NAPROXEN Ressources

Application Information

This drug has been submitted to the FDA under the reference 074105/001.

Names and composition

"NAPROXEN" is the commercial name of a drug composed of NAPROXEN.
It belongs to the class NSAIDs and is used in Musculoskeletal pain/inflammation (Musculoskeletal Disorders)

Answered questions

Does naproxen have aspirin in it?
Asked by Charlie Segur 4 months ago.

Naproxen Naproxen is a pain reliever with anti-inflammatory effects. It is not aspirin, but some persons with sensitivity or allergy to aspirin may have the same reaction to naproxen. Naproxen is especially helpful for the pain of bruises and sprains. Its anti-inflammatory effects make it useful for tendonitis. Common brands include Naprosyn. Naproxen is usually well-tolerated by the stomach. The pills should be taken with food (if possible) to prevent stomach upset. Naproxen does have some aspirin-like effects on the stomach, so persons with active ulcers or sensitive stomachs should avoid naproxen. There is a mild anticoagulant (blood thinning) effect lasting a few hours. Medicines of this class can reduce the effectiveness of some blood pressure medications and diuretics (water pills). If you're being treated for other health problems, ask your doctor how often (or if) you can take naproxen. There's a limit to the amount of pain relief you can get with naproxen. Beyond 440 mg (two tablets), little further relief of pain occurs. Do not take higher doses without the advice of your physician. (The prescription dose of naproxen is 440 to 500 mg two to three times a day.) Usual dose: 220 mg every 8 hours. good luck and God Bless Answered by Yang Meakin 4 months ago.

It means you shouldn't take them at the same time because they act in very similar ways on your body. That being said, assuming you followed the correct dosing on the aspirin, now that four hours has passed you should be fine taking the naproxen, or more aspirin. If you do take the Naproxen you shouldn't take any more aspirin for about 8 hours to be safe. Answered by Kandra Baumfalk 4 months ago.

No, I'm pretty sure naproxen has no aspirin. Its the exact same thing as Advil except longer lasting. Answered by Cassy Throckmorton 4 months ago.

I really don't know, look on the label. Answered by Debbie Gattas 4 months ago.

No. Look it up on uptodate Answered by Sigrid Klappholz 4 months ago.

