 100mg are the preferred dosage. Side effects include foggy brain, thick tongue and not being able to say "no", sexually speaking. I know this first hand. Enjoy the feeling. Answered by Keira Mcgougan 2 years ago.

Well I think that you should go to your family dr. and see what they say! Answered by Jarrod Beaber 2 years ago.


Could Narcan given at the hospital skew a toxicology report and possibly hide a pain medication drug overdose?
Asked by Nina Sporn 2 years ago.

No. Narcan only acts as an inhibitor of the narcotics, it doesn't remove them from the blood. Narcan attaches itself to the nerve receptors that respond to narcotics and doesn't allow the narcotics to bind to those receptors, thereby keeping the body from responding to them. Answered by Lashonda Marable 2 years ago.

VERY in all likelihood. Hydrocodone is hassle-free for intense facet effects, yet while it somewhat is an overdose then he likely has taken the drug previously and is familiar with the way it impacts him. Bloody diarrhea is the main substantial clue that he desires scientific interest at present! After his restoration, he might might desire to be dealt with for drug dependancy and melancholy - because of the fact he took too plenty on purpose Answered by Kathie Covey 2 years ago.


What are the uses for the drug called Narcan?
Aside from being used to counter Overdoses of Morphine and Opium, what are it's other uses. and what are the dangers of it? Please name sources. Asked by Felica Garigen 2 years ago.

Narcan is a drug used to reverse the effects of opiates. The drug binds to the opiate receptors in the body and prevents morphine, oxycodone, demerol, and other opiate-type drugs from binding to the receptors. For that reason, Narcan can reverse the effects of an opiate overdose. Narcan is used extensively in the field by paramedics to reverse overdoses of heroin. We also use it in the hospital on patients whose respirations are depressed from opiate pain relief. Narcan can also inhibit the effects of PCP, ketamine, dextromethorphan if given prior to their administration. Finally, Narcan can reduce gastritis and esophagitis associated with opioid therapy during mechanical ventilation. It's important to remember that Narcan's use can bring about serious side effects when administered to an opiate dependent individual. Nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis (sweating), hypertension, seizures, and cardiac arrest have all been reported. Answered by Mari Luallen 2 years ago.

GENERIC NAME: NALOXONE - INJECTION (nal-OX-own) BRAND NAME(S): Narcan Medication Uses | How To Use | Side Effects | Precautions | Drug Interactions | Overdose | Notes | Missed Dose | Storage USES: This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. HOW TO USE: This medication is administered by injection into a vein or muscle. The dose may be repeated as needed or this may be continuously infused depending on your condition and the purpose it is being used. This medication must be used under close medical supervision so the dose can be adjusted to the response. SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. DRUG INTERACTIONS: Tell your doctor of any over-the-counter or prescription medication you may take, including: narcotic pain medications. Do not start or stop any medicine without doctor or pharmacist approval. OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US national poison hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canadian residents should call their local poison control center directly. NOTES: This medication can cause withdrawal symptoms in persons addicted to narcotic pain relievers. Answered by Haydee Sciarra 2 years ago.

This medication is used to prevent or reverse the effects of narcotic pain relievers. It has also been used in the treatment of shock, alcoholic coma, schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur Usually used for overdose patients, in order to get the drugs out of their system faster. Answered by Rocio Lobbins 2 years ago.

What Is Narcan Used For Answered by Sharyn Ellenbogen 2 years ago.


Has any one ever heard of narcan? if so, what is it used for?
Asked by Mickie Germano 2 years ago.

NARCAN (naloxone hydrochloride injection), is an opioid antagonist. Mostly given to patients whom may have overdosed on morphine, heroin or other opioids. However, patients in "Septic Shock" may also be prescribed this drug. It is most commonly injected intravenously for fastest action. The drug generally acts within a minute, and its effects may last up to 45 minutes. According to it's pharmacodynamics, naloxone has an extremely high affinity for μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system. Naloxone is a μ-opioid receptor competitive antagonist, and its rapid blockade of those receptors often produces rapid onset of withdrawal symptoms. Naloxone also has an antagonist action, though with a lower affinity, at κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Furthermore, adverse events associated with the postoperative use of NARCAN are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows: -Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. -Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting, nausea -Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion -Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness -Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia -Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating -Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing. Good Luck! Answered by Silvia Siebe 2 years ago.