Yes, because aleve is a form of aspirin, and Naproxen is found in aleve. Naproxen (na PROX en) Aleve, Aleve Caplet, Anaprox, Anaprox-DS, EC Naprosyn, Naprelan, Naprosyn What is the most important information I should know about naproxen? • Take naproxen with food, milk, or an antacid to lessen stomach upset. • Do not crush or chew the extended-release forms of naproxen (e.g., Naprelan, EC Naprosyn, others). Swallow them whole. These are specially formulated to release slowly in the body. Ask your pharmacist if you do not know if you have an extended-release formulation. • Contact your doctor if you experience blood in vomit or bloody, black, or tarry stools. These symptoms could indicate damage to the stomach or intestines, which could be dangerous. • Many over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, and pain medicines contain aspirin or other medicines similar to naproxen (such as ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and others). Before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicine, talk to your doctor and pharmacist. • Patients who are taking over-the-counter naproxen products (Aleve) should follow the instructions on the label. Do not exceed the recommended over-the-counter doses for naproxen (220 milligrams twice daily) and do not take naproxen for longer than ten days unless a physician directs otherwise. • Avoid alcohol or use it with moderation. If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages a day, naproxen may increase the risk of dangerous stomach bleeding. Talk to your doctor before taking naproxen if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages a day. • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Naproxen may cause dizziness. If you experience dizziness, avoid these activities. What is naproxen? • Naproxen is in a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Naproxen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body. • Naproxen is used to reduce pain, inflammation, and stiffness caused by many conditions, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, ankylosing spondylitis, injury, abdominal cramps associated with menstruation, tendinitis, and bursitis. • Naproxen may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking naproxen? • Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you · have an allergy to aspirin or any other NSAIDs, · have an ulcer or bleeding in your stomach, · drink more than three alcoholic beverages a day, · have liver disease, · have kidney disease, · have a coagulation (bleeding) disorder, · have congestive heart failure, · have fluid retention, · have heart disease, or · have high blood pressure. • You may not be able to take naproxen, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above. • Naproxen is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Naproxen should not be taken late in pregnancy (the third trimester) because a similar drug is known to affect the baby's heart. Do not take naproxen without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. • Naproxen passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing infant. Do not take this medicine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. How should I take naproxen? • Take naproxen exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you. • Take each dose with a full glass of water. • Take naproxen with milk, food, or an antacid to lessen stomach upset. • Do not crush or chew the extended-release forms of naproxen (e.g., Naprelan, EC Naprosyn, others). Swallow them whole. These are specially formulated to release slowly in the body. Ask your pharmacist if you do not know if you have an extended-release formulation. • Patients who are taking over-the-counter naproxen products (Aleve) should follow the instructions on the label. Do not exceed the recommended over-the-counter doses for naproxen (220 milligrams twice daily) and do not take naproxen for longer than ten days unless a physician directs otherwise. • Shake the suspension well before measuring a dose. To ensure that you get the correct dose, measure the liquid form of naproxen with a special dose-measuring spoon or cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist where you can get one. • Store naproxen at room temperature away from moisture and heat. What happens if I miss a dose? • If you are taking naproxen on a regular schedule, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose. • If you are taking naproxen as needed, take the missed dose if it is needed, then wait the recommended or prescribed amount of time before taking another dose. What happens if I overdose? • Seek emergency medical attention if an overdose is suspected. • Symptoms of a naproxen overdose may include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, seizures, sweating, numbness or tingling, little or no urine production, and slow breathing. What should I avoid while taking naproxen? • Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. Naproxen may increase the sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when exposure to the sun is unavoidable. • Avoid alcohol or use it with moderation. If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages a day, naproxen may increase the risk of dangerous stomach bleeding. Talk to your doctor before taking naproxen if you drink more than 3 alcoholic beverages a day. • Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Naproxen may cause dizziness. If you experience dizziness, avoid these activities. • Many over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, and pain medicines contain aspirin or other medicines similar to naproxen (such as ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and others). Before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicine, talk to your doctor and pharmacist. What are the possible side effects of naproxen? • Contact your doctor if you experience blood in vomit or bloody, black, or tarry stools. These symptoms could indicate damage to the stomach or intestines, which could be dangerous. • If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking naproxen and seek medical treatment or contact your doctor immediately: · an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives); · muscle cramps, numbness, or tingling; · ulcers (open sores) in the mouth; · rapid weight gain (fluid retention); · seizures; · decreased hearing or ringing in the ears; · yellowing of your skin or eyes (jaundice); or · abdominal cramping, heartburn, or indigestion. • Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take naproxen and talk to your doctor if you experience · dizziness or headache; · nausea, diarrhea, or constipation; · depression; · fatigue or weakness; · dry mouth; or · irregular menstrual periods. • Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. What other drugs will affect naproxen? • Before taking naproxen, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs: · aspirin or another salicylate (form of aspirin) such as salsalate (Disalcid), diflunisal (Dolobid), choline salicylate-magnesium salicylate (Trilisate, Tricosal, others), and magnesium salicylate (Doan's, others); · another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), etodolac (Lodine), fenoprofen (Nalfon), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, others), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Orudis, Orudis KT), ketorolac (Toradol), meloxicam (Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), or tolmetin (Tolectin); · an over-the-counter cough, cold, allergy, or pain medicine that contains aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen; · an anticoagulant (blood thinner) such as warfarin (Coumadin); · a steroid such as prednisone (Deltasone); · insulin or an oral diabetes medicine such as glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase), and others; · probenecid (Benemid); · lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid, others); or · bismuth subsalicylate in drugs such as Pepto-Bismol. • You may not be able to take naproxen, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medicines listed above. • Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with naproxen. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal products. Where can I get more information? • Your pharmacist has additional information about naproxen written for health professionals that you may read. --------------------------------------... • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed. • Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist. Copyright 1996-2005 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 8.01. Revision date: 1/19/05. Answered by Manuela Jacob 4 months ago.