Narcan can reverse the effects of drugs like morphine, heroin and even Demerol. In my early days of pediatric practice, sometimes a newborn would be very sluggish as a result to drugs given to the mother during labor. Narcan usually brought them back. Obstetric anesthesia has improved since then, and I needed to use Narcan much less frequently when attending deliveries later in my career. Answered by Kristie Quist 2 years ago.

it is used to treat opiate overdose. it reverses the effects of narcotics, including respiratory depression. Answered by Millicent Reuther 2 years ago.


Does Narcan cross the placental barrier?
This is for a paramedic class....not for my personal information but for an educational reason. Please don't tell me to look it up on the Internet - I was hoping that somebody in EMS or the healthcare related field could help me out. Thank you. Asked by Antione Widera 2 years ago.

Narcan does cross the placental barrier. So when narcan is given to a pregnant opiate addict, the fetus may be thrown into withdrawal. So discretion is advised. However, if the mother is not breathing then the fetus is not recieving oxygen. That is an indication to provide narcan. You could always start off at 0.4mg then go up from there, until she starts breathing, or yelling at you for getting rid of her high. Answered by Heidy Caminiti 2 years ago.

Webmd says: This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Kourtney Rutana 2 years ago.

Yes it does....it is also pregnancy class B medicine so it has no adverse effects on the fetus that is known.....because when they test medications for the pregnancy risks they test on animals and class B is no adverse effects on animals and that is it not tested on humans. Answered by Kylie Carnegia 2 years ago.

Look it up on the internet. If it says not to use it when pg, it does cross. Answered by Franklin Velthuis 2 years ago.

Most likely it would, then you will have 2 pissed off patients. Answered by Mirta Sartore 2 years ago.

i'm thinking no.... Answered by Dorinda Boutin 2 years ago.


Can 2 full doses of Narcan put someone into Cardiac Arrest?
Asked by Hiram Rily 2 years ago.

Yes, it can, but it is not common and is usually linked to a pre-existing condition. Please see the reference below. "As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it." For starters, opiate wirthdraw does not kill you; however, it may make you feel like you are dying. Secondly, narcan is not a pill and is not commonly prescribed for outpatient use. It is an injeectable drug that is used in emergent situations to antagonize the effects of narcotics and prevent someone from dying from hypoemia associated with a narcotic overdose. Thirdly, narcan is to be titrated to the return of spontaneous respirations. "Slamming" narcan is a good way to get assasulted by your "patient" and is considered bad form. As per the NIH: Abrupt postoperative reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tremulousness, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death. Excessive doses of NARCAN in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression). Several instances of hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest have been reported in postoperative patients. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. These have occurred in patients most of whom had pre-existing cardiovascular disorders or received other drugs which may have similar adverse cardiovascular effects. Although a direct cause and effect relationship has not been established, NARCAN should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing cardiac disease or patients who have received medications with potential adverse cardiovascular effects, such as hypotension, ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, and pulmonary edema. It has been suggested that the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema associated with the use of NARCAN is similar to neurogenic pulmonary edema, i.e., a centrally mediated massive catecholamine response leading to a dramatic shift of blood volume into the pulmonary vascular bed resulting in increased hydrostatic pressures. Answered by Antonio Kulon 2 years ago.

Not usually. It works on receptors in the brain to block effects of narcotics. Dosage is usually 2mg and most likely won't cause arrest. In some cases multiple doses are need to reverse affects of narcotics. There is a side effect of ventricular arrhythmias, but very highly unlikely and I have never heard it happen. It is most likely a cause of cardiac hx and not the Narcan. Answered by Arlen Come 2 years ago.