Naproxen????
I'm 13 and i take Naproxen a couple times a month for cramps. I herd from a couple people that it can cause stomach bleeding. Can it? Asked by Linn Northouse 4 months ago.

Yes, one of the effects of Naprosyn- naproxen sodium- is the possibility of stomach bleeding. However, that will be true of most of the pain relievers you would take, they are all known to be possible causes for stomach irritations. However, it is not a highly probably problem for you, given your age and the frequency of use. It's a problem much more associated with old age and constant high dose use, and when there are already stomach problems present- like ulcers. As long as you are careful to take it with food or milk, and aren't drinking alcohol, you won't likely have any problems like bleeding at all. When you are looking at the side effects and complications of taking medicines, you need to keep in mind that in drug studies, the pharmaceutical companies have to report EVERYTHING that was noted in the test population. Even if a problem only happened once in the test group of say a few thousand, it still has to be reported, even if it doesn't make sense at all- like somebody complaining they got a sore throat while taking a medicine to treat their knee pain. I also use Naprosyn a couple days a month, and have done so for years now. It works better for me than anything else, I only take a couple per day, for a max of 2-3 days. I suspect this is how you use it as well. Don't let your friends scare you. All medicines have some kind of side effects that must be listed on the inserts, it's the law. The trick is learning to read them and put the risks in some sense of proportion, and deciding how high the risk is versus what good it will do you. In this case, the risk of bleeding is low, and suffering is pretty much the only other choice. So take your naproxen with food or milk, and relax. Answered by Sharie Rampadarat 4 months ago.

One of the side effects of Naproxen is stomach irritation and ulcers. Those side effects are uncommon for occasional use. It's when you take a medication like that every day that you need to be more careful. Also, if you drink alcohol regularly or have an ulcer. If you're just taking it a couple of times a month, you are fine. Just don't take more than the recommended amount unless your doctor says you can take more, and stick to taking it only when you have pain. You can also use other methods of helping your cramps, like ThermaCare heat wraps, to minimize how much medication you have to take. Answered by Noelia Repine 4 months ago.


Is it safe to mix Diazepam and Naproxen? . . . ?
Thanks for replying but have already looked up all the risks, etc of taking both seperately, but just wanting to know about mixing Diazepam AND Naproxen and WHY it may not be recommended, if that is the case. . . . . . . . Asked by Kathey Ecklar 4 months ago.

Naproxen Withdrawal Answered by Kit Naufzinger 4 months ago.

Yes, it is safe to mix naproxen and diazepam. There are no significant drug-drug interactions between the two. They have no effect on each other. Answered by Federico Brunetta 4 months ago.


Do you take naproxen 500mg for period cramps ?
please tell me your dosage and side affects and also how long you/ve been using it thanks Asked by Deandre Buckhalter 4 months ago.

Naproxen 500mg is generic Aleve (220mg Naproxen). It is simply a higher dose in the 500mg tablet form but you should not exceed that dose. One tablet at 500mg taken twice a day (every 12 hours) is the maximum in which you should take the medication because of its side-affects. Bleeding in the stomach and intestines is common with drugs like Naproxen because they are NSAIDs which stands for Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory. Some side affects can include increased tiredness or fatigue due to the medicine and/or ulcers along with the bleeding (related to long term use). Take with food to minimize these effects. If this drug doesn't work you can try Advil (Ibuprofen). Over the counter the pills are sold in 200mg tablets. You can take up to four of these 200mg tablets (with food is an absolute must) every 6 hours (3200mg per day). Do not exceed this dose and do not take it without food. Do not take Ibuprofen with Naproxen. The only over the counter medicine you can take either drug with is Tylenol (Acetaminophen). I hope this helps, stay healthy. Answered by King Kolts 4 months ago.