SIDE EFFECTS: Nausea, stomach upset or drowsiness may occur. If these effects continue or become bothersome, inform your doctor. Notify your doctor if you develop: vomiting, sweating, tremors, breathing trouble, seizures, rapid/pounding/irregular heartbeat. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. MISSED DOSE: It is important that each dose be taken as needed. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as remembered. Skip the missed dose. Do not "double-up" the dose to catch up. PRECAUTIONS: Tell your doctor if you have: heart problems, heart disease, been using any type of pain reliever for more than 2 weeks, allergies (especially drug allergies). This medication should be used only if clearly needed during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Answered by Will Steagall 2 years ago.

As I understand it, Narcan makes you go into immediate withdrawal of opiates. So theoretically, one dose could be enough to kill some people. Like any medicine you have to know what you're doing when you use it. Answered by Madelene Dimery 2 years ago.


Does anybody know where i can purchase narcan drug?
"narcan" is used in hospitals by doctors to reverse the effects of an overdose. (used to save lifes). Asked by Garfield Machel 2 years ago.

Narcan is the trade name, naloxone is the generic name of the drug. If my memory is correct, it only comes in the IV form. The drug is readily available in the hospital setting, but not at your local pharmacy. The better question is WHY would you need naloxone? Answered by Mistie Fabrizio 2 years ago.

I can't conceive as to why a provider would prescribe Naloxone/Narcan, out of an emergency room or anesthesia setting. It can be very hazardous to use in that it can also precipitate withdrawal and is relatively short acting compared to the duration of action of the narcotic targeted. Hence it requires follow up dosing.........a slippery slope. Your run of the mill pharmacy would likely, have to special order it. Best bet...The recipient should be hospitalized if that profoundly "narcotized". Answered by Ronnie Midura 2 years ago.

I don't know why you would want to buy Narcan. But you do have to have a valid prescription to get it. I just doubt any doctor will give it to you. No prescription? If you try to purchase it, it is felony prescription fraud. Answered by Jennifer Flitton 2 years ago.


Will Narcan reverse opiate overdose once cardiac arrest has occurred?
Asked by Shelby Perschall 2 years ago.

That person was dead wrong. Ok, first of all, allow me to explain Narcan...it's drug that blocks the bodys absorbtion of narcotics...simple as that. You could shoot anyone with Narcan, if they aren't on the drug, it won't do anything to them, if they are they will lose their high as the drug will no longer affect them. Now, about your question: Narcan WILL cancel out what's left of the drug, HOWEVER if the heart has stopped, and the drug cannot circulate, it may not work as well...but CPR can fix that. Here's the problem: MOST overdoses go into cardiac arrest not because the heart stops, but because the person stops breathing...and when you stop breathing everything else shuts down. Here's the bottom line: If they haven't been down too long, they can be revived, but Narcan alone cannot save someone who is already in cardiac arrest. If they've been down too long there will be too much damage to reverse, even with Narcan and an effort to bring them back. Answered by Lawrence Merando 2 years ago.

The paramedic is right. IF the ambulance gets there soon enough after the person arrests, then there is a CHANCE of survival. Narcan will knock out the opiate, but damage to the heart, brain, and kidneys may have already occurred. Answered by Lorilee Nuzzo 2 years ago.

NO no no!!! Narcan is only to be used if the person under situations where a person has received morphine in a clinical setting and they are having a reaction to it. Not for overdose; they will need advanced cardiac life saving with a defibrillator and ACLS drugs. Answered by Gia Praska 2 years ago.


Can IM administration of Narcan in a cardiac arrest victim be helpful?
Asked by Marin Waldall 2 years ago.

Narcan is used in respiratory failure due to opiate overdose. It will help as it stops the opiate's resp depression abilities. It does nothing specific for the heart. It is given IV in most cases. Answered by Migdalia Fraughton 2 years ago.

Narcan is a narcotic antagonist. It is given through an IV to reverse the effects of pain medications that can suppress the respiratory system or, if a patient cannot be aroused because they are heavily sedated. This is NOT used during a cardiac arrest. On of the adverse reactions of Narcan can cause ventricular fibrillation , this condition would result in a cardiac arrest. In this situation, a code would be called. I hope that this helps. Answered by Marjory Pellegren 2 years ago.

Hey there! Narcan, as is mentioned by the others, is an antidote for narcotics. It is not, however, listed in any ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) protocols as a treatment for cardiac arrest. If someone is in cardiac arrest, anything given IM is futile until adequate circulation is restored. Hope this helps! Answered by Hedwig Hartert 2 years ago.

Narcan is used for narcotic overdoses. At least in NYS, it is not in our protocol to use it in the event of cardiac arrest. In fact, if used on someone with a cardiac history, which we do not always have knowledge of depending on the circumstances, there is a risk. Answered by Dominic Condroski 2 years ago.

Narcan is an antidote to opiate-based drugs (morphine, fentanyl). If a person has not ingested these drugs (or taken them in another manner), Narcan will not have any effect. It is often given in situations where a person has overdosed on drugs of this nature. EMT Answered by Antoine Moghadam 2 years ago.


What are the side effects of narcan IV for overdose of demerol IV?
When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42.... Asked by Lynwood Wohlrab 2 years ago.

When I was hospitalized with ideopathic pancreatitis I was given an overdose of Demerol IV due to nurses error, The narcan made my body rapidly evacuate bowels, bladder and uncontrollable vomiting. Since my uterus is prolapsing as is my bladder. I have to have a hysterectomy and bladder attachment now at age 42. Is this normal? Usually normal does not appply to me. Answered by Franchesca Lantelme 2 years ago.

Naloxone 0.1 mg/kg or Narcan is usually given IV to counteract or almost instantaneously reverse ALL of the opiate effects- not just the respiratory depression of the analgesic- Demerol and other narcotics. There are usually no side effects of Narcan. Actually it's a life-saver. I had to have a hysterectomy at 32. And a bladder lift at 36. Your hysterectomy, vomiting,and diarrhea have nothing to do with your overdose nor the Narcan. Urinary incontinence has many causes. One of them is childbirth and pregnancy and poor support from the pelvic floor muscles. Your bladder and pelvic floor muscles communicate with each other to help hold urine in the bladder without leaking. In women, the bladder and uterus (womb) lie close to one another and are supported by the same muscles and ligaments. Any surgery that involves a woman's reproductive system — for example, removal of the uterus (hysterectomy) — runs the risk of damaging the supporting pelvic floor muscles, which can lead to incontinence. Answered by Windy Bompiani 2 years ago.

This I happen to know. Demerol can be administered either way. When administered IV, the drug takes effect immediately [depending on the strength] IM, about 15 min. 50mg to 100mg are the preferred dosage. Side effects include foggy brain, thick tongue and not being able to say "no", sexually speaking. I know this first hand. Enjoy the feeling. Answered by Carie Kakimoto 2 years ago.

Well I think that you should go to your family dr. and see what they say! Answered by Jeremy Fonda 2 years ago.


Could Narcan given at the hospital skew a toxicology report and possibly hide a pain medication drug overdose?
Asked by Shellie Chappelear 2 years ago.

No. Narcan only acts as an inhibitor of the narcotics, it doesn't remove them from the blood. Narcan attaches itself to the nerve receptors that respond to narcotics and doesn't allow the narcotics to bind to those receptors, thereby keeping the body from responding to them. Answered by Katelyn Ikkela 2 years ago.

VERY in all likelihood. Hydrocodone is hassle-free for intense facet effects, yet while it somewhat is an overdose then he likely has taken the drug previously and is familiar with the way it impacts him. Bloody diarrhea is the main substantial clue that he desires scientific interest at present! After his restoration, he might might desire to be dealt with for drug dependancy and melancholy - because of the fact he took too plenty on purpose Answered by Xochitl Mcclellon 2 years ago.


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