I have terrible cramps but I have a script for extra strength Ibuprofen...that helps me. I don't know anything about naproxen..sorry. Answered by Joel Goolden 4 months ago.

naproxen 500mg is not the right drug. Normally it is used for pains relating to migrane headhach & anklet pain. no way it is connected with period cramps. SPASMO PROXYVON is the right drug with limited side effects. MEFTAL SPAS is also recommended. Answered by Lelah Whitelock 4 months ago.


Apo-naproxen and alcohol--safe?
i've just been prescribed apo-naproxen and i was about to go on a trip where i plan on consuming alcohol. i know i shouldn't trust sites like this with medical information, but the certified sites i've seen say, "Alcohol: should only be consumed in small amounts as it may increase your chances of... Asked by Enda Brazeau 4 months ago.

i've just been prescribed apo-naproxen and i was about to go on a trip where i plan on consuming alcohol. i know i shouldn't trust sites like this with medical information, but the certified sites i've seen say, "Alcohol: should only be consumed in small amounts as it may increase your chances of having problems with your stomach." does anyone have any experience? Answered by Ocie Wetherell 4 months ago.

Naproxen sodium (called various names such as Apo-Naproxen or Naprosyn) as well as Ibuprofin belong to a class of drugs called NSAIDS meaning Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatiries. Inflammation, such as occurs after a muscle strain involve Cox-2 type "receptors." NSAIDS of any sort block these receptor sites and reduce inflammation and help with pain. The issue here is that the walls of your stomach also have a type of Cox-2 receptor that produces mucus that protects the lining of your stomach. Therefore NSAIDS can reduce mucus production at the stomach wall--and can cause irritation to some people. Now consider alcohol--it too tends to block Cox-2 receptor cells in the stomach (unfortunately not at a muscle strain). So add the two together and you can reduce mucus production at the stomach wall. If you take a lot of NSAIDS and drink a lot of alcohol you are at severe risk of developing an ulcer. I had a patient once who I cared for who drank, and the more he drank, the more his stomach hurt, the more his stomach hurt the more he took NSAIDS. He is very, very lucky to be alive today for he developed an ulcer that perforated and led to severe internal bleeding. Now, with the scary story aside, I'll occasionally drink one glass of wine, even if I've taken Naprosyn. But if I were to drink three glasses--I'd avoid the NSAID, why take the risk? A small amount for you if you are male is 2 ounces of alcohol equivalent (two glasses of wine, two shots of liquor, or two beers, over a reasonable amount of time) for a female it is half that. It may seem unfair but in fact males metabolize alcohol about twice as fast as females (and they are often larger too) because males produce an enzyme that metabolizes some alcohol within the stomach, and females do not. Acetaminophen is an over the counter analgesic (pain killer) that does not affect Cox-2 receptors, but Acetaminophen needs to be cleared by the liver, and therefore it too does not do well if a person wants to drink "a lot." The above assumes that you have not had ulcers or prior stomach problems. If you have a medical question it is always better to consult your medical practitioner rather than rely upon helpful people ah Yahoo Answers. Answered by Kenny Perilli 4 months ago.

Apo Naproxen Answered by Bernardine Enriques 4 months ago.

Is Naproxen Safe Answered by Tyron Sark 4 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: apo-naproxen and alcohol--safe? i've just been prescribed apo-naproxen and i was about to go on a trip where i plan on consuming alcohol. i know i shouldn't trust sites like this with medical information, but the certified sites i've seen say, "Alcohol: should only be consumed in small amounts as it may increase... Answered by Ilda Bouknight 4 months ago.

Naproxen is an NSAID which is famous for causing hyperacidity and stomach problems. Take it with alcohol and you can expect a major exacerbation of the stomach problems. You'lll be really miserable. Answered by Tambra Mcwaters 4 months ago.


Why is naproxen sodium based?
Asked by Grady Matsuoka 4 months ago.

Naproxen is an NSAID that is sodium based AND not bound with sodium. You have Naproxen C14H14O3 (molecular formula) which is chemically named: (S)-6-methoxy-α-methyl-2- naphthaleneacetic acid And you have Naproxen Sodium C14H13NaO3 (molecular formula) which is chemically named: (S)-6-methoxy-α-methyl-2- naphthaleneacetic acid, sodium salt. So there are two different molecular compounds. Both Naproxen and Naproxen Sodium have relatively equal bio availability and response. However, to answer your question -- Naproxen Sodium was developed as a more rapidly absorbed formulation of naproxen for use as an analgesic. In other words, the sodium was added to the molecular structure to increase the rate of absorption after oral ingestion. It is that simple. Both forms work equally well in controlling pain, inflammation, and other standard properties of NSAIDs. Take care, Answered by Deandra Benestad 4 months ago.


Can I take two Naproxen 500 MG tablets at one time?
Like will it hurt me? They were prescribed for foot pain, but I have BAD period cramps and need to knock these mofos out. Asked by Randolph Cushman 4 months ago.

Naproxen is tough on cramps as it is. I'd stick to taking one, and make sure you put something in your stomach first. Naproxen can also irritate your gut and make you nauseous, another reason to stick to just one. Don't take them if they've been in the cupboard more than about a year or so, also. Naproxen is essentially extra extra strength ibuprofen. If ever you think a regular Advil or Motrin will cut it, try that first. If one hour after taking the Naproxen your cramps don't feel better, try taking another half, again with some food. If you're able, try taking a really brisk walk or do some light cardio after you take the pill. A brisk walk, once you've done about 2-30 minutes, can really really help with the cramps :) Or just chillax with a hot water bottle on the couch :) Answered by Dionna Oliger 4 months ago.

Naproxen 500 Milligrams Answered by Rebbeca Michl 4 months ago.

Naproxen 500mg Tablets Answered by Trudy Zervas 4 months ago.

I Have RA Dr Prescribed 1 Tab twice a day or as needed, can i take two at the same time for my pain. Answered by Deedee Tertinek 4 months ago.

You should not be asking this question on yahoo. Call a pharmacist. Answered by Polly Covey 4 months ago.


What is the difference between ibuprofen and naproxen?
Asked by Nan Scavetta 4 months ago.

Both Ibuprofen and Naproxen are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) IBPROFEN Ibuprofen is chemically similar to regular aspirin and functions in an analogous way, minimizing the production of prostaglandins, though it accomplishes this with slightly different chemical reactions. So how is ibuprofen different from aspirin? In lower doses, ibuprofen seems to irritate the esophagus and stomach lining less than its close cousins, aspirin and naproxen. If you have ulcers or acid reflux disease, ibuprofen may be the best product for pain clearly resulting from inflammation (arthritis, sprains, sunburns, etc.). NAPROXEN - Although it is used for headaches, naproxen is especially effective as an anti-inflammatory agent. For arthritis, sprains, sunburns, and other inflammation-based pain, naproxen seems to edge its competition. Many women suffering from menstrual cramps also report that naproxen is more effective than standard aspirin. The other difference between naproxen and its chemical kin? Similar doses of this over-the-counter pain reliever tend to last longer - often for 8-12 hours instead of 4-8 hours. Answered by Candice Henegar 4 months ago.

Ibuprofen Vs Naproxen Answered by Jennine Csensich 4 months ago.

This Site Might Help You. RE: What is the difference between ibuprofen and naproxen? Answered by Son Hornoff 4 months ago.

They are both non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). They are different compounds. The biggest difference is the length of activity. Ibuprofen typically has a dosing schedule of every 6 hours and naproxen is typically ever 12 hours. Some people tolerate one over the other but that's hard to predict prior to trying it. Answered by Elana Ruzycki 4 months ago.

Both are NSAIDs. Ibuprofen – 30 min onset, 1-2 hr peak, duration 4-6 hours. Good for arthritis, osteoarthritis, mild-moderate pain, reduces fever. Naproxen – 1 hr onset, 2-4 hr peak, 7hr duration. Mild- moderate pain, osteoarthritis, tendonitis, acute gout. Also reduces fever. Answered by Gladis Allamong 4 months ago.


Is taking two OTC naproxen sodiums and then 2 hrs later taking a OTC sleeping pill dangerous?
Asked by Asa Waldvogel 4 months ago.

Naproxen can increase your risk of life-threatening heart or circulation problems, including heart attack or stroke.This risk will increase the longer you use naproxen. Naproxen can also increase your risk of serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and gastrointestinal effects can occur without warning at any time while you are taking naproxen. Older adults may have an even greater risk of these serious gastrointestinal side effects. also in large amounts and taken oftern can begin to eat through your stomach.I would say its not the best thing to take especially if Its on a daily basis I have chronic insomnia, sometimes i dont sleep for like 56 hrs and what really helps me os 500 mg phenibut and 9mg melatonin.I find that on their own they dont have the desired effect ( safe sleep) but together they relife my insomnia.You could purchace them on ebay. Obviously Im not a dr so just check with yours first that your medication, if any is going to be effected. My DR said it was fine. Answered by Shala Rambin 4 months ago.


Forms

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
074105/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074105/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074105/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074110/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074110/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074110/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074111/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074111/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074111/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074121/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074121/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074121/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074129/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074129/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074129/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074140/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074140/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074140/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074163/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074163/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074163/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074182/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074182/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074182/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074190/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per ML
074201/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074201/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074201/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074207/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074207/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074207/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074211/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074211/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074211/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074216/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074216/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074216/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074263/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074263/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074263/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074410/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074410/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074410/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074457/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074457/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074457/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074936/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
074936/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075061/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075061/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075227/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075227/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075337/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075337/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075390/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075390/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075927/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
075927/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
075927/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
076494/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
076494/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
076494/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
077339/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
077339/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
077339/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
078250/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
078250/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
078250/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
078620/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
078620/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
078620/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091305/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
091305/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
091305/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091416/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
091416/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
091416/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091432/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
091432/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
200429/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
200429/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
200429/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Similar Active Ingredient

ApplId/ProductId Drug name Active ingredient Form Strenght
017581/002 NAPROSYN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
017581/003 NAPROSYN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
017581/004 NAPROSYN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
018965/001 NAPROSYN NAPROXEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per ML
020067/002 EC-NAPROSYN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
020067/003 EC-NAPROSYN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
074105/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074105/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074105/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074110/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074110/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074110/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074111/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074111/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074111/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074121/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074121/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074121/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074129/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074129/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074129/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074140/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074140/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074140/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074163/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074163/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074163/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074182/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074182/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074182/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074190/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN SUSPENSION/ORAL 25MG per ML
074201/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074201/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074201/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074207/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074207/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074207/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074211/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074211/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074211/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074216/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074216/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074216/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074263/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074263/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074263/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074410/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074410/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074410/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074457/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
074457/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
074457/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
074936/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
074936/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075061/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075061/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075227/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075227/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075337/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075337/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075390/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
075390/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
075927/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
075927/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
075927/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
076494/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
076494/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
076494/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
077339/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
077339/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
077339/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
078250/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
078250/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
078250/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
078620/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
078620/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
078620/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091305/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
091305/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
091305/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091416/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
091416/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
091416/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG
091432/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 375MG
091432/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET, DELAYED RELEASE/ORAL 500MG
200429/001 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 250MG
200429/002 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 375MG
200429/003 NAPROXEN NAPROXEN TABLET/ORAL 500MG

Manufacturers

Manufacturer name
Atnahs Pharma UK Ltd
Stirling Anglian Pharmaceuticals Ltd

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